* Posts by Ragequit

155 posts • joined 26 Aug 2012

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Paper factory fired its sysadmin. He returned via VPN and caused $1m in damage. Now jailed

Ragequit
FAIL

For now the FBI...

will use cases like this for a self congratulatory shoulder slap (not that they did much) but if they become too common I could see some laws being introduced to fine grossly negligent businesses like this. Then again governments have their heads in their nether regions in regards to IT so I hope all the free press is worth the extra case load.

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College fires IT admin, loses access to Google email, successfully sues IT admin for $250,000

Ragequit
FAIL

/facepalm

I seriously doubt they had such a policy before this incident. They probably cooked it up or pointed at some vague clause somewhere in their employee policies. This is why admins aren't only walked out of the building (a little hard when they work from home), you sit them down and delegate their work on anything critical to other employees before you terminate them. Though having multiple accounts and a periodic review of these things is best. It's also nicer when access is regulated by certificates that can be revoked...

As far as being racists? Who knows. Neither party seems like the brightest bulbs.

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Elon Musk: I'm gonna turn Mars into a $10bn death-dealing interplanetary gas station

Ragequit
Joke

Re: Musk seems to be losing it

Don't worry, Netflix will probably offer to send a preloaded server on the trip. When they get there they can use the very high latency, very limited bandwidth comms to earth to slowly update the local cache of videos rather than do more important things.

Seriously though how do you keep that many people entertained for months?

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What the hex is up with Jupiter's North Pole?

Ragequit
FAIL

Where's waldo

Don't see a hexagon or anything in the article that supports that there is one. Copy, paste?

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TP-Link fined $200k, told to be nice to wireless router tinkers after throwing a hissy fit

Ragequit
Facepalm

Re: Smoke and mirrors...

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/06/14/imagination_come_back_to_mips_wifi_vendors_we_have_an_fcc_workaround/

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Ragequit
Devil

Smoke and mirrors...

This narrative would probably have been one of cooperation if the FCC had been working with an American company. And it's not exactly like this went down as quickly as this article suggests. I bought a tp-link wifi router as soon as I caught wind of what the FCC was planning. It was months later that tp-link pulled their products over this.

Not that I'm defending tp-link. I just think it's silly to say they threw anything when it was the FCC that started this. Sounds like damage control via a slap on the wrist.

I seem to recall a certain embedded processor company offering a virtualization stack as a solution to this very problem. Wonder if all wifi products sold in two years time in the US are going to mysteriously use this. Who at the FCC is on their board or is in their pocket? :P

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Science non-fiction: Newly spotted alien world bathes in glow of three stars

Ragequit
Joke

Re: Am I missing something?

Well the graphic is a 2-d representation of something that is 3-d. I'm guessing that the twin-stars aren't necessarily on the same elliptical orbit as the planet? Though that's gotta make for some extra weirdness when they are nearest the primary star. It seems to me it would be nothing approaching stable. But what do I know?

Stranger is the notion of how life would evolve on such a planet if it was given the time to. Life that didn't depend on a day-night cycle would be most likely. Though I suppose a 140 year dormant/hibernation cycle might be possible. Though the opposite is a possibility. Life that flourishes only during the almost constant day. It might only get warm enough during these periods of constant day?

Intelligent life with an evolutionary means of hibernating during interstellar flight? Space vampires.

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Intel still chip, chip, chippin' away at the European Commission's anti-trust fine

Ragequit

Wintel...

I had all but forgotten about this. Microsoft and Intel didn't just share a bed, they used the same techniques as well. The irony being that the PC industry is now on such a decline that I doubt even Intel could afford to use such tactics again and this amount, while not unsubstantial, has probably been funded for nearly a decade.

It'd be nice to see AMD's Zen be a repeat of the AMD64, except with superior sales. Won't hold my breath though. What AMD really needs to shine is a hardware platform (chipsets) that not only competes with Intel's but is as well supported in as many OSes as possible. And I don't just mean in raw features. It needs to have a good track record and that takes time. Time AMD might not have. That's why I haven't exactly postponed any hardware purchases despite Zen's relatively close release.

Time will tell. One thing I can hope for are chipsets that don't put arbitrary constraints on PCIe express lanes. Often it's a tactic employed to force you to buy the next tier, but even ignoring the cost I find it extremely annoying that I have to color inside Intel's predetermined use cases.

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The fork? Node.js: Code showdown re-opens Open Source wounds

Ragequit
Devil

I thought...

The underlying issue in this case had more to do with how fundamentally flawed Node.js was? It's code namespace being such that a dispute over package name like this was inevitable? I don't use Node.js. As I understand it there is no way to split the namespace by, for example, developer name, project, website, etc. It was just something I heard on another site. Not sure if it's true.

This article no doubt points out the elephant in the room, but the smart corporations largely avoid this by keeping the natives at least content. At least until the platform stops making them money and they try alternate ways to monetize (sourceforge) or just close up shop. Guess it's good thing we have shabby platforms like this to point out just how much of a house of cards the "cloud" is. Not to mention the possibility that these "forks" that presumably have replaced this missing code haven't been reviewed (that's assuming the originals were). It'd be pretty easy to stick some malicious code in at this point in time.

TL:DR Rather than be concerned about tension, I'd be more concerned with building upon solutions that are likely to fail even before they shutdown.

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Intel tock blocked for good: Tick-tock now an oom-pah-pah waltz

Ragequit
Devil

Re: Stagnation...

You did read my post right? That I didn't think it would happen overnight. That it'll be some time before people will be satisfied? There's 30 years of unreasonable wish fulfillment to work through. Still, I think there will be some market for it. It might even be reasonably popular for a year or two before the hype machine stalls. The difference now is that we have more compute than we know what to do with. Granted we need more than just compute and that's where we're going to get hung up on reality tech. But that was one of the major hurdles back in the day. That and high res displays. Back then it was too expensive to develop something better than Minecraft sans textures. Now we can at least get our foot in the door tech wise.

People are going to have a wake up call on what's passed for 3D graphics up till now. When you give people the chance to really look at things closely in your environment - texture, lighting, and shadows quality is going to become obvious. Time to stick Ray Tracing in an FPGA?

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Ragequit
Pint

Stagnation...

Let's face it everyone is in trouble, intel or not, unless 'the next big thing' is realized. Some are hoping VR or AR is just that but I don't think it'll happen overnight. That tech, especially the former, has been the dream of many a Sci-fi/wonk/nerd for 30+ years now. I'd be very surprised if anyone is satisfied with the first product out the gate.

Intel seems to be banking on Hybrid CPU/FPGA tech for the hyperscale and perhaps they're hoping it will filter down into the mass market in VR products? I speculate machine learning would be helpful in some of the problems faced by emerging tech. I.e. Adapting character animation to more closely match the normal movements of the user. It's important for the immersion factor. Not everyone has the same cadence (ahem) and people have quirks all their own. You could do this with a GPU? Sure, but it's just one example and efficiency could become important in mobile versions.

AMD is of course banking on their GPU and APU to tackle some of the same problems. The problem is that their facing more than one front here. Intel and Nvidia. AMD has, until this point, been slow to bring their ARM based products to market but it seems the OS/toolchains have almost caught up. Except that helps Nvidia as much as it does AMD. If 64-bit ARM takes hold Nvidia stands to be a major player as well. Still early days. Zen will hopefully be a way for AMD to get back to profitability in the near term, but going forward they need to be adaptable and offer solutions others can't or won't provide. Intel is very protective of their distinct product lines and do their utmost to keep one from consuming the other. If AMD can provide competitive solutions that give customers options rather than be forced to color within Intel's lines I think they have a fair shot of surviving.

I think it's true Intel is going to have some trouble maintaining the status quo going forward. MS is at a turning point with their OS, which leaves x86 dominance in question, and Intel is trying to diversify a bit before the storm hits. I.e. New memory/storage tech, FPGA's, and even software stacks for open source that favors their products. Well the later isn't really anything new.

At any rate things might actually start to get interesting for once. More competition and some cool tech from all camps. At least one can hope.

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Microsoft will rest its jackboot on Windows 7, 8.1's throat on new Intel CPUs in 2018 – not 2017

Ragequit

Or you could...

Use the Disc?

Get a cheap USB controller with a chipset supported by Win7?

Just to mention a couple possibilities... Probably others.. /yawn.

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Microsoft wants to lock everyone into its store via universal Windows apps, says game kingpin

Ragequit

Short on details..

I haven't been readily following the OS-that-should-be-called-windows-9 (other than how to stop it's invasion) so I'll admit to not knowing all the details (though it sounds as though MS is being evasive on some). Side-loading is the only option for non-appstore UWA for now and thus Epic's complaint. Meanwhile MS claims there will be more revealed later. Yet they keep claiming the UWA development platform is "completely open". They did open source some of their stack recently did they not? I wonder if the their response will be something along the lines of - "You're welcome to build your own Appstore target!!!.." and in very small print, "as long as you get certified by us and give us a negotiable 5-10%". I just don't see MS giving up completely on this business model. The plan B has got to include some sort of revenue stream or the free Win10 upgrades will have to be entirely subsidized by ads/dataslurp.

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A glass of soda-and-lime is the straight dope for graphene

Ragequit
Joke

Correct me if I'm wrong...

But this has nothing to do with the manufacture of graphene itself. This just expands its applications and further explores its properties. Got me excited to think they had a way to manufacture graphene in volume.

If only we could 2d print this stuff.

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Boffins' gravitational wave detection hat trick blows open astronomy

Ragequit
Joke

Need more data?

Easy! Just produce some micro black holes next to the LIGO and start recording. Once you can mass produce LIGO arrays you establish a network of probes at the edge of the solar system and start mapping. Wake me up when I'm 150 years old. Zzzzz.

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RAM, bam, thank you Ma'am! Samsung fires up fastest-ever memory

Ragequit

Cool but...

Until they start producing the 8Gb parts it's future is questionable in GPU's. Insomuch that VR and 4k gaming are going to increase demand for texture space. 4Gb is fine today but I dunno about 6-12 months from now. Also while 256 GBps is impressive as memory goes it's actually slower than the rated bandwidth of some of the higher end GDDR5 cards out there (Usually achieved with a 512 bit bus). That said the power requirements and the clock freq needed are presumably much less so mid range graphics cards and APU's does sound like the likely fit.

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PostgreSQL learns to walk and chew gum

Ragequit
Thumb Up

"he would also like more improvement's to the scheme's scalability."

I'm assuming this is referring to the 4 worker threads under the node? I suppose it's rather inefficient if your rig has a lot of cores. But the devil is in the details when it comes to DB's. I imagine there are only so many tasks that can be made parallel.

That said it's nice to see improvements to PostgreSQL. I've never used it myself but always heard it wasn't as performant as some of it's less feature rich cousins.

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Nvidia unveils credit card-sized 'supercomputer' for portable AI

Ragequit
FAIL

Nothing new?

Other than how it's packaged this hardware already exists in mobile devices. So it's just the software stack that is new then? And Nvidia is just hoping (begging) would be developers decide to use it for their RoTM nanny came drones? Doesn't sound like this idea is totally baked. The last thing we need is a swarm of UAV's around the playground supposedly doing the job the parents should be doing themselves. What's the nanny going to do? Film it? Worse case try to hit any would be kidnapper with a stun gun and instead hit your kid with it? About the best you could hope for is that the thing could get a license plate but I'm assuming criminals will get wise and bring a baseball bat to knock the pests out of the air.

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California enormo-quake prediction: Cracks form between US boffins

Ragequit
Devil

15 percent...

While 15% is significant from a scientific perspective I'm going to go out on a limb here and say the bottom line - California will have earthquakes in the near future. Hmmm.. that's never happened before...

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Double blow for AMD as CPU brainiac jumps ship to rival Nvidia

Ragequit
Devil

Non compete

Article says he was at ATI since 1994. Odds are he wasn't forced to sign one back then and the more integral a person becomes to a company the harder it is to get them to sign one. If it's even legally possible without rehiring (or possibly during the merger). They'd likely have to try to force everyone in his department to sign it. Generally speaking HR policies have to be equally applied w/o running afoul of at least discrimination laws.

It's also a bit like trying to get the old ball and chain to sign a pre-nup after years of marriage just in case they decide to leave you to shack up with your enemy. Which is where the analogy fails because at that point you would probably wish them on your enemies.

Joking aside here's hoping AMD can make some sort of comeback but I feel like they're betting everything on one last strategy. If this Zen processor refresh fails to at least get them out of the red then they're not going to be in a position to entice/rehire experienced engineers for another try. At which point I wouldn't be surprised to see further company grooming/pruning to make themselves an attractive acquisition.

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Microsoft, Tesla, build battery that knows how much (energy) you suck

Ragequit
Stop

Re: Putting Windows in control of the energy equivalent of a small bomb

Well at the very least the current approach must be largely hardware agnostic at the OS level? Using very basic profiles/parameters that apply to any battery type I would assume. Also, this new approach does seem to allow indirect control of current/load as there will be multiple batteries in the system with the ability to switch between them. So without some hardware based safety thresholds a completely software driven solution could in theory overtax a single battery past it's specifications could it not?

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Ragequit
Devil

Re: Putting Windows in control of the energy equivalent of a small bomb

That was my first thought as well. If it's truly software defined then you run the risk of "thermal" issues. Granted this isn't really a windows only issue and it might be mitigated with some safety thresholds in the hardware. If this really is a patent laden solution that MS is trying to use for competitive advantage in the mobile arena it's going to have to overcome several hurdles (and offer some real world results of course).

Here's hoping someone is sane enough to start a patent/fee free industry standard/software stack. The later should really be open source to decrease the chance of thermal runaway, etc.

Though they say this will be cheap to implement I'm thinking you'll need to offload this to something other than the main CPU. Perhaps a FPGA? Otherwise power use will spike every time you power cycle a device and you have to wait for the OS to boot.

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Woman makes app that lets people rate and review you, Yelp-style. Now SHE'S upset people are 'reviewing' her

Ragequit

What would really be ironic...

Is if the site/app launches and makes a profit just because of all the bad press. Since when did any of the information have to be true? If it generates ad revenue then does it matter that it's a steaming pile of an idea with a lifespan of a meme?

Still it's a horrible idea. I can't tell if they're really that stupid or if they're just trolling everyone with feigned naivety.

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NASA announcement of MAJOR MARS DISCOVERY imminent: WHAT can it be?

Ragequit
Devil

They've...

Grown some potatoes in some mildly moist dirt.

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NASA rover coders at Intel's Wind River biz axed – sources

Ragequit

Working @ home...

Maybe the senior staff had such large salaries they decided to subcontract their work overseas? It's happened before with people in an office. It'd be even easier to pull off the scheme from home. Joking aside, if uncle sam really does have projects that need their expertise it wouldn't be surprising if they found themselves being recruited by the defense contractors (or NASA). Or for that matter coming back to work for Wind River as contractors. Maybe Intel is looking to sell it off and wants to gut employee benefits to make it look more appealing on paper. /shrug who knows.

Long story short I bet the guys who lost their jobs won't have too much trouble finding work.

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Thanks for the memory: XPoint put under the analyst microscope

Ragequit

Maybe I missed it...

But I don't recall seeing the article mention how this report got it's information? I'm assuming it was either design docs or an engineering sample straight from Intel? I can understand them not commenting on the actual materials used (probably under NDA), but it doesn't seem like we've learned all that much? Well I guess it's too early days to expect any real benchmarks or use cases (and even if there were they wouldn't be indicative of the final product). Still the 1000x this and 10x that speak makes me skeptical of how trumped up they are. Especially in light of the paper launch so far in advance of it shipping.

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AMD chief architect Jim Keller quits chipmaker – again

Ragequit
Unhappy

Well that blows..

I can only hope that means the design for the Zen is effectively finished and the only thing holding back a shipping product is getting their 14nm Fab ramped.

@AC - AMD already announced it has abandoned the ARM play in favor of going all in with the Zen core for desktop, mobile, and potentially server as well.

That said I hope him leaving isn't premature and in reaction to that project being scuttled.

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LTO issues mighty seventh-generation 15TB tape format

Ragequit
Devil

Ah.. tape..

How I hate thee. Seriously can they just stop advancing tape tech already? I know it might be a bit of a inconvenience to some people's data recovery plans but what happened to all the promised optical/holographic storage tech? I much prefer the idea of storing data on non-magnetic media with much more reasonable lifespans. But then humans are always living in the present and rarely plan (effectively) for the future.

We produce and consume all this data these days but I wonder if we really have the means to preserve it? Or perhaps the better question is do we want to? Who gets to decide what stays and what goes in the bit bucket? Cat Videos? Bin.

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Wi-Gig signals are bouncing off the walls, can't settle on the sofa

Ragequit
Pint

Sounds like they're desperate...

To get more low margin Wifi kit to market and don't care if it's actually usable. I have to wonder where this market for multi-gigabit Wifi is? What's going to drive the demand for it on mobile devices were battery life is far more important than how many times faster your Wifi is than your internet connection?

At any rate solutions would seem to include some sort of negotiated triangulation of directional antennas on another band or as the article suggests more transmitters to expand the range of the WLAN. Which all leads back to selling more low margin kit.

Although in the end it seems silly considering it has many of the same limitations as LiFi.

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Disney's light-bulb moment: build TCP into LEDs for IoT comms

Ragequit
Facepalm

IoCTIOCB

Internet of creepy things invading our children's bedroom.

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DARPA adds 'sense of touch' to robot hand

Ragequit
Devil

Double edged sword...

It certainly has great promise for spinal injuries and amputees but if DARPA is involved their already wondering if this can be used for torture without "physical" harm. I hope someone involved with the design of these neural interfaces has the sense to release an easy hack for them that would install something of a limiter on data coming from various sensors.

Either that or one can hope that a mental training regiment will be developed to help soldiers tune out the sensory data coming from these interfaces making it all but useless for the would be malicious side of such tech.

Speaking of which I got the impression these interfaces were hard wired. So I suppose it'll be some time before we have to worry overly much about big brother. :P

Of course on the vein of cybersex there will undoubtedly be some who are excited over the prospect of other side of the coin.

How long until a company patents the 5 senses? :P

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Apple downgrades iPhone 6S with wimpy 1715mAh battery

Ragequit
Devil

I remember...

The good old days when a cell phones battery and back cover were one in the same. If you wanted more battery life you slapped on a larger pack that added a few pounds, got worryingly hot during extended use, and really didn't solve the issue... unless you bought a second pack and an external charging station to do a proper complete drain / charge cycle.

/sarcasm off

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Ragequit
Joke

Re: Bit of soft shoe-ing here

Can't really make a prediction if the SoC shrink + Added hardware features = Less battery drain. The most I'd hope for is a net zero sum. In which case the reduced battery capacity would mean less battery life. But it's all speculation at this point.

All manufacturer battery life calculations are rubbish anyway.

Lets just hope Apple doesn't get the crazy idea to use the kinetic energy from people fondling their i-devices harder to charge their batteries. So many dead devices in the heat of the moment. So many lost loves in the hands of fanboi's. Truly heartbreaking. Cough.

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ARM wants you to jump into mbed with it – IoT open-source OS in beta

Ragequit

Re: Hmm...

I didn't mean ARM specifically. As you say they are just providing a *paid* service to the would be IoT vendors of the world. Attempting to capitalize on a new market? Kudos to them in that regard. It's the market's business model and ultimately the vendors selling kit to consumers I don't agree with. Not only do we not own the software or the content, but if they could have their way they'd own all our content/data as well. Oh, right most EULA's for online services sign our rights to those away. In the end the only thing we own is some hardware that is completely bricked if we don't want to use their services.

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Ragequit
Devil

Re: Hmm...

@AC - I'd feel a whole lot more confident that was the case if you had the option of *not* sending it to their cloud or at least had consumer centric EULA's. In my mind if they are not charging you for a service they either have planned obsolescence in store or are somehow monetizing your data. Otherwise they have a fubar'd business model that will not sustain itself.

Follow the money.

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Ragequit
Joke

You mean mBad?

"ARM has told us it is trying to open source as much as it can – using the Apache 2.0 license – but commercial realities cannot be ignored."

The commercial reality being that every IoT vendor wants to slurp up your personal data to their "private cloud" and sell it off to the highest bidder, etc.

Joking aside, at least they have the client that is completely open source. So here's hoping you really can write your own backend. Of course that's after the inevitable cat and mouse game of vendors trying to lock down all their devices in the name of trust! and security! while people find a way around it so they can install truly trustworthy software stacks and actually apply security updates.

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Ship-swallowing GREEN BIO-STORM spotted FROM SPAAACE

Ragequit
Joke

Quickly!

Like the Australians/Americans/humans are oft to do! Introduce a new algae eating species to the Baltic to "solve" the problem. Nothing will go wrong!

We're seriously bad at meddling with nature.

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America's crackdown on open-source Wi-Fi router firmware – THE TRUTH

Ragequit
Unhappy

So it is true...

I remember catching wind of this a while back but when I didn't see the expected coverage hit the major sites I figured it was a bit of FUD. I don't envy the FCC on this topic. I can understand their need to enforce certification, etc but at the expense of BYOF (bring your own firmware).

If only the radio firmware/stack/driver could be abstracted and reside on another piece of flash. Easier said then done on the software side I imagine. That and it would increase the cost of the devices. At any rate perhaps a middle ground could be found where the layers further up the stack were user modifiable without having direct access to the radio itself? Sorry, tired probably not making sense.

Now what are the odd's that companies will start updating their firmware due to these proposed rules? LOL. Let's enforce who can update the firmware! No one ever does....

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Wangling my way into the 4K gaming club with a water-cooled whopper

Ragequit

Moore's Law and gaming...

While some would argue that console gaming and multi-platform game releases (targeting the lowest common) have slowed the march of graphics fidelity I think it's also due to the stalling of chip processes. How long have Nvidia and AMD been on 28nm process for their GPU's? 4+ years? Until they can drop down to 20 to 14nm we're not going to see a vast improvement (10nm is unlikely considering Intel has even delayed theirs). 4k gaming on mainstream hardware will probably be a pipe dream until then.

In the near term we need faster RAM, better I/O, less latency.. I wonder if hybrid memory tech like Intel's Xpoint will allow for some optimization of the rendering pipeline? With lots of non-volatile Ram I wonder if certain things could be preprocessed? Hmm.. maybe not. /Shrug.

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Work has started on VMware's secret security disruptor

Ragequit
Devil

Strange...

I can only think this is a "solution" to increase VMWare buy-in as creating an OS and Application agnoistic Encrypt-all-the-things special sauce would probably just entail creating VPN tunnels between VM's managed by VMware? Unless it isn't agnostic and that would be a bloody mess.

Nothing can go wrong...

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Leak-shamed Intel finally bares nifty Skylake details to world+dog

Ragequit

Re: Meh...

I'd figure the atom based C2000 series of SoC's would be a better fit for NAS boxes? And those have yet to see a refresh (denverton was the next name iirc).

Too bad we won't see anything like the new Xeon Phi's at the lower end for quite some time. Though if you were to believe the rumors the high end of the upcoming AMD Zen refresh will have HBM memory on die. Time will tell. AMD has put HBM on their GPU's.

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Ragequit
Meh

Meh...

It's really hard to get excited about processors these days. Especially not fond of being forced into solutions just because it runs counter with Intel's goals (read keeping all their product lines relevant). Give me more PCIe lanes and more cores rather than higher clock rates.

I still have a little bit of hope that AMD isn't completely blowing smoke with their Zen processors. If for no other reason that it will but some pricing pressure on Intel. Course they need to start shipping some volume too and despite what they might hope I don't think that will be coming from Win10.

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Groin-melting Fujitsu LifeBook batteries recalled in conflag alert

Ragequit
Devil

Just how many...

Groins will they melt before they're satisfied?! Is Fujitsu's CEO perhaps a widow?

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Farewell to Borland C++: Embarcadero releases Delphi and C++ Builder 10

Ragequit
Joke

Ah.. Borland..

I guess in a way we're still hearing the muffled screams of their demise. Do people still use Delphi? To be fair I liked Borland's little SQL server back in the day. Well as much as one can like a product that is stuffed down their throat. Still, it was a viable alternative to MS, etc for a small shop. Iirc MS SQL couldn't even do record level locking at the time without padding out your table schema to whatever pagesize. Take away the datatypes and you'd think MS wrote the first NoSQL database decades ago.

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All pixels go: World's biggest sky-gazing camera gets final sign-off

Ragequit
Joke

RE: ...phones will have better resolution.

Except being able to zoom in on selfies on facebook to the point where you can see every nose hair, black head, and blood vessel is only interesting for a, as yet unnamed, special breed of stalker. Dark matter indeed.

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Prof Hawking cracks riddle of black holes – which may be portals to other universes

Ragequit
Joke

I welcome...

Our holographic overlords freshly escaped from a super massive.. err microscopic black hole.

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Blueprints revealed: Oracle crams Sparc M7 and InfiniBand into cheaper 'Sonoma' chips

Ragequit
Joke

Just don't...

backward engineer their crypto instructions looking for vulnerabilities. That's against their EULA. oO

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Boffins raise five-week-old fetal human brain in the lab for experimentation

Ragequit

Wakes up and crawls out from beneath his rock...

I guess I haven't been paying much attention to news about genetics. I had no idea we were anywhere near this. It has so many potential applications. Though some of them are quite the nightmare sci-fi scenario. But for once I'll focus on the good. Medical research and the further research of Neuro Nets in computing? Yes, please.

*Does his best not to think about brains in jars connected to supercomputers..*

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A magic bracelet that unlocks PCs, dancing robot spiders, and more in Intel's circus

Ragequit
Joke

I think...

Intel misunderstood IoT. Their chips didn't actually need to be in "things". As in mechanical critters ready to steal/disarm our ID bracelets that grant access to WMDs and bring about the worlds destruction.

Joking aside, besides xpoint which is as much of a paper launch as everything else I'm wondering if Intel is suffering from tick-tock withdrawal due to their 10nm delays.

Also, please put a heat sensor and heart monitor on the ID bracelets. I'm rather attached to my extremities.

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