* Posts by MonkeyCee

916 posts • joined 16 Apr 2013

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BOFH: There are no wrong answers, just wrong questions. Mmm, really wrong ones

MonkeyCee
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Re: 2B) or not.

Them: "good news; you're not an axe murderer".

Me: "Don't be silly. Axes are dirty. Fire is pure. Only fire will cleanse the filth from this world. Definitely no axes."

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Apple wants to buy Formula 1 car firm McLaren – report

MonkeyCee
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Thank you EC

I'm glad that the EC is kicking Apple about it's tax arrangements. At least if they spend some of their sack of cash on doing something new it'll be better for all of us than it sitting offshore.

McLaren is an excellent high tech engineering company. Even without doing anything about cars, they should be able to improve Apple's manufacturing operations.

My tin-foil hat thoughts was that faced with the US and EU getting together and probably forcing Apple's hand on paying tax, Apple has a plan that involves setting up some suitably state-funded (and loved) industry and use that as a negotiating stick for a better tax deal. Buy a car company, start the negotiations about where you'll site your factory, in exchange for the usual backhanders.

Guess we're lucky Apple's not buying into the F35 project ;)

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TRUMP: ICANN'T EVEN! America won't hand over internet control to Russia on my watch

MonkeyCee
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Re: I honestly don't know who'd be worse

"You mean even MORE than Obama has managed?

Actually, most people I speak to have seen Obama as a reasonable President. "

There are Trump advocates who sincerely believe (with much truthiness) that Afghanistan is Obama's war. As in, he declared war and invaded them, so this mess is his fault.

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Hackers hijack Tesla Model S from afar, while the cars are moving

MonkeyCee
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Your Corolla doesn't catch fire after a 100mph impact? Damn....

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Paint your wagon (with electric circuits) but leave my crotch alone

MonkeyCee
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Oh gods...

Plumbing is just a mind bender for me....

In the Netherlands, getting the builders and the plumbers to talk to each other, except to agree it's neither of their faults, is the biggest pisser. I've ended up doing a bunch of the building type stuff myself otherwise we go for weeks without a shower.

Current bullshit is the shower cabinet no longer leaks on the sides, or where the panels meet, but the drain trap seems to overflow. I say seems, because actually catching the bugger in action doesn't work, and seems to either dump 1-2 liters or 10+, without any clear reason why.

I'm at the rip it out and put in a bathtub stage.

I'm lucky tho. One of our neighborhood buddies had their next door "indoor growing arrangement" spring a leak, which saturated two storeys worth of wall and a ceiling with a green tinge.

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Watch SpaceX's rocket dramatically detonate, destroying a $200m Facebook satellite

MonkeyCee
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Re: Wet beach sand

Ah, all these delightful comments about the more energetic chemicals reminds me of Max Gergel’s memoir “Excuse Me Sir, Would You Like to Buy a Kilo of Isopropyl Bromide?”

Both very entertaining and extremely terrifying at the same time. Much like rocket fuels :)

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L0phtCrack's back! Crack hack app whacks Windows 10 trash hashes

MonkeyCee
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Re: Nope

Another trick for a stand alone windows 7 box is booting off a live linux USB, and do the following:

- pick an input utility to bugger with. In this case, the on screen keyboard

- rename that utility (osk.exe to osk.old)

- rename cmd.exe to osk.exe

- reboot into windows

Now you can call the osk from the login screen, which will in fact run cmd.exe with full admin rights.

Then resetting the password is a simple command: net user *username* *newpassword*

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Ireland taxman: Apple got NO favours from us, at all, at all

MonkeyCee
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Re: See the needfor US tax reform

But the reason the EU is sticking t's beak in is that the US also allows corporations to defer paying taxes until..... well, until they feel like it.

Since there have been previous tax holidays, allowing corps to pay their deferred taxes at a lower rate, then "proper tax planning" means the corps will hold of paying tax until they can get the maximum discount.

The EU feels that this is bollocks, and that taxes should be paid relatively promptly, based on where the profits are booked. They have called out the US Treasury department on this issue, and as rightly observed, any tax paid outside of the US will count as a tax credit for the US profits.

It's also cheaper to pay lawyers to string this out, while sitting on a big arse pile of cash. Hell, the interest alone is probably covering lawyer fees and associated bribes.

I'm not quite sure how various Irish/Dutch/Luxembourg tax laws have survived so long, since they are clearly being used to avoid taxes. It's all well and good that double taxation is avoided, but it's (relatively) simple to claim that back, but if your laws designed to avoid double tax result in no tax, then it's clearly taking the piss.

Combined with some spectacularly lax oversight of the arrangement by the Irish, such as having billions be transferred to a company that isn't actually based in *any* country, it's been clear for 20+ years that Ireland has been bending over backwards to accommodate this arrangement. No idea why either, since it's not like Ireland makes very much on this arrangement.

As for playing bullshit with tax for personal reasons, my understanding is that with a trust* or two in play, and making loans that are never paid back, it's possible for Jo Public to pretty much avoid taxes too.

I think the only way actual tax reform would occur is if the majority of taxpayers (ie people with incomes from selling their labor) starting doing the same tricks as the major wealth holders. Once every man and his dog has a personal and family trust set up, and an offshore stash pot, then the abuses by the big players might get addressed. More likely is that the rules on wages/salary will be re-interpreted, and some new form of trust will be created, to ensure that nasty things like NI, income tax and death duties are paid by the plebs, not the "proper" types who run this joint.

* trusts usually pay some tax, AFAIK 10% every 10 years, or a bit less than 1% pa.

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New booze guidelines: We'd rather you didn't enjoy yourselves

MonkeyCee
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Don't worry brave brexiters! Those puritan killjoys, the ones who interpret every EU directive to best fuck with the British public, they will still be with you. Since it's Whitehall fucking you, just using their (often batshit) interpretations of EU law, you can rest assured that silliness will ensue.

Most europeans drink. The anglos drunk. It's all about getting smashed, not about the journey.

Back to gardening with my bucket of adequate refreshments :D

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Microsoft: You liked Windows 10 so much, you'll get 2 more in 2017

MonkeyCee
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Hackintosh

Eh, they work OK. Colour is usually a bit off, and wifi can be iffy.

Getting a hackintosh to work is about as hard as getting linux to work in the early 2000s. Usually pretty fine, and you get 95% of the stuff working OK. Still got a bootable OSX for this box that I haven't used in.... 3 years I think?

It's quite a lot easier (and far less fussy about hardware) to install some flavor of linux and make it look Mac like.

Most of the time the extra hardware cost is easy to recoup in either less support costs, or being able to get decent money in a couple of years time selling on old kit.

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California to put all your power-hungry PCs on a low carb(on) diet

MonkeyCee
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PSU quality

Now I'm a little obsessive about PSUs, since they tend to be something (along with high end GPUs) that it's worth spending the extra bit of cash on upfront to get a more reliable experience later.

Hence I've often forked over (personally and professionally) for PC Power and cooling kit, and always been very happy with it. Very few failures, and the one that did they fell over themselves to replace and get back the bung unit.

Trying to justify the extra cost on the basis of power savings is *nearly* impossible. Even running 24/7 machines the difference between silver and platinum rated PSUs are minimal compared to initial costs. The difference in cost between a "minimal" sub-bronze PSU and the cheapest silver should justify cost recovery during the life of the machine, but increases the PSU cost by 20% or so.

However, the cost of downtime while buggering about replacing a dead PSU, or finding that the PSU spec is wildly optimistic about how much it can actually supply simultaneously on the 12 volt rail, is what the big time saver is.

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Did Donald Trump really just ask Russia to hack the US govt? Yes, he did

MonkeyCee
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Re: Treason

Next you'll be suggesting that the gwb43.com email scandal is anything like the Clinton one.

But it's very clear in tribal politics, whatever the other guys do is terrible and should involve jail, flogging and hanging, but our lot are pure as the driven snow. Because ideals, ends justify means, them lot want to destroy our country etc etc.

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Gullible Essex Police are now using junk science lie detectors

MonkeyCee
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Re: Methods that are more credible than a polygraph

"As a side note, I've always wondered why the "psychic" didn't call you."

They already know what you're going to say

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MonkeyCee
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Confessions

"I wonder what will happen the first time someone gets banged up for violated the terms of their release based solely on the polygraph and it is later proved that the polygraph was incorrect."

It will never happen. It's certainly not whats happened here.

The suspect confessed to a violation of parole. That's what the evidence is. If they want to retract the confession, they will probably have to show some reason for it. If this is "I was being whacked over the head with the yellow pages" then the confession will (hopefully) be thrown out. If it's from something that is considered an acceptable interrogation technique, then it's acceptable.

So if you have two suspects in custody, it is usually acceptable to say things like "your mate is busy telling us everything and is going to get a sweet deal" or "you totally done it, we know you done it, confess now and we'll go easier on you" or "if you don't 'fess up, we're going to arrest your mum/nan/child since one of you lot done it". Saying "I know you're lying, I have magic powers/technology" is probably fine too.

As an aside, it's often pretty easy for me to tell if someone is being deceptive. When your safety depends on reading people's intentions it's instinctive, and I'd imagine most LEOs have something similar. Determining exactly what that deception is covering up is a whole other ball game.

I would also suggest that if you're talking to the cops and are guilty you should probably get a lawyer. If you are innocent then you REALLY should get a lawyer before answering. Or decline to assist until they arrest you.

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Florida Man cleared of money laundering after selling Bitcoins to Agent Ponzi

MonkeyCee
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sting versus entrapment

IANAL, but I believe entrapment requires three criteria have to have been met:

1. The idea for the crime must have originated from the government agents and not from the accused person.

2. Government agents persuaded the person into committing the crime, as opposed to just giving him or her the opportunity to do so.

3. The person was not ready or willing to commit the crime before speaking to the government agents.

Since selling bitcoin is not in itself a crime, and the chap never actually committed any other crime it's pretty tricky to prove anything.

It's also why you shouldn't buy drugs etc as a "favor" to a friend.

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The very latest on the DNC email conspiracy. Which conspiracy? All of them, of course!

MonkeyCee
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Trump doesn't have policy stances. His statements are often contradict each other, and he will promise things that either are not possible, or require the rewriting of the constitution or are so light on details that it's so much meaningless hot air. It's a blank slate allowing people to project what they want onto it, and he'll say whatever will score some laughs. He's a demagogue, so will say what the mob wants to hear.

Trump is also (from all accounts) not actually planning on doing any of that boring presidential stuff, aiming to hive off foreign and domestic policy onto his veep, while he goes around being presidential "making America great again".

It's also the big pony show (presidential race) that gets liberals all fired up (because hollywood tells us the president is magic), while the actual business of government that affects your lives is about congress and state senates. The GOP plan seems to be much more focus on those races, especially at state level, to push their desired laws through and segregate the country (all the gays to blue states etc). It's why mid terms are important, but get ignored by those lazy lefties :)

Clinton does seem to be the more "conservative" candidate from my perspective, in that she's pretty keen on maintaining much of the status quo. I have *no* idea what Trump would actually do as president, since he doesn't really seem to have a party backing him, and he's all over the place on his "hot button" issues. But whoever gets elected, their ability to work with congress is going to matter more than anything they are spouting now.

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Uber's dud private dick given a hard time by judge in stiff surge case

MonkeyCee
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Just curious

About that whole "off the record" thing.

Now, I'm not a journalist, and I'm always reluctant to let them into my life based off previous experiences* (all writers steal, at least authors of fiction bother to disguise you a bit), but as I understood it *nothing* is ever off the record. You can ask to not be specifically named (which is what it usually means) but it will still get attributed, since making up quotes/facts is A Bad Thing, leading to a career in politics a la BoJo.

So if the Buzzfeed chap realised this, the difference would have been instead of Emil Michael as the source of the quote, a "person in a position of leadership at Uber" would have been the source.

If you say something *to* a journalist, or in public, I thought it's fair game.

Be good to know from an actual journo what the deal is.

* journalists are often not too bad, but will record everything you say, then their editor will pick all the bits that conform to the juiciest story, without regard for any promises made.

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Nintendo to investors: Pokémon Go won't make money come

MonkeyCee
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Re: This clearly goes to show you...

You need to read better economics :D although you are correct about how insanely orthodox econ departments are. I studied econometrics, so we where the "geeks who want to be quants". Studied how the models are built, by people who help write them, and most of those are pretty wise to the ways of the world, and of the behaviors of groups of people.

In general, micro economics is very good, and usually quite scientific. If you have a very specific situation, you can model it quite accurately. And a model for a similar situation can be used as a basis for a model of a similar situation. There's also plenty of experiments that show that people are *not* rational when it comes to negotiating over money.

If you read the papers, there are often more caveats and assumptions than actual arguments. But it often ends up with a rule/model for every situation, all of which lose some amount of detail. So I'm always very careful about aggregated data, GDP and inflation by basket-of-goods can be manipulated to hide what is happening in various segments of the population.

How economics is used politically is roughly half the things that are conventionally "agreed" on will ever be implemented, and only if it benefits the groups currently gaining the most from the current system. So you either can use models to benefit real world stuff (operations research), use it to "beat" the market by predicting behaviors, or be used to justify whatever our political masters are going to do anyway.

The profit scaling from a free-to-play are massive. Your marginal cost for items is nil, your fixed costs are (hopefully) tied to the size of player base, and once you're news, then plenty of free advertising. It's like a theme park, either charge you $40 to come in and ride all day, or $2 a ride and reasons to come back each day. Why sell physical goods, when virtual ones cost you nothing and nothing to transport.

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UK employers still reluctant to hire recent CompSci grads

MonkeyCee
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Re: Quality of graduates

I'm currently studying a fairly well regarded CS type degree (Knowledge Engineering and Data Science) in the Netherlands, where the "sandwich course" (there's some German name for it here that I can say but not write) is still in big favor.

The top 30-40% of my first year class have already got (paid) internships, with the majority of companies aiming to keep them on through a masters, then 5+ years afterwards. Based on what happens with the other years, I'd estimate 60% will be placed by end of second year, and 75% by final year. Given that about 5-10% go into the research track* (which precludes you interning), there will only be 15-20% of people graduating who don't already have jobs lined up. They will also tend to be some combination of less motivated, less able or missing desirable secondary skills like additional languages.

This seems to bear out with your experience, in that grads that haven't got a job during their study are *less* desirable than ones who are midway through and want to get more relevant experience.

There are a number of other educational institutes around, teaching what I think of as poly style** CS courses (programming, networking and security) who produce excellent programmers. Enough that we are strongly discouraged from competing with them directly for roles, as a programming position should go to them, whereas we should be doing more data focused activities. Well, if we want school credit.

I'm also a little shocked that a CS course means a student hasn't really done "proper" writing. First year alone, we had two short essays, four group reports and three group presentations. Plus another four short reports that where optional but could get you a bump in your grades. You are also expected to produce a thesis in your final year and defend it, plus publish a joint paper if you're doing the research track. At the very least you should be able to write a basic report, and some semblance of simple research and summation for a less technical audience.

* the research track and work placement are part of the honors program, and research gets to play with robots, so there may be more going there than in previous years.

** not intended as any insult. The Dutch education system can be rather vocationally focused, but they do manage to instill a good basis of knowledge whilst giving top level instruction for job related education. Placements/internships are required as part of the course.

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Tight-wad Apple repair techs swapped our damaged iGear with used kit – lawsuit

MonkeyCee
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Warranties

Not sure if this is still the case, but when my friend used to work in consumer electronics, the law was very clear about a device comes with either a reasonable lifetime warranty, or 2 years. Depending on your country, opinions of courts etc. Thus selling someone "insurance" was selling them something they had already got. My friend used to get a 1% commission on most goods (kit, but not consumables IIRC) but would get somewhere between 33% and 60% of the sales of "insurance". Which gives you an idea of just how lucrative it can be.

Donkeys years ago I bought a "boom box" with a CD player in it, for $65. Salesgoon tried to persuade me that dropping $40 on insurance was a good idea, which I found hilarious.

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Apple Watch craze over before it started: Wrist-puter drags market screaming off a cliff

MonkeyCee
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Re: @Bob Dole ... Could Also Be...

I'm with Esme on this. I'm old enough that also needed a watch when growing up, although finding one that didn't make my wrist get uncomfortable was a pain, so I ended up with a sweatband with the watch on top. It was the 80s, so that was one of my lessor crimes against fashion.

After a friend snapped his wrist after a small (1 foot) fall where his flailing arm hit a wall, and the watch nicely concentrated the impact onto a couple of bones, I stopped wearing them. Had one looped on my belt until I got to secondary, where the perv who taught geography did the same thing, so had to change that trick.

Got quite good at reading other people's watches, or clocks, and then the prevalence of digital displays meant it was pretty easy to keep track.

Pocket watches are cool, but my suits that fit are all 3 piece, so tossing a pocket watch on there means that I'm a little less likely to be mistaken for a waiter. Also means I get to wear my granddads rather battered brass watch, which survived WW2 and a couple of years of service after the war.

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Star Trek Beyond: An unwatchable steaming pile of tribble dung

MonkeyCee
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Re: @Midnight - Penn Jillette as Cyrano

You say this like it's a bad thing, but that's the best movie pitch I've heard for a while.

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An anniversary to remember: The world's only air-to-air nuke was fired on 19 July, 1957

MonkeyCee
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Re: just goes to show how little ...

Due to national security issues, it's somewhere between hard and impossible to get an accurate count of people who have died on nuclear projects. Whether in construction, accidents, radiation poisoning or from cancer. There's a bit of PR tied in with it too, but in general radiation is more dangerous than some of the "safer" sounding stats, as they ignore the hidden deaths, and not nearly as bad as some of the more shrill greenies make out.

It's also pretty much impossible (short of evidence of ingestion) to determine what radiation caused what cancer. We're all exposed to various levels, depending on locale, and we all have various cancerous growths*. If someone dies of a heart attack and had multiple late stage cancers, what's the cause of death?

Even if you factor in a reasonable estimate, nuclear power (as electricity generation) is about as safe as large scale hydro, which is pretty** safe most of the time, considering the size of the civil engineering involved.

It's pretty easy to find people who've died of radiation poisoning. Whether someone who dies from cancer, showing that cancer was caused by a particular source of radiation is very hard to prove. Off the top of my head, about 30 people died of radiation poisoning at Chernobyl (within a few weeks), Harry Daghlian Jr and Louis Slotin for doing nuclear experiments without proper (any?) safety measures, and Alexander Litvinenko.

* 99% of which we'll outlive, as they grow slowly. It's the fast growing buggers that we worry about.

** Hydro dams don't fail often, but when they do it's horrific.

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Gaming apps, mugging and bad case of bruised Pokéballs

MonkeyCee
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Re: The whole thing

Because you don't understand how people can spend money on a hobby that boggles anyone who doesn't engage in that hobby?

There are many examples of things that people spend small fortunes on, that I think are an utter waste of money (and time)*. But I'm not going to win any argument with them because there are different priorities. Same way for things I own that are an insane** or ego pumping purchase for most of the population.

The principle in f2p games is that ~80% of the players never spend a dime on the game, and often enjoy a perverse pride in it. ~15% spend roughly the same as you'd make from selling it at a conventional price, and ~5% spend serious money on it. As long as you're happy with which group you're in, and you don't get too annoyed at the p2w aspect then they are often better games than subscription or purchase models. You also get an option to spend time or money in leveling up, which exists even if the game doesn't explicitly allow it. Had more than one freelance gig which consisted of being paid $30 an hour to grind a clients WoW character.

* I worked out that my Dad spent roughly $150 per round of golf he played, based on his membership rates, and various other bits. This is ignoring buying clubs, balls, travel or time costs. Paintballers spending ~$5000 on a new marker, hobby photographers with ~$10k worth of kit etc.

** Chefs knives, which where worth it when I was spending ~80 hours a week cooking. A $200 knife saves time, effort and is safer than a $20 one. But for home use you've probably got better uses for the extra $180 :)

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Telling your wife why you were fired is the only punishment

MonkeyCee
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Yup

Well, that was my attitude too. If it's a serious crime to just posses the damn files, call the cops.

I'm curious why I got a couple of down votes for my CP anecdote. Perhaps I should have made clear that the stuff was nasty shit, nothing that could be mistaken for innocent images etc. Not kids in the bath stuff, things that made me want to take a cricket bat to the fucker.

That or there are some kiddie fuckers on here who feel that IT workers should afford you a higher level of privacy than say lawyers, shrinks or doctors. If you provide evidence of a crime to them, your client privilege goes out the window.

I guess I should have included the other stories where I found stuff that was clearly intended as "funny" but bestiality is still illegal. That chap just got a written warning since it was: a) a single image, b) he saw the error of his ways and c) he went and personally apologized to the various offended parties.

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AWS works on 'urgent' deals for UK customers as £ dips against $

MonkeyCee
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Balance of trade

"What about the foreign traders in our goods? They must now be getting more. Supply and demand will now make the stuff we sell to them more attractive"

Like any economics that a child could understand, it's not actually true. Or to be fair, the usual answer is "it's complicated" :)

The UK is a net importer of goods and services, so things are not equal. Currently imports are declining slightly, but exports have declined even more so.

All the bumf about how this helps exporters, and will somehow increase UK manufacturing ignores reality. The UK doesn't have lower wages or higher productivity than it's direct competitors (other technologically advanced nations) and is in no way able to compete with more developing economies.

Much of the UKs manufacturing base is highly taxpayer subsidised, to the point where it'd actually be cheaper to import finished goods and just pay the workers directly.

Another issue is if you're planning on buying from a regular supplier, you want to avoid volatility in pricing. Since there clearly isn't a plan for brexit, why risk buying from a UK based business when an EU or US based one will likely be more consistent. At *best* the UK business will be like an EU one, but depending on how negotiations go there may be tariffs or restrictions that come into place.

What worries me is that this is all from a non-binding referendum, without any clarity as to what exactly "leave the EU" entails, and the exact details of single market access for goods and services is possibly going to make this worse.

The free movement of people is slightly less relevant from a financial perspective, since lessening EU immigration will result in increased migration from the rest of the world, so labor markets will be similar.

Best of all the UK gets an unelected PM. Which should at least lose the cons the next election, if the party survives that long.

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Facebook deleted my post and made me confirm pics of my kids weren't sexually explicit

MonkeyCee
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Re: It's not your platform and you are not a customer

Really? Don't own shares in companies that make money hand over fist and are regarded as essential by a not insignificant chunk of the population?

I've owned Google and Apple shares, and sold them for decent profits. They are perfectly good "valley tech" shares, in that they are from profitable, expanding companies (well, at the time) that have decided to not pay dividends* because fuck you. The money is now in far more boring and traditional companies that pay dividends and deal in stuff that I understand.

Google is probably the most successful advertising company *ever* since compared to a newspaper, radio or TV, they pay sweet FA for content but have a huge (and highly targetable) market. Alas, due to their "valley tech" styles, they are not happy simply having a company that does it's thing well, and sit on that, but need to go play with other exciting tech instead of paying back their investors.

* while I owned them, Apple have started since

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When is a refurbished server not refurbished? Ask this Dell reseller

MonkeyCee
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Re: Dell orders can be shortened

Oh God, HP in the UK (as compared to APEC) almost drove me to murder the fucking PMs who where ordering stuff.

The PMs ordered based off the parts list, and no-one thought to confirm that it would be assembled by HP, or that it would actually work. So I get handed a pile of boxes, and told "build teh servers!". They all came with redundant power supplies, but without the conversion kits to be able to mount them, which turned out to cost ~20% of the total cost again.

Then about 40% turn out to have been returns, where they flake out after being powered on for 20-60 hours. Luckily I still had my HP technician details from when I used to work for them, so I managed to convince them to accept returns after about a week, since each "fix" needed a couple of days to test.

HP then shipped us replacements. Which turned out to be the *same* units. Because their technicians couldn't replicate the fault, it tested fine, so ship it back as new.

Don't know what the rest of the world is like, but I've been sold too many things "new" in the UK which where IMHO refurbished or repaired.

Personally I'll always by second hand or refurb kit for anything that I expect a decent lifetime from. I think the only new power tools I've got are gifts, and they are often better (light industrial versus consumer) than what I could pick up at my local DIY store. It's just a pisser when they don't get returned, since I can't just go and grab another one for the same price.

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Bad blood: US govt bans bio-test biz Theranos' CEO for two years

MonkeyCee
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Re: The minute...

That's quite unfair to Jobs.

He was very demanding of his designers and engineers, often to the point of being unreasonable. But at least the products he managed did something useful. Even if it was almost always something that someone else was already doing (often better and cheaper), Jobs was great at adding the gloss and glitz to something with function.

This was clearly bollocks from the get go. They couldn't even do the *normal* blood testing correctly, and their new tech has never worked.

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Teen faces trial for telling suicidal boyfriend to kill himself via text

MonkeyCee
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Re: But is it Manslaughter?

"Retroactively making something a crime is illegal and unconstitutional as six different hells.

..And apparently happens every day."

What about the reverse, which seems to happen rather often too. Say some government agency has been keeping data in it's database of ANR/emails/phonecalls etc for longer than it should, and another agency has copied all this information into another "super" database, combined with all the other information it has.

Then when this *currently illegal* activities start surfacing in undeniable fashions, a series of home secretaries propose laws that make this all retroactively legal, move on, nothing to see here.

Not sure which is worse, but both are pretty clear abuses of power.

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MonkeyCee
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Well put

Well put. Depression isn't feeling shitty, or sad because something (or a series of things) are causing you pain.

It's a hole that you can't see out of. It's the lack of hope that anything will change for the better. The inability to dream. You lose your self esteem, self worth and then no-one really wants to be around you anyway.

That's why being depressed, plus some hard logical thinking*, often leads to suicidal thoughts. If those thoughts are encouraged and reinforced, then you can move to actions. Hence why reporting is restricted, since it can encourage people "over the edge".

Depressed people are vulnerable, and this lady took advantage in about the worst way possible. Well, making him kill others would be worse I suppose, but still. She's as culpable as someone bullying a person so much they harm themselves.

If someone is really suicidal, they don't need any encouragement, so FUCKING DON'T. They'll find a way, usually after a number of attempts, each of which leaves them in a worse state than before.

* in my case, courtesy of prozac.

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MonkeyCee
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While appreciated

It's a good joke, but if you're dealing with people's real traumas, then you do have to regularly see a therapist yourself.

I've had at least two therapists (a councilor and a psychologist) who had to refer me on because my crap was either too much, or to close to their own issues for them to be clinically effective.

While it's fun to mock rich people talking about their non-problems, there are some people who are out there trying to help, and they can carry of lot of other people's grief and anguish with them.

The kind of people who maybe this chap could have down with in his life, rather than this lady.

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MonkeyCee
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Re: Is suicide illegal in the USA

"Or was at one time before RR started shutting down the mental health institutions and dumping those folks into the prison system."

FTFY

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Blighty will have a whopping 24 F-35B jets by 2023 – MoD minister

MonkeyCee
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Re: "preparing perfectly for the last war and ignoring developments that have happened since"

That's hardly fair. Iraq is firstly several groups that pretty much hate/distrust each other, and while the state departments plans where pretty good, we'll never know how good since on all the points marked "do this, to avoid consequences" where ignored by defense when they took over.

So if you promise the armed forces a place in the new regime, and assure the ba'athists (or whatever group has most recently held the whip hand) that they too will have a place, then back track on those promises, it'll cause a massive ongoing problem.

Not that I'd advocate nation build per sec, but if you're going to do it, at least let the people who have experience with governance have a say.

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You can’t sit there, my IoT desk tells me

MonkeyCee
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Re: I see how this is shaping up

"A number of anthropologists believe that the adoption of agriculture was bad for human lifespan, health and intelligence."

I'd say that was a pretty bad take on things, and ignores the actual facts in favor of wooly theories. I"m married to an anth major, and she'd no doubt tear them a new one :)

For a person who makes it to 40 years old, if they where a hunter gatherer then they are usually a pretty fine example of humanity. A 40 year old in an early agrarian society often has suffered more disease, injuries, and is generally smaller and usually less skilled (more specific skills, fewer general skills). So far, so much confirmation of initial hypothesis.

However, you get 10-400 times more people making it to 40 in the agrarian society. People survive diseases they otherwise wouldn't, injuries result in changing tasks rather than leading to your demise. A hunter gatherer with a broken leg is usually dead.

There's almost no ability to produce a reliable surplus in hunter gathering, so you can't have any existence of a non-providing class, whereas agriculture allows people to do things other than get food. This is obviously used initially to make things that help make more food, shelter, retaining knowledge, and so on. Then after ten thousand years, some people are going to intellectualize their pastoral fantasies and declare that we where better as noble savages.

Agriculture was bad for an individual (assuming they survived), but is better for a population. Same as urban populations are, on average, less healthy than pastoral ones. But you'd be amazed how many armchair survivalists live in towns and cities.

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Idiot brings gun-shaped iPhone to airport

MonkeyCee
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Re: Apparently he was allowed to continue his journey

It's not really plod who decide on tweets tho it's the CPS, a cop can't really say "excuse me sir, but that looks likes you're about to do something against the law, you see how this is both dumb and illegal, and you agree to not do it anymore?" when someone is twattering. Might be good, although I prefer the option of informing the posters mum of what they said.

Tweeting is also considered more "public" by some laws, since it can be seen by many people. Not saying I agree, but laws have their own logic.

But in a face-to-face situation, the plod can make such a call (subject to whatever directives they have). Since this could probably be filed under "plonker with a toy gun" a warning and public service announcement should be enough. Arresting him would have been a waste or resources.

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Prominent Brit law firm instructed to block Brexit Article 50 trigger

MonkeyCee
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Well...

"On the contrary, it suggests to me that the populace is close to neutral on the issue."

I'm fairly sure that's not what this means. While I'm sure some in either camp are not too fussed either way, feelings are generally pretty strong on either side, even if they average out. Running the risk of being gunned down in the street if you piss of the wrong racist nutter* doesn't add to the appeal.

So if a politician goes strongly one way or another, they can expect to piss off roughly half of their voters. Hence why Cameron and Farage quit, rather than tackle the task, and BoJo was only ever in it for PM, not for any actual work. Farage can't actually build anything, but does a fine line in pissing on things whilst managing a spot of demagoguery.

What makes the whole mix worse is while Remain has a vague consensus on what they'd like, what "leave the EU" means to Leave voters varies a great deal. I strongly suspect when faced with what the actual deal will be, many of the Leave voters will feel betrayed, and rather than blaming the impossible lies they where sold (or where implied and suggested but totally not actually promised), the blame will fall on whoever got the short stick of negotiating.

* I don't think Leave voters are generally more racist than Remain voters, but there are certainly racists who are using it as a smokescreen.

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Microsoft's Windows 10 nagware goes FULL SCREEN in final push

MonkeyCee
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Re: Wine to the rescue!

"The day job was always Windows "

Just a personal note I've found using Linux tools, especially bootable devices, to save me massive amounts of time in supporting Windows only environments, or walk-in solo users.

For cleaning malware off machines it's almost always Hirem's boot, with whatever updates and additions you want to add. For recovering data, disk imaging and resetting passwords, a bootable USB with Mint is enough.

Apart from some very low level data recovery tools, I haven't used a DVD for some years now. All techs should have their awesome little USB stick of Doom :D

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MonkeyCee
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Re: Subscriptions

"I suspect that there'll be a noticeable exodus to Linux and OS X (including hackintoshes)"

I doubt it for the hackintosh. I've built a couple and while they are OK if you want a cheaper Apple, you're usually better off going straight to linux, or sucking it up and paying the Apple tax. The many small niggles with the hackintosh usually drives users away from using it as their desktop system (eg colour matching is off, and takes aaaaages to get right), and Mint et al are pretty user friendly these days.

One client is very happy with their hackintosh server, which started as a new desktop but didn't work out well for the artist. Toss a RAID card and a few cheapish drives in there and Robert is your mum's brother.

I like building hackintoshes, and I'd happily sell them to all comers, but they are a *very* niche market. I'd expect Linux on rebuilt machines and Mac OS if they're going to spring for a new one.

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MonkeyCee
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Re: A final throw of the Minty dice before

I've gone off Ubuntu as the standard XP alternate, since it's seemed less "plug and play" in the last couple of years.

Give Mint a try, see if it's getting the same issues.

You'll never escape GFX driver crap, unless you're either running integrated GFX, or your vendor has been making an effort. ATI do better linux drivers than NVidia these days. Never thought I'd say that....

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MonkeyCee
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Re: A final throw of the Minty dice before

You've been retired too long then mate :)

I've always got several thumb drives with either ubuntu or mint on them (mild preference for mint these days, but whatever). When a friend/relative/neighbor/classmate is having issues with a machine I'll get them to give it a trial, booting from the thumb drive.

Usually after a week of hearing nothing, I'll get hold of them, to be told that the computer is working fine thanks, and no need to do anything. So I'll install it (in a suitably impressive speedy fashion), take my drive back, and then it's even slightly faster.

Most don't even know there is a command line, they don't care. It opens email, it access the web pages they want, it's got something that opens most of the standard files they come across.

The main issues are printing and drivers, but in each of these cases (YMMV) the issue is not confined to Windows or Linux, and is often easiest to solve by spending a tenner on a new card, finding a work around, or in the case of printers, just binning it and helping them buy the right printer, rather than whatever bullshit inkjet is being pushed out this week. Most people DO NOT need an inkjet, a ~30 quid laser, essentially a HP LJ 4 with more modern guts, is fine for most things, and can be left turned off for weeks, fired up and print.

The last few printers I sourced have been Brother HL2130. Store had ~50 inkjets on display and two lasers, lasers practically hidden from view in the corner.

For myself, and my geeky friends, we run VMWare and whatever is needed for the job at hand. Single and dual booting is so 20th century dude :)

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MonkeyCee
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Re: A final throw of the dice before

It's not that cut and dried. IANAL, as you can tell the highly technical legal terms I use

The Windows 10 "upgrade" has to have:

- fucked up your machine and/or prevented you from using software that you relied on

- required rebuilding or replacing rather than a rollback

- have a demonstrable cost in both time and lost business

So get yer ducks in a line first, you'll need to document all the above, and have given some MS drones at least a couple of chances to fix it.

Although I do agree, small claims court is superb for dealing with large companies fucking you around. Since they can't send an actual lawyer to fight you, but Legal should have an eyeball of the case first, they will almost always come to the conclusion that paying what is owed, plus a lump sum that's under 6 figures is almost always worth it.

Oh, and if they lose, and still fuck around about paying you, you can start the bankruptcy filing for them. Which affects their credit rating (even for a 25k debt for a comapny making ~2mil annual profit on ~50mil turnover), and causes Legal and Manglement to start screaming at people until you get cut a cheque from petty cash or some slush budget, since there isn't a "we never planned on paying this contract" budget.

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Man killed in gruesome Tesla autopilot crash was saved by his car's software weeks earlier

MonkeyCee
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Re: Fatality rates

Maybe I misunderstand something, but it wasn't a "divided, limited-access freeway" otherwise the truck wouldn't have been crossing the lane the chap was driving in.

I'm also curious about the truck crossing the road, since it seems it wouldn't have right of way, and crossed in front of other vehicles requiring them to brake.

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This local council paid HOW MUCH for an SD card?!

MonkeyCee
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Re: This local council paid HOW MUCH for an SD card?!

Those $500 hammers where infact yer bog standard mild steel jobbies.

It's an accounting "trick" where a purchase doesn't have line item costs, so x different items for $y total means each item gets marked as having a cost of y/x.

The infamous invoice for this had, in addition to the large numbers of tools, a jet engine on it. Which was *also* valued at $500.

While "government is dumb" and procurement is full of bollocks (see many other posts) this is one of those oft repeated stories that actually make sense (as much as accounting ever does) when you look into the details.

I can bore you to death with how it was McDonalds fault for serving coffee too hot and other such stuff. But snopes usually do it better than me :)

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Brexit-bored Brits back to bashing the bishop after ballot box blues

MonkeyCee
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I gather...

If you search for "Dumb blonde fucks 15 million people at once" on pornhub, you get a (thankfully clothed) video of BoJo.

Apparently.

I'm averse to doing any further research on BoJo's potential sex tapes, and he's got plenty of sex scandals going around, being a tory and all that.

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Osborne on Leave limbo: Travel and trade stay unchanged

MonkeyCee
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Re: Project FUD is alive and well

"..and I think the FUD group were the ones saying "ooh, be afraid, there are lots of people with dark skin coming to take your jobs". "

I thought it was that Polish/Romanians who would be taking all the jobs. Once the UK is outside the EU, then it'll be migrants from the sub-continent who'll be taking the jobs.

So I'm pretty sure a Leave vote was anti-EU migrant and pro brown skinned or commonwealth migrant.

Or the UK could magically solve the labor issues by enforced training and job placement. Since this has yet to be shown to ever work (it's about the worst form of communism), once this has been solved then the UK can lead us all to the new utopia. Oh, and it would require not only controlling where people lived, but also not letting them leave the country ever.

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MonkeyCee
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Re: Irish passport

"we could go to the Netherlands or Spain, where it is recognised and then I, as the spouse of an Irish passport holder, could get Dutch or Spanish citizenship, and given our jobs, that would be great. So father-in-law is being encouraged quite strenuously."

I'd be careful about this. Usually a marriage is recognised or not by all countries involved. If in the passport issuing country you are not married, then you can't transfer it over.

Not sure about Spain, but for the Netherlands (since I"m looking at that now) to get nationality you need to be married to a Dutch national, or to have lived here for 5+ years and give up your current nationalities. Oh, and have B2 level Dutch, whatever path. So unless your missus is Dutch, I'd suggest something else.

The first step would be to get *properly* married (to whatever standard the Irish require) after your wife has her Irish passport, then apply for an Irish passport.

If you're eligible for Spanish or Dutch nationality directly, then apply directly :)

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'Leave EU means...' WHAT?! Britons ask Google after results declared

MonkeyCee
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Re: Well I thought!!!!

"don't get me started on university fees"

I find 2 grand a year to be pretty good university fees for world leading institutes teaching in English.

Oh, we're talking about English universities.... yeah, those fees are bollocks for what you get.

Quick students, get thee to Holland and Germany, and get married. Even a divorce will cost you less than the difference of 3 years fees :)

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EU GDPR compliance still a thing for UK firms even after Brexit

MonkeyCee
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Re: Pop!

I'm not sure "we only speak English" is a business advantage. Most American's are at least partially bilingual, and turns out so are most of the EU. Most people who speak English as an additional tongue (it's somewhere between 2nd and 4th language around my neck of the woods) actually speak it more correctly than the natives. But that's a consequence of actually being taught grammar, sentence structure and whatnot as part of all schooling, even in the vocational areas.

Your example is utter bollocks. Either the UK company is spending the time and money to comply with EU data regulations, which is the equivalent to staying in the EU, and is therefore at zero advantage over any other EU company; or it's not complying with the EU regulations, is excluded from the EU market, and intends to make up this difference with the US. So I'm lost how this is any advantage.

The main advantage of the UK company is that its attached to a different currency than the EU company. Since it's clear that the UK needs to devalue the pound, experience a recession while the negotiations with the EU take place* (~5 years? 2? 10? Fuck knows?) and then make a decision based on the *actual* terms of a separation, rather than the lies given by BJ and Farage, paying a UK company is probably a great plan. And as long as the UK company can buy all of it's kit manufactured in the UK, from UK sourced raw materials then it'll all be peachy.

Leave may well work out for the UK in the medium and long term. Just being in the EEA will mean that the UK will still have much of the same benefits, will have to pay *more* into the EU than currently, and will have little to no say in the EU legislation process, whilst needing to comply with the majority of the decisions.

The regions that have been left to rot by Whitehall, that are currently being regenerated by EU funds, will be abandoned once again. The people who used this as a protest vote against the government are only going to get screwed more, and then be given another scapegoat. Just hope next time ends up with less political terrorism by the leavers.

* It took 2 years for Greenland to negotiate the EU exit. With a population of 55k and a single export good type..

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IRS 'inadvertently' wiped hard drive Microsoft demanded in audit row

MonkeyCee
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Re: Huh?

I have a friend who is a military historian, based in the US.

He reckons there is a far more complete record of what went on in the military prior to mass adoption of computers. For example, American civil war orders, supply lists and casualty lists are still usuable in their original forms. This compares to US military orders and records form the 70s and 80s which are in some obscure file format and often corrupted, since they aren't a priority to be copied and backed up.

Thus he has a better idea about which units had cake in 19th century than if anyone had cake in the 20th.

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