* Posts by T. F. M. Reader

518 posts • joined 19 Dec 2012

Page:

Nuh-uh, Google, you WILL hand over emails stored on foreign servers, says US judge

T. F. M. Reader

Microsoft and Google

I have read the judge's decision and while I feel that some details are not spelled out in it I am guessing that the point is that there are substantial differences between the Microsoft and Google cases.

Apparently (it is quoted in the decision) when one signs up with Microsoft one states one's location and all the data are "segmented into regions", i.e., stored in the data centers in the same region as the customer. This was the central issue when the US demanded data that was never stored in the US by design.

It is not clear to me what the "responsive data" were in the Google case, but I am guessing that the customers were American (or at least located in the US) and the fact that the data were stored elsewhere was merely incidental and not a consequence of intentional segmentation.

It is also not entirely clear to me what information was in fact covered by the warrant. The order mentions "subscriber information" (this, apparently, includes various metadata, search history, location - I can see how this might be treated differently from, say, email contents). Arguably, Google possess this information in their main business location in CA, even if the record is in fact stored in another country (again, for purely technical reasons).

IANAL, and as I said, not all the details are clear. However, I certainly can see the judge may have a point.

6
0

'Nobody's got to use the internet,' argues idiot congressman in row over ISP privacy rules

T. F. M. Reader

Isn't he the same guy...

...who was one of the original sponsors of the PATRIOT Act? So, this might just be that rare case where one should attribute his voting pattern to malice rather than stupidity.

4
0

Half-baked security: Hackers can hijack your smart Aga oven 'with a text message'

T. F. M. Reader

The cost of security

Did I read it right? You really can make your IoT more secure by paying £6/mo less? Or will the bloody oven become inoperable without the mobile connection?

3
0
T. F. M. Reader

Re: Not even half-baked security

s/developers/product managers/ ?

3
0

Cowardly Microsoft buries critical Hyper-V, WordPad, Office, Outlook, etc security patches in normal fixes

T. F. M. Reader

Proper procedure?

OK, this begs a genuine question. You are an IT guy at some company that is a lot more serious than a mom-and-pop candy shop. You have a lot of laptops, and a significant number of servers. You need to deal with MSFT, and you also have software from other vendors running here and there. All of these issue updates from time to time, MSFT may be somewhat more organized than others as far as update schedules go.

Would you go over the list of patches (maybe de-obfuscated by El Reg or someone else) and test these patches individually in some sort of staging area to verify that they don't break anything AMD-based, ATI-based, Hyper-V-based, an odd installed DLL, or a non-default configuration setting that you pushed everywhere for unrelated reasons? Will you test and apply the critical stuff first and deal with less important updates later (but still test them)? Or, presented with such a mess, just apply the whole update on staging machines, check for any black smoke, and roll it out to every box in the organization as one big lump? Especially if the software/updates may affect the system boot, user logins, operation, security, etc.?

Inquiring minds want to know. One reason for the curiosity is that we provide software and updates, and we want to make our customers' admins' lives as easy as possible. Not only by having no (all right, as few as possible) bugs in the first place but also by integrating into the customers' procedures smoothly even when there are no bugs. My experience and inclinations do not necessarily tell me what others do.

What say you, commentards?

7
3

Official science we knew all along: Facebook makes you sad :-(

T. F. M. Reader

Re: Chicken and egg

To be fair, that's what the study - and the article - point out, too: correlation is not causation.

10
0

Put down your coffee and admire the sheer amount of data Windows 10 Creators Update will slurp from your PC

T. F. M. Reader

Re: Fighting back?

Anybody reading the Reg should be able to configure their router to block the telemetry servers, surely?

This will only work until you take your laptop out of the safety of your house.

4
0

NY court slaps down Facebook's attempt to keep accounts secret from search warrants

T. F. M. Reader

Does not compute...

Either the reporter is confused (not just El Reg, but Reuters, too), or the Court is. I definitely am.

On the one hand, the warrants demand that Facebook does not "tell users the warrants existed".

On the other hand, "challenging warrants is none of Facebook’s business – that’s up to the targets of the warrants."

Huh?

40
2

Wi-Fi sex toy with built-in camera fails penetration test

T. F. M. Reader

Reg-inspired?

Someone took the "Pictures or it didn't happen" meme a bit too far... eh... deep...

14
0

BMW chief: Big auto will stay in the driving seat with autonomous cars

T. F. M. Reader

Re: Cars built by an OEM

Happens now. E.g., Magna builds cars for BMW:

http://www.bmwblog.com/2016/01/15/magna-international-has-won-a-major-contract-to-build-vehicles-for-bmw/

http://www.bnn.ca/magna-to-make-bmw-s-5-series-sedans-at-austrian-plant-1.567348

1
0
T. F. M. Reader

Re: Well...

@regregular: "Tesla got 'em bad, in many markets the vehicle is ridiculously successful, much to the surprise of the industry".

Not so sure about this. TSLA is steadily in the red financially, bleeding money year after year which, for me, counts more towards the reality of being "ridiculously successful" than the coolness factor of a niche product. Tesla are nowhere close to having an iPhone class product. BMW sold ~2.4M cars last year with ~EUR7B after tax profits, on ~EUR94B revenue. Tesla produced ~84K cars last year (delivered ~76K), with revenue of ~USD7B and ~USD675M losses. I do not see BMW, let alone the automotive industry as a whole, shaking in their boots because of Tesla's "ridiculous success" yet. [All the numbers come from the official financial statements that are easy to find on the 'net.]

Not everybody seems to be ecstatic about the product, either. Negative consumer opinions about Model S and Model X quality issues on delivery abound, too. It is not clear to me whether those issues are systemic or anecdotal. To be fair (and anecdotal), a friend had horrible experience with is new BMW 5 series a few years back - BMW had to replace the car.

I also have my doubts regarding, say, MobilEye valuation: is a company that produces a minor and non-unique optional feature that amounts to a sensor rather than a complete functional component of any future autonomous vehicle really worth ~30% of the market cap of BMW (or Ford, or GM)? Maybe BMW have a reason to be skeptical (should I say, realistic?) about such a Silicon Valley approach to the field?

And apart from Tesla, no other frequently mentioned player - Google, Uber, now Intel - seems to think of making their own vehicles. Rather, they'll want their technology to be adopted by the incumbents, who, by the way, understand the inherent responsibilities and liabilities far better than the overly optimistic Silicon Valley geeks. So I, for one, expect the BMWs of the world to remain in the driver's seat and to keep their badges on the hoods of those autonomous cars.

4
0

Cisco boxen hang after 213-and-a-half days

T. F. M. Reader

So, what overflows?

The usual reason for this is a 32 bit counter of milliseconds overflowing, but that happens after 49 days and 17 hours, approximately.

I still remember when someone managed to run Windows for 50 days without a reboot for the first time...

Now, it would seem to me that Cisco have learnt that lesson and use a 64 bit counter. Unfortunately, they also decided to count picoseconds...

$ echo '2^64/18446400/10^12' | bc -l

1.00001865262108333420

6
0

BOFH: The Boss, the floppy and the work 'experience'

T. F. M. Reader

Re: Being on a placement myself...

Not met one who hasn't given the Dog-like confused head tilt when told to put the kettle on.

What do you expect from a poor intern? One needs to configure the kettle's IPv6 address (or DHCP), set up creds to connect to the network, make sure the NAC allows it, the firewall lets the kettle report to the Mothership-in-the-Cloud on a custom port... It's all IoT these days, you know, and the intern is not a competent IT professional yet...

It's up to you to train him in these essentials.

3
0

Twitter trolls are destroying democracy, warn eggheads

T. F. M. Reader

Predicted long ago

"The best argument against democracy is a five minute conversation with an average voter." - Winston Churchill.

18
0

Facebook chokes off car insurance slurp because – get this – it has privacy concerns

T. F. M. Reader

Never say "never" on Facebook

The heuristics (mentioned in other reports) the Admiral's algorithm would use look rather dubious to me. For instance, people who use words "never" or "always" would be regarded as overconfident and would get higher quotes, while people who prefer "maybe" would be regarded as cautious and thus safer drivers.

So, if you are cautious, or just care about your car insurance premium, never say "never" on FB, and in general always watch what you post. Uh-oh, did my premium just go up? Or is the algo smart enough to analyse the context? Somehow I doubt it is...

1
1

AI software should be able to register its own patents, law prof argues

T. F. M. Reader

Will AI be able to sue other AI or humans for infringement?

Why does this sound to me more dangerous than SkyNet?

1
0

Your wget is broken and should DIE, dev tells Microsoft

T. F. M. Reader

Re: Wow, every single sentence in your post is a little gem of stupidity.

Where 'little gem' is an alias for Kohinoor Diamond

... but only if ruby is not installed.

8
0

Password strength meters promote piss-poor paswords

T. F. M. Reader

Re: Passwords need to be rethought

@Being forced to reset the password means either the hole gets closed as the user changes the password or the breach gets detected...

It also means, especially since the users cannot use passwords similar to old ones (along the lines of Password34->Password35), that a (more) significant portion of the user population gives up on mnemonics and starts writing passwords down. The overall effect is that the probability of breach increases.

1
0

World religions stake out positions on Pokemon Go

T. F. M. Reader

Curious

I have not installed Pokemon Go, nor am I curious enough to try. One aspect does pique my curiousity though. My understanding is that when one starts playing both the phone's camera and GPS are switched on. I am curious whether anyone technically knowledgeable has checked whether the phone sends large amounts of data anywhere.

Given that, as far as I understand, players can be lured to "interesting" places by a third party there seem to be interesting possibilities...

Just curious...

3
0

A trip to the Twilight Zone with a support guy called Iron Maiden

T. F. M. Reader
Coat

Re: Hmm.

"dont do water in Cologne"

They do. They just call it Eau de Cologne.

13
0

'Leave EU means...' WHAT?! Britons ask Google after results declared

T. F. M. Reader

Re: Seriously...

"half the country has a below-average IQ!"

It's worse than you think, actually: more than half the country has below-average IQ. But don't despair, even after Article 50 is triggered half the country will still have above-median income.

3
0

'Nobody cares about your heart-rate'

T. F. M. Reader

Brilliant ideas

Let me see... Up to now people have been trying to convince me that using a smartphone to switch on the dishwasher from another continent or unlock the (IPv6-equipped) front door are brilliant ideas compared to pressing a button or inserting a key. Now they say that configuring and maintaining a firewall, a VPN, an IDS, and secure data storage in the cloud to allow me to open my front door without worrying will be even more brilliant?

I suppose the profit-sharing agreement with insurance companies is a brilliant idea.

3
0

Canny Canadian PM schools snarky hack on quantum computing

T. F. M. Reader

Politics used to be a noble science

I do not follow Canadian politics or Trudeau, but this does not prevent me from making a few disinterested observations:

1. The offered explanation can only be judged impressive in comparison with Sen. Feinstein's grasp of number theory.

2. A political press event at a scientific establishment, and no one among the generally skeptical El Reg commentariat voices a suspicion the question could be a plant?

3. Successful politicians tend to know how to be charming, and how to engineer (sic!) situations to apply the charm.

I will see nothing wrong in the situation even if it proves to be a plant, but it's still not like he gave a coherent and informed speech on what D-Wave Systems' success could mean to the Canadian technology (preferably with a high level overview of the controversy about whether they have demonstrated any quantum features... no, that's me being snark...). That would both make him really stand out among the world's politicians and fall well within his remit as the Prime Minister.

2
1

FBI v Apple spat latest: Bill Gates is really upset that you all thought he was on the Feds' side

T. F. M. Reader

Re: I don't quite get it...

No, Apple are not asked to write software that "breaks their own security". They are asked to write software that will exploit a weakness on a single device (an older model, newer models plug the hole) and will be useless for exploiting the same weakness of any other device, even if it gets into the wild.

2
6
T. F. M. Reader

I don't quite get it...

Why doesn't the Government make whatever local government department in San Bernardino that owns the bloody phone make a request (and maybe also file an amicus brief or whatever lawyers call it with the court) to Apple to help them unlock their phone.

I may be naive, but it seems to me that Apple would lose the privacy argument if the legal owner of the phone asked them to unlock what, IIRC, the FBI locked - and the FBI would not object.

[I don't know who the other 12 phones belong to.]

3
5

Intel shows budget Android phone powering big-screen Linux

T. F. M. Reader

Security model?

So what is the security model in this combo? Android's apps usually demand permission to do everything imaginable, including HW control, whether or not their primary function is related, and the security model is all or nothing: either agree or don't install, no granularity. Linux is a multiuser system with a relatively simple but robust and stable user/group/other model of permissions that is familiar, well understood, and works well in practice.

If the big idea behind the combo is having Android apps in the same system (including filesystem) as a desktop Linux, how will these two models co-exist? Will Android stuff run under a special euid? Will it be isolated from the rest of the system (Linux)? How?

If Intel "can go to production tomorrow" I assume they have the answers...

2
0

Google goes over the top with RCS

T. F. M. Reader

"Google goes over the top with RCS"

Pheeww.... My first thought was Revision Control System... No, calm down: just messaging with NSA/FBI/LEO support... All is well...

1
0

Coding is more important than Shakespeare, says VC living in self-contained universe

T. F. M. Reader

Apparently, Shakespeare is not essential for getting rich...

It might even hurt a VC professionally. E.g., I can understand that a VC would not regard "Neither a borrower not a lender be" a serious or useful advice.

And I have lost count of the occasions when I had to quote

We work by wit, and not by witchcraft,

And wit depends on dilatory time.

to various VCs and managers.

Admittedly, having read all of Shakespeare and being able to quote some stuff from memory did not make me rich. Not in a sense a typical VC could relate to, anyway.

[Aside: both quotes are by not the most attractive of Shakespeare's characters, but not the stupidest, either. A VC would probably point out that both were ultimately unsuccessful.]

4
2

Reminder: iPhones commit suicide if you repair them on the cheap

T. F. M. Reader

Blow by blow analysis

@article: "Apple says that the policy is designed to keep users safe."

Why does it make no sense to me? Consider:

1. A member of the public (MOP) repairs his iPhone.

2. The iPhone works fine for quite a while after the repair. If there are any security issues because an unauthorized repair shop touched the device they are not noticed by the MOP. The firmware/OS does not tell him that there is unauthorized hardware in the device or anything of the kind. For all we know the MOP's personal information has been delivered to some volcano lair in Eastern Ukraine or wherever 3.5 seconds after the repair+boot, and the replaced fingerprint scanner recognizes the fingerprints of 11 well chosen henchmen with heavy accents.

3. A long time later an OS update bricks the iPhone.

How is item #3 a security feature exactly?

6
0

Israeli drones and jet signals slurped by UK and US SIGINT teams

T. F. M. Reader

Where are those sensor suites and all their support equipment fabbed exactly ?

Probably in Israel, like your laptop's CPU.

1
0

What do we do about a problem like Uber? Tom Slee speaks his brains

T. F. M. Reader

Re: Profit?

Judging by the link in the end of the article (which gives a blurb only before you hit a registration wall) apparently attempts - so far not very successful - to expand into China and India cost an awful lot.

Bribes? Dunno...

And all those servers and Big Data and analyzing how often an average customer visits hookers every month and how hot a typical French "driver-partner" is on a scale from 3 to 7 must have operating costs attached... To say nothing about office parties.

1
0

Swivel on this: German boffins build nanoscale screwing engine for sluggish sperm

T. F. M. Reader

And the result will be...

... cyborgs?

2
0

T'was the night before Christmas, and an industrial control system needed an upgrade

T. F. M. Reader

"hurl tin of alphabet soup at wall"

Larry Wall?

4
0

Brazil gets a WTF WhatsApp moment

T. F. M. Reader

Re: What did the court orginally ask for?

It seems to me that in this case encryption is irrelevant.

WhatsApp encrypt messages only to make it difficult to eavesdrop in real time. If they do not keep the keys they presumably do not keep the messages past delivery since it would be a pointless waste of storage. Thus, a court request/order for past messages would be answered with a simple "we don't keep messages on our servers after they are delivered". The answer would be the same with or without encryption.

I also assume that if one changes one's phone there is no way to retrieve past WhatsApp messages from the servers, since there is no way to resurrect the keys. Can anyone confirm or deny? If there is such a way then I'll assume that the company could have complied with the court order...

I wonder if WhatsApp keep the metadata (who messaged whom when) and if metadata were requested.

5
1

GCHQ creates Github repo, offers graph database code

T. F. M. Reader

"Feel free to insert your conspiracy theory"

Fine, here it goes...

"Built on maven"... Found impossible to maintain... Released as spin data to confuse the enemy?

[Disclosure: looked at maven once, a few years ago... Still shuddering uncontrollably...]

2
2

'Dear Daddy...' Max Zuckerberg’s Letter back to her Father

T. F. M. Reader

Dear Mark, here is how you can really make your daughter's world better than ours...

Just shut down the company!

4
0
T. F. M. Reader

Re: Perhaps, just perhaps...

@skeptical i: Many cultures still hold a "many children = much status" belief.

I doubt it is much about status or the other explanations you mention, although there may be some truth in each of them. Most of all I think it is an alternative to insurance and welfare. Western societies have this notion of paying taxes / life insurance / national insurance / medical insurance /etc. with the understanding that one will get support when one is unemployed, ill, old, injured, incapacitated, etc. Societies that do not have such a system create large families instead: some children will die young, some will turn out no good, some may become criminals and get thrown into jail, but there will still a couple or more who will work the fields, get a job at a factory or abroad and send money back home, and in general will support their parents when they grow old or fall ill.

1
0

Yahoo! Mail! is! still! a! thing!, tries! blocking! Adblock! users!

T. F. M. Reader

Down the AOL way?

Ha-ha! I have an empty Yahoo! mail account I sometimes use to register on websites, mostly those that block Mailinator and such. I just logged in out of curiosity (I use AB+, but I am not in the US). In 2015 a grand total of two email arrived in my Inbox, but before I could see that I had to close a popup that offered me to integrate Yahoo!, Outlook, and ... AOL? Is that still a thing?

4
0

California cops pull over Google car for driving too SLOWLY

T. F. M. Reader
FAIL

I lived in California back in the day, long enough to need to pass a driving test, both theory and practical exam. The "driving too slowly is just as dangerous as driving too fast and is just as big a crime against humanity" mantra is instilled into you so hard that you won't be able to free your brain from it by any surgical means. Until this day whenever I see a car (in a different part of the world) moving slower than the posted speed limit I can't help thinking, "in CA the Highway Patrol would have your ass by now, buddy."

I can only assume that no one at Google who is involved in the project has ever had to pass the DMV test. Otherwise there would be no talk of limiting the speed to 25mph "to look friendly and approachable".

2
0

Linus Torvalds fires off angry 'compiler-masturbation' rant

T. F. M. Reader

It is quite instructive ...

... to read the thread in LKML (just go to the link to Linus's post and follow from there). The person who submitted the code immediately responded (no need for detective work), the network subsystem maintainer (Dave Miller) followed, the commit was reverted, a patch without the offending compiler wrapper was re-submitted.

It is obvious that despite the (characteristically) colorful language the criticism was understood by everyone involved to be professional and not personal, the reaction was professional as well, and the entire situation was handled intelligently and efficiently.

I suspect Linus knows very well that the somewhat impersonal nature of email provides for additional tolerance of colorful vocabulary, and the strong language is probably both a personal trait and a tool. When he makes a technical point he does it forcefully, and this makes him more effective in the absence of personal interaction.

4
1

Wait a minute, Doc! Are you telling me that you built a self-driving car ... out of a DeLorean!?

T. F. M. Reader

Essential facts missing from the report...

Does it have a flux capacitor or not?

6
0

'Traditional' forms of thuggery decline in UK, cybercrime on the rise

T. F. M. Reader

The REAL reason for decline in traditional crime

"from 19 million incidents a year in 1995 to under 7 million a year today"

So ONS sorta-kinda attributes this to traditional crims going digital, eh? I think it's a safe bet that at least some politicians - and media - will claim this to be a wild success of ubiquitous CCTV and will demand even more surveillance to protect the public even better.

1
0

SYNful Knock is no Stuxnet, says researcher

T. F. M. Reader

Re: Nation state resources...

I was alluding to Stuxnet which SYNful Knock obviously isn't (see the article's title).

1
0
T. F. M. Reader

Nation state resources...

...are not needed to write malware. They are needed to get a few SCADA systems and at least a decent simulator of a nuclear site those systems are supposed to control, to test your malware before you commit your sneakernet to installing it.

5
0

'We jokingly call Apple the Tesla graveyard. Cook gets our sloppy rejects. LOL'

T. F. M. Reader

Re: Response we'd like to see from Tim Cook, but won't...

@ecarlseen: "every dime of profit"

Eh, did you mean revenue? I don't really know about the other two companies - they are private and information is not easy to obtain - but Tesla is most definitely not profitable. I would be very much surprised if either SpaceX or SolarCity turned out to be profitable, actually. This, of course, only strengthens your comment about tax handouts.

SpaceX seems to be at least two orders of magnitude more efficient than NASA

Is that "efficient" in terms of what they deliver at what price? If you are not profitable then you certainly can seem more efficient. Besides, it is not clear to me what is meant by "NASA's efficiency" - the US space program has always been driven by private enterprise, it's not like NASA build rockets themselves (they do make landers and rovers). So, SpaceX should probably be compared to ULA (Lockheed + Boeing) who make Delta and Atlas rockets. Again, this does not necessarily invalidate your statement (e.g., ULA certainly feel cost pressure from SpaceX, albeit not by 2 orders of magnitude), but it could benefit from some clarification.

3
0

White House 'deeply disappointed' by Europe outlawing Silicon Valley

T. F. M. Reader

Re: Serious question

@AC: "Never wondered why most of the websites where they have to ask permission have two tickboxes, one for the privacy terms and one for the T&Cs? Well, that is what "explicit" means, you are not allowed to hide such approval in the usual 6 point grey-on-white clauses at the end of another agreement..."

a) I must be using a different Internet from you. b) I looked it up (gotta justify my Reg handle): the EC Privacy Directive talks about "unambiguous" rather than "explicit" consent.

Go through the motions of creating a new Google account (that's the way to provide Google with your "personal information"). I just did. There is a single checkbox that you tick to agree to both Terms and Privacy Policy. If you check it, you have unambiguously (and explicitly - not just "by using our services") agreed to them. It is up to you to actually read them. Google explicitly express their hope that you read them carefully, but I seriously doubt many punters do.

The terms very clearly allow Google to use the information they collect, including your "personal information" (the terms for "personal information" are more restrictive than, say, for your IP address and search queries), in all sorts of interesting ways worldwide[*]. This means (IANAL) that even today these terms go way beyond the Safe Harbour agreement that, as far as I understand, covers data sharing between the EU and the US. [Google is on the Safe Harbour List, in case anyone wonders.]

The way I(ANAL) interpret it no Safe Harbour is necessary since Google's privacy policy seem to comply with the EU Data Protection Directive (specitically, Article 26(1)(a) that deals with "unambiguous consent") as far as the users' personal information is concerned. Quite a few formulas in the privacy policy correspond quite directly to the Directive. Finding examples is left as an exercise for the reader.

So what's about to change as far as Google are concerned if the Safe Harbor Framework is torn up?

Things may get more difficult for (smaller and less scary?) companies with lazier lawyers and product managers than Google. I suspect they'll just have to reword their privacy policy in more specific terms and maybe implement a few opt-ins and opt-outs which should not be terribly difficult.

[*] To quote: "Google processes personal information on our servers in many countries around the world. We may process your personal information on a server located outside the country where you live. " You have unambiguously agreed to that when you created an account.

2
0
T. F. M. Reader

Serious question

IANAL. I must admit I have but a very vague idea what kinds of "personal data" the EU protects and how. It stands to reason that there is some sort of "without explicit permission" clause. Otherwise all sorts of simple things that we all take for granted may suddenly become illegal. If countries A and B mandate that their citizens' "personal data" must be stored within their respective borders where can emails - arguably full of personal data and metadata - between citizens of these two countries be stored? And so on.

I may be naive but I doubt even EU bureaucrats can by a stroke of legal pen prevent Europe's citizens from willingly dealing with American businesses. Today, I mean - in another 20 years we'll see.

And if there is an "explicit permission" provision then an awful lot of endangered good-paying American jobs can be saved by simply updating the TOS with paragraph 11.4(g) that says, "you give us explicit permission ..." if it is not already there.

So what really is the threat to Facebook? Can El Reg maybe commission a lucid explanation from Tim, Lewis, Andrew, or a pet international lawyer?

3
0

Lawyers win big in LinkedIn's $13m email spam lawsuit (you might get $10, maybe more)

T. F. M. Reader

Lawyers hit an easy target

1. I don't know anyone who has knowingly given LinkedIn permission to go over his/her contacts - that would be necessary to prompt the user to send an invite.

2. I definitely received invitations and reminders to email addresses that could not possibly be in the contact lists of the people who invited me. And I asked them to check - they weren't.

3. Whenever I talked to people who had sent me the invites they said they had been firmly under the impression that I was a LinkedIn user (had joined shortly before, whatever). No one realized that LinkedIn prompted them to invite me to join the network, not just connect on it. My friends know I am not on social networks, and they would not pester me with invitations. But if the impression was that I joined LinkedIn of my own volition, that's another matter.

Conclusions:

A. LinkedIn do not explicitly ask for a user's permission to sift through their contact lists.

B. They use more sophisticated and sinister methods of metadata analysis to connect people than just going through the users' contact lists.

C. They do not tell users that they will be inviting others to join LinkedIn as opposed to join them on LinkedIn, which is misleading.

Now, will anyone tell the lawyers they can sue again?

2
0

The Steve Jobs of supercomputers: We remember Seymour Cray

T. F. M. Reader

Nitpicking

Before Roadrunner there was Blue Gene. I am really surprised it is not mentioned, all the more so that even the current Top500 list has 3 Crays and 4 Blue Gene/Qs in the top 10, and that's a hell of an achievement for both Cray and IBM.

And Roadrunner was based on Cell processors (i.e., PowerPC cores), not AMD as the article claims.

2
0

Mars water discovery is a liberal-muslim plot, cry moist conspiracy theorists

T. F. M. Reader

Re: Mars is Red!

Liquid water is just the first step!!! NASA are presenting Mars as GREEN!!! To pander to both liberals and Muslims!!!

3
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017