* Posts by Halfmad

394 posts • joined 16 Jan 2013

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While Facebook reinvents Sadville, we still dream of flying cars

Halfmad
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Re: Flying cars? Pft.

Why the f*ck would I want them flying above my house? Not like they'll be restricted to specific routes and of course the governance for it will take years and start happening properly AFTER it's started and AFTER several high profile crashes no doubt.

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PC sales are up across Europe. You read that right. PC sales are up

Halfmad
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Re: Brexit or not...

It's not cretinous to not know about computers especially since many of those buying them for grand children didn't have access to them until they were well into adulthood. I'm sure a few of them could teach our millennials a few things about how even modern car engines worked as they are far more likely to have had to get their hands dirty maintaining their own car.

Using the wrong terminology is one thing, fact is they knew what they meant - storage space as that's typically what's marketed as good as it holds all the kids "college work", it's not as if other goods aren't marketed as equally daft at times, cars for example are typically done on fuel efficiency none of us ever see and on glamour when it's a tool most of us don't think twice about until it breaks.

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Police Scotland and Accenture were at odds over ill-fated IT project i6

Halfmad
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Re: "at odds"?

Quite impressed that the Police had a contract sewn up like that, good on them - now if only whitehall could start doing that.

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Halfmad
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There's ideas being mooted of merging some of the remaining health boards and/or potentially parts of councils too. I can see the merit in some of it, but as always with IT there's a lot of contracts which need to expire etc for it to start happening without a huge amount set aside for buying out/penalty clauses.

What I don't get is why England can't do something similar, if anything everything there is becoming more fragmented year on year.

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Halfmad
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Re: £46m to save £20m PA.

It's likely more complicated than that, infrastructure will be quite different from one area to another and changing that can cost a lot of money and require existing contacts to expire first.

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Flaws found in Linksys routers that could be used to create a botnet

Halfmad
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Smart eh?

It's always the smart ones which are dumb.

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Have we got a new, hip compound IT phrase for you! Enter... UserDev

Halfmad
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Re: Success!

Not security, training and likely not following policy.

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No, Microsoft is not 'killing Windows 10 Mobile'

Halfmad
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They don't have to kill it off.

It'll die on it's own.

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Free health apps laugh in the face of privacy, sell your wheezing data

Halfmad
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You'd at least think they'd want to stifle the competition for it..

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Londoners will be trialling driverless cars in pedestrianised area

Halfmad
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Re: Make use of...

Personally I have nothing against cyclists, I do however hate this them v us attitude from both sides. I live in a fairly rural community and what really grinds my gears (insert Peter Griffin here) is that planning it done almost entirely focused on cities when cycling clubs won't go out in the city for fun, they'll head to rural roads, as will family groups. Those are generally very poorly catered for, yeah you can get to cycling routes, if you shove your bikes on a car first.

There's shit cyclists, there's shit drivers and there's shit pedestrians. The sooner we tackle the main problem - namely many of us having to commute for a job we could likely do at home the sooner we'd all be a little happier. productive and fatter.. I mean less stressed.

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Consumers go off PCs as global shipments continue their decline

Halfmad
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Re: Yet again...

I also find I'm increasingly being asked to build PCs for people, they may not have the confidence to do it themselves so just want me to hang out and double check things for them. I've no problem doing this as I'm the sort these days who says "I'm not private IT support" and I stick to that. But I'm happy to help give them confidence to tackle their build.

I've recently helped my 71 year old dad build his first gaming PC, he was bored after my mother died last year and he's gotten right into Skyrim and the Total War series since (with a bit of rocket league thrown in).

He was able to build the PC he wanted, with the monitor he wanted etc and without software he didn't want or pressure to buy "tech support" etc during the after sales pitch.

Company wise we still replace PCs in a cycle, which I think is increasingly mad and even our directors are starting to see it that way, PC slow? shove in another gig of RAM if it's a 64bit OS and an SSD, job done 99% of the time.

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HMRC beer duty bungle leaves breweries struggling to pay online

Halfmad
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I'm disappointed that El'Reg didn't jump on that one to be honest.

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Ford to build own data centre to store connected car data

Halfmad
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200PB by 2021..

That's a lot of "where our customers have been" data.

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Security co-operation unlikely to change post Brexit, despite threats

Halfmad
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That's not what was said, essentially it's a case of "we won't be able to share information unless we have an agreement to share information", that sharing is two way.

It's stating the bloody obvious.

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How to leak data from an air-gapped PC – using, er, a humble scanner

Halfmad
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Morse code by clicking a pen, that's my bet.

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Creators Update gives Windows 10 a bit of an Edge, but some old annoyances remain

Halfmad
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I'm only here for the MS hate.. but

I quite like Windows 10, I just wish they'd stop all the bullshit with it. As a core operating system it's fine for most users and it's relatively easy to support.

But my god can cortana get to ****.

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FYI Docs.com users: You may have leaked passwords, personal info – thousands have

Halfmad
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Re: Wait, so ....

The entire point of the site is to share information and showcase it - I think that's potentially the problem, people have treated it like a dropbox alternative instead.

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BT hit with £42m fine for Ethernet compensation delays to competitors

Halfmad
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How incredibly convenient

That this news comes out shortly AFTER a decision is made not to completely split BT from Openreach, one may ponder why it wasn't announced just a few weeks ago where it would have been seen as a fairly damning indictment of the way the two work together (but totally don't, no way, not at all.)

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Microsoft delivers secure China-only cut of Windows 10

Halfmad
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Re: So...

A choice, like the EU browser choice window only country flags showing who you want your data to be shared with first. I'd suggest making the US flag into the shape of the old IE logo and forcing it to be default anyway.

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World's worst botnet fiends switch from ransomware to stock scam spam

Halfmad
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Re: We are no longer the botnet called Ni!

You should consider moving to SHHHHH!!2! ASAP AC!

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London councils seek assurance over Capita's India offshoring plans

Halfmad
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Being alert is one thing, giving a damn is another. They'll start caring when the first council is hauled over hot coals for breaching it, assuming the ICO actually uses it's new teeth.

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UK's Association of British Travel Agents cops to data breach

Halfmad
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Re: Dumbing down?

As it was outsourced I doubt they'd know themselves.

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Halfmad
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Re: Perhaps another approach...

It'd help if they stopped storing compressed images of the letters etc on a public facing web server too.

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How UK’s GDPR law might not be judged 'adequate'

Halfmad
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Re: NHS

random doesn't mean unannounced.

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Fire brigade called to free man's bits from titanium ring's grip

Halfmad
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That image

Never has the el 'reg put such an appropriate image on an article, bravo!

*continues crossing his legs*

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Apple urged to legalize code injection: Let apps do JavaScript hot-fixes

Halfmad
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Legalize ?

Don't you mean facilitate? or at a stretch simply approve?

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Petya ransomware returns, wrapped in extra VX nastiness

Halfmad
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Re: Priorities

Hospitals are only the "losers" if local IT don't have appropriate backups running and local/network permissions set properly. At worse ransomware should encrypt local docs and shares the user has access too - that's assuming it gets past firewalls/sandboxing/AV and malware protection and application whitelisting etc.

Restoring a few folders is the bread and butter of most sysadmin roles, hardly a big deal and that's the WORSE case scenario in a well run IT department.

Proper application whitelisting alone massively reduces randomware infections on it's own.

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UK to block Kodi pirates in real-time: Saturday kick-off

Halfmad
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Re: Why the obsession with Kodi?

Latest media obsession, expect Rory Kettle-on Jones on the BBC to catch up in about 6 months and still manage to get a few mentions of Apple in whilst writing about it.

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Halfmad
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Re: Meh

I prefer the term "Sniperdeathball" as that's what it looks like when they dive.

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Scott McNealy: Your data is safer with marketers than governments

Halfmad
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No it's bloody not.

The government (and people usually throw the NHS into that) self report to the ICO far, far more than any private companies do. That's a fact.

Just because they aren't reporting themselves doesn't mean breaches don't happen, they are merely more worried about bad PR than public employees, many of whom would report to the ICO even if their bosses told them not to (sorry MPs!).

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Spy satellite scientist sent down for a year for stowing secrets at home

Halfmad
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Re: It will happen this way...

Paper is exceptionally easy to sneak out of buildings especially if done over the course of several years. They only found 500-600 pages by the sounds of it, doesn't mean that's all of it.

As for them "missing" the 500 page set the first time around, there's nothing to say it was in the house at the time or if after the first search he thought "well that's that - let's get my own back".

Bottom line is we don't know enough about the discrimination case or investigation to draw any real conclusion.

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User lubed PC with butter, because pressing a button didn't work

Halfmad
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There's a balance to be had with IT, I'm sure those who have worked in IT departments know this, there are always bad eggs (like every department).

If the organisation hero-worships IT then it'll never work properly, the bad eggs will do next to nothing and consider themselves above the rules that apply to other stuff. If the organisation treats IT like sh!t, they'll only have poor staff and a high turn over of decent workers.

Personally I think IT should always be treated like any core service department, it's given the funds it needs but oversight is fairly strict, importantly that oversight should be by someone who understands how IT functions e.g. a Director who has worked in IT hands on. You'd never have a finance director who'd never worked in payroll or accounting after all.

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Brit ISP TalkTalk blocks control tool TeamViewer

Halfmad
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Re: Re : I wonder where the scammers got hold of their client telephone ...

This would require two things which TalkTalk clearly don't have 1. Systems which are fit for purpose. 2. Management with an understanding of what's going on.

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Road accident nuisance callers fined £270,000 for being absolute sh*tbags

Halfmad
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Proving who did it is usually the problem.

They should be charged with handling stolen information and a new crime of "willfully using illegally obtained data".

It's easier to prove what someone has, than what someone did.

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Internet declared a citizen's right for 34 million Indians

Halfmad
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It's a great idea, but..

With the way the internet can change (like recent W3C green light to DRM) is it really a great idea to enshrine this in law?

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Watt the f... Dim smart meters caught simply making up readings

Halfmad
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Re: pah....

You assume they have an inventory that shows who has and who hasn't had one. I've twice been told to check my smart meter, I don't have one. I've also had quotes from my own supplier "based on my smart meter readings" via the post if I were to stay with them - after deciding to change.

They don't know, it's a complete mess and frankly that means I'll probably be considered to have one for decades to come despite having the old mechanical type.

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Nintendo Switch orders delayed: Dun dun dun... dundundun dundundun dadada!

Halfmad
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I honestly don't think that massively matters for most Nintendo fans, it's almost part of their styling to lag behind other consoles and 15 years behind the PC and it never seems to do them much harm.

Most of their games are about game play though, fair play to them.

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YouTube TV will be huge. Apple must respond

Halfmad
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Re: Apple has to do precisely nothing

Honestly I think this is different, it depends on the content they offer clearly but there is a market for it, I just think they may be a little late if they are looking to compete with Netflix and Amazon Prime.

I suspect Apple are just going to buy up a large company that currently dominates in another area and expand their portfolio, potentially something like Netflix.

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Security slip-ups in 1Password and other password managers 'extremely worrying'

Halfmad
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I use one, but with exceptions. My domain, email and master password for the PW manager itself are never stored there. Heck none of them are stored - they are the only ones I remember and change myself.

This means should my passwords all be leaked, the method of recovering access to those accounts (generally via e-mail) is secure.

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Prisoners' 'innovative' anti-IMSI catcher defence was ... er, tinfoil

Halfmad
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Re: A cheaper option in the long run?

Or just do random searches one or twice a week rather than going months ?

Still amazes me how we're looking for a tech solution to basic prison functions - in other words confiscating banned items regularly.

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Halfmad
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Re: Generally agree about other spaces but

I'm the primary carer for my elderly father and he's got an alarm that alerts me if he falls or he can press if he needs urgent help such as confused, lost etc. It sends me his GPS location as well as calling me (I have to answer it) in order for it not to then call other relatives.

I just find it amazing that we're even considering this tech when the bottom line is theatre staff not chucking people out who are using mobiles and prisoners not being searched and having cells searched frequently.

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Net neutrality? Bye bye, says American Pai

Halfmad
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Re: Most Unpopular Administration

I work next to an American who apparently voted for Trump, he never stops telling me. It doesn't matter what the current administration do - my colleague approves of it. I asked why he voted for Trump - he said to protect his right to guns.

Which is odd as he's been living in the UK for 10 years.

When pressed why, he said if he wanted to move back to the US he would become a gun owner again to protect himself.

Why don't you have one whilst living here? You could join a club?

No need, UK is safe, we don't need them at home. It's great.

I just.. I just.. /facepalm.

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Revealed: UK councils shrug at privacy worries, strap on body cams

Halfmad
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Re: Who's in charge?

They have no choice, it's in their charter that they must have opposing views in most shows. It's the same on radio 4 (which I listen to far more than I watch TV), you'll usually find someone from the opposite side of the argument even if they're a numpty that even the presenter clearly dislikes.

The BBC are left leaning, it's pretty obvious to anyone taking an impartial look at them - and I'm left leaning myself, just not someone who's loyal to any political party or the BBC.

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ESET antivirus cracks opens Apple Macs to remote root execution via man-in-middle diddle

Halfmad
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Re: Less secure?

Yes and they don't even charge for this extra functionality, such kind hearts.

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San Francisco uni IT bods to protest Tuesday over cuts, outsourcing

Halfmad
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I'm not a fan of outsourcing IT..

But it sounds as if the IT department there is pretty huge, it's possible that it's simply grown too big over the years as projects were added, department sprung up etc. It happens surprisingly frequently in large organisations particularly when IT staff initially start as part of a department before being merged into the IT department later, I've seen that a couple of times over the years.

The problem here is they seem to be wanting to primarily reduce spend, but outsourcing tends not to do that from my experience and will always result in lower customer (staff) satisfaction and/or increased cost per completed incident/project.

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Microsoft slaps Apple Gatekeeper-like controls on Windows 10: Install only apps from store

Halfmad
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Re: @Streaky First it's optional...

They won't remove it for one very simple reason - it'd force many companies to use Linux.

I work in Healthcare, if they did this we'd be on Linux within 12 months and we'd never be back to Microsoft, so naturally I'm hoping MS do it.

However my biggest problem would be that only 2 of our 200 IT staff have any real 'nix knowledge, they've spent their entire life supporting Windows or Mac OS and only a handful have even used a linux live CD..

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Apple's macOS is the safer choice – but not for the reason you think

Halfmad
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Re: systems that are no longer "secure" but "immune."

We could also do with a clever-UAC model. One which learns which permissions are not routinely required and resticts the user more as time goes on, whenever one of those permissions they haven't used in 6 months suddenly needs to be used - it should prompt the user for authorisation rather than just saying "ah screw it, this is within his rights".

We need our permissions models to be more reactive, right now we set them in stone and hope that's enough but there are permissions which could be removed over time which purely by prompting could alert the user to unusual activity.

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Google Chrome 56's crypto tweak 'borked thousands of computers' using Blue Coat security

Halfmad
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Re: A Symantec product is total shit

They are when they initially buy the company which produces it, then it's merged, screwed with and forgotten about and of course the original coders behind it leave. Job done - the Symantec way.

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NHS patient letters meant for GPs went undelivered for years

Halfmad
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Re: Optional

Missing the point a little, these would have included referral letters, diagnosis notifications, letters asking people to come in for appointments etc etc.

These haven't been acted on, heck I bet they can't even find out if some of these people are still alive and if there was a negative impact on health of those who are and those who not aren't.

Bottom line is that some of these could have been letters to patients or to a patient GP updating them on something VERY important such as urgent treatments for cancer, Hep C etc.

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Linux on Windows 10: Will penguin treats in Creators Update be enough to lure you?

Halfmad
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I'm only here for the MS hate.. but

As one of my friends who teaches computing at school says - this will be handy for some of his classes as more kids at home will have some form of access to linux even if their parents are averse to them using linux live CDs etc.

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