* Posts by HwBoffin

18 posts • joined 17 Mar 2013

Boffin rediscovers 1960s attempt to write fiction with computers

HwBoffin

Megahal

I remember writing a little script to make megahal chat in a P2P network chat room about 2 decades ago...

It was really funny see all the users chatting with it. We admins kew what it was, but other users really had the most interesting conversations with it.

Some people got angry with it, suspecting a troll.

Downside was that after a few weeks the bayesian database got so big that I had to restart it periodically to avoid stalling my work station.

Batteries that don't burn at the drop of a Galaxy Note 7? We're listening

HwBoffin

FYI:

http://www.gsmarena.com/zte_blade_a610-8294.php

Not affiliated in any way. May be a poor quality device. Battery really lasts for more than 2 days.

'I feel violated': Engineer who pointed out traffic signals flaw fined for 'unlicensed engineering'

HwBoffin
Boffin

Nowadays isn't mandatory anymore.

Of course, if the engineer is part of the *guild* this both provides protection to the engineer ( his/her work is reviewed, has civil responsibility insurance ), and the customer ( the overall design is validated by a third party, has legal protection from lawsuits in case of faulty design ).

Most public services demanded that any project must be signed by an engineer/architect, so they had at least a minimum level of competence, but now is not longer the case.

From a few years ago, anybody can create its own designs and present them to be approved ( public concurrence venues, vehicles and its modifications, buildings, chemical plants, bridges ....), but unless they've done the same amount ( or better) than a true specialist, it won't get approved.

I'm glad I don't have to battle with that anymore.

Systems-on-a-chip are a huge, unaudited attack surface, says Project Zero's Wi‑Fi attack man

HwBoffin

Re: What a surprise

Last year I developed a PCIe add on card with a nice FPGA and assorted peripherals, and one of the proofs of concept that I did to show my boss how well it worked was using memory writes from the FPGA to the video card, as would be used by enabling a DMA from the host CPU.

Neither Linux and Windows were aware that I was reading and writing all around the video memory, IO space and the system's DDR RAM.

PCIe is really a true multi host bus without any kind of security. If the root device ennumerates you, you're free to roam and break havoc as you wish.

Put down your coffee and admire the sheer amount of data Windows 10 Creators Update will slurp from your PC

HwBoffin

Re: "The problem isn't lack of software alternatives, the problem is lack of will to change"

As someone once told me :

You may price your software up to the point where is just cheaper to change to the alternative.

So yes, the cost of software change isn't only the cost of the money paid to the creator, but the added cost of moving / recreating the data.

And this is why I have this obsession about having my data in an open format.

'Boss, I've got a bug fix: Nuke the whole thing from orbit, rewrite it all'

HwBoffin

Re: Beastly, Just Beastly

Just use call, and if you don't want to return, add to the SP to remove the return address from the stack.

Beware that different architectures may behave differently (flags saved on call, hardware call stack, so on)

Swots explain how to swat CPU SNITCHES

HwBoffin

3 days ago saw an application of this attack

In a security demo, we were able to sniff the private key of an RSA algorithm fom an ARM processor just sending clear text messages and recording the generated spectrum with an EMI probe connected to a pico scope.

Sending 200 messages and recording the 200 samples ( fs 100MHz, so quite low) allowed us to set data into a matlab script to correlate the signals and obtain the first 24 bits of the key in less than 5 minutes in a mainstream laptop.

Was quite impressive.

Moreover when you can use a 1GHz sampling DSO and use something more powerful to obtain the whole key in a reasonable amount of time.

Albert

No, Big Data firm, the UK isn't teeming with UBER-FRISKY GIGOLOS

HwBoffin

And military 'invetsment'

Top 10 SSDs: Price, performance and capacity

HwBoffin
Headmaster

Re: I don't get it

640kbytes

We need to talk about SPEAKERS: Sorry, 'audiophiles', only IT will break the sound barrier

HwBoffin

Re: Ancient technology

Tas5715 by texas. Pure digital class d amplifier.

IPv4 addresses now EXHAUSTED in Latin America and the Caribbean

HwBoffin

Re: Thinking off the top of my head…

Excuse me, please, but you fail to take into account all those devices with the ip stack directly made on silicon. Not to mention those oldies that need a jtag interface to program because they aren't built on top of an os.

Moreover, the cost of upgrading those of them that CAN be upgraded isn't small.

Albert.

Microsoft: Surface is DEAD. Long live the Surface 2!

HwBoffin

Re: What lack of app?

minesweeper

Hardbitten NYC cops: Sir, I'm gonna need you to, er, upgrade to iOS 7

HwBoffin

Re: Don't see the problem here

Hmmmm ....

It only takes a nerd to offer the wipeout service for all the muggers/pawn shops in the area to render the

security scheme useless.

Wait until some clever hacker offers it over the net ... just install that software in your laptop and, voilà, your laptop becomes apple servers and unbrikes the device.

Let's see how much time takes to the start of such 'commercial wipeout services' ..

Cynical me ?

EXPLICIT VID: Man filmed trying to bang brand new 'budget iPhone'

HwBoffin
Boffin

Re: It's plastic

i'm so sorry to inform you that the basic wave theory classes want their time with you back ....

Metals, as a conductors, impose a B/H field value of 0 at their surface for high enough frequency and a reasonably small value for 0 ....

Remember all those pesky contour settings in the maxwell equations ? Faraday Cages ?

So, no, radio waves won't travel across a conducting metal ... that's where the glass inlays come to.

Albert

NASA to flip ion engine's 'OFF' switch after brilliant 5.5 year burn

HwBoffin
Go

Re: Nuclear propulsion

One tiny detail ... the acceleration region develops a negative net charge because of the excess electrons not fired with their atoms, but there is a pretty simple solution :

Fire the excess electrons with another beam (an X ray beam, for example, like your old CRT tv).

That way, you can use the electrons to give some really tiny impulse to the craft. More than the impulse obtained, the main advantage will be the ability of not attracting the expelled ions with the spacecraft charge, that would otherwise provide a braking force ....

How Microsoft shattered Gnome's unity with Windows 95

HwBoffin
Headmaster

Re: To be fair to MS...

I'm sorry to contradict you ...

You won't get any coffee at Starbucks ... you'll get some type of brown diluted shit.

With apologies to shit.

Thank you .... yes I'm a coffee nazi .....

Lightspeed variable say intellectuels français

HwBoffin
Boffin

Re: Good

MonteCarlo simulations.

nuff said.

Samsung's new Galaxy S 4: iPhone assassin or Android also-ran?

HwBoffin
Boffin

Re: >"RGB light" sensor.

Yes, a 1 pixel camera, but with a huge dynamic span.

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