* Posts by JLV

1475 posts • joined 4 Mar 2013

F-35 'incomparable' to Harrier jump jet, top test pilot tells El Reg

JLV
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Re: VIFing?

I also seem to recall a platoon of upgunned (105s) Israeli Shermans trumping a bigger herd of buttoned-up Egyptian(/Syrian?) T-55s in the 67 war.

Skill and courage doesn't always win (Polish cavalry vs German AFVs), but it's worth keeping in mind when evaluating the merits of this or that piece of equipment from historical outcomes.

I suspect the skill advantage of the English pilots had a lot to do with Harrier performance over the Falklands.

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JLV
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Re: Hearts & minds propaganda, courtesy of MoD

>Sure, they may outshine us in future, but that remains to be seen.

An interesting point. Those of us old enough may remember the great Japan scare of the 80s and 90s when it seemed Japan Uber Alles was coming. But, at least in computers, Japanese superiority never quite crystallized - anyone remember the Fifth Generation Computer Systems initiative?

I think China is a different kettle of fish. It's 4x the size of the US, not 1/3, for one. For another, I believe lack of individualism, excessive consensus-ivess, is a major Japanese weakness. A lot of innovation is due to maverick behavior and if that's missing in your culture you suffer. The Chinese seem to be a lot more cutthroat and individualistic, i.e. "not nice" (to each other), than the Japanese. Their system is theoretically Communist, certainly totalitarian, but they worship money and success and will take it over consensus and being nice (even to each other). In practice, it's a chaotic free market, unlike Japan's government-led industrial system.

The other aspect is the US nearing 2020 is a very different country than in the 80s. The amount of partisan, unscientific and just plain foolish behavior across the political spectrum is staggering. The amount of STEM grads is low and you are doing your best to block skilled immigrants to make it up. Whereas the US could face off against the USSR and Japan 30 years ago, its government is ill-suited to take on China. Not least in how much global goodwill Republican administrations since 2000 have squandered.

Used to be the USA were loathed or loved, but at least respected. This is becoming less and less true and will make it harder going forward to build alliances containing China.

Currently reading "Destined for War: Can America and China Escape Thucydides's Trap? ", highly recommended, though my above ramblings are not from it.

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JLV
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Re: It takes very little to be better than tha Harrier...

IIRC the Harrier has also been pretty deadly to its pilots in accidents.

https://www.pprune.org/archive/index.php/t-77618.html but it's hardly the only such entry.

F35 sucks, true, but let's remain factual about what Harrier did and did not do well.

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JLV
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Re: Hearts & minds propaganda, courtesy of MoD

>It's ironic that the US "won" the cold war partly by forcing the USSR way beyond its economic means to keep up technologically and China is now well on the way to doing the same with its "allies" to the US.

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Hehe, still writing code for a living? It's 2018. You could be earning x3 as a bug bounty hunter

JLV
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Re: Worth it?

Yup, notice "median developer" but not quite so clear on "median hacker". Bit further in, the hacker %-ile vs income breakdowns give you some insight and it looks nowhere near as sweet.

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Upset Equation Editor was killed off? Now you can tell Microsoft to go forth and multiply: App back from the dead

JLV
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Re: A Possible Excuse

Good point from both of you. But, whatever the reason for that lack of access to the source code, this has worrying implications for users:

- MS doesn't have the code, so what you did with the app may not always be accessible, as almost happened here.

- lacking source code may (or may not, depending on how good we are scanning binaries) have implications on the discovery of vulnerabilities. And Office is well known as a vector of malware.

- at best, you can assume "feature freeze" on this functionality.

- one would assume, but wrongly so apparently, that whatever proprietary, closed-source, code MS is selling you, they themselves at least have the source.

BTW, it's not Data Science, it's Design Science. see https://superuser.com/questions/198358/differences-between-mathtype-and-equation-editor-format-in-microsoft-word

A source code escrow mostly is written to cover the case where the party owning the original code goes out of business. If they are not, the escrow would not necessarily trigger. Design Science is still running.

MS has, in a past life at least, though others may argue that it still happens, shafted partners. For that reason, there are large disincentives to giving MS source code access. And, in that context, the fact that Word now packs its own little editor would hardly be reassuring to the code's originator.

So, basically, while I am willing to live with "binary blobs" as an end user, I am less than thrilled that a vendor of MS's stature would pass on code that they themselves don't have good visibility on. It's not the end of the world, but this little mess is a direct, practical and not just ideological, argument in favor of Open Source.

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JLV
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Trollface

>lacking access to the ancient app's source code

<snigger>

Open Source fans usually rattle off a long litany of reasons why having access to the source code is desirable.

The vendor losing said source code is not usually one of them.

Well done, MS. Maybe it was Visual SourceSafe wot did it?

</snigger>

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Hawaiian fake nukes alert caused by fat-fingered fumble of garbage GUI

JLV
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Re: As I recently wrote on the broad matter...

>if the response before any missile is even half way across the Pacific will be to flatten them.

Geez, I sure do hope that, if both the West and the Soviets managed to live with a doctrine of "take first strike, then respond massively" during the Cold War, then everyone is sane enough not to launch a nuke towards NK until you know what they've launched.

The reason this was done is because false alarms happened several times during the Cold War and the stakes were immeasurably higher than Fat Boy's little tantrums. It doesn't make any sense to be on hair trigger, both the US and Russian arsenals are designed to survive strikes orders of magnitude bigger than NKs and hitting back right away doesn't stop the incoming missiles in the least. That's why both parties agreed to sit out the first strike.

Factor in that China might be mighty peeved, or worse, panicked, on seeing a US counterstrike and you can bet the counterstrike is gonna wait. All this, of course, is assuming some level of rationality out of POTUS or, failing that, in the NORAD protocols.

This whole thing about the EMP threat is highly uncertain as well. Yes, it would cause damage. How much? No one is quite sure. Again, even during the Cold War, the EMP was never quite that clearly the end of things (granted, standard atomic war would have done that quite well).

Here's a blurb about that: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-12-22/hardening-power-grids-for-nuclear-and-emp-attacks-by-north-korea

The 20KT cited by Big John is likely to be more correct than wrong - NK's are for now fission bombs and those top out in yield rather quickly - with bomb damage falling off at square of distance, Hiroshima type damage on any one selected target in Hawaii would be expected, not total destruction of even one of the islands. I'd aim for Seattle instead if I was him - Honolulu et all are not big cities.

Another issue for poor Fat Boy is that no one really knows if the various US Star Wars ICBM defenses would work. They might. Or they might not - their tests have worked at times but no one is sure if the tests were representative of real world difficulties. If they did work, he'd be flattened and wouldn't have caused any damage.

And, currently, it's not even a 100% certainty that a NK strike would actually work as intended.

It makes more sense for him to hold on to his missiles and use them as a threat against invasion or a regime change situation, rather than just lobbing them for the hell of it. He can even enlist them in his usual gambit of taking Seoul's population as hostages.

He might be a lunatic, but his dynasty has lasted 70 years so far, they're careful in what they do. Unless his back is seriously to the wall, these missiles are only useful as long as they are unused.

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JLV
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Trollface

Re: “Test” vs. “Prod”, Anyone?

could have been worse:

"Launch missiles. Test missile launch".

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JLV
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Gotta love Pai here , top form

Captain Obvious says this alert was crap and needs investigation.

As if it was a) intentional, b) likely to be repeated and c) not going to be highly detrimental to the involved idjits' career prospects.

Meanwhile, all of the above are likely to be highly true of Big Cable's consumer fleecings.

He's probably ecstatic he can be seen to protect the public in the exceptional instance where doing so doesn't rile his string pullers.

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PowerShell comes to MacOS and Linux. Oh and Windows too

JLV
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Re: Bash is superior but isn't supposed to be as feature rich as PS

>you're using either one of them wrong.

That's a nice quip, but what should the stereotypical power user - emphatically not a sysadmin - use as a Windows command line then?

Same question applies to those who state that PS is closer to a full-on language than a shell. What is the MS solution to basic user productivity tasks on the command line, if that's not really PS's design goal?

Honest question.

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JLV
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Re: PowerShell?

? is an alias for select-string here? sorry, I'd rather stick to the whole enchilada, these aliases are confusing me, if reference docs talk about select-string, sls or ? just add another layer of confusion, IMHO.

the point I was trying to make is that you can't just "wing it" with a grep, you need to know your upstream object. if my ls wasn't just a plain ls, but an ls -l and if I wanted to find foo anywhere in its output, I'd have to cast the whole thing to a string because select-string wants strings and it's not getting them.

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JLV
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Re: PowerShell?

upvoted, but it's a bit more nuanced than that.

PS is extremely good at piping precise object streams from one process to another. For example, I know bash has stuff like pgrep or pkill, but you can see people recommending jumping hoops to pipe ps into grep and then parse out all the fields you don't want to get at the pid.

PS needs none of that. Each step can feed exactly what's needed to the next and you have tons of filters/qualifiers to get exactly what you want.

If you're in the biz of programmatically configuring systems, I think PS has the edge. You don't have to faff as much with cut/awk/grep on a text stream, you have an object stream instead. I think it's a bit like the power use you see with 'find' doing things through xargs - any pretense that it's simple goes right out the window at that point in bash. PS is like that from the start, seems like.

Unfortunately, the number of options and qualifiers is massive and makes casual use of PS shell from the command line really unobvious for casual users, like me.

ls -t => get-childitem | sort -property LastWriteTime

ls | grep foo => get-childitem | Out-String -Stream | select-string -Pattern foo

(the above is not a good way to look for *foo* files, but it shows how hard simple grep use can be. aliasing it to 'gci' or 'ls' doesn't fundamentally improve things...)

Bash seems good to power users and admins alike. PS seems to really reward admins or ultra-power users because the learning curve is massive. Give me 3 weeks on it and I kinda get its basic usage. 3 weeks off, forgotten most of it again. Still better than cmd.exe though!

That's my take, but I'd be happy to hear from people who've used both bash and PS in anger.

A system that would support both paradigms would be awesome, but failing that I'll take bash over PS for my use cases. Even better would a system that mixed both. Still, hats off to MS here, they've been opening up quite a bit at the system level these last few years, much as I rag on Windows itself.

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Next; tech; meltdown..? Mandatory; semicolons; in; JavaScript; mulled;

JLV
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Re: Tabs v spaces

So, by that line of reasoning, Lisp should be shot because _I_ think its excessive use of parentheses sucks? Despite being a super clever language with devoted followers?

Hint: in both cases, their formatting approach is a meta design-feature. Plenty of people like that design, plenty do not.

If you don't, then don't use them.

Thankfully languages are not like Maduro in Venezuela, plenty of choices around.

Heck, I've even heard from reliable sources that some people like PERL.

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Funnily enough, small-town broadband cheaper than big cable packages, say Harvard eggheads

JLV
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Happy

this reminds me

of the country whose lawmakers passed a law banning its government from using its purchasing power to obtain lower prices from drug manufacturers.

Yup, free market all around, as long it pays for nice campaign donations.

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Black & Blue: IBM hires Bain to cut costs, up productivity

JLV
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Unhappy

Re: Management Consultants

Good to see that Netflix's "House of Lies" is firmly grounded in real life.

Sad icon, because this is such a sorry state of affairs.

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JLV
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Trollface

stop disrespecting Big Blue, please!

with such a well-done, informative, trenchant, PowerPoint, success is assured and nothing could possibly go wrong.

Bonuses all around lads! *

'lads' refers to the C-levels, duh!

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Cisco can now sniff out malware inside encrypted traffic

JLV
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Re: Yes, there are concepts for that...

Personally, if they want to be fancy, how about scanning database accesses for unusual patterns like "select * from personal_id_table;", for an unusual type of access. Some of those must have been churning through Equifax networks back in the days.

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Butcher breaks out of own freezer using black pudding

JLV
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Trollface

I knew there was a reason why I am not vegan*

* one of many reasons anyway.

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Beer hall putz: Regulator slaps northern pub over Nazi-themed ad

JLV
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Re: stable door / horse

not to mention all the free publicity.

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Memo man Damore is back – with lawyers: Now Google sued for 'punishing' white men

JLV
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Re: difference of opinion is not the same as calling management as incompetent

OK, my bad for not being more clear on "publicly".

In my example with my ex-colleague, that email was never public in the sense that anyone out of the company could see it. What I meant is that, on a general staff email, that person basically called out management for being incompetent. In what world do you live that you think criticism of management, voiced to the general employee base (not the larger public), is conducive to job security? That is why I separated it out from the whistleblowing, which is calling out management for illegal activities.

Anyway, I wasn't impressed by his memo when I read it. I also do NOT think he should have gotten sacked solely on his opinion that us poor men suffer undue horrible hardships. On the other hand, he was pretty darn scathing in his criticism that Google's management was effing up the diversity thing. So he did kinda set himself up for hurt.

I suppose if he, or the hypothetical aggrieved female employee, had cast-iron arguments that their particular group was objectively discriminated against, then yes, they deserve protection despite going way outside of normal employee complaint channels to criticize management. I don't think his rant reasoned exposition really passed that test of objectivity where a reasonable person would find his complaint totally warranted. So, IMHO, you're left with a disgruntled employee bitching openly about his bosses ... not something you'd expect to end well.

Like I said, I wouldn't be surprised if a woman avoided immediate censure for the same behavior (but I rather expect she'd also be blackballed later on). And I also wouldn't surprised if, minus his direct bitchiness about management, he'd also gotten canned, cuz SJW.

Still, anyone smart enough to work at Google should have thought twice before penning that note the way he did.

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JLV
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difference of opinion is not the same as calling management as incompetent

I read the entire original memo, and, as I remember it, the problem wasn't limited to him just holding out "a few heretical opinions".

He basically went on the record saying that management was really screwing things up. Which, regardless of the merits or not of said argument, well, isn't necessarily something that management really likes to see happening, cleaning dirty laundry in public.

In a previous life, a very competent engineer got fired for sending staff-wide email saying he did not want to to go a team building event (in Spain, all expenses paid) because he thought the regional management in one country was playing favorites on resource allocation to its own benefit.

Management was, and they were a bunch of f***ups. Still, I wasn't surprised that he got canned and couldn't really blame them for putting an end to public insubordination.

It might be symptom of excessive SJW that an aggrieved female might very well get away with writing Damore's memo, making the exact same whines from the other side of the fence and a company would put up with it*

Still, nothing in his memo struck me as particularly clever, neither from the rather confused points he was trying to make nor from calling out management, hard, over something as subjective as his claims and to do this so publicly. This wasn't, quite, a glorious doomed whistleblower scenario.

* though they might not. remember our toxic little friend Ellen Pao?

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WD My Cloud NAS devices have hard-wired backdoor

JLV
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Would this be the dlink that...

Once redirected all its routers' DNS to a signup for its Parental Protection subscription-ware after updating said routers' firmware? And obfuscated the opt-out dialog?

Comodo, DLink, etc... are on my never, ever, again list.

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And we return to Munich's migration back to Windows - it's going to cost what now?! €100m!

JLV
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Re: Registry? That's so 90's darling....

I was actually aware of that command, before finding the registry hack. That was my workaround for months.

But, do you realize that powercfg -h off has to be re-run every single time you restart that machine? It's not permanent.

Additionally, the registry item in question is not a blanket deactivation of hibernation. Rather I think it flips off some weird subsystem condition where Windows is expecting a bluetooth mouse or keyboard (which my machine didn't have). When that, inexistent, mouse doesn't do anything for a while, Windows in all its wisdom decides it needs to go to sleep. Even when the main sleep/hibernation settings say NEVER.

Windows has infinitely weird ideas about hibernation - there are items about USB peripherals and their sleep times, for example.

And it's a config mess: you have the basic Win10 sleep settings, but the advanced one shows you a Windows 7 legacy dialog of the relevant part of the Registry. But, that does not include the stupid bluetooth flag, that's somewhere else in the Registry again and has been there since Win 7, I think.

Bet Windows 11 will have yet another way to configure with sleep and hibernation.

Nope, not a fan of this crap.

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JLV
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>single repository for all configuration data

You mean the Registry? Yes, it seemed like a good idea when it was launched. I am not even being sarcastic here.

20+ years later has taught everyone* but MS that in practice it's a lousy approach to system management to shove everything into an opaque binary undocumented hairball.

Undocumented? Well take the case of Windows randomnly going into hibernation, which was plaguing my system. The solution, found by someone on the net, was flipping a boolean flag, in a key with a non descriptive name, under 2 levels of GUID-style Registry folders with 20 digit numeric "names". 77888886/8888899/flagFoo or the like. That's what disabled that hibernation!

Take your shilling and shove it, AC.

* well not everyone, a certain Linux subsystem often gets mentioned...

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JLV
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Re: 10 years to migrate 16000 PCs and they're going to go back to Windows ?

+1, but for all their failures, and there seems to be many, Munich was also a trailblazer in getting Linux/FOSS on the government IT maps. I can't recall any really high profile government outfits before they got started.

Yes, they seem to have massively effed up, for whatever reason. Having worked with public sector clients, the reasons a public sector IT project fails, even with well-intentioned vendors and consultants, are legion.

But, when Munich started doing it, others started to think about doing Linux as well. And succeeding. And even for Windows diehards, savvy ones may very well have leveraged this to get cost concessions out of MS.

So, a useful trailblazer, but lucky that people 10 years ago didn't see the future where they've ended up.

As others have stated, many other organizations have succeeded with FOSS since. MS may be overjoyed to quote Munich as a cautionary tale, but the secret's is still out that MS is not the only alternative.

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JLV
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>Microsoft money can make anything happen....

Hmmm, hasn't made Windows 10 very secure or resulted in a clean unified configuration system (outside of Powershell perhaps) : Tikfam pages, Win 7- dialogs, direct registry edits, (unpinnable) msc. changes version to version

far as Munchen goes "12000 macros" is probably a good hint at the cultural/organizational issues causing this clusterf***.

1.5 million inhabitants supporting upwards of $250M of direct in-out costs, not counting likely indirect productivity losses, nice job Teutonic efficiency.

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Amazon: Intel Meltdown patch will slow down your AWS EC2 server

JLV
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Re: where do database queries sit in the %CPU loss continuum?

heh, txs. that's what I was worrying about :(

you know, I'm starting to wonder if a big beneficiary of this whole mess might not, under the right conditions, end up being Intel.

Think of it - a lot of potentially somewhat risky/obsolete X86 silicon. Spectre isn't even really Intel/X86-only (or maybe it's Meltdown). This stuff will have to be replaced and who's the dominant vendor? Yes....

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JLV
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Re: True - But

3B. write up a decent regression test before 4 or 5.

Batches are surprisingly easy to test. With identical inputs the original program and optimized programs should match 100% in outputs. Given a sufficiently big and representative sample of production data, you're pretty much assured it will work live, but kick it off to QA anyway.

Diff-type programs are your friend. If your app is spewing out files, you're mostly there already. If it's populating a database, all you need to do is to dump those tables into files. Multiple lines per row, 1 line per field, sorted in a stable manner and properly formatted can be fed into any diff-type program.

Takes a lot of the scariness of rewriting stuff away.

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JLV
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Re: maybe it's time to re-consider server-side inefficiency

C++ REST? Respect.

Node and JS are weird, but sometimes you try something really clever and you go "haha, I thought that might work" and it does. There's a clever language hiding somewhere in there. The main issue, to me, is JS's atrocious support for early error checking and exceptions and never quite knowing what type of object you are looking at, or what 'this' might refer to. That, and client-side JS is hard to unit test efficiently unless you really know what you're doing (I don't).

For me, there's no overriding reason to code a backend in JS, its quirks are just not worth it. But it's not quite as clueless as people make it out to be. For frontend ES6+Vue are lightyears away from Java+Swing.

Java has way too much boilerplate and ceremony and is way too opinionated and enterprise/framework heavy to my taste. I'd rather code in almost anything else though I understand it somewhat. Applies 100x to J2EE.

I've peddled in C and like it. I'd love to look at Rust, Swift, maybe Go when I get a reason to. Surely 50 yrs after C and 30(?) after C++ we must have come up with better system languages than Java.

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JLV
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Re: maybe it's time to re-consider server-side inefficiency

I get that, and I agree with him that many people run sloppy systems. But if you're competent, you've already optimized the low-hanging fruits in your stack.

And if you're not, C/C++ are unlikely to work well for you ;-)

No one really seems to know how the Meltdown mitigation approaches will perform:

- after the various OSs have been tuned for them

- for different profiles of real-world taskloads: web, CPU-heavy, network, file I/O... We have synthetic kernel-only benchmarks at -50-60% efficiency, and ~0% games, so hard to tell where we'll all end up.

- what are the Meltdown risk profiles for paranoids (cloud providers who have to be) vs trusted platforms (systems where you know what you are running and where a Meltdown malware is already a failure in your systems to have it running in the first place.

- lastly, after Intel has pulled their thumb out of their rectum and fixed their next-iteration silicon.

Yet, BB already recommends C-based CGI. For real.

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JLV
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Re: maybe it's time to re-consider server-side inefficiency

yeah, cuz coding websites in C will make things waaay more secure...

And, are Django/JS even in the crosshairs of the heavy KPTI CPU losses? If they're doing I/O, would that I/O not happen pretty much the same way as a C program's would?

P.S. NO RANDOM CAPS????? 2018 RESOLUTION???

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where do database queries sit in the %CPU loss continuum?

I've heard of gaming, kernel-heavy, I/O heavy, etc... but what about RBMSs? Or even NoSQL? are they doing the kind of things that trigger that slowdown?

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UK drone collision study didn't show airliner window penetration

JLV
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Re: Let's just accept that the UK

Sadly, not just the UK is fond of morphing facts:

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/12/fight-over-seven-health-related-words-president-s-next-budget

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Proposed Brit law to ban b**tards brandishing bots to bulk-buy tickets

JLV
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>The fact that the secondary site is owned by the primary site is entirely coincidental of course.

+1

Equally convenient is that more tickets than allowed by event organisers doesn't apply since it's the organizers who are ripping you off.

Happily for me, I mostly attend smaller concerts in smaller venues, where the elaborate tricks to gouge the customers are less prominent. You can also buy off Craigslist, because people won't go through as much hassle to fake a $70 ticket as a $500 one. Though I still have nasty memories of the Pixies charging $150 minimum for their comeback gig 5 years ago, totally on their own initiative.

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Brazil says it has bagged Royal Navy flagship HMS Ocean for £84m

JLV
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Re: Whats in a name - I prefer the Banksian naming convention

damn, should have checked before my own post...

Attitude Adjuster, anyone?

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Kernel-memory-leaking Intel processor design flaw forces Linux, Windows redesign

JLV
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upside for AMD?

(I rather like AMD, used them preferentially back when I was building my own kit, in P4 days. I've been thinking of building a mini-ITX with my son and was already preferring AMD's Ryzen).

Once the dust settles, this may end up more negative to Intel than positive to AMD, sadly.

- it will be a big hit on Intel's financials

- assuming that it is relatively easily to design and implement a fix in silicon, this is a massive suck on Intel's current CPU lineup, but won't affect them much once the fix is in.

- Intel won't lose OEM business on existing systems (though the OEM's sales might drop). It need not lose business on future systems once they've fixed their silicon. It's vulnerable on a narrow range of systems where the choice of CPUs is still not finalized.

- Apple's rumors of switching to ARM arch concretizing? That would be a massive hit on Intel, but would do nada for AMD.

- OEMs may not at all be happy, but at least Intel has the $ to indemnify them, should it be decide to do so, or be forced to. AMD's $400M/Q losses just wouldn't allow it.

- Intel has always won because most premade system use them. A big part of that is their Intel Inside bribery incentive program. After this, they will just double down on spending big $ to wine and dine the OEMs and there's little AMD can do about it. Yes, massive reputational damage to Intel, but will it stick? Marketing $$$ is Intel's strength.

This will distract Intel, for sure. And it will cost them too. But will it change things a lot, much as we'd like more competition in the X86 space?

On the plus side for AMD, this couldn't have happened at a better time for them. They've had their moments when they were significantly better than Intel and right now is very much one of them. Had this happened 2 years ago, they would have had little to capitalize on.

Now, with the new Ryzens they have a much better story to tell to customers. If they can develop that into more OEM opportunities long term that'll be awesome.

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JLV
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Re: TRUMP??? Seriously?

We need a Godwin2 for morons who insist on dragging in the orange moron on every subject, no matter how unrelated.

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JLV
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Trollface

Re: Refunds and Compensation

Wow, this seems like a bad one. The PII floating point instruction was, IIRC, somewhat of an unlikely bug to happen, which is why it took a long time to spot - it really didn't affect most people too often and Intel could probably claim it worked well enough for most users. In any case, quoting Wikipedia

On December 20, 1994, Intel offered to replace all flawed Pentium processors on the basis of request, in response to mounting public pressure.[5] Although it turned out that only a small fraction of Pentium owners bothered to get their chips replaced, the financial impact on the company was significant.

A really nasty security exploit doesn't have that unlikely-ness protection - every black hat is going to have at it.

If Intel did the decent thing and replaced the CPUs (very unlikely) to their OEMs and assuming warranty/fit-for-purpose protections do their job and force vendors to make good (equally unlikely)...

then Apple may suddenly rue their tendency to solder things everywhere. Ditto for the Surface and its well-publicized glue-it-all.

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That was fast... unlike old iPhones: Apple sued for slowing down mobes

JLV
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Re: That probably explains..

Or, you could do like other Apple owners that have half a brain, find a trustworthy independent repair shop and get it serviced there. Faster, cheaper, no lineups.*

Plus, there is a hint in user replaceable

Funny how the world seems divided into Apple haters-no-matter-what and clueless fanbois who never hold them accountable for anything.

* one positive with Apple's market share and model range is that I've always been quoted much lower prices on iOS screen replacements than for other brands.

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To Puerto Ricans: A Register apology

JLV
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Re: Every day

> not all that bright

I think it's fair to look at the alternatives: while May may be somewhat of a gaffe prone incompetent politician with control freakery issues, she's not elected in a vacuum.

When your principal opponent goes on the record supporting Chavez, not 10 years ago, but considerably more recently after the actual misery caused by his policies have become amply apparent, then yes, in my book that does count in your favor.

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JLV
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Re: Every day

Hey, plenty of us saw that Ray Nagin (New Orlean's then mayor) was useless.

I think it's a great feature of the US political system that minority politicians can be elected (unlike say, France).

Of course, while it's usually a plus (and skipping on gerrymandering's pernicious impacts) sometimes unjustified racial preferences means you end up with incompetent nitwits running big jobs into the ground: this Nagin, then one mayor of Washington DC was a coke user, I also suspect mayors running Detroit for decades were the right color to get elected but not much fit otherwise.

Many of these people have been Dems, and, yes, it can hard to attack those men without seeming to rag on their ethnic voters.

Rarely however has there been such a flagrant case of unfitness fornicating with tribal voting as Trump.

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Firefox 57's been quietly delaying tracking scripts

JLV
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Re: So if it knows what the tracking stuff is

>Why doesn't it give us a way to "delay" it to infinity

that's NoScript's gig.

and banning JS scripts willy nilly is tricky - NoScript and cookie bans borked Facebook on FF for me. which got me to realize I didn't miss FB much and could fire up Chrome for it.

I use NoScript on almost everything, but best, IMHO, not to ban random non known-malware JS in the browser core behavior.

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JLV
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Re: At Adam 1...

Let's be honest and not blame green bananas for content issues:

would BB's posts make any more sense with normal capitalization? Methink not.

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Last week: Microsoft accused of covering up rape claim. This week: Microsoft backs anti-cover-up law ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

JLV
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Re: Restraining order for rape?

well some of these things don't make as much sense as they ought to:

https://www.google.ca/amp/s/www.theatlantic.com/amp/article/487415/

that's the Brock unconscious woman rape case where the guy got 6 months. Try telling me there is no way the law can screw up.

I think the general gist here is: take away the ability of companies to apply pressure through their employment contracts to sweep rape and harassment investigations under the carpet

which, besides being the right thing for victims, may also actually help things for people wrongfully accused* - criminal justice has a much higher burden of proof than just hearsay.

Or, to put it differently, would the Catholic church not have been infinitely better off if its tendency to sweep child abuse under the carpet had been legally prohibited and if it had been forced to clean house thoroughly and transparently?

* assuming that the law has been written with a balanced intent to protect victims of unjust accusations

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HMS Queen Elizabeth has sprung a leak and everyone's all a-tizzy

JLV
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Re: Aren't those fighters going to get a bit dated?

>50 years is a pretty standard life span for both a boat and a jet fighter

But those need not dovetail perfectly

Launched in 77, the Nimitz would have barely missed getting the Navy F4, getting F14s instead. Then F18s. And who knows, later even F35s???

This whole fiasco with the lack of catapults seems rather similar to buying an all-in-one PC where the original parts can't be switched, are expensive and do not even provide very good performance to start with.

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JLV
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Trollface

Re: Aren't those fighters going to get a bit dated?

>remained

both in terms of operational and first class remained seems misplaced wrt F35s.

or maybe it can be fixed thus:

military aircraft industrial welfare project which have remained operational and first-class for over half a century

in which case one would hope, but that might yet be mistaken optimism, that the F35's capabilities budgetary vacuuming would lessen rather sooner than over 50 yrs.

B52s aside, the OP has a point - a warship like this might be expected to field several generations of aircraft , not be stuck with1

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Funnily enough, no, IT admins who trash biz machines can't claim they had permission

JLV
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Double-kicked, even.

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