* Posts by Down not across

977 posts • joined 21 Mar 2013

Page:

Intel redesigns flawed Atom CPUs to stave off premature chip death

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: So what exactly have they done inside and what will be the consequences?

So its not likely to be "We'd like n new chips, please." Rather "ARRRAGH - you barstewards - you've borked the pinouts. We'll need n new boards as well"

I read it more as being the case of "we'd like new chips please", unless you were using the LPC pins as GPIO in which case you would need to do a redesign given you'll be needing additional logic for the functionaliity you needed the GPIO for.

0
0

FTP becoming Forgotten Transfer Protocol as Debian turns it off

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: FTP ...... ah the memories......

Which reminds me ... I still use UUCP in a few places, mostly to transport email within corporations,

I still remember my bangpath email address. That was before there was any commercial internet.

1
0

Don't install our buggy Windows 10 Creators Update, begs Microsoft

Down not across
Bronze badge
Coat

Re: They rushed it....

Originally this was supposed to be "v1704".

Is that Bismark or Furious ...or maybe Yorktown?

0
0

Hyundai app security blunder allowed crooks to 'steal victims' cars'

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: Next car I buy

If enough people did, the place would end up looking like Havana.

And the problem is? I'd have no issue having a nice '55-57 Bel Air or Nomad as a daily driver. Or maybe a '58 Bonneville.

0
0

Dark times for OmniOS – an Oracle-free open-source Solaris project

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: It was designed to fail

The only odd thing with Sun Solaris was that if you switched off the console the whole system shutdown. (the Lego Sun hardware)

Not quite. More a case of lego terminal that sends break when you turn it off.

0
0

systemd-free Devuan Linux hits version 1.0.0

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: Cat among the pigions but...

Things like systemd and Network Manager that are added for desktop convenience cause serious problems when they're shoehorned onto servers.

NetworkManager should be burned on a stake. Twice. Then nuked from orbit. It has absolutely no place on a server. For some reason CentOS insists on it and you have to waste time kicking it back under the rock it crawled from.

13
0
Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: It's not infighting

OMG. And Pottering's response is particularly priceless, too, demonstrating both his ignorance and hubris in one succinct piece of prose: erasing the entire filesystem is "not much of a problem", and "this is a unix problem" (it isn't, as pointed out by multiple other commenters).

That is just pure Poettering. As is his reaction to comments pointing out his ignorance:

@poettering poettering locked and limited conversation to collaborators Apr 17, 2017

PulseAudio. systemd.

Each to their own, but I've seen enough that I won't touch any software that has anything to do with Poettering. Kind of like "Once is a chance, twice is coincidence, third time..."

None of my Linux boxen have systemd (yes, I tried it, it can burn in hell). Luckily Centos 6 and Jessie are (or can easily be) systemd free. Looks like its time to give Devuan a try.

29
2

Half-baked security: Hackers can hijack your smart Aga oven 'with a text message'

Down not across
Bronze badge

@kain

<pedant>The connector in that picture is DE-15, not DB-15</pedant>

The only kit ever I recall using DE-15 for serial communications were early Macintoshes that used it for RS-422 (yes, it is possible for it to operate as RS-232) before they went with the 8-pin Mini DIN.

Rather obscure one, so points to OP for picking one that tripped my memory up. :)

0
0
Down not across
Bronze badge

Tut tut, USB port on an AGA?, surely a 15 pin RS232 would be more in keeping with the ambience.

15? Surely you mean 25-pin. Or did you mean the new fangled 9-pin?

3
0

Microsoft raises pistol, pulls the trigger on Windows 7, 8 updates for new Intel, AMD chips

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: Stupid

But for those stuck with Windows-ONLY software (that isn't WINE-friendly), they're kinda stuck, you know? Microsoft figures they've got a captive market...

For now.

The more Microsoft does these kinds of shenanigans, the more people will defect even if it means forgoing some windows-only software.

Eventually we might get to the point where vendors responsible for said software see the market share starting to shrink sufficiently that they will be forced to start offering non-windows versions if they want to stay in business.

4
0

Intel's buggy Puma 6 chipset earns Arris a gigabit-modem lawsuit

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: lawyer: I just made a bazillion bucks

Here's a tip, just use the cable modem that your ISP gave you. There are no secret tricks to getting proper bandwidth, aside from moving to somewhere other than the US....

You mean like in UK where with VM you do NOT have a choice? You can only use their supplied cable modem which if you're unlucky could be Arris based on Puma 6.

1
0

Facebook's 'delightful' AI Clippy the Paperclip creeps into Messenger

Down not across
Bronze badge
Happy

Salmon Days

Is it just me or was the headline picture lifted (or very similar) to Salmon Days clippy episode?

2
0

Bankers to get 1Gbps free Wi-Fi in City of London deal

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: Question

If it's 4G how do you connect? Wouldn't this require a SIM?

Err...with your phone? Yes you would have your normal SIM in it.

I presume, since the article says joint venture between Vodafone and Telefonica, that coverage for Vodafone and O2 should be very good. Users of other operators are unlikely to see benefit unless they start offering domestic roaming.

0
1
Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: Is that

CTIL will build 4G mobile small cells, which will be housed in lampposts, street signs, buildings and CCTV columns to provide enhanced mobile coverage at street level, as well as installing a Wi-Fi network which will be free for the public to use.

The article suggests both.

5
0

Microsoft's new hardware: eight x86 cores, 40 GPU cores

Down not across
Bronze badge

XBONE HDMI Passthrough

Xbox Ones can do HDMI passthrough. Will the Scorpio be able to do 4K HDMI passthrough, meaning it can go between the Sky box and the TV?

Annoyingly XBONE's HDMI passthrough only works if the console is on. What bright eejit came up with that stupidity?

I certainly hope they fix that annoyance on Scorpio (if it will have HDMI passthrough).

0
0

Drone complaints to cops are up twelvefold in three years

Down not across
Bronze badge

Pointless proposals

British proposals for tackling drone misuse potentially include mandatory registration of new devices and new criminal offences for misuse...

And how is that going to help? Any responsible person will be just as responsible as before. The less responsible ones just won't bother registering.

2
0

Silver Lake and Broadcom bid $18bn for Tosh memory biz

Down not across
Bronze badge

Silver Lake

We can add the pairing of Silver Lake and Broadcom to the ten bidders for part or while stakes in Toshiba’s memory business.

Isn't Toshiba in sorry enough state already for SL to try to load more debt onto it?

0
0

Franken-firm DXC Technology is born today, the fun begins...

Down not across
Bronze badge

employee briefing

At 2pm, Victoria will stage another “employee briefing where we will watch a video message from Nick Wilson, Mike Lawrie (CEO), a brand video AND there’ll be a live link to the New York Stock Exchange at 2.30pm to see in the official launch of DXC”.

That sounds like perfect opportunity to announce further reductions and watch its effect on share price.

No, of course I wouldn't wish that on the poor souls working there, but past form and all that.

0
0

Y'know CSS was to kill off HTML table layout? Well, second time's a charm: Meet CSS Grid

Down not across
Bronze badge

@Charlie Clark

From that page:

It’s an old saw that email design is stuck in the past. For the longest time, developers have been forced to revisit coding techniques that were dated even back in the early 2000s if they wanted to build an HTML email campaign. Locked into table-based layouts and reliant on inline styles, most developers refused to believe that email could do anything more than look serviceable and deliver some basic content to subscribers.

For a few email developers, though, frustrating constraints became inspiring challenges and the catalyst for a variety of paradigm-shifting techniques.

Aaargh! Yes I stopped reading at that point before violent tendencies (towards the, in this case, fairly innocent computer) got out of hand.

It being World Backup Day, can't we just restore to when email was just plain text.

5
0

Samizdat no more: Old Unix source code opened for study

Down not across
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: All the old UNIX source code you can eat...

For an interesting take on the un*x theme, check out Coherent:

ftp://www.tuhs.org/UnixArchive/Distributions/Other/Coherent

I remember that. It was quite reasonably priced at the time (around mid eighties) and IIRC I ran that on 286. It worked very well and I later ported some stuff onto CTIX on Convergent MiniFrame/MegaFrame.

Here Robert, have a pint.

0
0

Samsung Galaxy S8: Slimmer bezels, a desktop mode – and yet another me-too AI pal

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: Fingerprint scanner - why so many complaints?

Because, for example for me, it is in the wrong place. I prefer it on the front.

You, and most (if you say so) might not use it but I did, and it worked a treat on the Note 7.

Iris recognition is less great if you wear glasses or are a person who suffers from seizures or epileptic symptoms. Can't speak for S8, but in Note 7 fingerprint wasn't "just for 3rd party apps" but was one of several authentication methods for unlocking the phone.

0
0
Down not across
Bronze badge

Ok so now we know

Presumably Note8 (or whatever they will call it given the clash with names) will be similar (as in same way as in the past Note n has been to Galaxy Sn) and released later in the year. To be fair I think I'd rather have one of the refurb Note 7s thank you.

Whilst fingerprint sensor at the back is undoubtedly handy for single handed operation, I'd rather keep the physical home button and the fingerprint sensor on that.

And I don't want some annoying "digital assistant" thank you very much.

0
0

'Trash-80' escapes the dustbin of history with new TRS-80 emulator

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: Dragon 32

Yes a clone of the later Tandy Color (sic) computer ... 6809 cpu IIRC.

Best of all (just IMHO of course) you could get OS-9 for it.

0
0

Cheap, flimsy, breakable and replaceable – yup, Ikea, you'll be right at home in the IoT world

Down not across
Bronze badge

BA vs ES

(only drawback is they only sell screw not bayonet fixing)

Personally I wouldn't see that as a drawback. Especially since E27 bulbs are quite widely available in UK. Even supermarkets stock them if you need one in an emergency.

I've never seen a wobbly/loose E27 socket, whereas same can't be said for the B22d. Seems even more evident when comparing E14 and BA15d. No doubt this is mostly due to some manufacturers using cheap crap sockets/mounts and BA seems to suffer more than ES.

0
0

Why do GUIs jump around like a demented terrier while starting up? Am I on my own?

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: Adobe Reader... + Memories of Ashton Tate

Ah, I remember using dBase II (IIRC) on CP/M 2.2. It worked remarkably well at the time.

Yes, dBase suffered the unfortunately common phenomon of software reaching its peak and then getting worse until no longer useful.

Higher version is not always better.

1
0
Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: CP/M?

Bdos Err on B: Bad Sector

1
0

Now UK bans carry-on lappies, phones, slabs on flights from six nations amid bomb fears

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: Checked in luggage

Yes, but if your goal is to terrorize people, depressurizing a cargo hold (or starting a fire there) isn't nearly as spectacular as depressurizing a cabin full of people.

Explosive decompression of the cargo hold is unlikely to stay limited to the cargo hold.

1
1

'Sorry, I've forgotten my decryption password' is contempt of court, pal – US appeal judges

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: I guess that means it's time to add a time component to the encryption

There's a secondary issue: how do you tell the difference between an encrypted disc and one full of random numbers? Or one containing two encrypted partitions, one of which is completely innocent?

I don't think you can (without having the password and therefore being able to decryp and mount). Not reliably anyway.

With two partitions, presence of one known encrypted partition (confirmed by it being decrypted by the provided password) might raise suspicion of any other partitions on the disk being also encrypted.

Possibly better option would be TC's hidden volumes (within a parent volume). Even then a keen eyed observer might get suspicious with discrepancy between apparent used vs free space.

There are of course various other ways presence of hidden volume might be revealed.

0
0
Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: I guess that means it's time to add a time component to the encryption

No successful logins after X days means the key is destroyed and the data cannot be recovered.

Or another password, that will destroy data (wipe or re-encrypt with random key).

Although for forensic investigation all the work would be happening on a copy rather than original so it would be fairly easy to spot what happened. End result would likely be in contempt anyway.

0
0

BlackBerry admits dying BB10 is in pain

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: Support for Blackberry

Sorry no. I hope they (Whatsapp) burn in hell. The way they slurp contacts without those contacts' permission is unforgivable.

3
0
Down not across
Bronze badge

Link (and their other sync tool too) is the sorriest POS excuse for software I've seen yet.

You've not seen Samsung's Kies then?

0
0

The world's leading privacy pros talk GDPR with El Reg

Down not across
Bronze badge

Data transfers

“We're part of the information economy now, and the data transfers between Europe and the United States are so incredibly important we simply cannot abide by not allowing these data transfers to occur.”

Oh yes we can.

3
0

Linux, not Microsoft, the real winner of Windows Server on ARM

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: Well said!

now only if some of this lovely ARM Server H/W was available to us mere mortals at prices that were compatible to i5/i7 systems and off the shelf. That may be sometime coming though.

Quite. I'd love to get my hands on few Cavium ThunderX2 boxes/boards to replace some aging x86 stuff with. At the moment the only realistic options for reducing power consumption are either crappy Atom (for some very light non-memory intensive workloads) or low power i5/i7 (or perhaps Naples, depending what AMD comes up with). Given a choice I'd opt for the Cavium over the others, given the goodies in the SoC.

2
0

Hell freezes over: We wrote an El Reg chatbot using Microsoft's AI

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: This was first done around 1980

Or few lines of tcl for an eggdrop bot on IRC. There were some fairly clever ones back in the day.

3
0

User jams up PC. Literally. No, we don't know which flavour

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: Good design my a***

Why?? I'll rephrase that. No I won't. Why?? The laptop is useless without wifi!

Ever tried to use a corporate laptop that tries to contact DC and bunch of other services, before you have had chance to login to VPN to make them available?

Being able to turn wifi off means windows (no, linux is often not an option on corporate machines) will complete login/resume from sleep in few seconds instead of spending several minutes trying to connect somewhere being utterly unresponsive until it finally gives up.

Just because you have no need for it doesn't mean others might not find it very useful or even necessary.

5
0
Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: Turbo Button

Turbo buttons should've been called snail buttons.

That is actually a valid point. In non-turbo mode the CPU would be clocked at 4.77 MHz and in turbo mode it would be usually around 8-10MHz. Wasn't just for gamed though. IIRC some ISA cards didn't always play nice with higher clock speeds, which was probably more due to bad implementation by some motherboards.

1
0
Down not across
Bronze badge

2-digit 7-segment display

Ah those wonderful Turbo buttons with a 2 digit 7 segment display that was set just with a jumper board.

I used to (sometimes) wire those via a little homebrew logic to the ISA bus to watch POST codes as the machine was (or not, as often could be the case) coming up.

Given it was not particularly great deal of effort, I was somewhat surprised no case/computer manufacturer never (that I remeber) offered that as an option.

1
0

Ubiquiti network gear can be 'hijacked by an evil URL' – thanks to its 20-year-old PHP build

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: Pay peanuts

You say that as if Cisco etc have never had a stupid vulnerability or "feature" like being able to rewrite the firmware remotely without authentication...

Ok I bite.

I take you're referring to the Smart Install (yes, I agree in principle that most things named Smart something rarely are). Whilst I agree that the feature (I don't agree it being called a vulnerability since the behaviour and risk is well documented in Cisco's documentation) could no doubt benefit from additional security features, we are in the end talking about an enterprise feature which presumably is being used by qualified personnel.

Here is an excerpt from the doc linked to above:

The absence of an authorization or authentication mechanism in the Smart Install protocol between the client and the director can allow a client to process crafted Smart Install messages as if these messages were from the Smart Install Director. These include the following:

* Change the TFTP server address on Smart Install clients.

* Copy the startup configuration of client switches to the previously-changed and attacker-controlled TFTP server.

* Substitute the startup configuration of clients with a configuration created by the attacker, and forcing a reload of the clients after a configured time interval.

* Upgrade the IOS image on client switches to an image supplied by the attacker.

Execute arbitrary commands on client switches (applicable to Cisco IOS Release 15.2(2)E and later releases and Cisco IOS XE Release 3.6.0E and later releases.)

While designing a Smart Install architecture, care should be taken such that the infrastructure IP address space is not accessible to untrusted parties. Design considerations are listed in the Security Best Practices section of this document.

Let's face it, if you using this feature to provision kit into your network, why would you NOT add the no vstack into the config you push to new device?

0
0
Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: 20 year old PHP implementation?

I have no qualms still using csh on Solaris 2.5(?), which would be about 20 years old by now I'd have thought.

I do. I wouldn't have any issue of using sh though.

Not trying to start one of the oldest flamewars, just that I never liked c-shell.

0
0

FreeNAS sheds storage skin, tries on sexier hyperconverged garb

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: Increased capability comes at a cost

Extra unneeded capability is not a benefit, no matter what iXSystem's roadmap says.

Quite.

After the splitTM, I was slightly torn as to which one to choose when it was time to upgrade from old trusty freenas 0.7.2. In the end, despite the lure of the plugins, I chose nas4free and it has performed impeccably. My old Microserver with 8GB RAM and intel pcie nic has not missed a beat. To my surprise it even imported old 0.7.2 mirrored volume, now of course long gone and copied over to new ZFS pool.

I think what iXSystems has done with FreeNAS is great and intend to give the new one a whirl to test, but for pure storage purposes nas4free has been flawless and I have no intention to retire that anytime soon.

2
0

Naming computers endangers privacy, say 'Net standards boffins

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: “Kellyanne's_Microwave_Oven”

Might have to use that as an SSID next time I get bored.

0
0

Monday muster point for storage news. Get in here now if juggling terabytes is your trade

Down not across
Bronze badge
Thumb Up

ioSafe

Colour me impressed. Digging fully working storage (or at least drives) from remains of a burnt down building is impressive.

0
0

Tim Berners-Lee says privacy needs fixing – and calls for 'algorithmic transparency'

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: "Control of personal data"

And that is as it should be. If you don't like those companies, don't use their services (I only use Uber in that list).

If it only was that simple. However it is not always up to you. For example: I don't use WhatsApp, but if anyone, who has my contact details in their phone does, my information ends up in WhatsApp's trove. I don't get a choice, or get asked if I allow that.

1
0

Family of technician slain by factory robot sues everyone involved

Down not across
Bronze badge
Coat

Who is liable?

The suit marks a grim but potentially important issue that will arise as more workplaces phase out manual labor in favor of robotic workers. When one of those units malfunctions and injures or kills human staff, just who should be considered liable?

Why, you call Elijah Baley of course. He will find out.

14
0
Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: 'Slain'

I clearly didn't have enough coffee yet and parsed the headline as the robot having slain the whole family.

6
0

User lubed PC with butter, because pressing a button didn't work

Down not across
Bronze badge

"Deluxe Paint."

Doesn't it make a mess of the DVD?

Nah. He said Deluxe, not Dulux.

7
1

MAC randomization: A massive failure that leaves iPhones, Android mobes open to tracking

Down not across
Bronze badge

Manufacturers have more than one OUI

For example:

$ grep -i samsung ethercodes.dat | wc -l

463

$ grep -i apple ethercodes.dat | wc -l

531

So just for apple multiply your number by 531 (as of mid February's oui.txt).

Also the uniqueness is only really an issue with regards to the AP you're associating with (ok, yes DHCP server, switch/router comes to play as well)

0
0

Western Digital CTO Martin Fink refused El Reg's questions, but did write this sweet essay

Down not across
Bronze badge

Thanks Martin (and Chris)

I really enjoyed the "essay".

Martin was quite clear, and explained, why the questions were wrong whilst answering to the extent it made sense to. Interesting way to look at things.

To get an idea where this is heding just think of a simplistic step like Oracle's Exadata where the controllers on disk have understanding of where clauses and how that benefits performance. SCM of course would take it to another level entirely.

0
0

Tesla 'API crashes' after update, angry rich bods complain

Down not across
Bronze badge

Pissed in CA

“I get concerned when there are server-side problems like this that go on for multiple days. I would be really pissed if I were on a road trip,” Made in CA added.

Why? AFAIK the car functions normally. Do you really need the app to use the car?

I'd be pissed off if the car depended on some flaky phone app to work.

<ObBritishEnglish>

I think highway patrol would be bit miffed is he was pissed while driving

</ObBritishEnglish>

0
0

Huawei's just changed the way you'll use Android

Down not across
Bronze badge

Re: "There's no way to customise this in current software builds: you get what you're given."

So to put it another way: If the built in storage on phones was priced the same as an SD card, would there still be the same demand for an SD card slot?

Yes.

If phone makers didn't charge a mark-up on bigger built in storage, is there still any advantage to an SD card slot?

Yes.

1
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017