* Posts by Robert Heffernan

366 posts • joined 2 Jul 2007

Page:

SpaceX 'raises' an extra 100 million bucks to get His Muskiness to Mars

Robert Heffernan

Re: I guess, yeah, His Muskiness is kinda --

"And the Model X made it into consumer reports' list of '10 least reliable cars'."

Looking at that list, honestly I would prefer the Model X to any of the other cars trouble in that list.

Paint and trim can be easily fixed and does not cause a physical safety issue that could possibly kill you.

The climate system is an annoyance, but you could just roll down the window if you need some air. Admittedly it's a PITA if you live in the arctic tundra and the heater doesn't work but again, it's not going to explode sending shards of drive shaft or transmission into the cabin.

Body Hardware is very broad. Things like Side Mirrors, hinges, etc, again all annoyances but still not enough to cause a life threatening situation.

Disclaimer: I used to work for an Automotive transmission manufacturer and personally machined many types of components designated as Critical Safety Items, meaning components that if they failed could possibly result in loss-of-life.

4
0
Robert Heffernan

Re: Andrew Silver, this is article is low effort trolling.

"I think it's a bit over 95% now - 2 losses in 49 flights - which is about average for the industry."

Currently stands at 95.92%. The next successful launch will bring it to a nice neat 96.00%

2
0

Tesla reveals a less-long-legged truck, but a bigger reservation price

Robert Heffernan

Re: Electricity vs Petrol/Diesel prices

"Downhill yes, but the energy consumed in braking usually exceeds the rate at which it can be fed back to the battery."

True, but feeding a bank of Super Capacitors to capture the energy rapidly then trickle back into the batteries / provide peak energy for acceleration would help greatly.

1
0
Robert Heffernan

Re: Electricity vs Petrol/Diesel prices

Tesla owns Solar City, so they have Solar Panels on-tap. Buy some land in a nice open location perfectly suited for Solar and build a massive farm. It doesn't matter where the MegaChargers are located, so long as they connect to the same grid as the farm, then your trucks are solar powered.

The argument about Diesel vs Electric is moot, it doesn't matter what one is more expensive, the fact of the matter is, Diesel needs to die and it needs to do it now. The climate is already screwed, Where I live in Australia is already in the peak summer temperature range but it's still only spring. The time for having a hissy-fit about moving away from Fossil Fuels to Renewables is over.

Electric vehicles are just going to get better and better, efficiency and range will get better all the time and people will one day only see ICE vehicles in museums or owned by collectors.

2
0
Robert Heffernan

Re: Electricity vs Petrol/Diesel prices

Then there was the statement from Elon that the power provided at the MegaCharger network being deployed for trucks would be generated from a Solar Farm attached and the power would be provided at 7c per kwh wholesale (5p at current USD/GBP conversion)

4
3

Online outrage makes Logitech drop a brick: Now it will replace slain Harmony Link gizmos

Robert Heffernan

You spin me right round baby right round!

Sounds like a bunch of spin to me. They fully intended on shit-canning the service to push people into buying the "next new thing". If they can update the firmware, they can update the SSL Certificates on the thing.

The thing is, why does it's certificate need to expire anyway? Just build the server's certificate fingerprint into the device and ignore the expiration date. The connection is still encrypted, there is protection against MITM and no body need to expire anything.

Regardless, the SSL was just a scapegoat for why it was being shuttered. Perhaps some legislation requiring a company to open up their device and protocols if they decide to shutter a service wouldn't go astray

15
0

Tesla buys robot maker. Hang on, isn't that your sci-fi bogeyman, Elon?

Robert Heffernan

That'll fix it

Having worked in Automotive Manufacturing, it sounds to me like Perbix were contracted to design and implement sections of the production line and it's equipment, and as is typical, it didn't come up to snuff and was experiencing many unanticipated issues.

Then coupled with the fact that suppliers can get pretty finicky when their stuff doesn't work as expected (who wants to troubleshoot when you can sell and install new stuff), and Elon feeling the pressure to get production humming along while the supplier is dragging ass in regards to fixing it, it makes perfect sense to me that Elon would just buy them out to force them to focus on fixing the problems in a timely fashion.

It also has the side-benefit of growing the vertical integration, in that they now have the knowledge and expertise in-house to be able to design and build these types of production equipment.

0
0

Car insurers recoil in horror from paying auto autos' speeding fines

Robert Heffernan

Re: Terrorism

In a fully self-driving world speed signs wouldn't be needed even for roadworks.. Instead of placing a speed sign up the road, a mat gets rolled out with an RFID coil system that when the car drives over it, the RFID mat tells the car the speed limit is decreasing for roadworks, then past the roadworks another mat tells the car to go back to the normal speed.

It's a completely digital system that doesn't rely on computationally expensive and sometimes inaccurate image analysis

1
0
Robert Heffernan

Why does the car need to be fined at all?

Why does a self-driving car need to be fined at all? Fines are a human construct designed to punitively punish a human for breaking the law. A vehicle cannot learn the lesson from paying a fine, and having the insurer pay it is also dumb because they aren't breaking the law.

The vehicles will have enough on-board smarts to deal with the different speed zone appropriately and safely, and even when enough cars become self-driving speed zones can be seriously increased or even eliminated.

In the case of what-to-do about the car missing the sign, the manufacturer can be made aware so the situation can be investigated and patches applied.

Then there is intra-vehicle and vehicle-roadway communications systems so that the cars don't even need to see a sign to be notified of a speed zone change, for example, an RF system embedded in the road and the car passing over it is notified the speed limit is changing in X meters and can deal appropriately, or as cars pass into a new speed zone they broadcast the zone limit change to all vehicles within range along with GPS coordinates of where the zone is.

7
0
Robert Heffernan

Re: Terrorism

It's not hard to include certain isolated hardware and software that disables the vehicle in the event it stops responding as expected.

For example, a secondary computer with supervisory software (written by a 3rd party) isolated from the primary driving computer who's sole function is to determine if the response of the primary is in keeping with the input provided.

So if the primary decides to suddenly point at pedestrians and accelerate rapidly, the supervisor sees this as an unexpected action, disables the primary computer's CPU and dumps it's RAM to a dump file, applies the brakes until stopped, then locks the vehicle out so it's unable to be driven until the manufacturer performs a reset sequence.

6
1

Your future data-centre: servers immersed in box full of oil, in a field

Robert Heffernan

Mars

I wonder how these would go on the surface of Mars. Go plonking them down outside, connect a cable that supplies data and power, instant processing power without wasted power draw from cooling systems, low/no maintenance, and you could even reprocess them once they get to a certain failure rate eg: You have two units with 50% failure, take them inside, drain the oil, swap the good bits from one into the other, then you have one unit back at 100%, and an empty chassis with oil ready for a shipment of upgraded computers to arrive from Earth

0
0

Woeful NBN services attract ACCC's attention

Robert Heffernan

Re: You may be suprised

Unlimited plans aren't the source of congestion. Data limits are a construct designed to take the focus off the fact they the ISPs, Wholesalers, NBN, etc do not have enough bandwidth to supply their clients needs and to provide a way to charge clients more for using their connections.

The easy way for this to be mitigated is to monitor the backbone, see which links routinely see traffic above a specific threshold and then add more capacity to that link via upgrading the gear on either end of the link to higher speeds, or by aggregating more parallel links.

0
0

Elon Musk says Harry Potter and Bob the Builder will get SpaceX flying to Mars

Robert Heffernan

This one is easy

The delay will be just too damn long for anything. The only solution will be a Mars-Local instance of the internet where sync to/from the Earth is done over the currently proposed store-and-forward interplanetary data link.

I think i'll be off so start developing a Cloud company developing extremely high capability but extremely low weight data center modules based on an aluminium shipping container.

1
0

Tarmac for America's self-driving car future is being laid right now

Robert Heffernan

Relieving congestion will be awesome to watch at intersections once enough cars are fully autonomous. Seeing cars leave enough space and sync the approach so that cars can just drive on through full speed with no slowing down just crossing in front or behind will be amazing

4
0
Robert Heffernan

Re: Disabilities

How I read it was currently people with disabilities can be denied licenses, but the new law will allow these previously unlicensable people to have a licence for an autonomous vehicle

3
0

Australian telcos promise to be better NBN helpers

Robert Heffernan

Re: It is not the copper wiring

Try being stuck on Fixed Wireless. I am in Albury where the entire region is serviced by a single tower. And is so oversubscribed and under provisioned by NBNCo that you're lucky to get 3Mbps during peak times. It's not always the ISP with the bandwidth problem.

NBNCo in my case know about the issue but have lumped it into the "too-hard" basket and refuse to fix

1
0

nbn™ cracks the $1bn revenue barrier, cracks whip on tardy retailers

Robert Heffernan

Re: Morrow, what a clown.

You're doing better than I (http://beta.speedtest.net/result/6544417274).

All of Albury shares a single FW tower for everyone who can't get FTTN. So over subscribed and underprovisioned for NBN backhaul that no matter the ISP your connection sucks.

This is nothing like the next-gen broadband service we were promised by a long shot. Heads need to roll.

0
0

Core-blimey! Intel's Core i9 18-core monster – the numbers

Robert Heffernan

Re: Gamers?

Well given the fact that most games don't need more than 4 cores aside, they tend to bolt on the following background tasks...

* Stream encoding to upload to Twitch, etc.

* Watching streams, youtube

* Downloading torrents, etc

Just because the game only uses a subset of cores doesn't mean the rest of the system isn't churning away on other processes.

10
2

SQL Server 2017's first rc lands and – yes! – it runs on Linux

Robert Heffernan

Re: Good first step.

@Bombastic Bob

If thats the case you got some really shitty security and permissions going on. Having good backups and minimum required access mitigates this problem majorly. Restoring a few encrypted files from backup is inconvenient but not as bas as being totally hosed cos you couldn't use security properly

0
0

Intel's Skylake and Kaby Lake CPUs have nasty hyper-threading bug

Robert Heffernan

Re: ugh

Having read the documentation on the issue, it's certainly triggerable given the right circumstances.

1. You need to be in a loop with less than 64 instructions in the loop

2. You need to write to specific registers within that loop

0
0

Texas says 'howdy' to completely driverless robo-cars on its roads

Robert Heffernan
Trollface

Feeding the trolls?

Its a great move on the part of the state but given how quickly the judiciary in that state is to bend tech companies over a barrel while the patent trolls are busy getting the lube ready, i will be surprised if any tech companies do set up shop at all.

2
2
Robert Heffernan

Re: Great

Thats ok, im sure the dark ages where you're from has its charm

6
2

Boeing preps pilotless passenger flights – once it has solved the Sully problem, of course

Robert Heffernan

Remember Alice?

I always thought it was "And we thought one big pile is better than two little piles, so rather than bring that one up we decided to throw ours down"

2
0

Google to give 6 months' warning for 2018 Chrome adblockalypse – report

Robert Heffernan

Re: Would you allow your website to serve ads that you would be held responsible for ?

The difference with Print advertising and Web based advertising is rather significant.

1. Print ads don't make you read the ad before viewing the content

2. Print ads don't harvest and phone home metrics on where you have been and what you have been doing

3. Print ads are required to conform to an ethical standard set by the relevant media authority

4. Print ads are traceable to their creators

5. Print ads don't contain malware intended to back door or hold your files to ransom

6. Print ads don't try to scam you with fake errors or issues trying to get you to pay for bogus support you never needed.

In my opinion the more like Prind ads that online advertising becomes the better. If Google is forcing standards and ethics on advertisers then great, about time someone did

11
0

nbn™ to offer 100Mbps fixed wireless service

Robert Heffernan

Re: 100Mbps funny joke

Working in the IT service department of a telco who provides NBN service, it is my understanding that when a Fixed Wireless site is deployed it gets a basic allocation of bandwidth by NBN Co. Its not until enough customers on that site start to complain about poor performance that they come back afterwards and tune the bandwidth allocation.

So, it doesn't matter how many different ISPs you try, it's NBN Co and the FW Site that are the issue. Your only recourse is to complain loudly and often, and get as many people in your area on the same FW service to do the same.

0
0

If fast radio bursts really are revving up interstellar sailcraft, here's the maths

Robert Heffernan

Re: Astrophysicists think

How to stop?

Travel with enough fuel for conventional or ION engines to slow you down and manuver at the destination and use the light sail and FRB's to get you on the way there..

1
0

Galaxy Note 7 flameout: 2 in 5 Samsung fans say they'll never buy from the Korean giant again

Robert Heffernan

I still want one.

Every manufacturer at one time or another will have this kind of problem, it doesn't need to destroy them.

Ok, so fair enough there was a flaw in the production of the batteries that caused them to catch fire but the battery is removable and replaceable by the user.

I still want one because I really love the platform, the phone fits well with my lifestyle and has good battery life (when it's not going up in flames)

0
1

Aircraft now so automated pilots have forgotten how to fly

Robert Heffernan

Re: drivers?

@DanceMan It was probably off so the tool could do some circle work

0
0

Cisco forgot to install two LEDs in routers

Robert Heffernan

Re: "looking at the device for confirmation that it's working"

Yeah, I have an 865 myself. Most definitely full IOS.. Great little router, really helped cutting my teeth on CISCO config. Now I have the most complicated home network ever... (two fully managed switches, two routers, and House LAN, WIFI and Shed LAN on seperate subnets with full routing and access control/QoS)

0
0
Robert Heffernan

Re: " most admins aren't going to be looking at the device for confirmation that it's working"

Not to mention the C800 series are SOHO/SMB routers so chances are it won't be in a rack full of gear with SNMP enabled and teams of admins pouring over it keeping an eye on every bit that runs past.

It will be some poor secretary in a plumbers office on the phone to their nephew asking why they can't search for google!

4
0

End in sight for wireless power standards war as field shrinks to two

This post has been deleted by a moderator

Western Digital's hard drive encryption is useless. Totally useless

Robert Heffernan

NSA?

So much for *THAT* NSA back door!

11
3

Telstra passes on NBN billions, plays it safe

Robert Heffernan

Remediating Copper? Muppets!

The copper network doesn't need REMEDIATION. It needs REPLACEMENT, that is what we were promised with the NBN. To replace the ageing and failing copper network with a nice shiny new fiber network that will lay the foundation for Australia's digital future.

Getting to be totally over politicians these days. Over promising and under delivering would be acceptable but this Government has screwed it all up so badly I have completely lost faith in the whole system.

5
1

Windows 10 marks the end of 'pay once, use forever' software

Robert Heffernan
Mushroom

Seriously?

How much money do they think the average person has? When OS releases were every few years, I was easily able to scrape the cash together for a one-off purchase. Now that they are moving to have to pay for every little update or some type of subscription where am I going to find the cash?

It's not like every other corporate leech is attached to my wallet, fuck-it Food or Rent is not doing me a lot of good perhaps I can just ditch one of them. Hell, my entertainment budget is $15 a MONTH (and I am splitting that with my partner) for Netflix so I don't get my arse raped by the lawyers in Hollywood (I am in Australia btw, screw you High Court of Australia).

6
0

Crazy Chrysler security hole: USB stick fix incoming for 1.4 million cars

Robert Heffernan

You know what they say about assumption

@Charles 9

If they couldn't get basic network security to work I wouldn't assume they have an idea about public/private key security on a USB stick.

0
0

An EPIC picture of Earth, sunny side up, from one million miles out

Robert Heffernan

Re: British Summer Time

Quite possible it's Gamma Rays striking the CCD you see these artifacts on the raw CCD images on pretty much every spacecraft, they typically get removed in post processing before press release. The fact that the bright "Tan" coloured one in the bottom right is a horizontal smudge rather than a round blob indicates this to me. Gamma Rays are extremely directional and Stars are blobs.

0
0

NASA's New Horizon probe rudely fires its thruster at gnome planet

Robert Heffernan

Rounding Error

You gotta love compounded rounding errors.

0
0

Windows Server 2016 to inherit Azure's load balancer, data plane

Robert Heffernan

Why is it so exotic?

It's not hard to stick an FPGA onto a card. PCI-E and Ethernet MACs are two blocks that are basic functionality that can be found on a lot of FPGAs. Putting a PHY and an RJ-45 connector with integrated magnetics, some DDR, flash and a PCI-E edge connector will be easy for just about any engineer at any half-competent PC peripheral company.

Once you got that it's all down to the software and drivers to fill in the rest. There is no reason aside from support that Microsoft can't release the VHDL files and associated OS drivers.

2
0

SpaceX in ROCKET HOVERSHIP PRANG: 'Close – but no cigar,' says Musk

Robert Heffernan

Re: It's been tried before...

@JeffyPoooh

Pooh Pooh To You JeffyPoooh.

SpaceX isn't a government operation. It's a private company with in house manufacturing and is focused on inexpensive space access for a profit.

It's not some government pork barrel where every company is out to milk it for all the cash it can like the Space Shuttle program was.

Therefore your argument is invalid.

2
0

We are never getting back to... Samsung's baking Apple's 14nm 'A9' chips?

Robert Heffernan

Re: Make your minds up...

I thought Apple had the design patent on a rectangle with rounded corners and Samsung had a patent on a circle with flat sides?

Must be wrong, oh well.

3
0

KRAKKOOOM! Space Station supply mission in PODULE PRANG EXPLOSION CHAOS

Robert Heffernan
Joke

Relevant YouTube Clip

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iWtohHwNXoU

0
1

Icahn and I DID: eBay volte-faces, spins PayPal into separate biz

Robert Heffernan

Bought for a mere $1.5B

But what a legacy that "mere" sum has produced for humanity. Shaking up two of the most incumbent industries in the world. Producing realitsically affordable commercial space travel and Electric cars with good range and performance.

1
2

LOHAN packs bags for SPACEPORT AMERICA!

Robert Heffernan

Re: Daft Government

I have had a test motor over pressurize and blow the nozzle out the end. Very loud. While I do agree in the wrong hands you could do some damage, it doesn't warrant the restrictions placed on it.

0
0
Robert Heffernan
Flame

Daft Government

Governments worldwide are daft with regulation. Even in Australia if I wanted to make rcandy propellant (Potassium nitrate + Sugar) I too would need a commercial licence to manufacture explosives, which is odd given that mix just burns vigorously and doesn't actually explode.

2
0

Oracle: That BUG in our In-Memory Option will be fixed in October

Robert Heffernan
Trollface

SQL Injection For Fun and (Oracle's) Profit

I can just imagine a carefully crafted SQL injection query to invoke the INMEMORY feature, and costing the company a shed-load of money.

3
0

Put down that Oracle database patch: It could cost $23,000 per CPU

Robert Heffernan

Re: SSD?

Yes, it still matters quite a lot. While SSDs are faster than spinning rust drives, RAM still blows it away by an order of magnitude at least.

These read speed figures for media are rather general

Cheap USB2 Flash Drive: 5mb/sec

7200 RPM SATA HDD: 120mb/sec

SSD: 550mb/sec

DDR3 RAM: 12,500mb/sec

So from that you can see how much faster your database would run with your tabled cached in RAM.

That being said, at $28k per core I don't give two shits how fast my database runs, you shouldn't have to pay that much for what should be a basic feature of any database

10
0

German NSA probe chief mulls spy-busting typewriters

Robert Heffernan

Re: Not foolproof

Definite side channel attack vector here. If the NSA can deduce RSA private keys from the silent squeals of a CPU then they can read documents by the sound of the keystrokes. I can actually remember they have developed this for PC keyboards so adapting this to retro tech would be trivial.

Perhaps the rest of the world should just file an international class action lawsuit against the US/English/Any other Cooperating government on behalf of the rest of the world

2
0

Satya Nadella: Microsoft's new man presses all the old buttons in LONG memo

Robert Heffernan
FAIL

No Thanks

Mobile-First: No thanks, just because my mobile device has a 1920x1080 display and loads of compute power the battery doesnt last long enough to do anything meaningful and the screen size is so small all its good for is browsing, some lite email and maybe a movie whth the headphones in when im bored. If I need to do any actual work its back to my desk with the 24" LCDs and real, usefull input devices.

Cloud-First: Oh Hell No. There is no way I would subscribe to ising the cloud voluntarily. The spooks at the NSA have really put a huge dent in that idea, sure the cloud is a good idea in theory but there are too many issues in practice

13
0

Start packing your bags for a Windows Server 2003 migration

Robert Heffernan
Happy

Re: Microsoft FAIL

I recently migrated several physical hosts away from Server 2008 R2 to Server 2012 R2. It was a very painless experience and the extra features in Hyper-V in relation to replication and disaster recovery made it well worth it.

My colleague and I had three physical servers and all the contained VMs migrated in a couple of hours on the weekend. No in-place upgrade, reformat and reinstall, apply OS updates, install SAN tools, setup iSCSI and reload the VMs. Too easy.

The Touch interface didn't really get in the road the updated server management tools keep you away from that abomination, and with a liberal sprinkling of Start8 it's as if Metro never existed.

Next victim on the chopping block is the SBS2003 domain controller.

1
0

Elon Musk: Just watch me – I'll put HUMAN BOOTS on Mars by 2026

Robert Heffernan
Thumb Down

Float? More like Sink!

For a company like SpaceX, floating on the public exchange would sink the company.

Commercial Rocketry is a long-game, you cannot run that kind of business in a manner compatible with publicly held companies. They require CEO's with drive and vision and the ability to run a business over the long term. Elon Musk has such drive and vision.

SpaceX's bottom like will be looking very good over the long term (much longer terms than wall street investors look at) and unless you are turning over huge sums of cash every quarter then your a bad investment, I can well imagine SpaceX having quarters full of red ink due to the expenditure of capital on valuable R&D which then gets topped up when launch contracts are fulfilled. Because of this red ink, SpaceX will suffer as a public company.

18
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017