* Posts by SolidSquid

676 posts • joined 13 May 2013

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UK reforms on private copying and parody come into force

SolidSquid

Re: Do the quotes have limits?

My guess is Audible.com doesn't have their stuff in Youtube's auto-blacklisting system and haven't been flagging things at the same rate they've been added

Leaked: Mobile operators' SCARE campaign against net neutrality

SolidSquid

Is Vodafone *really* trying to spin this as the EU trying to pass a law that would prevent blocking of illegal materials? I seriously doubt it would have gotten through if that were the case, since afaik every country in Europe has laws for blocking that kind of thing

EVIL patent TROLLS poised to attack OpenStack, says Linux protection squad

SolidSquid

Re: They were talking about getting ahead of the game....

Unfortunately it's become standard practice with software patents to go as vague as you can, since the various patent offices generally don't have anyone with sufficient understanding of coding to catch you out if it's got enough jargon

Apple, Google mobe encryption good news... for TERRORISTS – EU top cop

SolidSquid

Re: The lady doth protest too much methinks.

Wait, when did they ever claim that? There's *always* been a chance of being identified online, even if you take precautions like tor or VPNs. There's never been a time when there was no way for a machine to be identified, just ways to make it difficult enough that people give up looking

SolidSquid

Re: Irreversible encryption

It does kind of seem like the people popping up to criticise this don't actually know anything about the subject and are just mimicking others (badly) to get some face time on tv

LulzSec supersnitch led attacks on UK, Australia – report

SolidSquid

Re: So...

Technically, at least according to the Department of Defence and the Executive Branch, the FBI could be an accomplice to acts of war against foreign nations. Remember them claiming that they'd consider cyber "warfare" as an actual act of war?

One Windows? How does that work... and WTF is a Universal App?

SolidSquid

Re: @Trevor

To be fair they should have disabled the option at installation if they didn't have it working in the beta (although if it's a bug then that's fair enough). It's one thing collecting data in the beta, but if you give customer/tester the option to opt out of that collection then you really should be going along with that

IRONY ALERT: Former MI6 chief warns of 'mass snooping' - by PAEDOS

SolidSquid

You know, spending a lot of money to put together a fairly innocuous app which is good enough to end up popular purely so that you can use it to track people's location isn't exactly the most straight forward (or cheap) way of following someone. I wonder where the former head of MI6 got the idea

SLOSH! Cops dethrone suspect - by tipping over portaloo with him inside

SolidSquid

As I understand it that's standard practice to prevent the officers being investigated from interfering with any investigation (police having a better idea how to go about doing that than the average joe). It's pretty reasonable since not everyone who is investigated will have actually committed an offense, even if it does look bad when it's something as blatantly obvious as this. What matters is what comes out of the investigation, and it looks a pretty clear cut case (especially since I suspect the victim will be looking at legal action against the police for what happened, could get a pretty nice pay out for this)

US Attorney Gen latest to roast Apple, Google mobe encryption

SolidSquid

Re: fallacy of false choice

They already have a decent mechanism for this, they can get a court order to require access to materials they believe are stored on the device. It's the same rule as with safes and accountancy books, if they know it exists and have good reason to suspect it's in that location, they can get a court order with the threat of prison time if the court order isn't followed

The only thing this restricts is police cloning devices for later review during a stop and search. Currently the legal opinion of the police is that, if the device is on your person when stopped and they have reasonable suspicion of a crime (which is needed for the stop in the first place anyway), they can search it without a warrant. This makes that near-impossible to do, and means a lack of warrantless searching of any email accounts linked to that phone

Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?

SolidSquid

Re: You don't need rights when you've money

Technically, even if the Tories *did* create a bill of rights, it would only stay in place until a later government (potentially including another tory one) decided they didn't like it. No parliament is bound by the decisions of it's predecessors, which is why having a body *outside* of the UK courts to deal with human rights is a good idea. Our system just isn't designed to deal with that kind of thing

Business is back, baby! Hasta la VISTA, Win 8... Oh, yeah, Windows 9

SolidSquid

Re: Remember when "Windows NT" was the KILLER OF EVERYTHING™??

Heartbleed was in the OpenSSL libraries, which were cross platform, not linux/osx specific.

Shellshock was a bug in bash, which is mostly *nix (although I think cygwin lets you install it in Windows), although there are alternatives to bash which are also available on *nix machines and don't have the same vulnerability.

Also, as pointed out, when the bug was found it was publicised quickly and had patches out within days. Compare this to Microsoft, who in the past was known to hold back patches so they could be incorporated into a scheduled update because they were concerned that too many updates would worry customers

SolidSquid

My office actually has started using google docs for a lot of their stuff purely because it also integrates with google drive, making it much easier to share the documents with clients. Being able to work in the browser bypasses any issues with whether they have compatible software to read or edit files in

FBI boss: Apple's iPhone, iPad encryption puts people 'ABOVE THE LAW'

SolidSquid

Re: Never assume

Well considering it took something like 60 years for MI5 to actually catch a criminal it wouldn't surprise me too much

SolidSquid

Re: Keep wringing those hands, guys . . .

They don't really expect anyone they know to be victims of a crime like this, they just don't want to be put in a position where they get bad PR as that damages their long term employment opportunities

SolidSquid

Re: And all completely irrelevant to us right-pondians...

Afaik they can only require you give them the password if they have specific evidence they know is on the device they want access to, much like they can require the key to a safe that contains a company's accountancy records. The only case I know of where the court was able to actually require access to a phone the guy had already showed the contents to someone at a border crossing, and it was what he'd shown them that they wanted access to.

Arguably you might be able to get around it by providing the specific thing they wanted access to on your device, but considering they can only get that kind of court order if the thing they're after is evidence of criminality I don't think you'd want to be doing that

SolidSquid

Re: I am a little reassured

It's also entirely possible that they *can* break this encryption, but they don't want anyone to realise they've managed it because then the standard will increase again and they're going to start struggling. Being able to bypass encryption for a criminal prosecution (ie they have to submit the decrypted phone data as evidence, so people know it happened and will suspect the encryption was broken) is kind of a one shot deal

Indian mom just loves it on Mars, tweets fave holiday snap

SolidSquid

Re: If I were to congratulate India for their technical achievement

Ok yeah, see your point there. If it'd been a reply I wouldn't have bothered, I just didn't see the other comment. If it's any consolation I've upvoted both since you were replying to something specific and the first comment was reasonable

SolidSquid

Re: If I were to congratulate India for their technical achievement

Well at least one of those was because your comment was directly commenting on getting down voted rather than for cheering on India with this

Giuliani's Call of Duty: defeat Noriega in epic boss battle

SolidSquid

Re: I respawn my case

If the setting of the game includes Panama when he was being ousted then he doesn't really have grounds for claiming it's unauthorised, it'd be like someone making a documentary about American politics over the last 10 years and being told they couldn't have an actor playing the role of George Bush

As for the ad hominem claim, one of the prosecutions accusations is false depiction. This means that what he did (and is now in prison for) is directly relevant to the legal claims being made. Ad hominem is when you attack the person *instead* of the claim, not when the person's past actions are a substantive point of the claims

Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp

SolidSquid

Re: Am I the only one...

The system itself actually seemed pretty good, but the linking of all google services with it and requirement to use your real name (and trying to impose use of that on other services too) was a real pain and put me off using it. I ended up doing whatever I could to close my G+ account just because I had no idea what I was posting elsewhere would be re-posted there automatically

Fast And Furious 6 cammer thrown in slammer for nearly three years

SolidSquid

Re: Civil --> Criminal

The copyright act was amended a while back so that commercial copyright infringement was considered a criminal offence rather than a civil one. If he hadn't been selling them then it would have been much tougher for them to try and get him charged under criminal law

'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder

SolidSquid

If what she's described is true then it suggests this was probably happening at the director level of the foundation, rather than at the group level. It's likely that corporate sponsors would react much more strongly to a director of the foundation voicing concerns about them, and that reaction would likely be fed back

Microsoft refuses to nip 'Windows 9' unzip lip slip

SolidSquid

Re: Meh.

If they were just to add an option that let you open desktop mode apps in fullscreen mode (the F11 one) and then switch straight back to Metro when you close them it'd be a huge improvement on the user friendliness of Metro. As it is, even on the tablet I have the interface is awkward as hell to work with

Loss of unencrypted back-up disk costs UK prisons ministry £180K

SolidSquid

Do the prisoners have any recourse regarding the loss of their personal data? I would have assumed that they would have a reasonable expectation of privacy with regards to this data, and should receive at least some form of compensation from the government for their incompitence

SolidSquid

Agreed that that could often be true, but in this case we're talking about database records that could be backed up incrementally pretty easily, so it shouldn't require the level of bandwidth a van full of tapes provides

SolidSquid

Re: ooh the irony

Reduces their operating budget I'm guessing? A bit like arguments over who's budget various costs come out of in a company, it's still the same company's money but none of the departments want to be the one to shell out

GitHub.io killed the distro star: Why are people so bored with the top Linux makers?

SolidSquid

Syntax has it right, the GPL grants a standardised range of rights over a code base that otherwise you'd have no rights over. Without the licence, nobody knows what they're able to do without violating the rights of the project owner

SolidSquid

Re: DDG?

You mean Bing that was found to be piggybacking off of Google's search results in order to increase their accuracy?

London cops cuff 20-year-old man for unblocking blocked websites

SolidSquid

Re: Jolly good work.

I think he's gotten confused, although apparently you have as well. Copyright for *commercial purposes* is a criminal act, but copyright for private use is not. Copyright infringement on a non-commercial scale is a civil tort, not a crime (civil and criminal law are two separate branches of the law).

Illegal refers to something that breaks the law, regardless of what kind of law. A crime is a breach of criminal law, which is the jurisdiction of the police and CPS (or a private prosecution, although these are pretty rare). A civil tort is a breach of civil law which requires the injured party/parties bring it to court themselves

Also, the long running ad campaign by FACT where they say "Breaking copyright is a crime" are flat out lying. They want copyright to be perceived as being equivalent to theft, which is a criminal offence, so that people are more willing to accept severe punishments for it. It's basically a propaganda campaign, since FACT are entirely funded and run by various large name publishers and film studios

Obama's healthcare.gov savior says: 'No suits please, we're techies'

SolidSquid

Re: Direction from the White House?

Eh, I could see them actually giving directions, but only after *he* gave *them* direction on what they needed to do to create a usable job spec.

US Copyright Office rules that monkeys CAN'T claim copyright over their selfies

SolidSquid

Surprised nobody's pointed out the Copyright Office's very silly definition of what they won't allow to be copyrighted. Nothing created by animals? That's humans out then

Need a green traffic light all the way home? Easy with insecure street signals, say researchers

SolidSquid

Re: Why the different standards?

In your example you're stealing a bit of physical property, without which there's an increased risk of accidents. What the article is talking about, if you were doing the clear green light route at least, wouldn't have any theft and wouldn't increase the risk because it works with the traffic light's systems. You wouldn't have green from every direction, it would be green for you and red for others

Frenchman eyes ocean domination with floating, mobile Bond villain lair

SolidSquid

Re: VIP deck?

Clearly Bond, as a Commander of the British Navy, would be classed as a VIP. As such I would be disappointed if the bed in this room didn't have the obligatory restraints and cutting laser

Steve Jobs statue: Ones and ohs and OH NOES – it's POINTING at us

SolidSquid

Well if nothing else, at least they got the disapproving expression down well

Prez Obama cyber-guru: Think your data is safe in an EU cloud? The NSA will raid your servers

SolidSquid

"NSA and any other world-class intelligence agency can hack into databases even if they not in the US"

Didn't the US say that they would consider such actions by a nation state to be an act of war at some point last year? Or was that only building of viruses to target systems they were referring to?

French youth faces court for illegal drone flight

SolidSquid

Re: He was only following the rules

Actually, in Britain they can literally make up a crime for you to have committed after the fact. It's not common these days with enough broad based laws to cover most things and the political ramifications of such actions, but it can happen

'No representation without taxation!' urges venerable tech VC

SolidSquid

Re: Yawn

Going to be dull just now, but he was famous for being the only son of God. His brothers and sisters would have been the sons and daughters of Joseph, and half-siblings to Jesus

Imprisoned Norwegian mass murderer says PlayStation 2 is 'KILLING HIM'

SolidSquid

Re: If they were serious about punishment

It's worth pointing out that Norway has one of the lowest levels of recidivism in the world, something which is largely attributed to the focus on rehabilitation over punishment

SolidSquid

Re: If they were serious about punishment

Not as gutted as when he finds out all those cool adult games they gave him for his PS2 don't work on the PS3 they replaced it with. Oops, must have been some cross communication there. It'll be resolved as soon as possible

Foxconn to staff: ‘Put down the drill and launch a start-up!’

SolidSquid

Get around customer requirements for staff health and safety standards by forming new companies which you then sub-contract for manufacturing? Not exactly the most novel practice

Furtive ebook readers push Hitler's Mein Kampf up the charts

SolidSquid

Re: The inside story

Kindles and other ebook readers are becoming more common, to the point that they're not really noticed on public transport as something unusual anymore. Coupled with a slow realisation of the anonymous nature of ebooks which would take the general public a bit longer to catch on to and I don't think it's surprising that books people could find "objectionable" would start to become more popular. What I'm curious about is what the next one will be, and also how the popularity breaks down by region. Could be quite interesting

TPP treaty nearly ready to roll over us, says Oz minister

SolidSquid

Seeing as the treaty is nearly ready for signing, I take it they wouldn't object to publicising it's contents? After all, the only objection before was that the incomplete version would give people the wrong idea of what it would cover since it would undoubtedly change

Pinterest who? EU rules social network CAN'T trademark its own name

SolidSquid

That's what they were trying to do and which the EU courts rejected

Gay hero super-boffin Turing 'may have been murdered by MI5'

SolidSquid

To be fair, the investigation was fairly brief at the time and wouldn't have been considered sufficient to reach the conclusion of suicide these days. That said, I read a theory that his death was accidental, and that he'd accidentally got cyanide from his home laboratory on to the apple (apparently he was quite careless in his lab and had been electrocuted several times, plus his friends suggested he was in good spirits at the time and he had been off the court mandated medication for around a year)

IBM hid China's reaction to NSA spying 'cos it cost us BILLIONS, rages angry shareholder

SolidSquid

Sounds like someone might be getting fired for buying IBM

Apple fanbois warned: No, Cupertino HASN'T built a Bitcoin mining function into Macs

SolidSquid

People don't take things on /b/ seriously, they take the things on /b/ and post them elsewhere to make it more plausable, then start re-tweeting/reposting it elsewhere so it seems like a trending topic. Any reference back to 4chan is hidden so it's harder to pick up that it's fake

You gotta fight for your copyright ... Beastie Boys sue toymaker over TV ad

SolidSquid

Not entirely sure how I feel about this. If the Beastie Boys had just sued to begin with then I'd be more on the side of GoldieBlox, but considering GoldieBlox apparently lied about the Beastie Boys suing them as a way to drum up more attention for their product I'm not entirely sympathetic now that the Beastie Boys have decided to take up that suggestion.

Of course, this is completely irrelevant to whether there's a valid parody exception here, which there might well be. I just can't help but feel GoldieBlox is being a bit scummy in the way they're handling this

UK.gov chucks another £260m at MOOC-based cyber security training

SolidSquid

Of course they're throwing money at this, everyone knows you need an army of MOOCs to guard any government installation

Mandela memorial. Yup, let's SNAP A SELFIE, say grinning Obama, Cameron

SolidSquid

Is it just me, or does it seem more like Obama and Thorning-Schmidt are taking a selfie and Cameron is photobombing them?

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