* Posts by Brian Miller

931 posts • joined 3 Jul 2007

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Stanford Uni's intro to CompSci course adopts JavaScript, bins Java

Brian Miller
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Re: Education

And training is not education.

Recently, I worked with a developer who didn't know the difference between a C precompiler macro and a function. I had to write sample code to show him the difference. He had been writing C in the same job for 18 years.

I have worked with mathematicians who did not know programming data structures. They were somewhat competent, but did have a ways to go.

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Seagate launches non-flying disk drive for drones

Brian Miller
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Joke

Where's my flying NAS?

Hey, Seagate, where's my flying NAS? If the Navy can launch the USS Akron (ZRS-4), then we can have real storage in the clouds! So where is it? A disk on the ground is exactly that, and we need fully cloudy storage.

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Would you believe it? The Museum of Failure contains quite a few pieces of technology

Brian Miller
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Re: Bah!

Kodak developed the digital camera, but Kodak was not a technology company, and really still isn't a technology company. So they did a lousy job of bringing the tech to market. Yes, Kodak sensors were in a lot of other cameras. But then Kodak kept selling off important pieces to support the company, and finally all of the profitable pieces were gone, and then Kodak went through bankruptcy.

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Microsoft touts SQL Server 2017 as 'first RDBMS with built-in AI'

Brian Miller
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Linux

Pre-trained neural network

"The company claims SQL Server includes "built-in AI" as it introduces pre-trained neural network models for sentiment analysis..."

How much analysis is need for what people think about Vista and Windows 8? (Yes, I switched over to Linux as my main OS when my new laptop came with Windows 8. Yes, I upgraded it to Windows 10, the nine that is not nine, but I'm sticking with Linux.)

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H-1B applications down after Trump's 'American techies first' rhetoric

Brian Miller
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IT jobs may move to Canada

IIRC, Obama tried something similar, and the IT giants said they'd shift the positions up to Canada, where they won't get hassled. Now, the decline in H1B applications may be due to people choosing to not come to the U.S., or else it could be that the jobs have already shifted to Canada, or other countries where it is more convenient to employ the labor.

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'Nobody's got to use the internet,' argues idiot congressman in row over ISP privacy rules

Brian Miller
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Related to RFC 1149 - IP over punch cards?

Maybe Sensenbrenner's last real exposure to computers came during the days of punch cards. Sure, nobody had to use them, but they sure did. Want to make a phone call outside of your house? Better have a cell phone, because pay phones are very few and far between.

I bet Sensenbrenner really doesn't have to use the Internet, because he has his staff do it for him.

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Regulate This! Time to subject algorithms to our laws

Brian Miller
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Article title should be: "Subjecting our laws to algorithms"

From the text of the article, the laws and sentences are being subjected to algorithms. The problem is that the humans who should be giving the results a second thought and using them as a guideline are instead rubber stamping the results.

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Alert: Using a web ad blocker may identify you – to advertisers

Brian Miller
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Re: Noscript...

That's what happened to me, too! And I have Exploding Cookies, too. So: no cookies, no JavaScript, and thus certainly not much of a trackable foot print. If a website that I don't need to use doesn't work, I don't care.

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'Tech troll' sues EFF to silence 'Stupid Patent of the Month' blog. Now the EFF sues back

Brian Miller
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"you can't sue us because we're Americans" instead of fighting the ruling in Australia.

Actually, that is the valid legal point. Here, we have it enshrined in our country's constitution that we can say things that someone may deem as being unpopular. If that speech causes people to take note and someone's dubious business model grinds to a halt, so be it. This is what happens when someone "calls a spade a spade," and stands up to legal bullying over the statement.

If the trolls don't like California sunshine, too bad.

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Half-baked security: Hackers can hijack your smart Aga oven 'with a text message'

Brian Miller
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Use a clock timer

The only secure way for this to work is simply to use a clock timer. Set the clock time, and then set the time for when you'd like the Aga to start heating. Done.

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Troll it your way: Burger King ad tries to hijack Google Home gadgets

Brian Miller
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Re: Makes you wonder

There was a vulnerability in Windows voice recognition like this. Applications could be started via voice recognition, and then all hell meanders aimlessly about.

Of course, I suppose an ad could target Amazon Alexis. At least it's a search, and not instructing the device to place an order.

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TCP/IP headers leak info about what you're watching on Netflix

Brian Miller
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Silence on the Wire

A good book I read a while back was Silence on the Wire, about all of the data you could glean from a network just by listening. If someone wants to analyze your traffic, there's actually a lot that inadvertently leaks out.

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Radio hackers set off Dallas emergency sirens at midnight as a prank

Brian Miller
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Re: using radio waves...

"You're looking at around 88 operators, every single night, just in case someone pay this prank."

Well, I've called 911 myself a couple of times. Once was for an obstacle dropped on the freeway, and the other was for a prowler. The first was very quick, as other people had dialed it in, so about 10-15 seconds. I would imagine that the sirens would fall into this category. "Is this for the sirens?" "Yes." "OK, we're on it, bye." I'm guessing that Dallas might have 20 operators on duty.

Yes, it would be good if the 911 systems were more unified, so that idle operators in one area could take over for operators in another area. Unfortunately, I know that's not the case. Incidents like this always point out that the 911 system needs improvement.

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Brian Miller
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using radio waves...

I'm sure that the system was originally set up to be triggered in case normal communications, such as phone lines, etc., were disrupted. Unfortunately, these tend to be fairly simplistic, and of course are inadequate to the ease of being "hacked" by the modern miscreant.

FYI, some 911 systems use VoIP, so a DDOS could also blow that out. In this case, it only took 800 calls before the system was so backlogged that real emergencies had to wait minutes just to talk to an operator. Not good.

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As you stare at the dead British Airways website, remember the hundreds of tech staff it laid off

Brian Miller
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Why fly?

Yes, I realize it has to be done every once in a while. As seen with United, though, everything is at the business end of a billy club. Overbooked? Club the passengers off the plane. Here, we have an airline not allowing people on. And when you do go, you get searched in the most invasive way possible. And for things that only work in a movie script.

If people really want to change how airlines do business, don't do business with them. Don't like the security? Travel by another means. There are alternatives to the sky buses, and you can fly without all the security theater bother.

Act, and things change. Sit and stare, and nothing changes. You will choose, one way or another.

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Boeing-backed US upstart reckons it'll be building electric airliners

Brian Miller
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Catapult takeoff?

What if the airplanes used a catapult mechanism for an assisted takeoff? Then batteries might be adequate for short-hop commuter distances.

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Stop us if you've heard this: Cisco Aironet has hard-coded passwords

Brian Miller
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They will never learn.

There's a site called News of the Weird. Well, they have a section of weird stories that come up every so often, which are weird, but frequently enough that they no longer make the cut for being weird.

Hard-coded passwords. Default credentials that have been in use since 1970. No passwords. And the programming blunders.

Really, some of these simply should be firing offenses.

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Snakes and bats cause more blackouts than criminal haxors

Brian Miller
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Eh, as always, squirrels!

Yes, it's the wild life that takes out the power, most of the time. Gee, does that taste good? Too late! Let's all land on this wire! Not a good idea.

Personally, I always figured that the best way to disrupt air travel was to plant bird seed. Maybe throw some around the transformer stations, too.

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Minnesota, Illinois rebel over America's ISP privacy massacre, mull fresh info protections

Brian Miller
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Trump revitalizes America...

by making so many bad decisions that everybody gets off their butt and gets involved.

First, it was the travel ban. Now, it's about people's data. After that? I don't know, but I don't recall any other president generating this much action on part of the individual states of the union. Prior to the American civil war, the US was referred to as, "the United States are.." and afterwards, it's "the United States is." What Trump is doing is getting the states to behave as individual states, and maybe after he's done, the world will see the US as a collection of states again.

This will also be a big boost to various VPN providers and others who don't track their users. Some of them also have GitHub projects, so feel free to get involved!

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Next Generation Security: No, Dorothy, there is no magic wand

Brian Miller
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Re: There is a magic wand...

And to think that you did that right after I sprayed it with urushiol "disinfectant."

Really, that should be in the BOFH's playbook. "I got this rash, all I was doing was using my keyboard and mouse..."

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Uncle Sam needs you... to debug, improve Dept of Defense open-source software at code.mil

Brian Miller
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Oh, and pay us?

Will they pay us to improve their software? Will they? Or is this just another idiot project meant to make an agency look good?

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Meet the chap open-sourcing US govt code – Paul, an ex-Microsoft anti-piracy engineer

Brian Miller
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Go for it!

It's good to see that someone is getting the ball rolling for government-sponsored open source software. +1 for Paul, he's a very bright guy.

Really, various agencies should be tasked with producing open source software. Why not? They need the software just as much as world+dog. Not every good programmer out there is a dollar-obsessed mercenary.

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Microsoft makes cheeky bid for MongoDB devs on Azure security grounds

Brian Miller
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Change the port, put it behind firewall rules, and, uh, passwords??

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Why I had to sue the FCC – VoIP granddaddy Dan Berninger

Brian Miller
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"Say I have $1m ..."

“Also, no funder wants anything to do with a regulated industry. There’s no investment in infrastructure innovation. In the areas I work in, there’s no investment at all. Title II reclassification dried up investment funding. Say I have $1m and I want to invest it somewhere. I need to asses my prospects for success. These will be a function of the rules I’m facing. If the FCC is in there, then it’s game over. I don’t know what the rules are.”

I wish Mr. Berninger had given a better example. OK, so you have money to invest. Is it being invested in equipment infrastructure, or is it in a service? Is it the hardware that's being regulated, or the service that runs through the hardware? Is this a service that requires another service provider, or is it a service provider itself?

Personally, I always thought that "infrastructure" meant real hardware, not software. And we are seeing real innovation in hardware and software, despite the FCC.

Title II needs to be there, but it needs a very serious overhaul.

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Brian Miller
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Re: less gummint regulation is nearly always a good thing

Charge extra for something that's already in the RFCs? "Oh please, won't you please honor 802.1p and DSCP?"

The "neutrality" portion is so that all packets that are equal, are actually equal, I.e., one video service won't be favored over another, one VoIP provider won't be favored over another, etc., or even that one website won't be blocked out because it is "offensive."

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Talk of tech innovation is bullsh*t. Shut up and get the work done – says Linus Torvalds

Brian Miller
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Edison and Torvalds

Torvalds said he subscribes to the view that successful projects are 99 per cent perspiration, and one per cent innovation.

"Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration." - Thomas A. Edison

Gee, same concept, a century or so later. I'm not surprised. Everything goes to crap when shortcuts are taken.

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You know IoT security is bad when libertarians call for strict regulation

Brian Miller
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Known knowns, known unknowns, and unknown unknowns

One of the code review comments I've written: "Please use computer science to solve this problem." The developer had put in a sleep() to solve a resource problem. (He also didn't know the different between a function and a header macro.)

The problem with security is how hard is it to bypass it, and get to the target. Everybody wants something cheap, they want it now, and they want to plug it in and start using it.

We are faced with a paraphrase of what Donald Rumsfeld said, but in software security. There's always some weird crap happening, that some clever monkey has been able to figure out how to break the lock on the cage. ASLR has been broken by some clever JavaScript code. Who saw that one coming? And how about malicious code escaping from virtual machines?

There's a limit to what can be done. If you're one level above the end-user, then you can't do anything about the hardware in the CPU, or the code in the hypervisor. You can put down rules to keep a device from being accessed, but you can't do anything about the actual problem itself.

The manufacturer can do a certain number of things to "secure" the device, but even if they do their job, they still have to use code from someone else. How many IoT manufacturers write their own kernel?

The rules that should be in place are simple things, like requiring a good password the first time the device is used, and only offering additional services by manual configuration, not by default. For instance, if the device has a web UI, then require the consumer to log in via HTTPS, put in a good password, and then manually enable SNMP and SSH.

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Forget quantum and AI security hype, just write bug-free code, dammit

Brian Miller
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Re: Specifications are also part of the problem

In the instance you have created, the product is going to wind up being crap anyways.

Start with a spec, put the change into the spec as spec(A), and then tell the boss that the "small change" is really a big change, and will cause changes to many things down the line. And no, it can't go out tomorrow.

This is the problem of the idiot boss, who has never been a part of the actual process. This boss person is someone who has either never been trained in software development, or else did such a crap job that the only survival option was to become a manager, or go flip burgers. Guess which pays better.

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Brian Miller
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Re: We already have the techniques!

Re, race conditions, management pressure, and specifications:

As a matter of fact, I come from a background of mixed software and hardware. One of my bosses was from the Intel 80386 design team. Flat out, if you have complex race conditions, then either get someone who understands them, or use designs that avoid them. Race conditions are well-solved! Threading and concurrency are well-solved! There are many books that explain this stuff, and explain it well.

For management, yes, I am quite familiar with the "ship it now" idiots. I just left a company where that was the mantra, and it resulted in a garbage product that was repeatedly rejected by customers. Literally, the customers would demand their money back because the product actually didn't work, and the management never decided to ship a quality product. If you work in an ethics-free company, then the only thing to do is get out of there. Run. The management just wants to screw over everybody, and then fold and run when trouble comes.

As for the spec, yes, part of the "engineering" is getting the spec right, as in, a coherent and correct spec. I had a temp job at an OS company in Redmond, WA, where the spec was, literally, the names of some structure fields, and nothing else. They claimed that a full spec wasn't "buying" them anything, so they didn't do it. The team had some of the worst code monkeys I've ever seen.

The source of truly bad software is people who don't give a s***!! Managers who know nothing are managing programmers who lie out their ass. "Oh, hey, I'm managing!" "Oh, hey, I wrote code that compiles!" That creates a living hell for anyone who actually cares about quality. You can write up hundreds of bugs, but the product will get shipped anyway, because something has to go out the door.

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Brian Miller
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Mushroom

We already have the techniques!

Back in the day, I was taught something called, "software engineering." That's when you take a spec, one that has been coherently thought out, and go through a process to create and test the code. How many out there know any real methodologies for writing code?

At the last company I worked, the code may have well been written by monkeys. Whether it was C or Java, it was a load of trash. It wasn't a matter of, "I can write COBOL in anything," it was a case of having no clue about organizing anything, or that the data mattered at all. Nope, you got a keyboard, it compiles, and so you toss it out and call it good. "We have to ship something some time!"

No, not good enough. In fact, very stupid. What does this mean? It meant a product that was upgraded by downloading the source code, and compiling it on a customer's system. It meant a system that was patched again and again, with nearly each customer's machine being subtly different. No, the systems were not performant. Yes, the systems crashed. Customers were not happy. Some ditched the systems, but the management never got a clue, no matter how many times the customers slapped them in the face!

We have techniques to write bug-free software, and it doesn't have to do with the language. It has to do with the methodology that's used to write the code. It has to do with the management being responsible enough to desire good code, instead of throwing a handful of crap at the customer.

Kanban: a better handful of shit than the last time!

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Toshiba chairman quits over $6bn nuclear loss

Brian Miller
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Re: That's a real problem in the US; corporations are in control and inflate all earnings

Actually, the mess started with a pipe company in Louisiana. (Bloomberg article) Then one lying deal went on to another lying deal, and finally it all got bought by Toshiba, who was wearing rose-colored glasses, and then it all went in the crapper.

This is what happens when nuclear power plants get built by those without any expertise, and then the inspectors come along and cry foul. Toshiba should have stuck with its 4S plants, and avoided getting into the big plants. Especially when the "strategic acquisition" is Westinghouse, known for producing steam exchanges with cracking problems.

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Battle of the botnets: My zombie horde's bigger than yours

Brian Miller
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Re: Previous Reports

... The real issue is that computer security is still just a bolt-on, rather than inherent to a design. ... "accept all" is the problem here, and it's been stupid since day one to trust the internal network so implicitly on a consumer-level home network.

Here's the problem with white-listing: "yes" "yes" "yes" "yes" "yes" "yes" "yes" "yes" "yes" etc.

People are putting vulnerable devices on the "DMZ" of their home router, because they think they want to access their IP camera from their phone, or whatever. The home routers don't have any ability to manage their rule sets to something like, "DMZ, but only for addresses from a Verizon cell phone."

Until then, stuff will be tossed out into the DMZ, and that's it, with less attention to security than when it came from the manufacturer, because the really don't know any better.

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Brian Miller
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Previous Reports

Take a look at the Akamai report page in sequence:

"IoT botnet attacks are real and present threats."

"300 Gbps attacks become more common."

It's gone from "real and present" to "common." The solutions to this problem are not with the government. The ISPs are going to have to band together, and block access. Somebody wants their connection turned back on? Take care of your problem first.

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GoDaddy CEO says US is 'tech illiterate' (so, yeah, don't shut off that cheap H-1B supply)

Brian Miller
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Re: Cheap labor

It's about cheap labor, and the opportunity to treat people badly.

One company where I worked back in the 1990s had a problem with lab techs. The boss was very miserable to the techs, so they kept quitting. There wasn't a shortage of new US techs, it was keeping them despite the boss. So they hired an H1B from Pakistan. Problem "solved." Yes, the management lied on the federal form.

And yes, it's a felony to lie on that form. And no, the powers that be don't check, because it's too expensive and not worth the return to prosecute.

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Despite the spiel, we're still some decades from true anti-malware AI

Brian Miller
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Re: Um, sarcastic joking?

"I would think a nice stiff rod swing ..."

And that's effective with AI software, how?

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Brian Miller
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Joke

Um, sarcastic joking?

Oh, I get it now: you're being sarcastic. Right? Since we can parse natural language better and apply it to a web search or an app, then it must be good enough for protecting us from ingenious minds who want to play havoc on our computers.

Sad fact: we have nothing that passes Alan Turing's original test: how to tell a woman from a man pretending to be a woman. So, will the computer pretend to be the woman, or will it pretend to be the man pretending to be the woman?

What is being presented as AI is the anti-malware version of Clippy: "Say, it looks like you're encrypting your disk. Do want some help with that?" (The user will, of course, click "yes" and the disk will not only be encrypted by the ransom-ware, but also by a helpful AI who will keep the password from you, as you'd just breach security anyways with it.)

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Google to cough up $20m after Chrome rips off anti-malware patents

Brian Miller
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WTF?

Again, prior art?

Doesn't this patent cover how the Intel 80386 works, along with an operating system that supports protected mode?

I wonder if someone brought a patent infringement suit involving cattle if the jury would be able to comprehend it. Hopefully, in a case involving a patent troll and cattle, they would cry, "Bull****!"

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Brave VMs to destroy themselves, any malware they find on HP's new laptop

Brian Miller
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But cell phones already do this...

Except that it's not in response to malware.

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Lovely. Now someone's ported IoT-menacing Mirai to Windows boxes

Brian Miller
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Protecting the numpties

Look, it would be nice if everyone were paranoid about their network security, etc. However, the world has numpties, and it's not easy protecting them, from them selves, or world + dog from the actions of numpties.

A Windows box gets infected (and all the time), and then it spreads its binary disease wherever it can. Clue: the numptie clicked somewhere that entices numpties to click, and then everything went pear-shaped. We don't fire numpties, we just let them sit there, doing what they think of as a job. We can only clean up behind their damage.

Yes, we need internal honeypots, routers, and firewalls that can interact with managed switches to shut down hostile devices. There's an FTC competition about that.

At Microsoft, they monitor their network, and shut off switch ports at the drop of a hat. It's up to the people on the other end to clean up their mess, and then they'll re-enable the port of it looks safe. That's not a bad way to run a network. (Too bad they also don't fire numpties.)

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Life after antivirus: Reinventing endpoint security

Brian Miller
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Well, yes, that is how it works. And then there are those who will blow through half-a-dozen prompts in order to run that malware they received, or even shut off the scanner.

It's always a challenge to defend the benign-and-stupid against the clever-and-malignant. That's what scanners try to do.

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AMD's daring new money-making strategy: Sue everyone! Mwahaha

Brian Miller
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Re: That's the point

Didn't nVidia rip off Silicon Graphics' patents? Hmmm, then SGI sued them, and then they formed a "strategic alliance."

Could that be AMD's future?

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Intel Atom chips have been dying for at least 18 months – only now is truth coming to light

Brian Miller
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Re: Insider's View

I have a hard time believing that Intel didn't catch this during QC testing, as some tests subject the MCU to intense heat over a short period of time.

I can believe that they didn't catch this, as this sounds like long-term component degradation. A short heat test of, say, 72 hours, probably wouldn't catch this. Maybe there is something actually growing on the inside of the chip packaging, too. It could have been fine in the initial samples, and then when they went to production something happened.

(A former boss of mine worked on the i386 design team, so I learned a few interesting things.)

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Pentagon anti-missile-on-missile test actually WORKS, for once

Brian Miller
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Hair-trigger destruction

How fast can a missile be destroyed, so as not to set off the payload? If I were confident that my missiles would be going through a "shield," I would put in a mechanism to detect a catastrophic event, and set off the payload for grins and giggles. You don't need to flatten a city to unleash hell, you just need to get the EMP to wipe out as much of the grid and electronics as possible. Two small nukes can wipe out the entire US electrical grid. Pentagon estimates are for 90% of the population dead within a year, without electricity.

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Slammer worm slithers back online to attack ancient SQL servers

Brian Miller
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Bugs? Fixed? Really?

Wow! A blast from the past. What's next? Oh, yeah, Windows can be taken down with a bad SMB link.

I guess we do need the ROTM to patch all of the fscking bugs and write good software for us.

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US tech giants take brave immigration stand that has nothing to do with profit whatsoever

Brian Miller
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Re: That's a long article, let me condense it for you.

Compare that to Canada. Years ago when my company needed to temporarily transfer me to work in Canada, they had to first prove to CA that I had skills that could not be properly satisfied by existing Canadian labor. Many countries have the same, or similar, requirements.

Actually, the US also has that stipulation, and it's a felony to violate it. Unfortunately, that isn't enforced. I remember a former employer who decided to bring in a worker from Pakistan because the workplace was so horrible the workers kept quitting. The joke was, "OK, who wants to sign this and commit a felony?"

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Mozilla axes IoT project, cuts staff, backs off from commercial stuff

Brian Miller
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IoT emerging like Nylanderia Fulva

"IoT is clearly an emerging technology space ..."

It isn't emerging, it has emerged, and has become a serious plague o'er all the lands, like tawny crazy ants. What the Mozillans have done is admit defeat, and thrown in the towel. Look at their wiki:

1. Build internet-connected devices that empower individuals, enrich their lives, and magnify the public benefit of the internet;

2. Leverage our experience building devices to develop an open-source platform for the Internet of Things that promotes security, privacy, decentralization, interoperability, accessibility and openness; and

3. Engage commercial partners to bring our products to market and to drive widespread adoption of our platform.

It's all about rainbow unicorn ponies! Or garden gnome business plans.

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Microsoft's device masterplan shows it's still fighting Apple

Brian Miller
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FAIL

We don't need another Clippy

But it seems that we're going to get several, despite what we actually want.

"Hey, let's add another feature!" No, please don't. When Windows 8 came out, I bought a new laptop. It was so awful that I promptly made Ubuntu my main OS instead of secondary OS. I hardly ever use my Windows laptop now. And no, I did not have an easy time "upgrading" it to Windows 10; it required a complete reinstallation.

Microsoft is about maximalism, not minimalism. More bloat, more slow, more suck.

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Naughty sysadmins use dark magic to fix PCs for clueless users

Brian Miller
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Re: No quite wizadry but.../ Percussive Maintenance

A friend of mine related a story about percussive maintenance. When he was in the US Navy as an electronics tech, there was a certain terminal that would break once in a while, When said terminal was reassembled, it might need a whack on the side before the CRT scan would sync up. A young lieutenant was ushering a group of visitors on the bridge when my friend had finished maintenance. The display went on the fritz, and the lieutenant told his visitors, "Now see how this sailor uses his technical expertise to fix the problem." Since my friend was known to be religious, he said a prayer: "Heavenly Father, please show your mercy and blessings upon this terminal. Heal!" And "laid on hands" on both sides of the terminal, whereupon it commenced to work.

He was told by the captain, "Never do that again, unless I'm there to laugh my ass off!"

(Personally, I have had a "broken" printer that commenced to work immediately as I walked in the room.)

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Stop replying! pleads NetApp customer stuck in reply-allpocalypse

Brian Miller
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Windows

Microsoft: "Me, too!"

This stuff happens at Microsoft every once in a while. The biggest incident was in the late 90's, when someone noticed that they were on a mailing list they didn't know about. This happened to be a mailing list that was constructed for testing purposes.

Idiot: "Who owns this list, and what is it for?"

Idiot2: "I'd like to know, too."

Idiot3: "Me, too!"

Idiot4: "Me, three!"

And so on, and so on. The Exchange mail servers were overloaded for at least three days.

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More mobe malware creeps into Google Play – this time, ransomware

Brian Miller
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Different checks for different apps?

The apps that I've gotten through the review process have been communications, and both Google and Apple have taken an interest in them. Apple rejected one based on the lack of a "beep" when the call was recorded, and another time they wanted a video showing the app being used. Google has always taken quite some time, many hours, for the app to work its way through their process. I've never seen a Google app be approved in minutes.

From all of the malware that's been springing up from the very first on the Google play store, I would have expected that some rather heavy analysis would have been instituted to put in some red flag checks. Apps that ask for administrator privileges should be marked with a big red flag. I'd really love to see a comparison of Google Bouncer to the "virus" scanners from the major AV players.

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