* Posts by Fat-Boy-R-Dee

21 posts • joined 26 Jun 2013

Veritas to put biz tech support on the slow boat to India – insiders

Fat-Boy-R-Dee
Facepalm

Re: Open source AV?

VRTS doesn't have an AV product - its ex-parent SYMC does, along with a DLP suite etc.

AFAIK there are a lot of freeware, if not open source, options available on Windows for AV, DLP, etc.

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Tech bribes: What's the WORST one you've ever been offered?

Fat-Boy-R-Dee
Megaphone

Re: A cuppa soup

[quote] Apparently the noise of a thousand squawking penguins going off simultaneously is indescribable...[/quote]

Here, lemme try.

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Fat-Boy-R-Dee
Pint

Nobody has gone here yet, or too obvious?

Not one mention of "Master has given Dobby socks, Dobby is free!" ... I'm not sure whether to be impressed or disappointed, El Reg.

Technically not a bribe, but best extravagances I remember were from right before the dot-com bubble burst, and our Sillycon Valley department heads were flying everybody in from around the globe, putting us up at retreats, and paying stupid money for us to eat catered dinners at the Monterey Aquarium. That was, shall we say, a lot more motivational than the current environments of "for lunch, stun a pigeon with your briefcase" and "share a hotel room for this conference - we're breaking you down by gender and CPAP usage" ...

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Russian regulator asks courts to disconnect Telegram

Fat-Boy-R-Dee
Terminator

A more colloquial/idiomatic translation -

"I'll see you in hell!" ... kinda like "Hasta la vista, baby," or even "Bye, Felecia".

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Bombastic boss gave insane instructions to sensible sysadmin, with client on speakerphone

Fat-Boy-R-Dee
Paris Hilton

2TB SQL/Oracle database back then? Sure.

I'm utterly baffled about these limits. My Oracle database hit 1TB - back in 2001 on Windows NT 4, and with no sign of getting anywhere a limit.

That's because your 1TB database was made up of a whole bunch of 32-bit .DBF files, almost 100% surely strung over multiple drive letters (mount, er, "reparse" points didn't become a thing until Win2K).

Doesn't Outlook use SQL server as it's backend? I'm pretty sure that even back then, SQL server could go over 2TB.

Exchange (not Outlook, that's the client) does use a tuned variant now, but way back when, it was the JET engine, baby.

And in 2012, we still had that Oracle database running on Windows 2003, then over 200TB and growing by at least 2TB a month.

a) Yeah, Oracle licensing remains as transparent and platform-migration/upgrade friendly as ever /s

b) I always knew paypal had some humble beginnings, but ... /s /s

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As Apple fixes macOS root password hole, here's what went wrong

Fat-Boy-R-Dee
Facepalm

OFFS - it isn't creating a new user, OK?

All it is doing is adding a password to an existing, disabled user without a password (NULL (UNDEF?) vs "blank" vs zero, fankids), and then enabling the user.

Yep, serious hole, Apple blew it off until it got user-level publicity (shame on them). Sad part is it's like the gratuitous "hacker" scene in action movies where somebody taps a few keys and magically pwns the system - you know, the ones we all groan at. Well, truth appears to be stranger than fiction, once again.

But it's NOT creating a new user (possibly with root privileges/sudoer/whatever). That's an entirely different level of stupid.

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US intelligence blabs classified Linux VM to world via leaky S3 silo

Fat-Boy-R-Dee

Re: Shock news. US drivers actually use safety belts?

So the USDoD built SIPRNET (as opposed to MILNET/NIPRNET) and various "high side"/TS networks with all kinds of bells and whistles. The problem with using these dedicated/hardened networks, and what these tools were trying to address, was how to get actionable intelligence quickly to/from the field. The more hoops to jump through, the older the intel gets, and the less useful/valuable it is. (insert misattributed Forrest quote "fustest with the mostest" here)

Labeling the container "INSCOM" in the clear wasn't *quite* as stupid as labeling it SIPR or somesuch, but I can see a lot of scenarios where it would be nice to, while you're really forward deployed, be able to get to tools, and the only thing you need is the local dishwalla (or whatever the Iraqi/Afghan/ME equivalent is) and a suitably hardened IronKey or somesuch.

Ah well, you (hopefully) learn something new every day, hopefully at somebody else's expense :-)

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More expensive, takes longer than usual, not particularly brilliant. Yes, it's your robot surgeon

Fat-Boy-R-Dee

Great Question!

But doubtful. But a great way to slice/dice the data from another angle (pun? intended), agreed.

Surgeons, like everybody else, tend to do their tasks assembly-line fashion ... they either use a particular bot every time (for a particular procedure) or don't use it every time. Robots are a great tool for what they were designed to do - work relatively slowly, very precisely, and within a very small field. For gross (no pun intended) procedures like a nephrectomy, they really don't bring a lot to the table (pun intended).

Citation: did a lot of consulting work with CV (heart) surgeon practice groups (clinics) a few years ago. This was a more than occasional topic of discussion. I also fully realize the plural of anecdote is not data.

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Your shoe, chewing gum, or ciggies are now your extra password

Fat-Boy-R-Dee
Facepalm

More keys = more SPOFs

So, if I'm interpreting the article correctly, you would need both your phone (maybe another with the app?*) and your photographed item for this to work.

There's now three potential SPOFs - you forget your password, you lose your phone, or you don't have the magic item in question. Will it become like a smart captcha where 8 out of 11 factors gets you in?

If this ever becomes an implemented scheme where I work/shop, I know what my magic item's gonna be:

http://stvmcqueen.tripod.com/salute.jpg

* Which leads to all kind of hack-written (sorry, no pun intended) spy movie scenes ... "my voice is my passport, verify me" ...

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Fat-Boy-R-Dee
Coat

Now that's job creation!

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Fancy that! Craft which float over everything on a cushion of air

Fat-Boy-R-Dee

Re: You spoil us

Ninja'd, but thought I'd post the link anyway. Yes, you do spoil us, and yes, I see what you did there.

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/09/15/scientist_zaps_himself_electric_eel/

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Telcos waive bills during Houston hurricane recovery

Fat-Boy-R-Dee

Re: "will have some or all of their costs waived"...

I sincerely doubt it, the negative PR alone wouldn't be worth it ... but I'm sure they will a) build it into the CODB, b) apply for mucho dinero from FEMA/DHS afterwards, c) use it as exhibit B or C at the next tariff inquiry (if Pai still bothers to have them), or d) all of the above

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The curious case of a Tesla smash, Autopilot blamed, and the driver's next-day U-turn

Fat-Boy-R-Dee
Boffin

Re: Shock news. US drivers actually use safety belts?

Yeah, vehicles these days are stupid safe (at least for collisions) versus a couple decades ago. My years in fire rescue yielded (geddit?) a few choice nicknames, such as the Honda Accordion. Very high tech stuff. If you're curious about the latest and greatest, check out boronextrication.com to see how we get you out of those cages ...

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Did speeding American manhole cover beat Sputnik into space? Top boffin speaks to El Reg

Fat-Boy-R-Dee
Mushroom

Plot Device

And thus, the plot/plot complication for The Martian Returns/Gravity 2 was birthed. Extra points if the plug/cover has "V GER" scribed somewhere on it.

Icon b/c it's oddly appropriate.

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How a Cali court ruling could force a complete rethink of search results

Fat-Boy-R-Dee

Re: Exactly how is this a problem?

"It is the same as going into a cafe and asking for a "Coke"

Not to go off on *too* far of a tangent :-) - but sometimes that becomes genericized past the point of practicality. For example, here in the southeast US ...

"Hey while you're in there, can you get me a Coke?"

"Sure, what kind?"

"Diet orange, please."

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MOVE IT! 10 top tips for shifting your data centre

Fat-Boy-R-Dee

Excellent opportunity for a DR drill, especially if you're replacing kit

If you're taking the opportunity to replace certain systems/subsystems, this is an absolutely awesome time to do a disaster recovery drill ... since that's essentially what you'll be doing for the migration. Unless you are spending severely large monies on fat pipe(s), moving multiple terabytes over a VPN still won't be as quick as other options (sneakernet an array, or even better, set up a replicated backup solution between your office and DC (but seed both devices at the office first) ... once the DC is operational, reverse the data flow ...)

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Galileo! Galileo! Galileo good to go after six-week recovery effort

Fat-Boy-R-Dee

Re: Figaro!

I just wanted to thank El Reg for the earworm this morning ... well played, gentlemen, well played.

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No TKO for LTO: Tape format spawns another 2 generations, sports 120TB bigness

Fat-Boy-R-Dee

Re: Lowest-cost archive medium

Um, not quite.

Drives cannot read uplevel media (for example, an LTO-5 drive cannot read LTO-6 media).

Drives can read and write one downlevel of media, and read two downlevels of media. For example, the same LTO-5 drive can read LTO-5/4/3 media, but can only read/write LTO-5/4 media.

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Password manager LastPass goes titsup: Users locked out

Fat-Boy-R-Dee

Maybe a little research/sanity here ...

I do not work for LastPass, but I am a long-time paying customer.

1. Before you start bashing a cloud-based password manager, do your research ...

http://lastpass.com/how-it-works/

Nothing (except maybe meta-metadata) is stored in the clear in the LastPass cloud. Once you authenticate, the encrypted blob is downloaded and decrypted locally on your system. If you add a site, note, whatever, again, it's encrypted locally and then added to the cloud blob.

Show me a cheap, roll-your-own password solution that supports multifactor authentication, one-time passwords, secure password sharing, and rollbacks, and I will buy VC stock in the company.

2. Downtime this (for me) morning was pretty annoying, no lie ... but in 4 years this is the FIRST time I've ever experienced any hassle ... so for a darn cheap system with an offline fallback, this is pretty darn good. About the only thing I'd ask LastPass product management to do is to put in a "manual offline" option to force using the local copy ... but that has its own security issues as well.

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Boffins 3D-print biomimetic shark skin

Fat-Boy-R-Dee
Mushroom

Y'all aren't thinking big enough

Imagine, if you will, that this technology is able to scale up to, say, be able to be applied to a cargo ship or supertanker. If they can get the propulsion optimized to spec, a 10%+ improvement in efficiency (and translated bunker fuel costs) ain't nuthin to sneeze at.

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Breaking with your back-up supplier is a sticky business

Fat-Boy-R-Dee
Devil

A case study that turns into a thinly-veiled elevator pitch?

Well played, well played.

Spawn of Satan because, well, it was a good deception.

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