* Posts by Nifty

664 posts • joined 13 Sep 2012

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Tech to solve post-Brexit customs woes doesn't exist yet, peers say

Nifty

Re: How does this work?

Estonia has had a mostly electronic border with Russia for a while now.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bkfxcx

All working smoothly.

A bad case of 'not invented here' syndrome?

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Trump pulls trigger in US-China tit-for-tat tariff tiff: 10% slapped on $200bn of imported kit

Nifty

I'm tarrified.

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Euro bureaucrats tie up .eu in red tape to stop Brexit Brits snatching back their web domains

Nifty

Re: Very petty indead.

Tsk. Why didn't the Remain campaign tell us that if we voted leave the kitten gets it?

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Google keeps tracking you even when you specifically tell it not to: Maps, Search won't take no for an answer

Nifty

Whats wrong with this picture?

In Googles reply to the Reg, "that when they (the users) disable the product, we continue to use location to improve the Google experience when they do things like perform a Google search or use Google for driving directions."

USE but not STORE?

I do wonder.

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Top Euro court: No, you can't steal images from other websites (too bad a school had to be sued to confirm this little fact)

Nifty

Re: how exactly were the school to know of the copyright in the first place?

"All images are copyright and you must obtain permission to use them. If you don't know who owns the copyright then you still can't use it."

So where are we with incidental images?

During news and documentaries on TV there are street posters, book covers in shop windows, street art, etc. These images feature as background on TV all the time. Does the TV station have to seek approval from the image or installation creator to shown them on TV incidentally?

What if the the image is the main topic - something as banal as the side of the Brexit bus?

https://www.google.com/search?q=brexit+bus&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

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Click this link and you can get The Register banned in China

Nifty

Re: Depends on your view.

"...lack of plane wreckage, perfect shaped hole on the interior wall of the pentagon, film during an interview showing a building still up..."

Hadn't you heard of the medias tendency to grab old stock images and clips when they can't get real images in a hurry? Some of which will have been taken from movies.

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Boffins build a NAZI AI – wait, let's check that... OK, it's a grammar nazi

Nifty

Re: Commas and clauses

"My experience of reading junior engineers' English"

Do we have to call in the 'use of the noun 'engineer' in Anglo-Saxon culture police in?

Or would that be the same engineer that fixes the taps in our washrooms?

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Your phone may be able to clean up snaps – but our AI is much better at touching up, say boffins

Nifty

Re: How about the audio equivalent?

There was a compression standard called MP3+ which replaced everything above about 11 kHz with bursts of white noise of the same duration of the original full spectrum sound. It turns out that our ears/brain are tone-deaf above a certain frequency, only caring about duration and phase if stereo. OK, trained musicologists mileage may vary.

The codec was used by online radio stations for a while. Not sure if AAC+ uses similar tricks. Anyway the empirical result was very good.

Hence I was thinking that a similar reconstruction would potentially work well. Concerning the info that is buried in old recordings: I don't just mean audio info, they have implied human language or knowledge about musical instruments. AI can cross-reference to language and music knowledge bases to help the reconstruction.

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Nifty

How about the audio equivalent?

Much effort has been put into cleaning up old audio recordings. But I’ve yet to hear of any project that uses AI type algorithms that can restore or enhance missing sibilance in speech by learning from speech examples in the same language. Maybe even a similar idea with old orchestral recordings is possible.

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Tech team trapped in data centre as hypoxic gas flooded in. Again

Nifty

Hydrogen peroxide

This does remind me of an office I worked in, building was a kind of factory hall. We started noticing a 'sharp' smell that no-one could quite place. Occasionally a very strong whiff of it would hang around certain spots of the building. It became quite concerning. Management ignored the issue until we researched/guessed that it was a biogas and that was nasty stuff to breathe and highly flammable too.

The cause? They'd raised the roof some years back by making the building walls taller. Trouble is, the sewage breather stack was left inside the building. Not a problem until a combination of cold weather and a change in the loo cleaner to a strong disinfectant had caused anaerobic digestion to begin in the cess pit.

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Tech support chap given no training or briefing before jobs, which is why he was arrested

Nifty

Re: Back in my day

"you shouldn't take a drive apart outside of a clean room"

This reminds me an incident with expensive minicomputer disk platters.

The manager of the local 400-stong workforce of a company I worked for walked the floors smoking his trademark cigar. One day he was showing visitors proudly around the minicomputer room while waving said cigar around. He exhaled nice plume of cigar smoke and almost immediately in front of our eyes (ears) the platter of one computer started screeching. They were £3000 a pop in the money of those days IIRC.

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Infrastructure wonks: Tear up Britain's copper phone networks by 2025

Nifty

The local streets analogy

So local authorities own/commission the maintenance of the local roads. Funded through council tax. The transport itself is bought from service providers (carmakers and the public transport system that the roads put in reach).

For some strange reason this model is non-controversial.

Imagine:

LAs own the local last-mile parts of fibre, commissioning the maintenance funded through council tax. Service providers do the backhaul and value-added from junction points where several competitors can interconnect, i

That idea is thought to be highly controversial.

Explain?

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Nifty

"it would be quite feasible to get a significant workforce from the ranks of the unemployed"

Nah, the the seasonal turnip pickers from Eastern Europe would just switch to the fibre-laying season.

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Galileo, here we go again. My my, the Brits are gonna miss EU

Nifty

Re: HS2 and the Galileo replacement

"When Airbus, BMW, Nissan, Honda, Toyota, Hitachi, all the Financial Institution in the City and a host more all leave our sinking ship because of BREXIT"

BMW, Nissan, Honda, Toyota, Hitachi will all want to stay manufacturing in the UK so as not to be penalised by the tariffs that the USA and others place in EU built cars, in retaliation for the 10% EU car tariffs that we are currently bound by. But needn't be going forward.

As for he Financial Institution in the City:

http://www.cityam.com/288069/german-asset-managers-call-unhindered-access-city-post

If the EU had been on a trajectory to genuinely freer trade and a socially viable set of intra-EU migration rules, we could easily have stayed in. It was not to be.

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Ex-Rolls-Royce engineer nicked on suspicion of giving F-35 info to China

Nifty

Re: There was something the Chinese didn't know already?

“not sure why military types of each generation believe that they can combine high and low altitude performance, stealth, speed and agility, short take off, heavy weapons capability, long endurance, land & maritime capability etc all in one airframe“

Same mentality that resulted in the ‘sports utility vehicle’

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Uber 'does not exist any more' says Turkish president

Nifty

Instanbul - the one place that NEEDS Uber

There is a breathtakingly crafty scam among Istanbul taxi drivers. I think they give each other training on it.

- Your friendly, English-speaking driver wants to drop you off at a busy intersection or narrow street near, but not at your actual destination.

- An irate traffic queue instantly builds up behind the taxi and starts sounding their horns.

- When you pay (flustered), he uses sleight of hand (it's very good) and switches your largest note for a small value one, thrusts this back at you and claims he has not received full payment. You've little option but to pay again.

The 2nd time this trick was performed we were ready and watching but could still not spot the switch. We stood our ground and he drove off disgusted.

So if there is anywhere in the world that needs a fully trackable system like Uber, maybe it's Istanbul.

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UK has rejected over 1,000 skilled IT bod visa applications this year

Nifty

Re: Visas and skills gaps

On which planet?

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Nifty

Won't downvote this one but it's naive. We actually need vocationallly trained people, not more Phds.

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Nifty

And us to (finally) have freeer access to theirs?

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Fixing a printer ended with a dozen fire engines in the car park

Nifty

It was in the 80s where I worked that someone, as a prank, placed on a colleages desk a shoebox with a large ticking alarm clock in it and lots of bright red curly wires sticking out.

The building was evacuated of a couple of hundred people and management was not impressed.

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Google's socially awkward geeks craft socially awkward AI bot that calls people for you

Nifty

Implication for voice recognition banking security?

Where you get asked some simple questions by the bank system, and it uses your previously trained voice print to validate your access.

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Twitter: No big deal, but everyone needs to change their password

Nifty

So all websites store your plaintext passwords for batch-hashing later on?

I’d always naively thought that passwords are hashed at moment of creation, leaving no opportunity for them to be stored on a website or database unhashed. I thought that hashing & salting was a one-way process and the result is only usable for matching. Where was my naive assumption wrong?

Or: Due to a coding bug, a logfile was being written in plaintext of all passwords being created. And this logfile had been left running for years and years, long enough to acquire millions of plaintext passwords? Colour me skeptical.

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Blighty stuffs itself in Galileo airlock and dares Europe to pull the lever

Nifty

Re: £14 billion

“money will no longer be controlled by a bunch of unelected MEPs (yes really), it will be controlled instead by the intelligent honest qualified professionals who inhabit the house of commons”

Ones who can be booted out by their local constituents.

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Birds can feel Earth's magnetic fields? Yeah, that might fly. Bioboffins find vital sense proteins

Nifty

Re: How would it feel?

Is this about lay lines?

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Cambridge Analytica CEO suspended – and that's not even the worst news for them today

Nifty

Re: What I don't understand

You forgot to mention Corbyn at the UK 2017 snap election where an activist subgroup finessed social media beautifully.

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Samba settings SNAFU lets any user change admin passwords

Nifty

Anyone care to list which popular devices/situations use Samba? Didn’t Apple use it at one time?

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Swiss see Telly Tax as a Big Plus, vote against scrapping it

Nifty

Re: It was a vote against their abolition

Stark choice referendum with no middle ground. Now where did I hear about one of these recently, a little closer to our shores?

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Cryptocurrency miners go nuclear, RSA blunder, Winner back in court, and plenty more

Nifty

Wot no fission?

Huh, I thought the headline meant cryptominers had strapped sone supercomputers to some nuclear power stations. I’m frankly disappointed.

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UK's Dyson to vacuum up 300 staffers for its electric car division

Nifty

True, and Dyson had better anticipate patent trolling from big German electrical concerns

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RIP... almost: Brit high street gadget shack Maplin Electronics

Nifty

While the criticism of Maplin & Toys R Us is fair enough, bear in mind that behind retail bricks and mortar is a highly capitalist retail rental industry that tries to maximise it's own income. And local authorities that see retail rates as an easy cash source. It takes a very long time for retail rents to fall when the market changes structurally. That makes retail in buildings an always-marginal business.

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UK mobile customers face inflation-busting price hike

Nifty

Re: Abuse

Correct about Three. So I use Skype when roaming to call 'the guy standing next to me' or my holiday car hire company.

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Nifty

Re: Abuse

Deleted

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Home fibre in the UK sucks so much it doesn't even rank in Euro study

Nifty

Re: *Shrug*

Try this experiment then: Alight from Waterloo station at 5pm. See an excellent 4G signal on your phone. Then try to get some data, any data. Something ambitious like a Google map of your locality.

No data - at all.

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US broadband is scarce, slow and expensive. 'Great!' says the FCC

Nifty

Re: Opinion & Facts

Could you go on to explain why electricity was rolled out perfectly fine to this same far-flung addresses?

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Biker nerfed by robo Chevy in San Francisco now lobs sueball at GM

Nifty

It'll be interesting to see how much 360% footage was recorded by the AV for the forensic analysis of who/what was to blame.

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'The capacitors exploded, showering the lab in flaming confetti'

Nifty

Can't remember the product details but in the 80s/90s the relays we used in process control switch cabinets had a built-in fuse, one per relay. If it blew, a small cylindrical projectile would fire at high speed from the fuse towards the eyes of the technician standing in front of the relay bank.

A fuse cover had to be added to each relay.

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Why did I buy a gadget I know I'll never use?

Nifty

Nuts bolts washers and screws

In that order in case misunderstood.

I keep all kinds of old rotating fasteners and spacers.

Believe it or not the really do come in handy when fixing things or doing some sort of DIY improvisation.

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You may not be a software company, but that isn't an excuse to lame-out at computering

Nifty

Not even an honorary mention that J. Lyons & Co built the first business computer for their tea shop logistics in 1951 and were soon time-sharing it to other businesses and government?

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OK, Google: Why does Chromecast clobber Wi-Fi connections?

Nifty

Apple iPhoto sync - looks like same thing

With my previous Netgear router, as soon as the iMac woke up and tried to auto sync My Photo Stream with the iDevices, a general WiFi lock-up would happen. After upgrading to an Asus router the issue seemed to disappear and possibly (though never admitting there was ever a problem of course) Apple have fixed it on their side too.

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Infamous Silicon Valley 'sex party' exactly as exciting as it sounds

Nifty

No one mentioned the robot pole dancers at this years CES yet?

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Intel, Microsoft confess: Meltdown, Spectre may slow your servers

Nifty

Got a feeling that once the 'patches' are in place and it's supposed to go quiet, one by one the security researchers will start popping out the POCs that it's not at all fixed.

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Wannabe W1 DOW-er faked car crash to track down reg plate's owner

Nifty

Re: Not all cops are crooks

"Would you prefer a constable to pull you over and having found that you are not on drugs or alcohol and apologetic..."

https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/728841/300-fine-woman-failed-fill-up-screen-wash

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Nifty

Switzerland....

Funny how another country can think differently... in Switzerland, unless the car owner has succeeded in going ex-directory, the reverse lookup is public:

https://www.ch.ch/en/number-plate-owner-details/

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You Wreck Me, Spotify: Tom Petty, Neil Young publisher launches $1.6bn copyright sueball

Nifty

"Depending on the outcome spotify's stock could be free falling"

You *are* referring to the Tom Petty song there?

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Why bother cracking PCs? Spot o' malware on PLCs... Done. Industrial control network pwned

Nifty

Re: Question is 'why'?

"there will be no credit card numbers, sensitive documents..."

Secret recipes for process-controlled manufactured products - flow rates of each material and durations

In piped energy/chemical transport - exact quantities flowing and when, so that's great industrial espionage

And... is PLC logic used to control 'secure' entry systems?

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Yes, Britain has an urban-rural 4G schism. This is what it looks like

Nifty

London railway stations

You are right about London rail stations. At Waterloo and the streets surrounding on Three 3g/4g, a strong signal and zero data. Quite an inconvenience if you were blithely relying on satnav for your last half mile from the station. Simply too many handsets in the locality during the rush hour, which makes the system unfit for purpose.

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Nifty

You are right about London rail stations. At Waterloo and the streets surrounding on Three 3g/4g, a strong signal and zero data. Quite an inconvenience if you were blithely relying on satnav for your last half mile from the station. Simply too many handsets in the locality during the rush hour, which makes the system unfit for purpose.

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Neural networks: Today, classifying flowers... tomorrow, Skynet maybe

Nifty

This article still doesn't explain why the 'Like That Garden' app on IOS works in such a vague way. The old gaffer down at the allotment can identify plants better!

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Digital minister: We're still talking to BT about sorting crap broadband

Nifty

Funny then that some rural communities have grouped together and done DIY fibre at a fraction of that £20k then.

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Windows Update borks elderly printers in typical Patch Tuesday style

Nifty

Re: backward compatibility NOT a thing with Micro-shaft

It's a Brexit conspiracy then!

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