* Posts by ma1010

473 posts • joined 30 Nov 2012

Page:

Greek police arrest chap accused of laundering $4bn of Bitcoin

ma1010
Silver badge
Megaphone

This is the problem with globalization, isn't it?

If this person is guilty of helping launder stolen funds from Mt. Gox, I'd say he's guilty of a serious crime. If all this is true, then he should be tried SOMEWHERE, should he not? If I live in Bulgaria and write ransomware and steal money from people in, say Brazil, Mexico, the U.S.A. and Canada, what should happen to me? Who prosecutes me? Anyone? No one?

The problem is we don't really have any worldwide laws about this kind of thing or worldwide justice system where these miscreants could be tried and punished. Perhaps the world should start putting together some sort of mechanism like that? Until that happens, it's a case of whichever nation wants to step up and try to apprehend and punish the guilty, sort of international vigilante justice. The U.S. tends to do that more than most, so we get a lot of criticism. Other than just ignoring the crimes, what's the alternative right now, until some international system is in place?

0
0

Wisconsin badgers Apple to cough up half a BEEELLION dollars for ripping off chip designs

ma1010
Silver badge
Coat

Hey, Apple!

How ya doin'? How's that patent "thermonuclear war" tactic working out for you these days?

11
3

Pastor la vista, baby! FCC enforcers shut down church pirate radio

ma1010
Silver badge
Megaphone

This is part of their job and it needs to be done

The author of this article really had the "snark" dialed up to 12, and it isn't really helpful.

I'm not a giant fan of the FCC or Pai and his policies, but I do respect the job the FCC is doing as far as enforcement of spectrum allocation goes. If nobody enforces spectrum, then anybody can just broadcast anything, at any power, at any frequency, and so what? Would you like some clown transmitting on cell phone frequencies, so you couldn't use your phone? Especially if you needed to make a 911 call? Or blocking police frequencies, especially when you need the police? (I recall a case where someone was doing exactly that, and was caught by them).

I'm a ham radio operator, and can tell you that the FCC have gone after some really nasty offenders. We had a guy not too far from here who went on racist rants, jammed other stations and was just a total prat. Fortunately, the FCC enforcers paid him a visit and gave him a large fine to convince him of the error of his ways. The spectrum laws do apply to everyone, and they need to be enforced. There isn't really a sensible alternative.

33
3

All hail AT&T! Champion of the open internet and users' privacy!

ma1010
Silver badge
Mushroom

It's like I said the other day

Corporations are such cynical scumbags these days that they don't even PRETEND to be reasonable or law-abiding or anything else that's pro-social. They do provide "service," though. Yesterday's mail had an ad from AT&T offering fiber-based Internet service at my house. (They're the only one offering that in my area.)

After reading about how totally fast the service is supposed to be, I noticed the add was full of asterisks and fine print and references to requiring "other services" to qualify for the (largely displayed) $50/month price they were supposedly offering. Those "other services" were not spelled out at all. So what's the REAL price for this, AT&T? Why do you have to act sly and tricky about something this simple?

While I do rather like the idea of upgrading, the ad was so dodgy (and the company itself so dodgy and morally bankrupt, as the article points out so well), I just threw it in the garbage. I'll stick with my slow DSL service because that's from a small, honest company with great customer service.

AT&T can go bugger itself.

23
0

Uber borgs with Yandex's ride-sharing biz in Russosphere

ma1010
Silver badge
Coat

Not likely to work for long

Once they get a close look at Uber, I expect that the Russian Mafia government will be shocked and horrified by Uber's total lack of ethics and moral values. The government will then boot Uber out of Russia for being a bad influence.

2
0

Robo-surgeons, self-driving cars face similar legal, ethical headaches

ma1010
Silver badge
WTF?

Eh?

Who pays when the euthanasia bot malfunctions?

Well, if you were angry at still being alive instead of dead, I suppose you could sue the bot maker? Or just go jump off a bridge?

1
0

Guess who doesn't have to pay $1.3bn in back taxes? Of course it's fscking Google

ma1010
Silver badge
WTF?

Nowadays, they don't even pretend

It's amazing what the big corporations get away with. When I were a nipper, corporations at least PRETENDED to follow the law, and the laws seemed reasonable. This is not to say that a lot of nonsense wasn't going on, but it was hidden.

Nowadays, it's right out in front, and they seem to make no bones about it. Besides this amazing "why should you pay any tax, Google?", look at the Waymo / Uber suit. How could anyone at Uber imagine that a former Waymo employee's "own ideas" were worth paying $600+ million for after just a few months? <sarcasm>I'm sure it NEVER entered their heads that this guy was bringing over Waymo trade secrets.</sarcasm>

It's amazing and disgusting, watching these corporations. But I guess it's sort of entertaining, in a horrible way, watching society in a slow motion train wreck.

Of course, none of us had better owe $10 to the IRS or 10 quid to the HMRC (etc.), or they WILL get us for every penny and more.

7
1
ma1010
Silver badge
Pirate

In other news...

Jacques DuQoq, recently retired member of the French tax tribunal, drove his brand-new Tesla today to his new 20 room house on the Riviera.

Government of the corporations, by the corporations and of the corporations.

plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose

9
2

Dental app startup drama: Two attack websites and a lawsuit

ma1010
Silver badge
Holmes

He planned to do what?

As consumers are reliant on the tech he will change the terms and conditions to include payment for basic services and allow himself to use your personal data as freely as he likes...

So, he's going to do business just like Google and any other "free" site on the web, then? TANSTAAFL!

6
1

BOFH: That's right. Turn it off. Turn it on

ma1010
Silver badge
Go

"There are no problems, only users."

A perfect mantra for an IT support professional. Should have it engraved on the door of the helldesk room.

14
0

While USA is distracted by its President's antics, China is busy breaking another fusion record

ma1010
Silver badge
Alert

It may have competition

Check out this site. This is not "cold fusion," but promises essentially unlimited, clean power.

The guy behind the company has been working since the early 90's on this, and the problems they are fighting are engineering ones, "real" problems, much like the fusion people. Some physicists reject his theories, but it seems that, at least to some extent, they are gaining acceptance. I'm not enough of a physicist to have a real opinion, but it sure looks intriguing to me. If he's right, we should see a working prototype this year, and see commercial units sometime in 2018. Time will tell.

0
30

Wanna tap 3 MEELLION phone calls? All it takes is one measly warrant

ma1010
Silver badge

Re: I know better, but...

AC, don't blame ME! I don't even want it going on here, much less anywhere else. I wouldn't wish this crap on North Korea, much less the U.K., Europe, etc. I'd be thrilled if the USG stopped the "War on Drugs" here and actively encouraged our friends and neighbors to do the same.

Don't expect it to happen anytime soon, unfortunately.

23
0
ma1010
Silver badge
Flame

I know better, but...

<rant>

I'm too old to ever expect anything sensible from government (and I work for them, too, which makes me even more cynical), but will they EVER have enough sense to just STOP this stupid "War on Drugs"?

As the article points out, it does NO GOOD. It sure costs money and erodes freedoms, though. And lots of people die, partly in "business disputes" between drug dealers. I've seen cases where people were killed over a $3 weed deal. Aside from the murders, most drug overdoses are caused by the lack of "quality control" inherent in street drugs. So the "War on Drugs", like any war, kills a lot of people.

If we accept all these people dying, there must be some kind of major upside to society, right? We fought Hitler for very good reasons, and accepted the cost of lives and money involved. So for this war, there MUST be some sort of major "upside" (for someone other than the criminals who profit from it, that is) for it to be worth carrying on, but exactly what that upside is escapes me at the moment. I suppose it does mean more employment in law enforcement and prison and such, but I don't see that being worth all the casualties.

I remember quite well when Nixon first declared this "war." It sounded like something worth a try at the time. But it's been quite a few years now, and I have yet to see ANY real benefit to society from this "war," much less a benefit remotely comparable with the costs of it all.

Time to re-think our strategy, America! PLEASE?

</rant>

51
1

Don't panic, but Linux's Systemd can be pwned via an evil DNS query

ma1010
Silver badge
IT Angle

Seems to be some confusion here about System D?

"System D is a Line troop tradition. The men organize themselves into small units and go into a section of town where they all drink until they can't hold any more. Then they tell the saloon owners they can't pay. If any of them causes trouble, they wreck his place, with the others converging onto the troublesome bar while more units delay the guard."

-Jerry Pournelle, West of Honor

9
1

Virus (cough, cough, Petya) goes postal at FedEx, shares halted

ma1010
Silver badge
Alert

Well, MAYBE this will get their attention

Obviously these large multinationals aren't securing their networks properly. Perhaps after they all lose lots of $ from this attack, just PERHAPS, instead of listening to the bean counters and MBA types that tell them not to spend a penny on "unproductive" things like network security, they will listen to somebody who knows what they're talking about.

Well, I can dream, can't I?

24
0

Four Brits cuffed in multimillion-quid Windows tech support call scam probe

ma1010
Silver badge
Joke

Never could happen!

As a suitable punishment, may I suggest anyone found guilty of running these scams is placed in a genuine computer support desk?

In the U.S., I think that would be forbidden by the "Cruel or Unusual Punishment" clause of the Constitution.

13
0

US engineer in the clink for wrecking ex-bosses' smart meter radio masts with Pink Floyd lyrics

ma1010
Silver badge
Coat

Well, at least he has good taste in music

Probably why he got a lighter sentence. When I think of some of the lyrics he could have used, it's frightening.

19
0

Heaps of Windows 10 internal builds, private source code leak online

ma1010
Silver badge
Coat

In the news today...

Satya, in his never-ending quest to make Windows more Linux-like (embrace, extend, extinguish, after all), has decided to open-source parts of Windows 10!

32
5

BOFH: Putting the commitment into committee

ma1010
Silver badge
Childcatcher

Re: TIGASA

You need a reminder alarm?

I have a simple logic I follow:

Start ---> Is it time to go home yet?

--> YES --> LEAVE!

--> NO -- SHIT! (Return to Start)

And thanks to Simon for another excellent episode!

5
0

Waymo: We've got a hot smoking gun in Uber 'tech theft' brouhaha

ma1010
Silver badge
Alert

Okay...

"TK, no matter his flaws (everyone has them) was one of the best leaders I have seen," the petition reads. "He worked day and night creating this company to what it is today."

Yes, he made Uber what it is today. Seems to me that is exactly why he needs to be gone, so Uber can, perhaps, become something less toxic.

27
0

Let's go live to the 3rd circle of Hell – and see what Comcast and Charter are screwing up

ma1010
Silver badge
Mushroom

I believe it

I don't doubt it at all.

Comcast and Charter are evil bastard corporations, both of which should be taken behind the shed and shot many times. In the head. Then their heads cut off and garlic put in their mouths and buried separately from the bodies - which have stakes put through their hearts. Just to be on the safe side.

They are perfect examples of unbridled, rabid capitalism on a rampage while we have a government that is a complete joke when it comes to reigning them in. The "fine" Charter is paying to New York is what, 1 day's profit? If that?

Until (and it will never happen) we either REALLY jack up the fines or, better yet, start putting CEOs and board members in jail when corporations misbehave, this sort of thing will just continue.

29
0

No, really. You can see through walls using drones and Wi-Fi

ma1010
Silver badge
Big Brother

Interesting technology

...a lot of problems have to be solved before drones can be used for more complex situations like search-and-rescue operations, structural modelling to monitor the state of buildings and bridges, or inspecting potential archaeological sites.

The above sound like good uses for this technology if it works. But it could also be used for spying on people in their homes. Of course, who would want to do a thing like that?

Might be an idea to keep a loaded shotgun (or other drone-stopping device of your choice) handy.

0
0

Want to learn machine learning in 15 minutes? Start here...

ma1010
Silver badge
Thumb Up

Yes, excellent

Thank you! This is a very useful article. More like this, please, El Reg

6
0

Worried about election hacking? There's a technology fix – Helios

ma1010
Silver badge
Joke

No! No! No!

You CAN'T use this system, ever! It uses ENCRYPTION, which is BAD 'cause TERRORISTS!

Blah blah unsupervised safe space blah blah you'll all die blah blah keeping you safe blah blah.

29
0

Teen girl who texted boyfriend to kill himself guilty of manslaughter

ma1010
Silver badge
Mushroom

Re: "don't understand why it took so long."

The US legal system frequently makes the Vogons look like efficiency experts

Having worked for many years in that system, I must say that you are absolutely right.

Of course, inefficiency can sometimes be a good thing. After all, the Vogons still haven't gotten around to clearing the way for that hyperspace bypass.

41
0

BAE accused of flogging mass-spying toolkits to assh*le autocrats

ma1010
Silver badge
Devil

Reminds me of

The Night Manager

Unfortunately, Dickie Roper will get away completely this time. They aren't called Death Merchants for nothing.

2
0

Oh, wow, Canada: No more carrier-locked phones for Canucks

ma1010
Silver badge
Unhappy

Canadians have rights?

Here in the U.S., the only "rights" people seem to have from our carriers is to be overcharged, underserved, tracked constantly and all our personal details sold to anyone.

20
0

Soldiers bust massive click-farm that used 500k SIM cards, 100s of mobes to big up web tat

ma1010
Silver badge
Joke

Re: Meanwhile the hunt continues for the ring leader

How about the joke from The IT Crowd where she started to date a guy named Peter File? She broke up shortly after meeting him when she heard his name spoken out loud, as in "Is there a Peter File here?" Fellow Left-Pondians keep in mind the British pronunciation of "pedophile" is PEE-DUH-FILE.

0
0

You're all too skeptical of super-duper self-driving cars, apparently

ma1010
Silver badge
Thumb Up

Good for the elderly

I'm getting a bit elderly, although I'm not really there yet. I can still drive myself (and usually ride a motorcycle, so if I do fall too far below par and keep driving, Darwin will likely step in and take care of the problem). However, if I live long enough to get to where I truly can't drive safely, I would see a self-driving car as a Godsend, allowing me to still be independent and mobile (able get to the grocery store, etc.) without having to be a burden on others, asking for rides.

8
0

Crouching cyber, Hidden Cobra: Crack North Korean hack team ready to strike, says US-CERT

ma1010
Silver badge
Paris Hilton

Maybe this is silly, but here goes...

IF there is any truth to this, and given that anybody in NK with Internet access is pretty much a state actor, how about just the rest of the world totally block NK off the Internet until they get a reasonable government? Add that to the "economic sanctions."

Paris because maybe this is a dumb idea, but it seems possible to me.

4
0

BMW climbs into IBM Watson's cloudy connected charabanc

ma1010
Silver badge
Big Brother

Endless Snooping

Unless something is done to stop it (probably unlikely), every moment of our lives will be monitored by some corporation or other that sells every little tidbit to either the government or some other corporation.

George Orwell's "Telescreens" didn't even begin to scratch the surface of what's happening to us today.

8
0

HPE hatches HPE Next – a radical overhaul plan so it won't be HPE Last

ma1010
Silver badge
Mushroom

Work for HPE?

Best get started on that job search.

Icon because HPE looks to be at ground zero ===>

3
0

Raspberry Pi sours thanks to mining malware

ma1010
Silver badge
Headmaster

Re: Bah!

"Malwear"? I think you mean "malware." Although I've seen a fair number of examples of "malwear" at the mall.

8
1

Please do not scare the pigeons – they'll crash the network

ma1010
Silver badge

Re: The mystery of the internet that only worked when in the dark.

Bad ballasts can really put out a lot of RF. Had a situation in the midwest US where, in about a 2 block area, car key fobs quit working, and even police radios weren't working right. Nobody could lock/unlock their car with their key fob in that area. Nobody could figure out why. Que some local ham radio people who came in and "foxhunted" the problem down to a chinese-made ballast in a nearby warehouse putting out an amazing amount of radio noise.

6
0

Teen texted boyfriend to kill himself. It worked. Will the law change to deal with digital reality?

ma1010
Silver badge
Alert

Re: He who has no sin can cast the first stone...

No. I'm not without sin. I dislike a lot of people I shouldn't, but I don't go around trying to harm them or get them to harm themselves or encouraging others to do so.

This is NOT "thought crime" a la 1984. She TEXTED him, encouraging a (likely) mentally ill person to harm himself. And he did. She's like some scumbag that yells at someone up on a window ledge "Jump! Jump!" Worse, actually. She went to GREAT LENGTHS to get him to kill himself, sending hundreds of texts to this poor fellow. She's not only a stone-cold bitch psychopath, she did everything to harm him short of murder him herself.

She deserves some porridge time.

72
2
ma1010
Silver badge
Thumb Down

Too bad for her the Nazis are defunct nowadays

Being born too late and in the wrong country, she missed out on a real opportunity: she'd have made an excellent SS concentration camp guard. Having missed that opportunity, perhaps she could seek a satisfying job in the prison system of some evil third world country.

This woman strikes me as a stone-cold psychopath.

31
1

Forcing digital forensics to obey 'one size fits all' crime lab standard is 'stupid and expensive'

ma1010
Silver badge
Holmes

This is surprising because?

ISO 17025 is regarded as both inappropriate – even useless – and expensive

Therefore, it's like most government-mandated standards. Of course they will force it on everyone! It's just government being government.

(Full disclosure: I work for a government entity)

4
0

Live blog: Fired FBI boss spills the beans to US Senate committee

ma1010
Silver badge
Joke

I'm sorry, but...

don't you mean "damp squid"?

6
0

State senator sacked by broadband biz Frontier after voting in favor of broadband competition

ma1010
Silver badge
Holmes

Nice to see the oligopolies lose one

We have the finest lawmakers that money can buy, and with the money the oligopolies have accumulated by years of under-serving and overcharging us, they have plenty to bribe lobby those fine lawmakers, so losing one is a rare event for them. Not surprised Frontier took revenge on this senator, although with both houses strongly in favor of the bill, it's hard to imagine what they thought he could have done to stop it passing.

On another note, I'm in a state that has a (too) highly paid legislature, and they're plenty riddled with special interests. The problem is, nobody ever thinks they have so much money that they couldn't use a bit more.

17
0

Japanese cops arrest their first ransomware-slinging menace – er, a 14-year-old school boy

ma1010
Silver badge
Megaphone

There is no excuse for this

It doesn't matter what your age, you should know that buggering up other people's computers is NOT GOOD. It's as if one suddenly decided to see if they could make explosives at home and then decided to try them out by blowing up their neighbor's house (when they weren't home), just to see if it works.

These people cause a lot of damage and expense to others. In some cases, they even could cause injury or death (such as an attack on NHS or someone similar preventing proper treatment because they couldn't access medical records). Punish these little buggers. They don't need to go to prison for 20 years, necessarily, but a little quality detention time and a lot of forced community service (perhaps base the amount on the estimated amount of damage their software nasties did) might help curtail the urge to "try it out for real."

15
5

Hotel guest goes broke after booking software gremlin makes her pay for strangers' rooms

ma1010
Silver badge
WTF?

"Sounds like a lawsuit"

Oh, yes! They need to pay her all the money back PLUS all the bank fees she got charged, write letters to EVERY ONE of her creditors whose payment bounced explaining it wasn't her fault AND compensate her for her time and trouble. Or should sue them.

Hard to imagine such stupidity. As was pointed out, the CC# should never have been stored there in the first place, so how did it

1) Get stored

2) Get used for all bookings?

What kind of mind could conceive of doing that? Still, whoever it was should send out their resume. Probably be hired as a consultant (see obligatory Dilbert) for the next big government IT project.

47
0

Utah fights man's attempt to marry laptop

ma1010
Silver badge
Mushroom

Idiots

There really should be a law forcing idiots who file this sort of "lawsuit" to pay for the all the time they waste. How much time has the AG and staff wasted on this? How much court time will this silliness consume?

I'm not saying people shouldn't be allowed to file frivolous lawsuits, just that they should have to pay for their hobby, full compensation for the time they use up. Otherwise, the taxpayers foot the bill, and government already wastes far too much.

17
3

Plastic surgery patients face extortion in wake of clinic data breach

ma1010
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Implications

No, it's co-located with the email server the BOFH's company was using, in the craphouse of a minicab office in Cairo.

0
0

German court says 'Nein' on Facebook profile access request

ma1010
Silver badge
WTF?

Can't speak for Germany or the UK

But in the US, the right to privacy (what VERY little we have here) generally terminates with death.

I suspect few dead people have ever complained about their information being released.

As for Farcebook being worried about someone's privacy -- PLEASE! What their motives are, I can't say, but I can't even BEGIN to believe they care about anyone's privacy as a right. There must be a hidden agenda here, possibly just control of their data. Or maybe they're working on a way to monetize data from the dead, although we don't see any sign of that right now (but wait a bit...).

7
1

Lexmark patent racket busted by Supremes

ma1010
Silver badge
Paris Hilton

Or just MAYBE some company will get a bit smarter

Well done, Supremes!

It seems these days that corporations are pretty much out to screw the consumer, and they're not even ashamed of it. The whole ink cartridge thing is a perfect example of that. I've avoided using inkjet-type printers because I could see the way users got screwed.

As far as an "arms race" goes, how about if some company choose NOT to play that game? And told everybody they weren't doing it and why?

I'm curious as to what would happen. Would people say "Oh, look, such-and-such company isn't screwing us into the ground like the rest are!" and buy from them? Or are consumers too stupid to notice when they're being fleeced, and would go with the "$25 printer that costs you $100 to put ink in" model?

Paris because I don't know the answer, either.

10
1

Millimetre wave.. omigerd it's going nowherrr.. Apple, you say?

ma1010
Silver badge
Boffin

Too many problems with those frequencies - for now at least

Really high frequencies behave more like light than radio, and the higher you go, the worse it gets. Our ham radio club decided not to put in a 1.2 GHz repeater because our city has lots of trees, which would interfere quite a bit with the signal. We use 146 MHz and 441 MHz signals which work well.

Millimeter wavelengths are a good bit shorter and likely to be blocked by not much of anything. We'll have to wait and see if the boffins can somehow overcome the problems with such high frequencies.

3
0

We're heading back… to the future! Net neutrality rules on chopping block

ma1010
Silver badge
Unhappy

"Bad corporate culture"

That kind of sums up the US of A these days, certainly at the federal level, and in some states, too. Everyone is so busy riding their party's hobby horses and vilifying the opposition that nobody is even making an appearance of trying to work together.

The original Constitutional Convention was full of strong personalities who disagreed on many points. However, they were able to work together and come to a compromise which became the U.S. Constitution. Would to $DEITY that selfsame spirit were alive and living in this country today. But it isn't. Instead, nowadays, even the media are divided and spew out "facts" that support their predetermined view of reality while vilifying the opposition. If Trump opened death camps for crippled people, one side of the media would praise him; if Trump ran into a burning building and personally rescued several children, the other side of the media would at least insinuate that Trump had started the fire. It doesn't matter what you do. It's all about whose side you're on these days.

Today for most everyone in government it's "my way or highway!" regardless of which side of the Great Liberal/Conservative Divide they're on. I wish there was a way back to the spirit of compromise that helped build this country, but I'm not sure there is, short of total disaster.

9
0

40,000-plus AT&T staff threaten to strike Friday

ma1010
Silver badge
Thumb Up

Glad to see some unions still alive

Over the last 50 years I've watched unions dwindle as mammoth corporations arise and create new "McJobs" where they pay everyone a pittance and the high-ups live like kings. Add in the skyrocketing costs of renting someplace to live, and things are getting fairly grim for a lot of people. I think it's a lot tougher to be young and just starting out nowadays than it was when I were a nipper.

Can't speak for the UK, but in this country (USA), we need more unions to form and stand up for workers so they can earn a living wage. (Yes, Walmart, et al., I'm looking at you.)

As to what AT&T says, I wonder just how many of these striking people make "$115,000 to $148,000 in total compensation." Not very many, I'd wager.

14
1

Vigorous tiny vibrations help our universe swell, say particle boffins

ma1010
Silver badge

Re: The Silastic Armorfiends...

It would be Zaphod Beeblebrox?

0
0

Do we need Windows patch legislation?

ma1010
Silver badge
Mushroom

Complex software changes everything

If you have an old machine, say a classic car from the 1920's, you generally can't just buy parts for it from the manufacturer nowadays. However, it is possible to get bespoke parts made to keep it running, and there are those who do exactly that, although to do so costs quite a bit more than just buying a new car.

But complex medical machines cost much, much more than a car. So what do you do with your million pound+ diagnostic machine once the manufacturer of the software that runs it decides to not support that software anymore? We're not just talking PC's here. You can't just go buy a new one for a few quid or get pissed off at MS and decide to put *nix on it. And it's a pretty tall order to try to roll your own bespoke patches when you're dealing with a closed source operating system - and trying to do so certainly would violate the license.

And even when the issue is just about PCs, just replacing them may not be a simple option. Will the old, bespoke software that they use even run properly on the new version of the OS? Do you, as a government entity, have access to the funding it would take to "upgrade" to the new OS?

The fact that complex and expensive machinery or essential bespoke software is now dependent on a closed source OS changes everything. Everyone with such machinery is at the mercy of the vendor deciding to support or not support that software. Mechanical devices can be "hacked" easily enough and solutions found to keep them going. But what can the owner do when complex software is an essential part of an expensive device, and the vendor says "F*** you"?

So should NHS (and everyone else in a similar situation) just throw out expensive machinery because MS decided that everyone should buy a new OS? Perhaps NHS could (if funding were available) put a new OS on all their PCs, but will all the old software run correctly on the new OS? How much would it cost the taxpayers to make that happen? And what about expensive diagnostic machinery? Can a new OS even be put on those machines? Or should the taxpayers be forced to spend millions upon millions of pounds to replace those as well just so MS can make a bit more profit?

Another question is how much would it really cost MS to patch XP against this kind of vulnerability? Probably not a lot. If they charged all those XP users their actual cost of developing and releasing a patch, the cost to the end user would probably be a few pennies per machine. But they'd rather force their users into "upgrades."

Legislation? How about requiring that any software used in anything purchased by government must be open source and maintainable indefinitely? That's the legislation that MS and their ilk deserves.

</rant>

2
1

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017