* Posts by Robert Heffernan

351 posts • joined 2 Jul 2007

Page:

Australian telcos promise to be better NBN helpers

Robert Heffernan

Re: It is not the copper wiring

Try being stuck on Fixed Wireless. I am in Albury where the entire region is serviced by a single tower. And is so oversubscribed and under provisioned by NBNCo that you're lucky to get 3Mbps during peak times. It's not always the ISP with the bandwidth problem.

NBNCo in my case know about the issue but have lumped it into the "too-hard" basket and refuse to fix

1
0

nbn™ cracks the $1bn revenue barrier, cracks whip on tardy retailers

Robert Heffernan

Re: Morrow, what a clown.

You're doing better than I (http://beta.speedtest.net/result/6544417274).

All of Albury shares a single FW tower for everyone who can't get FTTN. So over subscribed and underprovisioned for NBN backhaul that no matter the ISP your connection sucks.

This is nothing like the next-gen broadband service we were promised by a long shot. Heads need to roll.

0
0

Core-blimey! Intel's Core i9 18-core monster – the numbers

Robert Heffernan

Re: Gamers?

Well given the fact that most games don't need more than 4 cores aside, they tend to bolt on the following background tasks...

* Stream encoding to upload to Twitch, etc.

* Watching streams, youtube

* Downloading torrents, etc

Just because the game only uses a subset of cores doesn't mean the rest of the system isn't churning away on other processes.

10
2

SQL Server 2017's first rc lands and – yes! – it runs on Linux

Robert Heffernan

Re: Good first step.

@Bombastic Bob

If thats the case you got some really shitty security and permissions going on. Having good backups and minimum required access mitigates this problem majorly. Restoring a few encrypted files from backup is inconvenient but not as bas as being totally hosed cos you couldn't use security properly

0
0

Intel's Skylake and Kaby Lake CPUs have nasty hyper-threading bug

Robert Heffernan

Re: ugh

Having read the documentation on the issue, it's certainly triggerable given the right circumstances.

1. You need to be in a loop with less than 64 instructions in the loop

2. You need to write to specific registers within that loop

0
0

Texas says 'howdy' to completely driverless robo-cars on its roads

Robert Heffernan
Trollface

Feeding the trolls?

Its a great move on the part of the state but given how quickly the judiciary in that state is to bend tech companies over a barrel while the patent trolls are busy getting the lube ready, i will be surprised if any tech companies do set up shop at all.

2
2
Robert Heffernan

Re: Great

Thats ok, im sure the dark ages where you're from has its charm

6
2

Boeing preps pilotless passenger flights – once it has solved the Sully problem, of course

Robert Heffernan

Remember Alice?

I always thought it was "And we thought one big pile is better than two little piles, so rather than bring that one up we decided to throw ours down"

2
0

Google to give 6 months' warning for 2018 Chrome adblockalypse – report

Robert Heffernan

Re: Would you allow your website to serve ads that you would be held responsible for ?

The difference with Print advertising and Web based advertising is rather significant.

1. Print ads don't make you read the ad before viewing the content

2. Print ads don't harvest and phone home metrics on where you have been and what you have been doing

3. Print ads are required to conform to an ethical standard set by the relevant media authority

4. Print ads are traceable to their creators

5. Print ads don't contain malware intended to back door or hold your files to ransom

6. Print ads don't try to scam you with fake errors or issues trying to get you to pay for bogus support you never needed.

In my opinion the more like Prind ads that online advertising becomes the better. If Google is forcing standards and ethics on advertisers then great, about time someone did

11
0

nbn™ to offer 100Mbps fixed wireless service

Robert Heffernan

Re: 100Mbps funny joke

Working in the IT service department of a telco who provides NBN service, it is my understanding that when a Fixed Wireless site is deployed it gets a basic allocation of bandwidth by NBN Co. Its not until enough customers on that site start to complain about poor performance that they come back afterwards and tune the bandwidth allocation.

So, it doesn't matter how many different ISPs you try, it's NBN Co and the FW Site that are the issue. Your only recourse is to complain loudly and often, and get as many people in your area on the same FW service to do the same.

0
0

If fast radio bursts really are revving up interstellar sailcraft, here's the maths

Robert Heffernan

Re: Astrophysicists think

How to stop?

Travel with enough fuel for conventional or ION engines to slow you down and manuver at the destination and use the light sail and FRB's to get you on the way there..

1
0

Galaxy Note 7 flameout: 2 in 5 Samsung fans say they'll never buy from the Korean giant again

Robert Heffernan

I still want one.

Every manufacturer at one time or another will have this kind of problem, it doesn't need to destroy them.

Ok, so fair enough there was a flaw in the production of the batteries that caused them to catch fire but the battery is removable and replaceable by the user.

I still want one because I really love the platform, the phone fits well with my lifestyle and has good battery life (when it's not going up in flames)

0
1

Aircraft now so automated pilots have forgotten how to fly

Robert Heffernan

Re: drivers?

@DanceMan It was probably off so the tool could do some circle work

0
0

Cisco forgot to install two LEDs in routers

Robert Heffernan

Re: "looking at the device for confirmation that it's working"

Yeah, I have an 865 myself. Most definitely full IOS.. Great little router, really helped cutting my teeth on CISCO config. Now I have the most complicated home network ever... (two fully managed switches, two routers, and House LAN, WIFI and Shed LAN on seperate subnets with full routing and access control/QoS)

0
0
Robert Heffernan

Re: " most admins aren't going to be looking at the device for confirmation that it's working"

Not to mention the C800 series are SOHO/SMB routers so chances are it won't be in a rack full of gear with SNMP enabled and teams of admins pouring over it keeping an eye on every bit that runs past.

It will be some poor secretary in a plumbers office on the phone to their nephew asking why they can't search for google!

4
0

End in sight for wireless power standards war as field shrinks to two

This post has been deleted by a moderator

Western Digital's hard drive encryption is useless. Totally useless

Robert Heffernan

NSA?

So much for *THAT* NSA back door!

11
3

Telstra passes on NBN billions, plays it safe

Robert Heffernan

Remediating Copper? Muppets!

The copper network doesn't need REMEDIATION. It needs REPLACEMENT, that is what we were promised with the NBN. To replace the ageing and failing copper network with a nice shiny new fiber network that will lay the foundation for Australia's digital future.

Getting to be totally over politicians these days. Over promising and under delivering would be acceptable but this Government has screwed it all up so badly I have completely lost faith in the whole system.

5
1

Windows 10 marks the end of 'pay once, use forever' software

Robert Heffernan
Mushroom

Seriously?

How much money do they think the average person has? When OS releases were every few years, I was easily able to scrape the cash together for a one-off purchase. Now that they are moving to have to pay for every little update or some type of subscription where am I going to find the cash?

It's not like every other corporate leech is attached to my wallet, fuck-it Food or Rent is not doing me a lot of good perhaps I can just ditch one of them. Hell, my entertainment budget is $15 a MONTH (and I am splitting that with my partner) for Netflix so I don't get my arse raped by the lawyers in Hollywood (I am in Australia btw, screw you High Court of Australia).

6
0

Crazy Chrysler security hole: USB stick fix incoming for 1.4 million cars

Robert Heffernan

You know what they say about assumption

@Charles 9

If they couldn't get basic network security to work I wouldn't assume they have an idea about public/private key security on a USB stick.

0
0

An EPIC picture of Earth, sunny side up, from one million miles out

Robert Heffernan

Re: British Summer Time

Quite possible it's Gamma Rays striking the CCD you see these artifacts on the raw CCD images on pretty much every spacecraft, they typically get removed in post processing before press release. The fact that the bright "Tan" coloured one in the bottom right is a horizontal smudge rather than a round blob indicates this to me. Gamma Rays are extremely directional and Stars are blobs.

0
0

NASA's New Horizon probe rudely fires its thruster at gnome planet

Robert Heffernan

Rounding Error

You gotta love compounded rounding errors.

0
0

Windows Server 2016 to inherit Azure's load balancer, data plane

Robert Heffernan

Why is it so exotic?

It's not hard to stick an FPGA onto a card. PCI-E and Ethernet MACs are two blocks that are basic functionality that can be found on a lot of FPGAs. Putting a PHY and an RJ-45 connector with integrated magnetics, some DDR, flash and a PCI-E edge connector will be easy for just about any engineer at any half-competent PC peripheral company.

Once you got that it's all down to the software and drivers to fill in the rest. There is no reason aside from support that Microsoft can't release the VHDL files and associated OS drivers.

2
0

SpaceX in ROCKET HOVERSHIP PRANG: 'Close – but no cigar,' says Musk

Robert Heffernan

Re: It's been tried before...

@JeffyPoooh

Pooh Pooh To You JeffyPoooh.

SpaceX isn't a government operation. It's a private company with in house manufacturing and is focused on inexpensive space access for a profit.

It's not some government pork barrel where every company is out to milk it for all the cash it can like the Space Shuttle program was.

Therefore your argument is invalid.

2
0

We are never getting back to... Samsung's baking Apple's 14nm 'A9' chips?

Robert Heffernan

Re: Make your minds up...

I thought Apple had the design patent on a rectangle with rounded corners and Samsung had a patent on a circle with flat sides?

Must be wrong, oh well.

3
0

KRAKKOOOM! Space Station supply mission in PODULE PRANG EXPLOSION CHAOS

Robert Heffernan
Joke

Relevant YouTube Clip

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iWtohHwNXoU

0
1

Icahn and I DID: eBay volte-faces, spins PayPal into separate biz

Robert Heffernan

Bought for a mere $1.5B

But what a legacy that "mere" sum has produced for humanity. Shaking up two of the most incumbent industries in the world. Producing realitsically affordable commercial space travel and Electric cars with good range and performance.

1
2

LOHAN packs bags for SPACEPORT AMERICA!

Robert Heffernan

Re: Daft Government

I have had a test motor over pressurize and blow the nozzle out the end. Very loud. While I do agree in the wrong hands you could do some damage, it doesn't warrant the restrictions placed on it.

0
0
Robert Heffernan
Flame

Daft Government

Governments worldwide are daft with regulation. Even in Australia if I wanted to make rcandy propellant (Potassium nitrate + Sugar) I too would need a commercial licence to manufacture explosives, which is odd given that mix just burns vigorously and doesn't actually explode.

2
0

Oracle: That BUG in our In-Memory Option will be fixed in October

Robert Heffernan
Trollface

SQL Injection For Fun and (Oracle's) Profit

I can just imagine a carefully crafted SQL injection query to invoke the INMEMORY feature, and costing the company a shed-load of money.

3
0

Put down that Oracle database patch: It could cost $23,000 per CPU

Robert Heffernan

Re: SSD?

Yes, it still matters quite a lot. While SSDs are faster than spinning rust drives, RAM still blows it away by an order of magnitude at least.

These read speed figures for media are rather general

Cheap USB2 Flash Drive: 5mb/sec

7200 RPM SATA HDD: 120mb/sec

SSD: 550mb/sec

DDR3 RAM: 12,500mb/sec

So from that you can see how much faster your database would run with your tabled cached in RAM.

That being said, at $28k per core I don't give two shits how fast my database runs, you shouldn't have to pay that much for what should be a basic feature of any database

10
0

German NSA probe chief mulls spy-busting typewriters

Robert Heffernan

Re: Not foolproof

Definite side channel attack vector here. If the NSA can deduce RSA private keys from the silent squeals of a CPU then they can read documents by the sound of the keystrokes. I can actually remember they have developed this for PC keyboards so adapting this to retro tech would be trivial.

Perhaps the rest of the world should just file an international class action lawsuit against the US/English/Any other Cooperating government on behalf of the rest of the world

2
0

Satya Nadella: Microsoft's new man presses all the old buttons in LONG memo

Robert Heffernan
FAIL

No Thanks

Mobile-First: No thanks, just because my mobile device has a 1920x1080 display and loads of compute power the battery doesnt last long enough to do anything meaningful and the screen size is so small all its good for is browsing, some lite email and maybe a movie whth the headphones in when im bored. If I need to do any actual work its back to my desk with the 24" LCDs and real, usefull input devices.

Cloud-First: Oh Hell No. There is no way I would subscribe to ising the cloud voluntarily. The spooks at the NSA have really put a huge dent in that idea, sure the cloud is a good idea in theory but there are too many issues in practice

13
0

Start packing your bags for a Windows Server 2003 migration

Robert Heffernan
Happy

Re: Microsoft FAIL

I recently migrated several physical hosts away from Server 2008 R2 to Server 2012 R2. It was a very painless experience and the extra features in Hyper-V in relation to replication and disaster recovery made it well worth it.

My colleague and I had three physical servers and all the contained VMs migrated in a couple of hours on the weekend. No in-place upgrade, reformat and reinstall, apply OS updates, install SAN tools, setup iSCSI and reload the VMs. Too easy.

The Touch interface didn't really get in the road the updated server management tools keep you away from that abomination, and with a liberal sprinkling of Start8 it's as if Metro never existed.

Next victim on the chopping block is the SBS2003 domain controller.

1
0

Elon Musk: Just watch me – I'll put HUMAN BOOTS on Mars by 2026

Robert Heffernan
Thumb Down

Float? More like Sink!

For a company like SpaceX, floating on the public exchange would sink the company.

Commercial Rocketry is a long-game, you cannot run that kind of business in a manner compatible with publicly held companies. They require CEO's with drive and vision and the ability to run a business over the long term. Elon Musk has such drive and vision.

SpaceX's bottom like will be looking very good over the long term (much longer terms than wall street investors look at) and unless you are turning over huge sums of cash every quarter then your a bad investment, I can well imagine SpaceX having quarters full of red ink due to the expenditure of capital on valuable R&D which then gets topped up when launch contracts are fulfilled. Because of this red ink, SpaceX will suffer as a public company.

18
0

SKA under budget cloud in the Great Oz Science Brain Drain

Robert Heffernan
Megaphone

Re: Re: Any truth to the rumour?

So when all the federal politicians ARE up in Canberra carrying on with their Bullshit, that makes you guys the front line.

Why aren't you all standing on the lawns of Parliament house with the Placards, Sticks, Stones and Pitchforks, ready to show these idiots who they really work for?

0
0

DreamWorks CEO: Movie downloaders should pay by screen size

Robert Heffernan
Trollface

Re: Dear Mr. Katzenberg

Laser range finder as a required piede of hardware drm in projectors?

4
0

Dutch doctors replace woman's skull with 3D-printed plastic copy

Robert Heffernan
Holmes

The Other Half

I am assuming her bone thickening condition wasn't only taking place inside the top half of her skull. How are they dealing with the thickening in the bottom half that the neck, cheek, node and jaws are attached to?

1
0

Shuttleworth: Firmware is the universal Trojan

Robert Heffernan

Wow

This would have to be the most intelligent thing I have heard Shuttleworth say!

39
1

SpaceX set to try HOVER LANDING for re-usable rockets on March ISS mission

Robert Heffernan

Re: Chasing rainbows

Why waste fuel for nothing?

Sure you need extra fuel that could be used to launch additional mass into orbit, but the reality of launching rockets is... Fuel is Cheap! it's the launch hardware that is not. If you spend a little extra on fuel to save a lot on hardware your ahead.

4
0

Intel, Sun vet births fast, inexpensive 3D chip-stacking breakthrough

Robert Heffernan

Re: Yes but what about supply voltage to each layer..

No, the power supply for each layer is done with conventional wire bonding, which for a few power wires around the edge of the die. The power wires can be done during the placement and bonding of each wafer.

The website has diagrams of how this works, they place the base die, put a layer of glue, align the next die on top, bond the power wires, put a layer of glue which encapsulates the power wires, places the next die, etc.

The upside of this approach is that there are only a few power wires per die (dependent on power consumption) which are bonded using existing low cost reliable technology. You aren't trying to make hundreds or thousands of connections between each layer using a new and extremely precise technology which increases manufacturing costs.

I can see a potential side-channel attack to this though.. what is the possibility of reading the inter-layer pulses externally to the chip?

3
0
Robert Heffernan
Boffin

Re: Wow. NFC *finally* finds an actual use.

By the circuit diagram and signal trace image in the article it looks like there is no protocol involved. The sender is simple it just charges a coil on the high signal and discharges it on a low.

The receiver is a little more complex, when its coil pulses positive in response to the charging of the senders coil it sets a flip flops output to high. When the senders coil discharges the receivers coil pulses negative which is used to reset the flip flop which then outputs a low.

2
0

Dell reveals 'proof-of-concept' ARM microserver

Robert Heffernan
Meh

ARM needs standards

ARM's biggest issue for mass adoption in microservers is the whole "on-a-chip" approach across multiple licensees who all tweak and fudge the hardware, memory maps and even instruction set.

It might be fine for the likes of Google, Facebook and Amazon who can buy tens of thousands of units to run their own custom workloads but for the rest of us its a fragmented mess that requires porting of some kind for each vendors chip.

This is where intel shines, sure the instruction set is messy and the chips are power hungry but you know your architecture is solid, the operating systems are well known and stable and the tools are easy to use and stable.

Given time I can really see intel eating ARMs lunch, with the money and bodies they are throwing at atom to get the power and performance down to be competition to ARM, the standard and well known platform will become the deciding factor.

If ARM wants to survive this attack by intel it needs to reign in the licensees and require a 100% compatible architecture so if I compile code for Vendor A's server SoC, it will also run on Vendor D's competing SoC. I am not saying all SoCs have to be clones but the core feature sets have to be compatible, leave the integrated prepheral hardware support upto the OS, but I dont want to have to rebuild my workloads for every little variant.

2
1

Apple's nonexistent iWatch to bag $17.5 BEEELION in first year alone – analyst

Robert Heffernan

Re: Can't wait to not buy this one!

My point being, those people who do wear watches, especially the "Flash and Expensive" ones, want a watch that is precision crafted, engineered by the best watchmakers the world has to offer, they are willing to spend 6 figures on a quality timepiece. They are going to look at a low 3-figure iWatch and wonder what kind of piece of shit that is.

The regular joe has a smartphone, if they have a watch its comfortable and practical, and in a woman's case, its usually dainty too. no matter what, Apple is going to be extremely hard pressed to fit a LiPo, cpu, ram, bluetooth, digitizer, piezio, lcd and charger all into the size of a practical watch.

1
2
Robert Heffernan
Pint

Can't wait to not buy this one!

The last thing I want is a damn watch. I have been given plenty of flash and expensive watches in my life and I havn't worn one of them. It's getting rare to see a guy wearing a watch who's not some kind of suit trying to look important.

I can't possibly see a way to milk a dying market for $1Bil, let alone $12Bil let alone $17.5Bil!

*Go home Tim Cook, You're drunk!

1
5

Eurocops want to build remote car-stopper, shared sensor network

Robert Heffernan

Re: Integration

@MJI

No, never on the UK Motorway. I have driven around Los Angeles though. But being an antipodean the worst I usually have to deal with is Kangaroos jumping out at me in the middle of the night on a Motorcycle, and Melbourne Taxi Drivers.

0
0
Robert Heffernan

Re: Integration

@MachDiamond

Having worked for a manufacturer of Automatic transmissions (I was in charge of machining valve bodies) I have a very good understanding of the control systems in a transmission. It would require a modest change to the mechanics of the valve body to remove the physical linkage from gear lever to the valve that controls what gear mode is selected (Park, Neutral, Reverse, Drive etc), and place it under electronic control.

Power steering is a modern luxury, you are perfectly capable of steering a vehicle without it, in fact high speed on a motorway makes it easier to steer without it. My partner even drives a car without power steering and she has no problem with it around town.

Also, modern brakes are designed to function perfectly without any power assistance. In fact it is part of their legal design requirements that they must still function even if the power assistance features of the braking system are completely disabled.

7
3
Robert Heffernan

Integration

Integrate this with the eCall system so police can call back to all vehicles in range, find the speeder, and disable it that way.

The idea of people getting wiped out by accident is ridiculous in that the system when disabling the vehicle could put the car in neutral, activate the hazard lights, disable the engine and lock the doors. The vehicle would coast to a stop and keep the offender/occupants safe inside the vehicle while other vehicles would give the target space as they should do when a car puts its hazards on and coasts to a stop

3
21

LOHAN develops amazing mind-reading powers

Robert Heffernan

Ardupilot

So what was wrong with the Ardupilot?

0
0

Meet NASA's Valkyrie: A silky busty robo superhero that'll save your life

Robert Heffernan

Serious Application

I got the joke ;-) but...

A serious practical application would be additional chest space for additional chest-mounted components, or mounting counter-weights further forward in order to balance the battery pack on it's back.

0
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017