* Posts by Anonymous Blowhard

929 posts • joined 25 Mar 2013

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Battery-hungry cars roll over Lenovo's FY 16/17 bottom line

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Excuses, excuses

"Can we have a better quality excuse next quarter?"

Other companies already took those too...

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Info commish: One year to go and businesses still not ready for GDPR

Anonymous Blowhard
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Asset vs. Liability

The root of the problem is that businesses see personal data as an asset; the more they have, the more they can monetise it.

If there was legislation to make personal data a liability, something that costs you money, then businesses would think differently about it and try to minimise their holdings of personal data.

So if businesses had to pay a levy of one pound per year for every row of personal data in every database they have then they would work to minimise that cost; they'd clean out personal data relating to old accounts as fast as possible, they'd think hard about the actual value of personal data to them. At the moment they keep as much as possible because "it's an asset".

The levy could be used to finance the enforcement of data protection and for compensating victims of data theft.

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Dell BIOS update borks PCs

Anonymous Blowhard
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@theblackhand

Yorkshireman: You were lucky...

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US Coast Guard: We're rather chuffed with our new Boeing spy drone

Anonymous Blowhard
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Roboat?

"the RN seemed keen to keep Scaneagle in service, using it during the Unmanned Warrior roboat exercise last year"

Is a "roboat" an unmanned boat?

Anyway, the RN seems keen on paying admirals to sit behind desks whilst the fleet shrinks to nothing; they'll be lucky to have row-boats, never mind robots...

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Drugs, vodka, Volvo: The Scandinavian answer to Britain's future new border

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Take back control

"neighbours Sweden, an EU member, and Norway, which is not"

But they're both in the Schengen Area so the cameras aren't enforcing the movement of people.

The border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland will have to be closed in order to implement the "take back control" bollocks, either that or they'll have to introduce immigration controls between NI and the rest of the UK to prevent Ireland becoming an unmonitored back door into the UK. It seems like this would be a backwards step for the peace process either way.

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America 'will ban carry-on laptops on flights from UK, Europe to US'

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Uncanny Parallels

"A world where it was no longer safe to transmit information."

That already happened...

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CERN ready to test an EVEN BIGGER gun

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Lineac 3?

It's just a translation; the actual names are Lineac 1, Lineac 10 & Lineac 100...

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Come celebrate World Hypocrisy Day

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Property is theft

@ PyLETS

"The Bible probably wouldn't exist had the early copyists had a concept of IP as a moral issue"

So you're saying the Christians are lucky they weren't fed to the lawyers?

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Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: It ought to be.

"there is enormous support for IP when it's your stuff or people you approve of) and less so when it's stuff you want to get for free"

Bender: This is the worst kind of discrimination. The kind against me.

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Fake invoice scammers slurp $5bn+ from corp beancounters – FBI

Anonymous Blowhard
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"That's what order numbers are for"

Not quite, you should also have a process for validating that what was ordered got delivered.

For physical items it's a GRN (Goods Received Notification) that is matched against the order when items arrive at your business.

For services you need an equivalent SRN (Service Received Notification) process whereby someone validates that the service has been received (usually the person that ordered or requested the service).

Then you only pay against the GRN/SRN (what was delivered) not necessarily what was ordered (these systems also restrict over-receipt to prevent scams whereby suppliers inflate their business by delivering more than was ordered).

These elements are typically part of the integrated purchasing and accounts modules for an ERP system, and the process should also prevent duplicate invoicing (either by the original supplier or by a third-party scammer).

It isn't rocket science, we were implementing these things in the 90s...

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Oracle: You've got such strong arms, Mr Pai. Oh, hello, Donald! We didn't see you there

Anonymous Blowhard
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"The concept that traditional internet access providers are exclusively transmitting unchanged data point-to-point is foreign to our own experiences and observations"

I want my ISP to transmit "unchanged data point-to-point"; anything else is interference with the delivery service I'm paying for.

ISPs, and others, are keen to analyse your data for the purposes of selling things to you (Google) or locking you up (Government) and it sounds like Oracle is keen to join in...

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iPhone lawyers literally compare Apples with Pears in trademark war

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Dear Apple.

"Apple fans are just plain nuts for life!"

Hang on, nuts are a fruit as well; you're just making the situation worse!

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Netgear says sorry four weeks after losing customer backups

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Levels of confidence

The IT industry's track record on quality is that it's a misspelling of "quantity"...

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Reg reader offered £999,998 train ticket from Cambridge to Horley

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Cambridge to Horley

Yes, it's £22 if you want to arrive today or in the near future, but if you want to arrive in Cambridge on the 15 January 2011 then £999,998 seems reasonable; £22 for the rail travel and £999,976 for the time travel.

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Trump signs exec order signaling foreign H-1B visa techie crackdown

Anonymous Blowhard
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"We don't have a level playing field for our workers, but you're going to have one very soon"

How's that? Are millions of Americans suddenly going to become better educated? Or is he planning to give Indian and Asian technology experts brain damage in some way?

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Finally a reason not to bother with IPv6: Uh, security concerns...?

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: I think bollocks...

"security tools haven't been updated to handle IPv6 yet"

Exactly; why blame IPV6 when the problem is with security vendors not updating their software?

This is a problem that the market will fix; as long as some vendors implement IPV6 compatibility in their tools then eventually everyone left in the market will implement, because if you don't you'll be out of business.

This is feature-analysis of network security tools masquerading as a technical assessment of IPV6.

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Law Commission pulls back on official secrets laws plans after Reg exposes flawed report

Anonymous Blowhard
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"a very very minor hiccup in the progress of the totalitarian police state that replaced the country of freedom and democracy I was born into"

Democracy? When was Theresa May democratically elected as Prime Minister? Or even as leader of the Conservative Party?

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Crafty Fokker: Norfolk surgeon builds Red Baron triplane replica

Anonymous Blowhard
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@Dr Who

Not sure where I got dentist from! I think I'm suffering from brain-fade.

On the other hand if he's an orthopaedic surgeon then there's no wonder he's built a wooden plane; my friend, a GP, always disparages orthopaedics as "carpentry".

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Steppe thugs pacified by the love of stone age women

Anonymous Blowhard
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I think Corded Ware Culture are appearing at the Upton Folk Festival later this month.

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Boeing details 'Deep Space Gateway' for Mars mission staging

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Nice idea

I agree; ten years ago this might have seemed like a great advance, but now that SpaceX has demonstrated a reusable first stage it just seems like a blast (off) from the past.

NASA needs to focus its budget on the technologies that aren't being developed by the private space industry and get the basis of true interplanetary vehicles worked out; the main theme has to be low-thrust, long-duration engines with high specific impulse.

NASA's, and others, experience with the ISS has given them a lot of information about living in space for extended periods, but they need to reduce the time take to travel interplanetary distances before manned exploration can really be practical.

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Wi-Fi sex toy with built-in camera fails penetration test

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Rooted via back door

I misread that too.

I'd suggest any malware that uses this backdoor be named "Brown Eye"...

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Mediaeval Yorkshirefolk mutilated, burned t'dead to prevent reanimation

Anonymous Blowhard
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Zombies?

You were lucky! When I were a lad, our parents would kill us and dismember our corpses to stop us walkin' t'Earth agin'.

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How to leak data from an air-gapped PC – using, er, a humble scanner

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Is this some James Bond-esque fantasy ?

"April 1 come early this year?"

Nope, it's exactly on time - in New Zealand...

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Miss Misery on hacking Mr Robot and the Missing Sense of Fun

Anonymous Blowhard
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You had me at "bisexual Danish energy vampires"...

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Nuns left in limbo after phone line transfer hell

Anonymous Blowhard
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"It's a pity the Judge's name was John and not Len."

Might be a relative...

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UK digital minister Matt Hancock praises 'crucial role' of encryption

Anonymous Blowhard
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"The pool of political talent available to Theresa May when she had to choose a Home Secretary must have been very small."

There's no shortage of "political" talent at Westminster, the problem is they have no talent for other subjects (maths, physics, engineering, medicine etc.) and if the "experts" say something they don't like they keep looking for experts until they find one they like.

I predict no end of expensive pseudo-solutions to the problem of secure-encryption-with-backdoors....

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NASA to fire 1Gbps laser 'Wi-Fi' ... into spaaaaace

Anonymous Blowhard
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"Is it WiFi if it is using focused light ?"

Well it is wireless; the proposed CAT 6 Ethernet needed too much copper...

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Decapitating Rockall: How a 1970s Navy expedition blasted the top off the Atlantic islet

Anonymous Blowhard
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"consider that Great Britain still has a number of countries under its commonwealth"

I think you must be looking at a hundred year old map of the world; The Commonwealth isn't a political union, and the United Kingdom government has no authority over any of the other Commonwealth Nations' territory, so it makes no difference to the Britain's access to economic resources.

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GCHQ dismisses Trump wiretap rumours as tosh

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: That was then...

"I wonder if we managed to make it through one year of Trump before them engaging in a massive war somewhere because Trump couldn't keep his stupid gob shut"

Time for a sweepstake! Yay, I got Canada!

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Anonymous Blowhard
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@ tr1ck5t3r:

And to save you time later, here's eBay's listings for tin foil...

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BOFH: Don't back up in anger

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: We only backup the shared drives

"Unless you're a certain London based university..."

I think you'll find they didn't lose a single one or zero; but they might not necessarily be in the right order...

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Zombie webcams? Pah! It's the really BIG 'Things' that scare me

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Access Denied

"Connect your substations directly to your control room rather than via the internet."

Sounds good in principle, but difficult to implement this late in the day. Imagine the cost of directly wiring every electrical substation in the UK to all the relevant control centres.

We shouldn't be afraid of using the Internet for communications, that's what it's there for; but we should always be aware of the risks and employ appropriate security measures, which means spending money on network security - this doesn't just mean installing software; software alone is never a solution, there needs to be investment in people to monitor the systems and react when threats are detected. It's the same as real-world security, you can't just lock a door and then walk away and hope no-one with lock-picking skills comes along and opens it; you have to have security patrols to reduce the opportunity for mischief.

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Get a GRIP! Robolution ain't happening until TOUCH is cracked

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: There is plenty of low hanging fruit

"They may just hijack criminals bodies for x years and hack into the nervous system. May be cheaper."

Frederick Pohl beat you to in in "We Purchased People".

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What went up, Musk come down again: SpaceX to blast sat into orbit with used rocket

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Don't call it "re-used"

"'Previously enjoyed' was how Mercedes used to sell used cars."

I had a girlfriend like that...

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Germany to roll out €100bn gigabit internet network

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: The €100bn project

The UK is spending nearly that to get from Manchester to London slightly faster...

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Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: If only our grandparents hadn't tried so hard...

"Yes, but the SS would have used ubiquitous broadband technology to conduct mass surveillance. At least we've been spared that."

Did you forget the joke icon?

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That CIA exploit list in full: The good, the bad, and the very ugly

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Signal / WhatsApp "good news"

"despite the attempt via the creation of the department of homeland security to get them all playing nice with each other."

I thought they created the DHS as a way of creating even more "Security Theatre" and duplicating FBI efforts...

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BONG! Lasers crack Big Ben frequency riddle BONG! No idea what to do with this info BONG!

Anonymous Blowhard
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Disappointed

I was expecting some ¡BONG!...

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Congratulations IBM for 'inventing' out-of-office email. You win Stupid Patent of the Month

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: You thought you were joking

How about "interlocking blocks of stone as a means of constructing buildings"?

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Security slip-ups in 1Password and other password managers 'extremely worrying'

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Little blue book

"Then I've got some bad news for you: the Pearly Gates have been upgraded to 2FA and moved into the cloud."

I thought they were supposed to be "in the cloud" already?

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Prisoners' 'innovative' anti-IMSI catcher defence was ... er, tinfoil

Anonymous Blowhard
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Porridge 2017 Script

Mr. Mackay: Fletcher! What's that large rectangle of tin-foil doing on your wall?

Norman Stanley Fletcher: Oh that, Mr. Mackay; it's a poster.

Mr. Mackay: It looks just like a large piece of tin-foil to me.

Norman Stanley Fletcher: Not at all Mr. Mackay; it's modern art; it's meant to help me reflect on my misguided ways...

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Installing disks is basically LEGO, right? This admin failed LEGO

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: HTFU?

I found "Hurry the FU", but couldn't see how that applied...

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Anonymous Blowhard
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HTFU?

Did you mean STFU?

Also, it must have been a pretty crappy server chassis if the idiot was able to fit the drives into the caddies the wrong way around; most caddies have a securing mechanism that locks into the screw holes of the drive (either regular screws or pins from a quick-release mechanism) and the holes in the drive are asymmetrical front-to-back so you can't put the disk in the wrong way around.

Maybe the "server expert" drilled his own holes for his "special" drives?

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Revealed: Web servers used by disk-nuking Shamoon cyberweapon

Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Disttrack.

"Mishaps/fires are commonplace at these facilities."

So no problem heating the popcorn then?

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You know IoT security is bad when libertarians call for strict regulation

Anonymous Blowhard
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"The government can pass a law that will magically stop hacking and will remove all unknown unknowns?"

No, but they can pass laws to make sure companies can't just shrug their shoulders and say "not my problem" when their kit gets hacked.

"Let's face it, IoT will kill the internet. It was fun while it lasted, now it is time for the new generation to move on to the next thing."

The Internet won't be killed, but neither will it be the Wild West any more; governments are going to police some aspects of it and corporations will pay for private security within their own networks.

On the whole, the Internet will get a bit more expensive to cover the cost of "good enough" security. People will pay for security when they get enough pain from the effects of not having it, then individuals will do what they can afford to do - rich people will pay for network security services and poor people will be at the mercy of criminals, same as the physical world.

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Anonymous Blowhard
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Re: Former libertarian

"What happens when you DO get a YES AND they volunteer the information?"

Go shopping?

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High tides: Boffins spy on dolphins baked on poisonous piscines

Anonymous Blowhard
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Seems like it's the Mammals

Long-haired good-for-nothings; the planet's been going downhill since the start of the Cenozoic Era!

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All of Blighty's attack submarines are out of action – report

Anonymous Blowhard
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"Well at least our Trident subs are working, aren't they ?"

The submarines, maybe; the Tridents, maybe not...

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Web-standards-allergic Apple unveils WebGPU, a web graphics standard

Anonymous Blowhard
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"Wasn't Apple actively using Metal a year or two before Vulkan was finalised?"

True, and that also applies to Microsoft, who've been using Direct3D in various incarnations for 20 years.

But, as in a lot of things, the time sometimes comes when it's better to go for interoperability than to try and force users/developers into your "ideal" way of doing things.

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