* Posts by hoola

208 posts • joined 22 Mar 2013

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Amateur astronomer strikes it lucky with first glimpse of a Supernova

hoola

Re: Nova GSi?

I had a used Chevette in the 80's and it was a gem. If you went down a hill, when you put the power back on at the bottom the road would disappear in a huge cloud of smoke. The rear diff sounded like a coffee grinder and the engine had a great knock. That said it refused to die, you just needed plenty of oil (it was like running a two-stroke at times).

It had one redeeming feature, the boot was absolutely massive (it puts most of today's similar sized cars to shame) and would swallow a tuba. two trumpets and a horn, the trombone of the brass quintet had to go inside with the occupants.

Unfortunately it expired on a road in the middle of bugger-all in Wales and was pushed into a ditch so cars could pass!.

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Elon Musk's Tesla burns $675.3m in largest ever quarterly loss

hoola

Trendy Tech losses are acceptable

If this was anything other than an outfit with roots in Silicon Valley it would be dead and buried. This just highlights the insanity of the situation where perfectly viable manufacturing companies get pushed to the wall with far less debt and liabilities than Telsa.

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Insurance companies now telling you what tech to buy with um-missable price signals

hoola

What could possibly go wrong......

Anything like this stinks of back-handers and the associated hospitality. I don't care who the vendors are, it is the same. The fact it just happens to be two large American corporations that believe they should have 100% of the market is a minor detail.

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Bring the people 'beautiful' electric car charging points, calls former transport minister

hoola

Lightening Strikes

Now that would be really efficient as it vapourises all the EVs, hopefully into small enough pieces such that they do. not block the road.

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You publish 20,000 clean patches, but one goes wrong and you're a PC-crippler forever

hoola

So you are quite happy to run unprotected or have some other less good piece of software in its place?

Maybe you should stop using Windows, Intel CPUs, Android, IOS or Windows Mobile....

And so the list goes on.

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Sack the Xerox CEO 'immediately', yell activist investors

hoola

Re: "Activist Investor" is short for...

Spot on, "Active Investor" is just a way of making total scum-bags appear respectable.

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User had no webcam or mic, complained vid conference didn’t work

hoola

Crossed Wires

Many years ago when I was working for the local council I picked up the phone late in the day for the helpdesk as they were short staffed. A heavy West African voice stated he was having a problem closing windows. At this point the council was giving all sorts of manual staff computer access so there were a number of calls with new users.

The call went on along these lines for what seemed at the time to be hours:

"I am having trouble closing windows"

"What are you trying to do?"

"I need to close everything so that I can switch off""

"Ahh, can you find the "Start Button" in the left hand corner"

short pause and heavy breathing - "no, no button there"

"Is there a Windows key" to press"

"No"

"Can just lock it so that it can be sorted out in the morning"

"No, if I could lock it I would have gone home"

Puzzlement on my part, try a different tack

"What can you see?"

"There's no buttons"

Okay, so maybe this is a language problem

"Have you had the problem before, are you a new user"

"It's been a problem ever since you fitted the new double glazing"

Ahh, now we know, scrabble around and try to find out where to put him through to....

Much laughter when the phone call is transferred.

It turned out that the departmental helpdesk number for IT was one digit different to the Housing service helpdesk for residents.

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Court throws out BT's plans to reduce pension rates

hoola

A Corporate Malaise

That is correct and when you then add in the disaster of the Labour/Brown decision to allow a corporate contribution holiday because pension finds had huge surpluses it is not hard to see why we are here. Future liabilities were easy to see and calculate but pressure from shareholders and directors to take more in profit (dividends) won the day.

Then add the second raid when pension funds were taxes (that still has not been reversed). The only way this is going to be rectified (given that it is now far too late) is for these huge companies to charge more for the services they provide. That means we will have to pay more and will further disadvantage then against the likes of Amazon and all the other tech based, venture capital funded, tax-avoiding scum.

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Destroying the city to save the robocar

hoola

Yet more data collection

Autonomous and driverless cars are nothing to do with what the general population want. This is everything to do with large tech companies (and Governments) to get yet more data from the unsuspecting public. This is just the same as Amazon Echo, Google Home and all to an certain extent Microsoft's half baked system. The more tech people blindly use (often with no actual reason other than it is fashionable or cool) the more they can monitorize you.

VW have been giving away a Bluetooth enabled thingy that plugs into the OBD port (there are loads of unofficial ones available already). This connects to you phone and collects all sorts of useful data but in order to use it you have to have a login to Volkswagen. All the data appears to be uploaded, trip information (yes it connects to Google Maps as well) fuel consumption, speed, braking etc.

Nothing comes for free and at the end of the day we appear to have a generation that happily share everything with anyone with no concept that what they are doing is in anyway stupid.

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Ice cliffs found on Mars and NASA says they’re a tap for astronauts

hoola

Ahh. science & Mankind

Can we not do anything without destroying the environment in the name of science? This then becomes commercial and gets even worse.

Mars (as is the moon and quite a few other places) are littered with crap that we sent up and discarded when it has reached the end of its life, broken or failed before it even got there.

How confident can anyone be that sending Cassini with a plutonium power pack into Saturn's upper gas layer has burnt it to a crisp? It has still left (albeit very small) amount of extra-planetary material behind.

I am all for science but it does make a mess and there appears to be little incentive to clear up afterwards.

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Should SANs be patched to fix the Spectre and Meltdown bugs? Er ... yes and no

hoola

Closed until it is not

This is nothing to do with whether they are closed or not but everything to do with performance. All storage vendors, particularly those mentioned are all competing for the last IOP that can be squeezed out. Anything that impact that is bad and whoever does patch will immediately be at a disadvantage.

Does any of this sound familiar? Yes, it is the exact reason we are in this situation in the first place, performance is of greater importance than security.

At some point some clever person will find a way to exploit this (bearing in mind all these products are now connected in some way to the Internet with phone home etc.) and then BANG!!!!

At that point a smaller vendor will probably go pout of business.

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Intel AMT security locks bypassed on corp laptops – fresh research

hoola

Re: Annnnnnd....

And exactly why is this anything to do with Intel? It may be an Intel product but the issue is a human problem. I would hope that any IT team working with AMT would have changed the default password. If they have not then they are morons.

This is just the same as leaving the default password on a router when every router has the same one.

At a corporate level they cannot randomise the initial password easily due the overhead to then commission it.

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US border cops told to stop copying people's files just for the hell of it

hoola

Re: What's the hit rate?

Having had the pleasure of trying to get into the US from the UK recently and being subject to a "You have been randomly selected for a bag search" everything about CBP working practices is a joke.

They are totally paranoid about drugs being brought in yet at the point of searching you are at the mercy of multiple belligerent jobs-worth type throwing their weight around. I had to watch my stuff being rummaged through and swabbed by an official who had not changed his gloves from the previous search as a minimum and dump stuff onto a filthy working area.

How the hell you are supposed to then get out of that if a swab comes up positive I don't know. As with any US officialdom the wisest option is to just do what the ask (order) and try not to piss them off any more, bearing in mind that the starting point appears to be pissed off with everyone.

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UK.gov told: Your frantic farming of pupils' data is getting a little creepy

hoola

This is just the tip of an iceberg

This is just the tip of the iceberg on data collection and the inappropriate use of technology/data. Increasingly schools are using biometric authentication for the highly secure task of paying for food. The schools then tout the bull that no personal information is stored as the fingerprint is turned into a number. They then also fail to tell you that you can opt out.

The kids all have ID cards with a photo on and a chip (probably MiFare) that when they use it shows the picture of the pupil in the system so that the catering staff can see it it the correct person. It does exactly the same with the biometric. The kids hate biometrics because it is slower.

In the case of my kids, the school techy has no idea other than the name of the company providing the service and that it is encrypted.

If you speak to the company they tell you the data is encrypted in a database and no personal information is held (WTF). They cannot even tell you if the servers/service is running in the UK, probably because it is in AWS or Azure at the cheapest rate.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/privacy-concerns-raised-as-more-than-one-million-pupils-are-fingerprinted-in-schools-9034897.html

If you speak to the company that runs the system

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Leftover Synaptics debugger puts a keylogger on HP laptops

hoola

Re: Here's what you need to do...

You have not read the article, it is in the Synaptics software, written by Synaptics, not HP specific. It has been found on HP devices.

"Take any laptop with a Synaptic touch pad and smash it. That will cover most laptops and who is to say that what you replace it with does not have some other hidden gem?

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hoola

Re: YeeeeeeeeeeeeeHAAAAAAWWWWWWWW!!!

It is called Agile and is the reason that so much shite software is produced. Agile is touted as the "must have" methodology" develop. The reality is that it s a piss-poor sorry excuse conjured up by management consultants and highly paid idiots that believe they are developers. The result is constantly changing software that is full of bugs that no one gives a toss about because it has been delivered quickly. They then use the next "sprint" to layer another pile off untested shite on top of what is already there.

As with all these fads some other equally bonkers scheme will come along to improve productivity, responsiveness or profit for someone.

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No, BMW, petrol-engined cars don't 'give back to the environment'

hoola

Range Extender?

What is that supposed to mean? According to the bull an i3 will top out at anything from 90 to 120 miles on a full battery charge.

Does it provide enough power that you can get home at 30mph? No idea, apparently it tops up the battery when it is nearly flat so they you can drive up to 205 miles in total. I suppose that is better than it being stuck waiting for it to charge but totally defeats the zero emissions. It is almost as good as all the stop-start technology that is used in diesels to get the CO2 down but there is a button to turn it off. As with all the hybrids, the real problem is the lack of space. The engine batteries and fuel have to go somewhere.

What I think is really interesting is the comment another contributor made on a similar discussion:

Petrol and diesel are part of the refining process of crude oil. If there is a huge switch to electric, what do you do with the lighter products nobody wants. We are simply nowhere close to reducing the overall oil footprint, if anything it is getting worse. Stopping using the lighter products then creates an immense waste problem where the only realistic option if to probably burn it. The only benefit there is you can burn it at the point of production so the resulting pollution is not in the city, It does bugger all for the CO2, NO problems, and realistically makes it worse. Using it to produce electricity is even more stupid as you then have to huge losses in the energy chain.

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UK.gov failing to prevent £10bn of annual online fraud, say MPs

hoola

All hot air

The really tossers here are the likes of eBay and Amazon who will do anything possible to pass the blame onto someone else and make it "not their problem". Both are full of fake, dodgy or fraudulent listings from far-eastern sellers, none of whom pay any vat. Both companies themselves are masters of tax mitigation to the point that it is taking the micky.

Why is Amazon in particular full of items that are at insane prices other than the system being rigged. The auto-pricing algorithms then push the baseline up and everyone except the customer is a winner. Ebay has similar issues on some items where an item is at a Buy-It-Now price about 1000 times what it should be.

Ultimately the general population don't care less as long as the next purchase arrives at the cheapest possible price. Few can see or care about the long-term consequences and as with all these mega corporations, there is so much lobbying, most traditional businesses are stuffed.

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Brit bank Barclays' Kaspersky Lab diss: It's cyber balkanisation, hiss infosec bods

hoola

All as bad

There is a huge problem here of hysteria and double standards. Every AV product uploads some form of information so that it is possible for the AV companies to understand the threats they are dealing with. Stop information upload and the whole threat response becomes far worse. Yes, Kaspersky should maybe have been more open but all AV products do this.

What really annoys me most is this singling out of Kaspersky in this way. No one except Kaspserky themselves really know, but my assumption is that there will do everything possible to secure that information, as should any other AV company. It is not in their interests to splatter that information to anyone. It is what their intellectual property is derived from, it is commercially sensitive and of great value to competitors.

Kaspersky are not more are risk, and probably are at less risk than the many US (or elsewhere) based outfits that will have no option be to roll over when requested by the NSA. The NSA (and many other US "intelligence outfits) are the biggest group of hypocrites there are and will be doing everything possible to spy on everyone and everything, friend of foe in the name of the "War Against Terror". Given the NSA's abysmal record of securing their own data, frankly I have less trust in uploading metadata to a US company than Kaspersky.

And as for the comment earlier "use Linux instead of Windows", exactly how does that help in this situation? All operating systems are vulnerable and should be managed/protected appropriately. Windows has the greatest use case where it interacts with users and therefore is the most targeted. If Linux, iLO or some other OS had ended up on the desktop, it equally would be the most popular target.

If you chose to run an OS with no protection then you are an idiot and smugly stating that it is a Windows issue is even worse.

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Big Mike is going to make HPE's life a living Dell: Server sales surge

hoola

Re: Anyone mention

And Dell don't have buggy code? The grass is always greener in the other field. Compared to iLO the IDRAC is a waste of space, as for much of the rest, it is an x86 server........ nuff said

Dell are only interested in one thing, that is to buy the market. The do not care about repeat business, only the next punter that is sucked in with the sales spiel.

Who is actually buying these servers? All the numbers suggest is that one of the big cloud providers has just furnished their latest bit barn with Dell as this time it was the cheapest.

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Dark fibre arts: Ofcom is determined to open up BT's network

hoola

Pot Kettle & Black

And what about the shambles where Virgin are digging up all the pavements, burying a fibre 6" under and vaguely putting it back.

Why ate they not being "forced" to open up the network?

BT may not be perfect, but like Royal Mail do have a universal service obligation. Push that onto Virgin and see where you get. Competition is only competition if it is equal. Currently all the "new" private companies are only interested in the profit making urban areas. Telecomms, parcels & letters. This leaves diminishing profits for the former public services that are still bound by regulation that do not apply to others.

I am sure Virgin will be only too happy to permit a newcomer to the market use their fibre and cable infrastructure, probably at below cost.

Ofcom are a total waste of space and are incapable of looking at anything other than BT/Royal Mail. There will be a truck full of lobbying in the background from Virgin, Deutche Post, UPS and they are all as bad.

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Activist investor rages at Mellanox for dismissing Marvell's advances

hoola

Active Investor

In other words, another bunch of self-serving greed shites that are just out to get everything the can in the short-term and bugger the consequences.

Calling them "Active Investors" makes it sound respectable. Just like Elliott, they are total and utter shites with no morals and simply do not care what the outcome is,

Just like hedge-funds managers, they should all be locked up as these people are the cause of so many problems it is no true

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Possible cut to British F-35 order considered before Parliament

hoola

Re: Still not too late

I don't know all the costs, but some of the missiles are awfully expensive. Couldn't they just put a web cam, a few servos and an action man in the cockpit and go for a one-way trip. These is so much electronics anyway you probably don't even need the remote control. You need less fuel, don't care if it buggers up the airframe too much on take off as long as it flies and have no landing issues. At the moment the best use appears to be to put a trebuchet on the deck and lob the aircraft and or missiles at your opponent. No pilot training and minimal fuel required, just enough to make a nice bang!

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London mayor: Self-driving cars? Not without jacked-up taxes, you don't!

hoola

EV & Driverless

There appears to be two confused threads here. Is a driverless vehicle automatically an electric vehicle? The real issue is the greater adoption of electric vehicles simply moves the pollution from the point of use to point of generation. There is insufficient generation capacity as it is to support large scale electric vehicle adoption and unfortunately, the quickest and cheapest way to add capacity is to build a gas powered plant. Worse is that there is never going to be renewable generation capacity to provide the energy required for large-scale EV use. There has to be shift from the current view that electric vehicles are in any way green. They are not, and in many ways have a carbon/natural resource footprint over the designed lifespan that is far worse than conventional vehicles. This is all about certain, currently niche pseudo tech companies, lobbying governments to get their piece of the pie at the tax-payers expense. What electric vehicles are very good at is moving pollution to places where people are unaware/don't care/NIMBY.

I am all for electric vehicles but the range and charging limitations simply do not make them viable as an only vehicle. In order to sort both out there has to be a step change in battery technology to support greater capacity and faster charge times or the battery has to be a leased item that is swapped. Fast charge and higher energy densities come with many problems that are currently being buried because it is inconvenient. The sorts of currents required to fast charge are surrounded by miles of red tape safety regulations. If you reduce the current you have to increase the voltage which then has equal limitations. Petrol and especially diesel do not spontaneously combust and if a pump host is damaged it is very obvious and the margin for error in putting the nozzle into the tank is huge. Also, and this is hugely important, someone is ALWAYS in attendance during the filling process.

Compare that with a cable, it is much more difficult to detect damage that causes heating/fire and the plug/socket interface has to clean, fully connected and low resistance every time. If it is not then it is a huge fire hazard and the process is designed to be left unattended.

High power DC supplies can do immense amounts of damage as the internal resistance of the batteries is so low that current is almost unlimited. Even a 12v car battery can melt/weld a piece of steel.

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Tesla launches electric truck it guarantees won't break for a million miles

hoola

Re: Tesla semi?

Just how the hell do you put overhead lines on motorways or any road? This is completely arse about face, the challenge to solve is getting the high-mileage done on rail with the distribution point in one of these huge warehouse estates that keep being built. You are already splitting the load at this point, so there is limited additional handling.

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UK private sector joins public in... Escape from DXC Max

hoola

Ah, the Azure Snake Oil.....

"We missed a trick with them," our DXC insider said. "They basically worked out they could do something better with Microsoft Azure and HCL. They came in with a better proposition and [Centrica's] CIO wanted to do something more cloud-based and sexier."

There lies the answer, Microsoft have been in targeting the C level offices and have promised the earth with Azure. It will, of course end in tears and be all down to the technical staff being anti-cloud etc. Based on my experience, this is a common pattern with MS, the resulting mess, usually linked with Agile, would be totally unacceptable if it occurred on-prem. I just find it totally baffling that because something is in the cloud, working practices are accepted that would result in staff being disciplined if they did it on-prem.

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Munich council: To hell with Linux, we're going full Windows in 2020

hoola

Virtualised WIndows

And therein lies the totally fallacy of the advocates of Linux. As soon as your workaround to get an application to work is to install a virtualised copy of Windows you are in a far worse situation. You now have 2 operating systems to support (yes, Linux DOES need managing and patching, particularly at scale) and users who have no concept of virtualisation. Why the hell should a user understand what a virtual windows OS is? They just want to do their work and could not give a stuff about the underlying OS. The options of botched alternatives that only half work and every thing that is then sent out has stuffed up formatting is just not acceptable. Most commentators here are IT Professionals who are happy to spend time making things work. The average user is not and has no interest in trying to make things work. If the Linux zealots are so keen to push Open Source then the only viable option is Apple. That then brings an equal set of problems as it cannot be managed easily at scale and is a serious pain in the arse on any corporate system.

Just endlessly bleating how good Linux Mint or whatever your favourite distribution is will not change things. In order to become mainstream there needs to be a single, consistent GUI and distribution, sort out all the dependency problems and having to compile things to get them to work and you might get somewhere. The only way this will happen is the distribution is commercial and then you have gone full circle. There might be different versions of Windows but that is no different to the Linux versions within a distribution. What Windows has never had is the varying distributions that mean nothing quite works as you expect it to within a major release.

At that point you have a single monopoly controlling the OS, licencing and pricing. We have now gone full circle........

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Car trouble: Keyless and lockless is no match for brainless

hoola

Ford Escort Van

Fro a week I had a Ford Escort van as a replacement whilst the regular vehicle had the front brakes replaced at a central maintenance facility. The loan pool van required 3 different keys to operate it (I never found out how to open the passenger door from the outside). This was all low-tech traditional turn the key to unlock it, no electronics. The one feature that it did have was an alarm. This used to go off randomly at all sorts of inconvenient times and you could only reset it by taking the key out of the ignition and pressing the butting on the zapper. On one occasions I took the key whilst going along on a straight road, to discover that said van pulled to one side and in correcting the drift, the steering promptly locked. Logic suggests that the best option is to brake to fix the lack of steering in a controlled manner, what actually happened was a huge panic trying to get the bloody key back in the ignition so I could steer again. Of course with the engine stopped you only get one shot at the brakes with the servo, given that they were crap anyway and you had to near enough stand up in the seat, this led to a major brown-trouser moment......

Fen roads, straight for miles with a huge ditch either side.

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Knock, knock? Oh, no one there? No problem, Amazon will let itself in via your IoT smart lock

hoola

Re: I must be in the "Beta" programme

Where this will score, just like all the other social media Internet shite is the generation that believe everything tech is great and do not have any concerns about privacy or the stupidity of what they do.

How often so those idiots post when and where they are going away?

The down side is that it is always someone else's fault or responsibility. The whole Amazon thing is just another addiction with big profits at the top of the money tree, bugger all at the bottom and an endless supply of buyers hitting "Buy".

Quite how your insurance company will assess this when you inevitably get burgled with no broken door or window because the crap lock has been hacked or left open.

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UK financial regulator confirms it is probing Equifax mega-breach

hoola

Closing The Stable Door After the Horse Has Bolted

The trouble with all this stuff about "working with the regulator" and "learning lessons" is that the crucial data has already gone. It cannot be got back, it is now out there forever. The only way to improve this is for huge fines, removing directors (no golden handshakes) and stopping licences to operate.

With all theses "one-off" breaches that keep happening there cannot be much left that is secure.

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HMRC's switch to AWS killed a small UK cloud business

hoola

No different from the Supermarkets

This is just the same as the supermarkets. Use a small supplier who then invests to support the new business only to have it ripped from under then with minimal notice.

Hundreds of smaller manufacturers and business have folded for this very reason. What is really hypocritical is that in the supermarket arena, the Government has a Select Committee specifically looking at this sort of practice. The fact that they are using an outfit that deliberately does everything possible to avoid paying tax is just typical. The whole G-Cloud and everything else around public sector procurement was supposed to encourage smaller players. This is then what you get for using the very system that the Government is trying to support.

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GE goes with Apple: Not the Transformation you were looking for, Satya?

hoola

And thie missing information?

How is the desktop used & delivered, if it is RDP, Citrix or Virtual Desktop the end user device is more or less irrelevant.

Non-story.

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Screw the badgers! Irish High Court dismisses Apple bit barn appeals

hoola

Facts and figures

I have not checked but 500 acres is a huge site, what are the using, mini racks 10U high with room to drive a truck through the gaps.

What this shows is just how much big business can do to sweet-talk politicians and planners. A small number of temporary construction jobs and then a (very) limited number of permanent is really pushing the economic benefits. Every time one of these big distribution centres or data centres comes up jobs is the big card that is used. The reality is that there are bugger all people in them, and those that are will not be that highly paid. Again, I don't know about this one but if you take the distribution centre, why the hell are they not forced to put solar roofs on them. We then have the total insanity of farmland being covered up by solar panels because the subsidies make it worthwhile.

All big businesses are doing everything possible to shaft anyone and everyone who is not part of the club. At some point the wheels will fall off and it will collapse. The trouble is that the arses in the club will all have their money and will not give a stuff, leaving the general public to pick the mess up.

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'There has never been a right to absolute privacy' – US Deputy AG slams 'warrant-proof' crypto

hoola

Re: Encryption..has borked that balance..rendering ineffective the..force to back up a legal warrant

Yes and here is the real difference, in a supposedly civilised society you cannot beat the shit out of someone (physically, mentally or chemically) to get the key. You can chuck them in jail but the likelihood is that is a minor inconvenience to them if it as a genuine major crime. I don't know what the tariffs are for failing to provide information to the relevant authorities with a court order, but it is probably a lot less that 20 years in the clink.

I am sure there is always some agency somewhere but in the end it would simply turn into another scandal. In less fussy countries those unfortunate enough to not hand over an encryption key will simply disappear after a lot of effort has been expended.

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Azure fell over for 7 hours in Europe because someone accidentally set off the fire extinguishers

hoola

Re: The insane thing about it is...

And you don't have to do any of that in O365?

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hoola

Double Standards

Every time there is some cock up with Azure Microsoft give a load of pathetic assurances that it will not happen again and they are always improving. Based on what we experienced in very specific circumstances there was data loss on a VM.

If this or even a far more minor event (a single VM host falling over) had happened in our data centre there would have been people screaming from the rooftops. But this this, because it is in Azure is just accepted, not even a whisper from upstairs.

On site is constantly under scrutiny and has to provide a far better service and then there are complaints about the cost.

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Guntree v Gumtree: Nominet orders gun ads site must lose domain

hoola

Hmm, unbiased then....

As usual the big business, big money and big lawyers prevail.

When did eBay and Gumtree become one? I had noticed the high number of eBay listings that appeared in a Gumtree search and just assumed it was doing generic eBay searches through a proxy,

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Musk: Come ride my Big F**king Rocket to Mars

hoola

So what

So far we have littered the Moon, with plastic bags and bits of lander. Mars has had allsorts of stuff dumped on it, along with all the other junk in space in the name of science and now Musk thinks it is a good idea to put 100 meatbags in a giant rocket. I supposed on the plus side that is 100 less rich idiots around when they get incinerated on takeoff. landing or suffocated when something goes wrong a the far end.

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Is this cough cancer, doc? No: it's a case of Playmobil on the lung

hoola

Re: True Story

That was an awesome Corgi car, it had I think 6 or 8 cones, 3 signs, opening doors and rear. I had a collection of police vehicles, the Rang Rover, a Land Rover, 2 minis and I think a Ford Escort that may have had working headlights or flasher.

Surprisingly, a few weeks ago I found the box of cars, looking a bit sadder than I remember in the loft, traffic cones included.

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Firemen fund sues Uber for dousing shares with gas, tossing in a match

hoola

And yet

And yet, they continue to makes losses which means they are still able to borrow money. Or more likely the equally scumbag Hedge Fund/Venture Capitalists who are from the same crap filled pond think they can make money.

If this was not a Silicon Valley Ponzi scheme it would have been a failure years ago.

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The award for worst ISP goes to... it starts with Talk and ends with Talk

hoola

OpenReach

My experience of PlusNet/OpenReach has only been good. The fibre connecting at around 65MB started to drop out. Finally contacted PlusNet support (now there is a challenge, phone only so pick your time otherwise you hang one for hours). Usual guff about the router, cabling etc (they could tell I was not using their Technicolor piece of crap) and the engineer rings the next day to check if anyone was in. He then spent 3 hours between the cabinet/exchange/house sorting out water in the manhole in the road and a faulty switch port at the exchange. He also replaced the internal master socket "just to be safe". It now connects at 70MB down and 20MB up on an FritzBox router.

My only complaint is the lunacy of PlusNet's call system, why you cannot open a ticket online just is beyond me.

Similarly BT/OpenReach recently had to replace an entire cabinet because some plonker parked their car on it, wiping out phone & broadband for quite a few houses. Within 6 hours phone was restored along with dodgy broadband. We all new the broadband was a bodge but 3 days later a completely new cabinet goes in and it is fixed.

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Brit broke anti-terror law by refusing to cough up passwords to cops

hoola

Being a smart-arse

The issue with much of the advice given here is that ultimately, if the security people do believe that you are hiding something because you have tried to be clever, you are in a much worse position. Whilst I do not necessarily agree that one should hand over passwords or unlock a device when requested, sometimes acquiescing to the request is a bloody sight simpler and safer than not.

If you have a work laptop full of confidential material, then the likelihood is that they are not interested anyway. If you are working for EDF at Hinckley Point and travelling to Iran then you probably should be of interest, likewise on return.

It is all about the risk profile, put more markers up and the interest mount exponentially.

Get your down votes ready but this is the reality. Bluster on a forum can look good but when you are there, being asked questions by security people, unless you have something to hide, co-operation can go a long way.

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Equifax's disastrous Struts patching blunder: THOUSANDS of other orgs did it too

hoola

Re: What a sad state of mind

What is happening is that so much of the data has been lifted by these miscreants, that it is reaching the point that there is very little personal information that cannot bought or found.

What I just don't understand is why we have reached the state that so much of this is on publically accessible networks.

Oh, that is it "Convenience" and the fact that the fines and responsibility for the people at the top mean nothing. Automatic custodial sentence for the execs would focus the mind, along with all the relevant licences the company needs to operate being withdrawn. Add an immediate cease and desist on their service provision so that impact is instant would help.

But of course, all that would happen is the incidents would never be reported. This is a no-win situation whatever you do with the only losers being those who have had the data stolen, i.e the general public.

0
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Boffins discover tightest black hole binary system – and it's supermassive

hoola

As another example of just how bonkers space can be, the Crab nebular has a Pulsar at its centre, rotating every 33ms. Just how something that big can rotate so quickly is just incredible.

Of cause it could just be a little green being with a very powerful laser and a Raspberry Pi experimenting and having fun out in space.

1
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Manchester plod still running 1,500 Windows XP machines

hoola

FOI Requests

And this is the nub of everything, the stupidity of the Freedom of Information Act that allows these sorts of pointless requests. The Act is so misused it is not true. There is an entire industry around extracting commercial information from public bodies to sell on.

Just Google this name to see how it is abused

Francios Charles freedom of information

0
1

Microsoft Office 365 Exchange issues for users across Europe

hoola

Re: Or you could have the actual information

What is so strange about this whole "cloud" thing is that it can be broken and nobody in the C-suite appears to give a toss. If the same thing happened on-prem then everyone would be running around like blue-arsed flies wanting it fixed.

The disparity between what is acceptable on-prem and in the cloud given that they are supposed to be delivering the same service is an indication of the skill of the cloudy sale people at selling snake oil.

1
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Massive iPhone X leak trashes Apple's 10th anniversary circus

hoola

Re: I've never spent more then 75 quid on a phone ...

Ahh, the MR1, if you bought the "high capacity " battery it may have even lasted into the evening. Trouble was that is you could fit enough of it into your pocket, your trousers fell down. Also the battery clip was the most ill-conceived piece of shite you could imagine. If you dropped the phone, the clip would break leaving the batter free to slide off (double sided tape was the fix). At least it was the battery that broke.

Other than that the thing was indestructible, I found my old one in the loft and my kids played with it for years when they were little with out smashing it. Give a two year old a modern phone and it will be a source of shards of glass in minutes, particularly as its only use is to hit things with as there are no buttons or flappy bits!

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hoola

Re: £1,000 for a phone

What a biased and twisted view

"So we're back to "they copied me, waaah, it's a rectangle with rounded corners and a screen on it". There's far closer clones to the iPhone X such as most Huawei devices"

How the hell can existing devices be copies of something that has not even been launched. Almost every feature on this expensive candy bar has been on other manufactures phones for years.

Just who is copying who, or to be more precise, who is just following the trend set by more dynamic companies?

Me thinks Apple are doing a lot of following here.

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Red panic: Best Buy yanks Kaspersky antivirus from shelves

hoola

Who has most to lose?

I would have thought that a growing boycott of software and tech products would hurt the US far more than anyone else. There are plenty of other companies out that that will fill the void. More to the point they will fill it permanently. The likes of Huawei would jump at the chance of replacing Dell, HPe, SuperMicro. It is irrelevant where the kit is manufactured as the profits are ultimately in the US and the are US companies/. The US could lose substantially, particularly if China not only joins a boycott but actively pushes alternatives.

1
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Sony remembers it once made a great little phone

hoola

Re: OS Updates

I have had a Sony Z5 for a while now and it is just awesome. On the case from a CaseMate Tough Case has protected the phone well after numerous drops onto hard floors, concrete etc. If the first contact point of screen is a small point (small stone etc) when you drop it then invariably the screen will crack. The exception to this based on experience with an HTC One M7 is if you have one of the semi-flexible Air-Glass protectors from Brotect.

On the updates front I cannot complain. It came with 5.x and had received OTA updates through 6.x and is currently at 7.1.1. Even an ancient Z2 tablet has been updated OTA to 6.x. This is far better than many suppliers. My daughter's Z5 compact is the same. From a performance perspective the Compact cannot be faulted. This is in the same CaseMate case and has survived being used by a teenager.

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