* Posts by JLV

1606 posts • joined 4 Mar 2013

Chrome 66: Get into the bin, auto-playing vids and Symantec certs!

JLV
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Re: Ok, so you have fixed some bugs

>Firefox - Has been trying to alienate all of its aficionados for the past 5 years

I honestly don't know why the OP feels he has to speak for all Firefox users. I wouldn't presume to speak for all Chrome users, though it is one of my fallback browsers.

Vivaldi is more interesting and waaay less hoggy of RAM than Chrome or FF => pretty much always <500MB.

Generally happy enough w FF, not least due to the presence of NoScript. Now, as far as resource usage goes, go take a peek under the covers and you will still see tons of RAM in use by FF, albeit split up under other processes than the main ones (a PR-friendly trick - even if process splitting serves other purposes too - it picked up from Chrome). 2.5G to serve 3 tabs, yay! Yes, I know unused RAM is useless RAM, but that's still over the top.

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New Galaxy un-smartphone can’t go online because Samsung's thought of the children

JLV
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Kinda dumb for a phone, but there might be a niche even here

I recently threatened my teen with a return to source in the form of a Nokia 3310* if he doesn't shape up @ school. Something like this might also be useful, though a big part of the dissuasion factor with the 3310 is the sheer embarrassment of toting what's visibly a dumb phone in front of your peers.

No complaints from his teachers since ;-)

* which I actually like myself.

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Latest F-35 flight tests finish – and US stops accepting new jets

JLV
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Re: Trial by fire

I'll second that we're in the dark right now. Voland regurgitating Russian claims is as gullible as your swallowing of the Pentagon ones hook line and sinker.

He said, she said.

We'll see, maybe, what gradually comes out over time. It took a long time past Gulf War 1 for the truth about Patriots' glorious interception of Scuds to come out. Seems like very little actual success intercepting those jacked-up V2s.

Not a big problem: in the immediate afterglow, everyone who could rushed to buy some Patriots. Mission Accomplished ;-)

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JLV
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Re: Trial by fire

Sure. 70% kill ratio by Syria, which recently, heroically*, managed to shoot down its first IAF F16 in aaaages. Pull the other one.

* being sarcastic here. Not much of a fan of Isreali stance towards meaningful Palestinian negotiations but they do have a kick ass army, unlike Syria.

@Arstech - get a clue. Not decrying the culture. Just military incompetence. You wouldn't find me making fun of the Taliban's fighting capacity, for example. Nor Hizbollah's. Syria on the other hand has a long history of iffy performance, these are cruise missiles so unusually hard to hit and shooting down 70% of them would imply really good anti missile hardware. Has anything like this ever happened to US/Israeli strikes, from Iraq/Syria armies? No it hasn't.

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JLV
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Trollface

Re: Trial by fire

Somehow, dunno why, I would take declarations of a 70% kill rate against incoming missiles by Syrian state media with a large grain of salt (10-20% would be a jolly good show by that lot).

File with "strategic retreat to pre-arranged defensive positions", c. 1944, German ministry of information, Eastern Front.

This really isn't to say anything good about the F35 btw. This was a turkey shoot and it still wasn't invited.

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JLV
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Re: Warfighter

Attitude Adjuster (with a nod to the late I.M. Banks)

On a side note, I am amazed that Lockeed, after perpetually running late, overbudget and with a shoddy POS of an aircraft, has the balls to refuse to pay for correcting issues with, what... the coating on screws, basically?

I wonder if DoD is not escalating a trivial dispute to hold their feet to the fire re costs in general. Would be about effin time with that mangy, flea-ridden, gold-plated albatross. Maybe the UK coulda done that with the +2B estimates from BAE for cats on their glorified helicopter carriers? Aww, well, too late.

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Exposed: Lazy Android mobe makers couldn't care less about security

JLV
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I like how it's implied that all would be good, if only the bad manufacturers took nice Mr. Jekyll Google's security updates.

Sadly, bad Mr. Hyde Google did not get called out for their sloppy updates on their own Nexus/Pixel line - 3 yrs after initial release you can go fly a kite for any further updates.

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Having ended America's broadband woes, the FCC now looks to space

JLV
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izznt that "You either believe broadcasters should be allowed to innovate, or you don't,"'s shithead Pai FCC?

Hard to say - is the FCC doing its job here and keeping orbits safe and clear? Or is Swarm stepping on Pai's sweetie Sinclair's toes somehow?

Anyone know? That's the problem w being a partisan prick - people have a hard time trusting you later.

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Hawaii Live-Go! Microsoft launches Honolulu admin tool for cloud and on-prem

JLV
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Re: Project Honolulu Because?

Not been to Honolulu, nor do I feel the need. But both Big Island and Maui are very nice. Very good for the outdoorsy crowd, not at all lounge-on-beach-only.

But, yeah, let's tar n feather a whole state due to a false missile alarm.

Twat.

I'm very much hoping MS has cleaned up its system management cruft, at least for savvy SOHO users. Much needed. Now they need to persevere and fix ONE approach, not act like ADD squirrels on meth who've forgotten their nuts and dig new holes every time. I like the idea of a thin GUI/Web veneer over Powershell to do the work too, separates out GUI from actual system functions.

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Google's not-Linux OS documentation cracks box open at last

JLV
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Re: OOOS

Agree that the OP hasn't a clue about OOP (PERL's weakpoint). But arguing that OOP automatically means simple? It's a tool, like functional or procedural.

Read this guy. http://csis.pace.edu/~bergin/patterns/ppoop.html

Total PatternWankitis.

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JLV
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Re: "I'm not sure anyone can realistically replace the Linux kernel"

Linux still hasn't great driver support compared to Windows and MacOS.

Well, depends by what you mean by great. As I recall refreshing drivers from repos via apt and kin is a much less annoying activity on Linux than finding your vendors' download pages on Windows. Sure, if you hit unsupported hardware on Linux, that's less fun, but reasonably you can shop based on compatibility.

Second, in what parallel universe does macOS support more hardware than Linux??? Asking as a mac user.

Quite cynical about Google's altruism here, but I welcome experimentation by someone that worked on BeOS. Let's see what comes out of it. Something stripped down for mobiles from the ground up might advance OS knowhow.

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Civil war erupts at top of FCC over Sinclair's creepy grasp on US telly

JLV
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Re: Red tape is socialist

you know, I agree that over-regulation can cause problems. So let's stay away from Pai activities that could be, by reaaaallly stretching it, be constructed as freeing up investment. cuz, you know, Commies and all that.

How does allowing selling off your net access habits "free up" anything? Please explain. How about your doctor can do same? Your lawyer? Make you happy? Somehow unfetters capitalism?

The US has some of the stronger anti monopoly laws in the world. How does redefining broadband speed to pretend there is local choice promote a healthy and competitive local free market?

Nah, just Godwin it by saying "Commie". Or Socialist, cuz you're too thick to see the difference between folks who ran the Gulags and people with a different perspective than yours.

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JLV
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>"You either believe broadcasters should be allowed to innovate, or you don't,"

Not sure what term describes this debating sleight of words and specious argument. How about something more like doing his job in an unbiased manner:

Should broadcasters be:

a) totally regulated

b) totally unregulated

c) somewhere in between, which I assume most competent adults would aim for. Certainly, most voters seem to feel that way about Net Neutrality and ISPs sharing their private info.

We know what choice Pai is being wined and dined into taking, don't we? Darn, I wish I could see the future and who he's lined up to get a gig with after the FCC. The Japanese have a term for it, Amakudari—meaning descent from heaven.

Methink El Reg needs a "sleazebag" icon, we're hearing so much of this kinda crap from everywhere.

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Get ready for the Internet of Battle Things, warns US Army AI boffin

JLV
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>Kott’s ideas rest on the assumption that countries have obeyed a ban on autonomous weapons “beyond meaningful control”

Yeah, what's the actual incentive for that to happen? In the Last Good Man, by Linda Nagata (which I've already plugged before), one of the opponents has a distinct advantage because it has stripped down its bots' dont-kill-civs AI routines considerably.

I happen to think that an alternative approach is not so much to figure out how to manage all the clutter/civs/friendlies in a land battlezone, which are forecast to become more and more urban. Instead, first aim for autonomous systems in an Air-to-air context.

Anything that doesn't (somehow) light up as friend with your Friend-or-Foe transponders is fair game in a hot war. No need to worry about civs. Just shoot it down.

This is one of the aspects that really worries me about F35s budgetary commitments. We know AI is coming. We know it takes years to train pilots, more so than infantry. We also know that pilots are bound by 8-9G maneuverability meatsack limits. And we know that the other players are going to have a massive incentive to go asymmetric. If we could switch out of whatever gen 5 jets we are fielding when this happens, fine. If we're overspent, not so fine.

Heck, loitering/swarming supersonic flying drones/missiles with go back-to-home-if-unused capability (a la SpaceX boosters) would be 80% of the way there in concept. The hard limitation would then to put together sufficiently performant airframes in large enough numbers. But not having to carry, or train, a human would be a massive facilitator there.

Disclaimer: I am well aware that, so far, Wild Weasels have tended to run rings around SAM systems. But if you can have a bot smart enough for urban combat, then I strongly believe it'd be smart enough for AA. Or at least enough not to make a massive bet against it from peer enemies.

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Modern life is rubbish – so why not take a trip down memory lane with Windows File Manager?

JLV
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Re: life extension - file extension

You may find this of interest:

https://apple.stackexchange.com/questions/317992/is-there-any-way-to-get-the-path-of-a-folder-in-macos/

Not defending Finder in the least, but still a useful shortcut. I use Forklift.

One thing I suspect Apple likes to do is to have you rely as much as possible on its system, rather than giving you context. Besides doing this to filenames, they also helpfully make it very difficult to show an actual phone #, rather than a contact name, in iOS. Fear of getting lost - another way to keep you from straying on to other pastures.

BB10, on the contrary, would display both the contact name as well as the #.

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Death in paradise: 'Cyber attack' takes out national government's IT

JLV
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Damnit! I even looked up Hispaniola in wiki to make sure I got its spelling right. Sooooo confusing.

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JLV
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It's not anymore. Fully independent since 2010, though I am sure they have financial support/defense arrangements in place. Own money, Guilder, own laws - no (legal) cannabis in St Maarten.

St Martin, French, is still really French, including Euros.

As to slice, well kinda awkward to talk about a half as there is no overall island name to St Martin/Maarten.

Unlike say Hispaniola for Haiti n Dominica's island.

actually, https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Martin even supports El Reg, though I've rarely heard St Martin in a context meant to encompass both. The Dutch, for one, wouldn't dream of doing so.

Flights? Charters, never flag carriers. Air France's always been a gouge there.

Island was divided in 1648 and avoided all Euro wars since. Wags have it the division was by country representatives heading of in opposite directions on the coast. Wherever they'd meet opposite would the border. Legend has it the French runners got the Dutch really drunk the night before, hence much bigger French side.

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Furious gunwoman opens fire at YouTube HQ, three people shot

JLV
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Re: Back on the hamster wheel..

See, that whole Northern Ireland analogy would be more impressive if it didn't so happen that, in this instance, the Brits, and the Irish, had the political courage to go out and fix what was wrong with their society and politics.

Or did you mean that to offer it as inspiration?

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As Zuck apologizes again... Facebook admits 'most' of its 2bn+ users may have had public profiles slurped by bots

JLV
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lots of juicy stuff ripe for picking

anyone remember the face recognition tests run by universities a few years back?

- grab CCTV images

- match to publicly available picture databases, one of which was Facebook, look up user tag when set

- about 20-30% success rate IIRC.

but one could always find comfort that surely FB's privacy controls were vigilant*. oh, wait

* I didn't so I deleted my images and requested to be untaggable.

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Spring is all about new beginnings, but it could already be lights out for Windows' Fluent Design

JLV
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Re: trouble is, they've copied the wrong RDF....

I don't disagree with what you said, wrt to Windows and its lack of consistency.

I mostly like Apple myself. But I also tend to see it as having many fanatical followers who never see anything wrong with what they do. The Reality Distortion Field does sometimes happen, but, as I said, it affects its customers, or rather the subset of Apple customers who have unquestioning loyalty.

Me, I'll buy them as long as I prefer them to the alternatives, despite their rather extortionate pricing. But I am totally open to switching to Linux in the future, if pre-built hardware offerings suit my needs.

(Really nothing wrong with Linux. I am just lazy and want out-of-the-box hardware configuration, Bash and Posix compatibility and apt-get type of open source software access. I feel I get these from macOS, but Linux could work for me too).

btw, if one wants to poke fun at Windows consistency, no better place to look at than the hoops you need to jump through to find out which version of Windows you are running from the GUI. Basically, to know where to look, you already have to know which version you are on 8-/

http://whatsmyos.com/ (not everything there is correct, uname -a works well on Linux for example.

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JLV
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>copied Apple's Reality Distortion Field and so their execs can no longer see this

Slight difference. Apple bamboozles its customer fanbois. MS tends to bamboozle itself into thinking it's clever. Until they quit whatever they are promoting in a huff.

Another abandonware framework coming up?

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Autonomous vehicle claims are just a load of hot air… and here's why

JLV
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Or an album cover

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Facebook's inflection point: Now everyone knows this greedy mass surveillance operation for what it is

JLV
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Re: People will forget...

Oh, Bolton didn't much like the Nam, that's why he stayed the heck away, safe @ National Guard.

Chickenhawk, following in the footsteps of Dick Cheney who did the same.

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Uber's disturbing fatal self-driving car crash, a new common sense challenge for AI, and Facebook's evil algorithms

JLV
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Re: Dodgy Statistic on USA Road Death Rate

my bad. shouldn't have quoted that figure without some fact checking myself.

I for one would welcome some more

numeracy in future AI driving articles - how many fender benders/km w research AI drivers vs how many/km w human drivers.

Now we can add a fatality rate too, sadly. But we need to gauge these rates, by company, vs human drivers. There is no other metric as significant.

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JLV
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Re: Backup driver zoning out?

>Naivety on steroids.

Clever comment. Reallly.

My point was that I wanted to step away from whether the AI screwed up or not (it most certainly did in this case) to what we can learn about how Uber is conducting these AI tests.

So we have a suspiciously low light dashcam, compared to other folks' YouTubes of the same area. That tells me they're either a) trying to actively reframe the context to make their failure seem more reasonable or b) they are being such cheap asses running these tests that they use low quality cameras to capture scene information as the tests are being carried out.

I support AI research in this but I was also taken by surprise learning we have so many systems that operate as if it's already an almost solved problem - Tesla's autonomous lorry crash was the first time I heard they had a full-on autodrive system and I wondered how they got approval for it so quickly. From the context of this crash ditto for Uber - it's not a spectacularly difficult crash to avoid for a human - the victim did not jump down from the median unexpectedly, she crossed another lane before the collision.

Maybe these tests should be more carefully conducted - I am all for that - but this is still a technology in its beginning stages. Investigators will have to review whether it was a glitch or a systemic shortcoming. As someone on Ars pointed out: deadly accidents are about one per 1 million miles driven. Uber's total is nowhere near that, so, with the limitation of what we deduce from 1 sample size this looks bad for the AI safer than humans meme.

So - letting aside that the AI can't be expected to be perfect yet - from what we can observe from the context of this deadly failure: can we trust this particular company, Uber, with the right to conduct tests on the open road? This has nothing to do with ethical fails in how Uber generally behaves elsewhere, except those being a signal that they don't mind cutting corners.

From a gut reaction at what I have seen so far. No. Let other companies proceed with tests, after reviewing how risks can be minimized. Shut Uber's division road access down until they are much better at risk management and use properly trained and managed backup drivers.

I expect the authorities to review this much more carefully, but I would also expect them to send a strong signal that safety is paramount and shutting down Uber if they smell the same stink.

There, better for you?

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JLV
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Backup driver zoning out?

Ok, we get the fact that AI is still being tuned.

There'll hopefully be a lot of analysis of why the AI failed. Algo? Sensors? That should come out given time. But what I find disturbing is that the backup driver, who presumably has to be there by law, is zoning out. She's on camera and she knows it. Yet, she's messing around with... her phone? car display? Who knows?

She seems pretty secure in the knowledge that Uber doesn't review that camera for backup driver inattention moments. As if it's just a formality.

Yes, she f***** up. She may not have been able to avoid the bike, that pedestrian was incredibly inattentive herself, stepping in front of a car that was coming down a straight line.

But she should have been available to try to do so.

But beyond her personal failure, Uber does not seem to enforce much attention on people doing a job where you'd expect the risk that the driver would space due to their almost never having anything to do.

Driver's also a convicted felon. Now, I would actually congratulate Uber on helping out with people's reinsertion if I did not have the niggling feeling that she probably got hired because she was really cheap.

Does Uber really have the attitude where you want their cars out in testing on open roads?

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Tiangong-1 re-entry window shrinks: Duck from March 30 to April 3

JLV
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Re: can these things be blown up?

to be clear: I meant, with onboard demolition charges.

though... good practice for Star Wars ABMs: China blew up a stray in orbit for ASAT practice 10 years back or so. unfortunately that episode left some shrapnel in orbit.

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JLV
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can these things be blown up?

So first the risk it hitting anyone is really really low.

But like space rocks, only big ones can survive atmospheric entry.

You couldn't blow it up in space, that would just add to space junk.

But could you blow it up once it started reentry? Make smaller pieces that would burn up entirely?

Or would that be too complicated, risky beforehand, unhelpful (your smaller pieces would need to be guaranteed to burn up) and ultimately not worth the hassle for very small risks.

Curious about mechanics (not really advocating) because we seem to go through these anxiety spells every so often.

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Recording Industry Ass. says vinyl and CD sales beat digital downloads

JLV
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Re: What about the artists?

hush now. This an article about the RIAA published statements. whatever makes you think they care about what the artists get paid, as opposed to how much the RIAA members make?

In fact, I suspect that any discussion about how little $ artists make when a record does get sold is not in the RIAA's best interest. In years of RIAA whining about piracy, the amount paid out per album to artists has never been a very popular subject with them - you will feel guiltier about downloading that $15 album illegally if you don't know that the artist only sees $1-2 of it anyway, but even that only after the album's promotional costs have been recouped by the music company.

Bigger artists with good bargaining power get better deals, but the little folk don't. Rest assured that Bono has plenty to $$$ to salt away in his Ireland-Netherland non-profit U2 company while lecturing us all about not sending out enough $ to poor countries.

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JLV
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Headmaster

>Composing.

com·prise

kəmˈprīz/

verb

gerund or present participle: comprising

consist of; be made up of.

"the country comprises twenty states"

synonyms: consist of, be made up of, be composed of, contain, encompass, incorporate; More

include;

formalcomprehend

"the country comprises twenty states"

make up; constitute.

"this single breed comprises 50 percent of the Swiss cattle population"

synonyms: make up, constitute, form, compose; account for

"this breed comprises half the herd"

Kinda pointless to correct folks' vocab when one's own is lacking, neh?

Really need 2 icons here: Pedant + Fail.

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DeepMind boffins brain-damage AI to find out what makes it tick

JLV
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Boffin

Re: Is Google DeepMind the next Cambridge Analytica waiting to happen ?

>go with the machine's answer.

Oh, maybe they did ask and did not like the answers:

CEO: "Mighty Deep Mind, what should we do to improve our business?"

Deep Mind : "Ensure better skills in your workforce. Less PowerPoint heroics, more working systems. Only shift jobs to India when the recipient there is actually competent. Stop fucking up big IT projects like Phoenix, it looks stupid. Cut C-level exec bonuses."

CEO: "Total nonsense recommendations, I tell you. Let's fire the Deep Mind business optimization learning team."

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Zucker for history: What I learnt about Facebook 600 years ago

JLV
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well spoken

As has been pointed out elsewhere, the lazy and flighty millennials of Parkland, Florida have been doing a rather better job of holding politicians to account than my generation.

Facebook may be flawed in many ways, but something like was bound to happen. Human nature will gradually have to adapt to a world where nothing is really ever forgotten and much "news" is fabricated gossip. That's the coming generations' burden, but there is little hard indication that previous generations would have been all that much better at it, cf various actual lynching episodes.

We might yet go all Kardashian and Idiocracy but little of this is Millenial-specific.

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Programming languages can be hard to grasp for non-English speakers. Step forward, Bato: A Ruby port for Filipinos

JLV
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Boffin

I wonder

When/if the Chinese are going to create their own language, and if so, in what alphabet.

Think about it. English is a lingua franca, which provides it with critical mass and a large, relatively well off pool of interested parties. The US is also still pretty dominant culturally.

Looking ahead to say 20 yrs from now and resurgence of Chinese economic and scientific capacity, would it be unthinkable for a hacker/group such as a Chinese Matsumoto (Mr Ruby) to choose to write a new language in Mandarin? They'll have the critical mass by then. There might also be national security motivations for a language barrier.

Would it be in Romanized Chinese alphabet or Han? There'd be advantages to having complex language concepts/methods represented in 2-3 characters on small screens no? Concise but explicit.

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JLV
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Re: Oh, the irony!

En Python is van Nederland.

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JLV
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Re: Nothing new here

>OQLF here (Office Québécois de la Langue Française) to coerce IT to switch to french

Quels cons :-)

Seriously you can translate language keywords but the real power of Ruby or Python are the libraries. Minus those, the exercise seems rather futile. Fancy a Tagalog Rails anyone?

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Magic Leap bounds into SF's Games Developer Conference and... disappears

JLV
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sure enough...

https://www.reddit.com/r/magicleap/comments/86975g/this_feels_embarrassing_heres_hoping_for_atleast/?st=jf2t380p&sh=00a5fd8f

may have to ask for desktop site if no content is displayed on a mobile.

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JLV
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Trollface

I bet reddit/magicleap is full of true believers angrily denouncing your "unprofessional and disrespectful" slander. It was last time.

Popcorn till the Ponzi pops.

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F-35B Block 4 software upgrades will cost Britain £345m

JLV
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Good of you to remind us. We all tend to forget this POS was originally sold as a high volume low cost alternative to the F22 (which can't be exported).

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JLV
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Mushroom

Seems unacceptable for early adopters to have to pay so much for bugfixes on systems that are being sold while essentially still in beta (unkind souls might even say alpha).

Witness the early block F35 that the USAF won't be able to upgrade.

This is truly scandalous.

Icon cuz that's what I would want to happen to that program. Skip to a 2030 timeframe gen 6.

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Screw luxury fridges, you can now run webOS on your Raspberry Pi

JLV
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Aka The Tute Screw

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Cambridge Analytica CEO suspended – and that's not even the worst news for them today

JLV
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Trollface

see, don't even need those Russkies

we can run a corrupt election all on our own

Steve "BrummellBreitbart" Bannon

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Uber breaks self-driving car record: First robo-ride to kill a pedestrian

JLV
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Re: Clear cut...

Whooa, let's wait up a bit to get the facts first, right? Uber or not Uber.

First, we don't know if the pedestrian did something that made avoidance really hard.

Second, I've always had my doubts about systems-good-enough-to-drive-almost-all-the-time-but-human-as-failsafe. If human then fails, then throw book at him.

That model works, well, with autopilot systems on aircraft. But, the crucial bit is that pilots have plenty of time to take over at cruising altitude and they are most definitely in the loop, if not outright controlling, at crucial points like takeoff and landings. Commercial pilots are also top level professionals in their field and they benefit from decades of massive investment in researching failure root causes in aviation.

Expecting a trained operator, who is a passive bystander almost all the time, to react instantly to avert an accident, each and every time when needed is unrealistic psychology of how humans work. Yes, an attentive backup driver may get it right 99% of the time, but it won't be like someone who is already in control of the vehicle. This is true for test drivers, but it will be 10x true if regular Joes and Janes are expected to instantly correct bungles by their autonomous vehicle.

Even with a backup driver, the AI really needs to be very, very, good at avoiding accidents. This is going to require some rethinking of test protocols, even if AI surpass regular human drivers in safety. Maybe we also need to mandate some failure analysis collaboration between competing AI companies - don't want to have the same mistakes done over and over due to commercial secrecy.

Thoughts to the family of the killed pedestrian. And, yes, to the driver and engineers too. This is a sad moment, no need for gloating and finger pointing. And, yes, that remark extends to the headline, despite my dislike of Uber.

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IBM thinks Notes and Domino can rise again

JLV
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Trollface

Re: Nuke notes

>You need an entire team to maintain the thing, what's the point of that?

Keeping the ClearCase team company?

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JLV
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Re: @TheVogon ... Shuffling the Deckchairs

C > B (think about it)

But, yeah, after occasionally enduring the lobotomized search functions of local Outlook at corporate sites, I definitely pine for Gmail's capabilities. Very 90's technology, esp when used in lieu of proper requirements documentation.

In comparison, my hazy memories of long years using Notes for emails and specs were nowhere as bad as Outlook. I rather doubt IBM can do much mass usage software right, but that's not saying they don't have an opportunity (that they'll probably squander).

Plus, isn't it common in discussions about Linux adoption for commentards to say that the one item saving MS's bacon is the lack of Exchange alternatives? Could a revamped Notes, possibly with much new functionality, step in? That's a straight question: I don't enough about either's function to have a clue whether Notes is relevant in that space.

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Mulled EU copyright shakeup will turn us into robo-censors – GitHub

JLV
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FAIL

seems dumb

The Github content is freely examinable.

Why not instead mandate access to the repos to an accredited external review authority that could flag the issues? Developers that really care about this could then sign up for it. Mandate a need to act on a takedown request, with an arbitration/review mechanism.

If dev X has issue Y against repo Z, that is much better decided externally and then notified to Github. There is no reason for Github to host "stolen" content, once that has been established, but asking each hosting provider to review stuff against potentially multiple jurisdictions' infringement criteria is silly.

Of course, having a member of the Pirate Party come out against this dumb directive makes it easier to dismiss criticism as the moochers' wish to continue unimpeded. But I don't think a lot of the honest contributors to Github, and I assume they are in the majority, would find any great amount of merit in this proposal as it stands.

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Fermi famously asked: 'Where is everybody?' Probably dead, says renewed Drake equation

JLV
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Re: universal infinity.

Upvoted you n BobbyS for making my head hurt:

http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/privacy-policy/104-the-universe/cosmology-and-the-big-bang/expansion-of-the-universe/623-what-is-the-universe-expanding-into-intermediate

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JLV
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Re: Obligatory DNA

>The Universe is also finite though.

Ok, I'll bite, because I recently saw some preacher's book makes a big point of the "fact" that the universe being infinite is stupid.

If the universe IS finite, then, once you reach its limit - and I am NOT talking about the limit of the current Big Bang expansion - what do YOU claim lies beyond that boundary?

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JLV
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Re: Obligatory DNA

Space is infinite. The volume w "things in it" is not - it's our expanding Big Bang front. The number of planets is therefore not infinite (and we're still discovering goldilocks planet likelihood, even for increasingly elastic definitions of what life might pit up with).

As to the absence of aliens - most of them learned much too late not to light lanterns in dark forests.

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Developers dread Visual Basic 6, IBM Db2, SharePoint - survey

JLV
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why does this remind me of cockroaches and nuclear war?

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