* Posts by Luiz Abdala

167 posts • joined 3 Jul 2007

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No, seriously, why are you holding your phone like that?

Luiz Abdala

All generations below mine...

...abhor actual phone calls and send voice messages through Whatsapp instead.

Which kinda makes sense, because actual phone calls are charged by the second, take longer to negotiate and are prone to failure, while compressed audio through whatsapp media is charged by the kilobyte in their data plan, is time-delayed instead of simply failing to transmit, and the net result is actually cheaper. Plus, the interlopers can repeat the messages to their hearts content, and those messages can be checked, before sending, for clarity.

Here is the jump to the topic: the messages are recorded using those 90 degree angles so they can see the screen at the same time they are recording, just in case the other party decides to send an emoji or (gasp!) text at the precise moment they are recording.

And during playback, they turn the volume of the phone down, in order to attain some privacy, and again hold the phone at that odd angle so they can hear the media like it was an actual phone conversation, but not being bothered by actual headphones, bluetooth or otherwise, while keeping the hand position to resume typing, or access once again the record button, at record speeds, no pun intended.

1 hour lost in my commute, observing 5 people doing those actions at the same time, in the metro, allowed this observation.

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'Fibre broadband' should mean glass wires poking into your router, reckons Brit survey

Luiz Abdala
Facepalm

Re: Better in the 3rd World

Perhaps they are referring to 5 GHz wifi 802.11 AC, to add more gasoline to the fire.

I set up a wifi repeater that had to be explicitly stated as 5 GHz, so it took the name [$wifiSSID 5G ext] and it dawned on me how easy it was to misuse it.

From 5 GHz to 5G...

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Luiz Abdala

In Brazil, of all places...

...they don't call it fibre or fiber unless there is a glass-filled thin wire plugged straight into the ISP-leased router on your desk.

They call it just 'cable' or 'Internet cable' at best, due to the commonality and ubiquity of a service provider first using DOCSIS 3.0 (over coaxial cables of course) common to TV's, only having actual fiber on the light pole outside. This service provider took advantage of using TV infrastructure (being a cable TV foremost) to advertise the new method of (broadband) Internet access.

The other service providers use POTS cabling and xDSL, again leaving the actual fiber cables on the poles. Only when you ask for 100+Mbps services, they will go the extra mile, rip everything copper off, and place another section of actual fiber all the way inside.

It turned out so because all ISP's, in one way or another, were behind the evolution curve kept by the clients, that DEMANDED proper installation of newer technologies, after having used dial-up for what seems like millennia and KNOWING that those were COPPER cables, and not fiber, going inside their homes.

The entirety of the Internet service provided in the country trickled down from enthusiasts and first-adopters, into the clients, families, employees, and colleagues of where the first-adopters worked and lived.

Only after the dial-up crowd was appeased and the looming threat of suing for false advertisement ended, actual advertising offering "cable internet" coupled with TV and phone services took place to a broader audience. The generic term was broad enough to ensure marketing couldn't possibly f*** up this time.

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Sysadmin cracked military PC’s security by reading the manual

Luiz Abdala

Re: Microsoft XML crazed fever extend to games.

Well, there's a Computer Repair Shop Simulator on Steam... so... anything goes.

From the cryptic broken english request from users asking to fix or upgrade their PCs, to waiting for delivery of parts, it's pretty broad.

And Solitaire games were developed to get the user familiar with the interface... like a mouse. A VR solitaire should serve the same purpose then, familiarity with the helmet/goggles and handles.

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Luiz Abdala

Microsoft XML crazed fever extend to games.

Microsoft Combat Flight Simulator 3 and Age of Empires 3 had all the game variables in XML files.

Things like "points of contact" of aircraft. 3 points with Z= 0 are the landing gear. Delete all the others and enjoy your nigh-invulnerable plane. Delete these 3 and watch the airplanes cross the airfield floor and explode when they go underground, even before the game begins.

Age of Empires 3 had all the variables spelled out, like TrebuchetAttackForce = 20 or something like that. Replace that 20 with 255 or 65536 and watch all your enemies buildings crumble beneath a single catapult attack. But I think that on AoE 3 only the heroes were identified, so if you changed one of these generic attack units, they would change for BOTH sides, so you could mod your game to your heart's content, knowing that your enemies would get the upgrade too... with hilarious results.

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Atari accuses El Reg of professional trolling and making stuff up. Welp, here's the interview tape for you to decide...

Luiz Abdala

I miss the old days...

...when the hardware said (lets use IBM) "IBM" outside.

You could be sure that every. single. chunk. inside. said IBM, or Made by IBM, or manufactured at [IBM address]. Every single part had the IBM logo, either embossed, or printed, or had at least a sticker. Every manual was carefully constructed, detailed, that even an idiot (hello, myself at age 16) could take it apart with a Phillips screwdriver. And it had pictures! Changing hard drives? Page 18! Adding RAM? Page 12! Your wife dumped you? Annex 12-b! It looked like they gave a fresh box to an intern and told him to put it together, and everything that went wrong on a statistical significance was logged and added to the manual.

Even things like flash a BIOS using a freaking bootable DOS disk were detailed, from which file to download, to "insert disk on drive a:" to how to find the reset button on the carcass of your model. They took you by the hand, and politely opened the limo door for you while holding an umbrella. You felt a VALUED CUSTOMER, you felt CARED.

These days, everything is licensed, it betrays the confidence you placed on this or that company, because almost ANYTHING is done through third-parties, where the Main company does NOT vouch for their warranty, or quality, or whatever.

(Not everybody. Shout out to AMD, that replaced me a Ryzen that never booted with a new one. RMA and a fresh proc across 2 continents in 15 days.)

We lost something valuable here.

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Pwned with '4 lines of code': Researchers warn SCADA systems are still hopelessly insecure

Luiz Abdala
Stop

Do not put these systems online then?

Why would you have any of these systems online? Just don't.

Put them at an USB pendrive of distance of an online PC, but do not hook them to an online machine. Use wi-fi, use ethernet cabling, but don't hook them directly to online machines. Ever.

And only allow system admins near them with said USB storage devices.

Go the BOFH way, and run stuff from a Command Center, not online. It is a hassle, true, but it is safe.

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Microsoft loves Linux so much its R Open install script rm'd /bin/sh

Luiz Abdala
Joke

Re: Remember the rule

But it looks like that in this case, it was running something like

[uninstall routine]

del c:/windows/system32/* /yes /force /fuckyou

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Apple MacBook butterfly keyboards 'defective', 'prone to fail' – lawsuit

Luiz Abdala
Trollface

Re: non-moving keys

I am expecting next from Apple that laser projection keyboard that just displays a laser grid on your desk. Instead of non-moving parts, no parts at all.

Ironically, this one in Amazon works for iPad and iPhone...

https://www.amazon.com/Projection-Keyboard-Bluetooth-Wireless-Smartphone/dp/B00X54W9FC

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Luiz Abdala

Re: I love my Cherry keyboard!

All those GAMING mechanical keyboards from Razer, etc, use Cherry switches. They even have a color code, Cherry Red, Cherry Blue, Cherry MX... at least the construction method was copyrighted.

Freaking hipsters took over, now they are expensive as hell.

https://lifehacker.com/how-to-choose-the-best-mechanical-keyboard-and-why-you-511140347

https://mechanicalkeyboards.com/shop/index.php?l=product_list&c=10

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Luiz Abdala
Joke

IBM Model M Keyboards...

Laughing all the way to the cupboard to get one of those, and heading to Apple to bash some skulls in... BOFH style...

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HP Ink to compensate punters for bricking third-party ink cartridges

Luiz Abdala

Re: USE A DOT MATRIX!

A friend of mine worked in a place where they used dot matrix Epson jobbies because it could run multi-forms.

He had to re-ink them with STAMP INK. BY HAND. They couldn't find replacement ribbons, so he kept doing that alternating 3 sets of ribbons. Then he started mending them with adhesive.

(You still can find LX300 printers, fresh with fancy USB ports. Those were not LX300's.)

Then he left the place.

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Luiz Abdala

Re: Lovin' my HP printer

There is a replacement kit for Laserjet 4 MPs with all the gears, rollers, and everything else that fails after 1 million miles, er, copies. So I heard.

Should you track one down, it will be good to go for another million pages.

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Luiz Abdala

Re: Lovin' my HP printer

Laserjet 4's were built like tanks, from the era they didn't profit from obsolescence. One of these and the same era Toyota Corolla, you will leave them to your grandkids.

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Luiz Abdala

HP is the blackest. Not the ink.

They seep blue ink along with the black ink, so you eventually need a replacement for an ink you didn't use. Specially if the color cartridge has all three colors into one body.

They say the ink is low when it is half full.

They lock third-party cartridges out, with legal proof coming from Australia.

An ink cartridge costs 0,20 currency* to manufacture, but it costs 20 full currency* to you.

Bulk-ink printers from HP are designed to fail a lot sooner than the ones that use cartridges.

(*) whatever your currency is, that is the scale of profit.

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Elon Musk's latest Tesla Model 3 delivery promise: 6,000... a week

Luiz Abdala
IT Angle

Re: Replacing the batteries.

Don't forget that the last 20% of said batteries are off-limits, unlocked by a special check-box that says, explicitly "I will make a long trip and require the full charge available", and said checkbox will clear itself in 72 hours. Some Tesla owner can show you that software button. Otherwise, you never get to fully charge the car to its full autonomy.

And I assume those remaining 20% (AND HERE IS YOUR IT ANGLE) gets to join an over-provisioning scheme, where these cells won't be actively charged and discharged, and will be probably used like that extra space in SSD drives, to increase durability of the battery pack, by reducing the number of cycles in each cell.

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Sysadmin’s worst client was … his mother! Until his sister called for help

Luiz Abdala

New folder > New Folder > New Folder

and then some:

New Folder

New Folder (2) along the way after a few years of updated Windows...

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Fear the Reaper: Man hospitalised after eating red hot chilli pepper

Luiz Abdala
Joke

Special Jalapeños...

We had a very special jar of jalapeños... that sat on the mess hall, behind a Nuclear Power Plant Control Room.

The few employees that had the privilege -or orders - to eat there were aware of that special jar, regularly topped up with the purest olive oil. Never a single piece of those peppers was removed from the jar - except one - since the power plant was commissioned in the year 2.000. It was 2003 and it was still there, looking exactly like a fresh bottle, bought in any store. The bravest ones would serve a few drops of that liquid in their meals, with no ill-effects in the short term. Even the most insipid grub would spring to life with a single oily drop of that vial. I have tasted it myself, and survived to tell the tale.

It was said that the Power Plant was jump-started with a single piece of jalapeño, from that flask, neutron emitters be damned. Since the lights on that mess hall were never actually turned off, fed from the same circuit of the control room, in a constantly inhabited place, nobody knows if that thing could actually glow in the dark or jump-start a Nuclear Power Plant, and nobody will ever know.

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Modern life is rubbish – so why not take a trip down memory lane with Windows File Manager?

Luiz Abdala
Holmes

Hmm, 2xExplorer Z1.

Now I know where 2xExplorer Z1 got its interface. Well done.

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2 + 2 = 4, er, 4.1, no, 4.3... Nvidia's Titan V GPUs spit out 'wrong answers' in scientific simulations

Luiz Abdala

Titan V for Pure Universal Bug Grep... research, then?

Who's got a Titan V, about to toss it in the bin, willing to donate it for... research?

You know, P. U. B. G, a linux memory dump readout effort searching for misplaced error strings...

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Home taping revisited: A mic in each hand, pointing at speakers

Luiz Abdala

I had a portable CD player with an option to sync-copy. You would select enough songs on the CD until the added time would be the amount you had of tape eg. 30 minutes. Then, you'd hit the REC+PLAY buttons on the cassette, and it would record those songs on that side.

Select the remaining to copy on the other side and presto.

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Luiz Abdala

I hated recording...

My old man used to live near a FM radio broadcast antenna. Very near.

Under it. Neighbor to it.

You turned the LP player on: you could hear the radio.

You turned the tape deck on: you could hear the radio.

You turned the amp on: you could hear the radio.

You turned the shelf speaker for the PC on: you could hear the radio.

You stretched a piece of copper and bit it with your dental fillings: you could hear the radio.

So you couldn't record anything. At all. Unless you wanted some random song or the evening news playing in the background, no you couldn't.

One day, he bought a stereo system that would PURPOSELY speed up the LP, and speed up the cassete tape recorder at the same rate. You could take 23 minutes to copy 45 m. worth of music.... with the freaking radio songs played at half speed, off-tune, in the background. It was haunting to hear some tunes at half speed.

I don't miss the experience of trying to filter a FM broadcaster out, that was violating every single local FCC rule.

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Suspected drug dealer who refused to poo for 46 DAYS released... on bail

Luiz Abdala
Coat

No man needs to hold...

... if they are not full of shit.

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Hubble Space Telescope one of 16 suffering data-scrambling sensor error

Luiz Abdala

Re: Differential input.

Feedback treatment is also pretty common among sound enthusiasts. Noise cancelling headphones, quite an achievement in Control, even in analog phase.

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Meltdown/Spectre week three: World still knee-deep in something nasty

Luiz Abdala

Re: A tactical mitigation/solution...?

If a chip can be reliably run at 10% overclock, they will give a new marketing moniker to sell it for 20% more.

Locked multipliers chips were sold SOLELY based on that. Entire generations of Celerons were underclocked gems that could be taken into stratospheric overclocks, provided you could cool them and the memory could keep up with them.

The entire overclock community was BORN exclusively of the fact that some CPUs were being purposely throttled and sold under different price tags, and someone discovered that the 50$ chip could perform just as much the 100$ chip, and the 100$ chip was the the same 50$ part, overclocked into the edge of electronic migration.

One certain old-school AMD chip was even "hard-locked", but this could be unlocked/overclocked if you shorted 2 pins.

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Luiz Abdala
Joke

If Windows create a section called:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/(...)/KnownBugsPatched (Boolean)

it's gonna add another 500MB of cruft on Windows Registry, just with descriptions.

Oh wait...

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'The capacitors exploded, showering the lab in flaming confetti'

Luiz Abdala
Mushroom

127V or 220V ?

My sister was working at a University Lab, as an undergraduate, and the place had gone under a major expansion and reform. Repainting, new furniture, more sockets, more lighting... the place was pretty much turned on 24/7 for lab experiments, except for illumination...

...but some sensitive lab equipment never survived the first weekend. And then 3 weeks in a row. Computers and more mundane gear as TVs survived without a problem.

So she asked a lift to complete an experiment on a Saturday, then we would go for lunch, so I waited for her to complete her task, and she explained the whole story. She turned off the lights and hell broke loose. Again.

We are not sure HOW the sparky managed to do it, but the 127V lights were somehow connected in series with all the power sockets...

As soon you turned all the lights off, all sockets would switch from 127V to 220V. I noticed literal sparks out of an empty socket when she turned the lights off, which shouldn't happen. At all.

A multi-meter and some turn-on-turn-off-lights later...

TVs and computers had multi-voltage PSUs and didn't give a damn about the voltage they were being fed... while the sensitive equipment, being really old, had fixed voltage PSU inputs...

I've never seen or heard of such a feat.

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Talk about a positive mental pl-attitude: WD Ultrastars shed disks without hit to capacity

Luiz Abdala

Re: Speeds?

[The 7K6 is said to be 12 per cent faster than the 600, although it spins at the same speed, 7,200rpm, and has the same 6Gbit/s SATA or 12Gbit/s SAS interfaces. The buffer size has doubled to 256MB.]

Something 12% faster than another thing. And the speed interface means SQUAT to spinning rust drives. Not a single MB/s metric out there.

Fine, I will look for performance charts of them in Anandtech or something.

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Luiz Abdala
Windows

Speeds?

I know, whoever buys these large drives is not after speed, but capacity... but how fast are they?

I bet somebody is planning to use one of these for backup, or something that requires a bit of speed, somewhere.... Like CCTV storage, or something similar. Whatever, there must be an use case that requires ginormous drives, and some performance combined.

Not even a brochure mention?

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F-35 'incomparable' to Harrier jump jet, top test pilot tells El Reg

Luiz Abdala
Go

Easier than GTA.

Land your VTOL Hydra at the top of Arcadius Business Center, in your favorite GTA game.

There, you can land the F35 more easily THAN THAT.

Color me impressed.

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Amount of pixels needed to make VR less crap may set your PC on fire

Luiz Abdala
Pint

Re: Interesting read

Q: [But why is it necessary to animate every blade of grass waving around in the background while I play Farcry ?]

A: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Escapism

People want to forget about their dull daily lives and immerse in something pleasant to the brain. Somewhere on the webs it is said that the visual cortex takes 70% of our brains, audio takes another hefty chunk of the remaining... so fooling them both will immerse you pretty handily.

And yes, my GPU also has more computing power than 2x my CPU, and guzzles just as much 'leccy as the whole rest of the system.

To almost complete the immersion of brain into pleasant things, you need a beer while playing.

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Nvidia: Using cheap GeForce, Titan GPUs in servers? Haha, nope!

Luiz Abdala
Joke

Name your research project Quake.exe and call it a day.

Just be sure to load some gaming on that research machine and nobody can utter a single word about EULA breach!

Time to fire that CS:GO server weekend section up!

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Watt? You thought the wireless charging war was over? It ain't even begun

Luiz Abdala
Go

I can't wait for car charging.

BMW developed a mat to charge a car... now picture the electromagnetic around this device when it is working.

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It gets worse: Microsoft’s Spectre-fixer wrecks some AMD PCs

Luiz Abdala
Pint

Re: So: Unplug network, Create restore point, Re-enable network, Install patch ...

Cross a few pair of fingers.... have a beer...

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Luiz Abdala
FAIL

Are Intel/AMD scrambling to create new processors without the flaws?

Is nobody answering that question?

Yes, several chips have multiple degrees of vulnerability for the issues... And Microsoft and Linux worlds can scramble to patch the issues via software, but...

CAN Intel and AMD design new chips without the flaws? Would they call it Core i3.1 or Core i4, or Core i6...?

Is it safe to say that Intel Roadmap have its place reserved on the trash bin, or at least delayed a whole generation to circumvent the design issue?

Did they stop making the faulty processors, or do they just expect the OS'es producers to completely fix the problem on the OS level?

Keep making the same processors with the same flaws is like keep making cars with Takata airbags to recall them later!

STOP DOWNVOTING ME! This is a valid question!

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Meltdown, Spectre: The password theft bugs at the heart of Intel CPUs

Luiz Abdala
Windows

Does it have anything to do with Von Neumann / Harvard architectures basic design premise?

One separates executable code from data code, and the other doesn't?

Just wondering if stuff was designed with Harvard design, would the flaw exist.... (because separating user executable code from kernel executable code would follow...)

PS... I'm completely ignorant and guessing here. Help.

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Kernel-memory-leaking Intel processor design flaw forces Linux, Windows redesign

Luiz Abdala
Stop

Stop the Presses...?

Taking this to the automotive side and mixing the kernel-level table jokes:

- Is Intel still selling CPUs with Takata airbags on them?

- Now they will send you a new catalyst for your muffler that will cut up to 30% of the horsepower of your vehicle?

- Nobody is suing VW for CPUs that had 30% extra horsepower, but polluted the environment?

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That was fast... unlike old iPhones: Apple sued for slowing down mobes

Luiz Abdala
FAIL

Where is the "battery saver" option?

Slap a button named "battery saver".

If checked, CPU is throttled to oblivion, but battery lasts the advertised™

If unchecked, CPU will run at full tilt, and the phone dies whenever batteries run out.

Is that so hard to implement? Nobody would be even upset.

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Tesla reveals a less-long-legged truck, but a bigger reservation price

Luiz Abdala

Re: Electricity vs Petrol/Diesel prices

And 178,731 km is next to nothing on the lifetime of a semi-truck. Trucks with 200,000 km on them are sold as "semi-new", no pun intended.

This thing will pay for itself much faster than any Diesel ever would.

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Car trouble: Keyless and lockless is no match for brainless

Luiz Abdala
Stop

Burglar lock-jammer...

Over here, most third-party alarm systems could be fooled by a radio jammer - that the burglars were quick to learn about. Victim parks car, burglar enables jamming, victim can't lock car, that gets nabbed.

Good old fashioned mechanical keys could not be fooled, however. Old habits of trying to open the car in order to test the lock, after being given the command to do so, couldn't be fooled, either.

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Oldest flying 747 finally grounded, 47 years after first flight

Luiz Abdala

Re: Post correction and update.

Thanks, forgot to account for about 20 years between those trivia facts regarding the B52.

I bet the 4th generation is in the works. And they never saw Top Gun, or listened to Danger Zone.

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Luiz Abdala

Re: For some jobs; you really do need 4 engines.

The B52 is the next best thing. It can even land sideways, should a test engine 'freeze' with its throttle open, the BUFF can land with a heavy yaw application, as if was suffering from crosswinds.

And it already runs on 8 engines in 4 pylons. A whole pylon could be spared for the test engine, and the aircraft would still have 6 good engines.

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Luiz Abdala

Re: A venerable workhorse

The B52 has 8 engines in 4 pylons. The US Air Force is not giving up on the BUFF anytime soon, and an airframe could easily re-purposed for engine testing, even if it meant taking off 2 engines and leave an entire pylon for the engine testbed purpose.

Fully unloaded, I doubt the B52 would face the same problems the 747 can already counter, such as the heavy yaw effect due to the uneven thrust. In fact, the B52 can even LAND way off the center line, since it has "crab landing gear", as in, the landing gear can also be twisted to make a heavy rudder landing, designed primarily for heavy crosswinds situation. The bomber is so reliable and the model so old, that in fact, the children of the first pilots already qualified and joined the Air Force and flew the bomber themselves.

Even so, nothing prevents them from building a whole new fresh 747 for the sole purpose of engine testing, even if the model has no longer any commercial application.

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Your top five dreadful people the Google manifesto has pulled out of the woodwork

Luiz Abdala

XKCD 1357

The man is entitled to his opinion.

But he should have kept his trap shut to keep his job.

I couldn't even understand most of what he said there, honestly, but it angered enough people to get him fired.

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CMD.EXE gets first makeover in 20 years in new Windows 10 build

Luiz Abdala
Windows

Speaking of which...

Can I read El Reg on white fonts with a black blackground?

Like the good'ol days of the Mosaic era, where all the sites had Arial 12 yellow fonts over black?

(A bit of BBS era nostalgia as well.)

Any scripts out there to fuzz around straight on the raw HTML code?

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Luiz Abdala

Ultima VIII Pagan..

I remember this game used a specific font, and depending on how the game crashed back to DOS...

... the prompt would inherit said font. Sorta.

Anybody cares for a command prompt with the equivalent of today's Small Font, size 16, in PURPLE?

4
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BOFH: Oh go on. Strap me to your Hell Desk, PFY

Luiz Abdala
Go

And Im using...

A completely fixed, non-adjustable desk, with a keyboard -lowered shelf, while the mouse sits on the LEFT of the desk. It was designed for PCs BEFORE the era of the mouse, but since I am LEFT-HANDED, the desk is PERFECT for me.

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Adobe will kill Flash by 2020: No more updates, support, tears, pain...

Luiz Abdala
Windows

Re: Webmasters, get your act together!

My Chrome crapped itself refusing to install flash as a security risk, and rerouted me straight to the beta site. (was it Chrome?)

Windows 10 offered me to install the mobile version from Windows store on one occasion. Even the app is cell-phone shaped. Anyway, that doesn't rely on any browser and can be killed instantly.

I don't know what part exactly turned Flash down, if it was AVG Antivirus (hahahahah perhaps no) if it was actually Chrome, and what other part routed me to the beta site.

TLDR; I don't know WTF happened but the Flash version of Ookla was stomped and killed with fire ON SIGHT.

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Create a user called '0day', get bonus root privs – thanks, Systemd!

Luiz Abdala
Windows

I could expect invalid usernames getting root in Windows...

...but I've never seen it in Unix / Linux before. (Provided I haven't touched one such system in 10 years, it would check out anyway, but I digress.)

Yet, people found the douchebag responsible for it under 42 femtoseconds. And then they got SURE he was a douchenozzle AND a douchebag that doesn't check boundaries on inputs whatsoever.

If it was a Windows Registry thingie we'd get "working as intended" blurted back by MS and then an obscure fix silently enabled on Patch Tuesday.

1
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In touching tribute to Samsung Note 7, fidget spinners burst in flames

Luiz Abdala

I'm thinking cell phone chargers. If you play, you get your phone charged. Or at least a flashlight.

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