* Posts by JimboSmith

266 posts • joined 16 Aug 2012

Page:

Vodafone, EE and Three overcharging customers after contracts expire

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: Moral of the story

I've never had a mobile phone contract I've always been PAYG because I don't need a contract. That's not to say I haven't been offered contracts I've had them left right and centre almost everytime I top-up. I buy my phones sim free and I can switch phones/networks whenever something cheaper comes up. I don't normally make many calls I get called far more and therefore do not need millions of minutes, texts and data. I use Whatsapp and emails a lot instead of calling people and that works fine. I have two phones and a Blackberry: One phone for work related stuff, one for personal stuff and a Blackberry for emails (I like the physical keyboard). However whenever I used to go to top up I would get told that they had a contract/sim only deal that would blow me away/save me money/is exactly what you need. Recently I bought a £20 top up from a Three store and they told me that they could "Do something better than twenty quid"

So I was then presented with the option to upgrade my phone (I don't want to do that) get silly amount of minutes, texts, etc. all for £15. I said how long do the minutes last and she said 30 days.

Me: [playing the innocent] What happens after that, how much of my £15 is left for the next few months?

Her: What do you mean? You get another load of mins, sms etc. next month

Me: And this is a one off charge

Her: No it's £15 a month

Me: That's an awful lot more than I pay at the moment.

Her: It's £5 less a month

Me: That £20 will last me about 3 to 6 months.

Her: What really?

Me: Yes really I use WhatsApp/Email rather than make calls if at all possible.

Her: [almost shouting] I so couldn't do that.

She then went on to offer me a sim only deal at £5 a month but that wasn't any good either. She then apologised for the length of time it had taken said I wasn't a typical PAYG customer and gave me my top-up.

O2 came out top of my justgivememytopupandstoptryingtosellmesomethingelse league table.

When I topped up with them a few years ago I was told I'd be better off on a contract. I explained my typical usage and the bloke said "If you can't be honest about how much you use your phone I can't help you". I told him that I was being honest showed him the call log and data usage and he said "Is this a wind up?" This is just one of the reasons I'm not with O2 anymore.

4
0

Man prosecuted for posting a picture of his hobby on Facebook

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: Laws

Not in Scotland apparently but I don't think it's been tested in a court yet! It will be interesting if it does ever get tested because the defence could argue that the defendant couldn't know what was illegal. I suppose we should be grateful it doesn't apply to all offences.

3
0
JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: Laws

Also, having laws that prosecute people because something is "grossly offensive or of an indecent, obscene or menacing" is asking for trouble. It is very subjective and easily abused to prosecute basically anyone at any time.

So you've not heard of the Scottish Extreme Smut Law

A spokesman told us: "We do not publicly disclose our prosecution policy in relation to specific offences as to do so may allow offenders to adapt or restrict their behaviour to conduct which falls short of our prosecution threshold."

So that clears that up then.

The sad thing is that these laws are often the result of citizens calling on the government to "do something" about something they don't like or don't understand (and can't be bothered to). For politicians it's a cheap way to please voters and get elected next time. Too bad such laws are often the basis for totalitarian regimes.

That's Daily Mail Politics in a nutshell. Pick a topic the Daily Mail have got their knickers in a twist over and pass a law banning, restricting, deporting etc. it/them etc. Instant votes.

3
1

FCC Commissioner blasts new TV standard as a 'household tax'

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: Who pays to use YOUR internet connection?

You're assuming I get anything like decent mobile reception in my house for whispernet functionality to work.

2
0
JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: Who pays to use YOUR internet connection?

My television is never getting connected to the internet. The same with my radio, my cooker, fridge, toaster etc.

4
0
JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: Is anything ever obsolete?

NTSC - Never The Same Colour (color)

PAL - Picture Always Lousy

That's what I was taught.

10
1

Rejecting Sonos' private data slurp basically bricks bloke's boombox

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: Crap like this...

Yeah I have a bluetooth speaker and a Hifi adapter that allows me to use a something as basic as feature phone to play music. Yes it's somewhat limited in terms of features but it works.

Friends have a load of these to do multiroom. They've got a bigger house than me whereas in mine the bluetooth signal reaches the entire house it doesn't in theirs.

2
0
JimboSmith
Bronze badge

E.g. a tune, for free and with blue text on a blue background you say that by clicking on the download button you are agreeing to a 50€ a month subscription) and a lawyer sent a letter asking for payment. A return letter from our lawyer, pointing out that a 12 year old cannot enter into such a contract, ended the matter.

Had a friend who was duped into signing up for something that I charitably described as a scam where the cancellation process involved sending a fax. She had signed up for a sample of a product with the terms and conditions written in the smallest font size/closest colour to the background they could get away with. Despite only thinking she was paying a small amount for shipping of the trial she'd signed up to £50 a month in product (teeth whitening kit) that she didn't want. When I found out we called the number listed on the website only to be told that the first months product was already waiting to be shipped and the trial started when you signed up not when you got the product. Yes we could cancel but only in writing and they didn't take email, we could fax or write to them. I told her to just cancel the card she'd used telling the card company that she thought someone else might have the details.

She initially said she wouldn't bother and I said I wasn't going to let her go home unless she did it. I said if you don't they can legally take money from you card each month. She then cancelled it because "it seems like you might know what you're talking about". Next day she called me and said she'd worked it out last night in bed that it was £600 a year they could nick from her. She only lost £50 but it was a good lesson in reading the small print. When the sample and first months product arrived apparently they were so tiny it wasn't worth bothering with.

5
0

Outage at EE wrecks voice calls across the UK

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

I feel your pain as I too have received a fraud spam text (at exactly 3am) that allegedly came from a short code number. I forwarded the message to 7726 and was asked for the number. When I provided that they said as it was a short code I just needed to opt out. I didn't sign up to receive messages from that number or indeed any other number. As such the last thing I'm going to do is respond to a text from it. I did add it to my block list immediately though.

12
0

Microsoft's foray into phones was a bumbling, half-hearted fiasco, and Nadella always knew it

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: Microsoft is suffering from a desperate mind-set of locking people in

Microsoft, with its many, many billions in the bank, could have been the sugar daddy for this kind of phone, but it couldn't imagine not locking people in and Windows-ing the whole thing.

Yeah locking people in is not always a winning solution.

It buried the death its Groove Music subscription service under an ostensibly chipper headline announcing a partnership with Spotify.

Does this mean that I will finally be able to get rid of the Groove Music entry on my Win10 start menu?

On the high end, Microsoft's slowness in adding support for the newest technologies meant that OEMs would never be able to get the specs they needed to be competitive with their Android counterparts. This was made painfully clear with the Lumia 1020, which despite its amazing 41MP camera, came out with a slow dual-core processor, and a 720p HD screen at a time when flagships like the Samsung Galaxy S4 were pushing quad and even hexacore processors paired with full HD screens.

A good friend of mine had a Lumia 1020 that she was given by her firm. She hated how slow it was but absolutely loved the camera. She now has an iPhone.

1
0
JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: Microsoft is suffering from a desperate mind-set of locking people in

You missed the Zune, Kin, and depending on how you look at it the Sidekick.

14
0

How bad can the new spying legislation be? Exhibit 1: it's called the USA Liberty Act

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: Meanwhile in a crack den beneath NSA headquarters...

You heard me son, Santa Claus is a person in interest and terrorist. Every year he violates US airspace, causes financial mayhem to our economy, drops packages containing god only knows what and..

Don't worry North American Aerospace Defense Command (aka NORAD) keep a close eye on him.

5
0

Google touts Babel Fish-esque in-ear real-time translators. And the usual computer stuff

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: No audio jack

I have a Samsung phone (XCover4) that has removable battery, headphone jack, micro usb and it's IP68. Yes it might be easier to make the phone waterproof without the headphone jack but it sounds (to me) like you've wimped out if you do.

10
0
JimboSmith
Bronze badge

What about the late James Alexander Gordon?

0
0

Home Sec Amber Rudd: Yeah, I don't understand encryption. So what?

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Oh well maybe they'll do what they did in Scotland regarding some types of Pr0n.

Scotland bans smut. What smut? Won't say" just don't tell anyone:

A spokesman told us: "We do not publicly disclose our prosecution policy in relation to specific offences as to do so may allow offenders to adapt or restrict their behaviour to conduct which falls short of our prosecution threshold."

They added that any such information would also be exempt from any attempt to tease it out by using Freedom of Information legislation.

Jennie Kermode, a Glasgow-based campaigner and writer for film review site Eye for Film told us: "The problem with the Crown Office's position in this instance is that, with the best will in the world, people cannot be expected to adhere to a law they do not understand. In the case of a crime like murder, it's pretty simple – don't kill people."

She added: "In this case, what the law says is that people may possess some images but not others; how are they to know which ones are okay?

"This kind of law has a chilling effect on activity not actually considered criminal, much as the infamous Section 2A (clause 28 in England) restricted discussion of homosexuality far beyond its original mandate due to its lack of clarity. Such intentional obfuscation goes against the spirit of our legal system."

6
0
JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: Rudd

Just seen an advert for a product containing Hyaluronic acid‎ and the description on this product http://www.boots.com/loreal-paris-revitalift-filler-renew-hyaluronic-replumping- serum-16ml-10191322 describes it as 10 times more concentrated with hyaluronic acid than the average L'Oréal product. Frightening stuff!!

4
0
JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: Techies will continue to sneer.

Reminds me of an ex-boss who encrypted his Android phone as soon as he found out it was possible.. Having done so he was then offered a newer phone which he picked up from the store. Sadly he promptly forgot the password and asked me to unlock it for him. When I explained that I couldn't do that he said I wasn't making any friends with that answer. It took two other people and Googling before he believed me.

We sat around trying to help him remember his password offering potential categories he might have chosen from. After going through half a dozen we hit paydirt with first place he went on holiday. We then went to the pub and he bought a couple of rounds as a thank you. The main reason he was desperate to have access to his phone was because it had the dates of his Wedding Anniversary and Wife's Birthday.

16
0

Vibrating walls shafted servers at a time the SUN couldn't shine

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: Wind!!!

An ex colleague told me that at a previous job they'd worked for a multinational with HQ in the US. The firm had a line of site link between two rural premises and one day it stopped working. My colleague was on secondment there at the time and was dispatched with another worker to see what the problem was. The equipment was working fine but they soon found that a farmer who's land was in between the two sites had moved a largish tree to put up a metal sided building. The tree hadn't been a problem before but it had grown very quickly that year causing the line of site issues when windy. They couldn't tell him to move it back or cut it, it wasn't their land. They did go and talk to him and asked him if he or they could trim the tree. He said no to that but said if they moved the link away from the tree he wouldn't put anything else in the path.

Back in the late eighties and early nineties a friend of mine was living out in the sticks. The nearest neighbour was about 150m away over a small valley and looked like there was a small antenna farm on the land. He had a very large satellite dish and a couple of smaller ones these were all motorised from memory. There was also various radio aerials and a larger than normal tv one all making the place look unusual. I'm staying for a few days and they mentioned that they had issues with TV reception currently. Of the four terrestrial channels none of them came through clearly. It was alleged that this had only happened since the sat dishes went up although it might have occurred late at night as well. The suggestion round the dinner table was that he was a spy and maybe they should turn him in.

They'd never met him though as they'd only moved in 6 months earlier and frankly just hadn't bothered. So whilst I was there everyone went round to introduce themselves (and me) to him. He was very nice and obviously not short of a few bob as there were large televisions in each room. He had several satellite receivers in the living room and each one had various boxes attached. He showed that each tv in each room could receive signals from the satellite set top boxes. He explained he'd acheived this by hooking a(n illegal) (were they called rabbits?) transmitter to each box and tuning in that channel on the tv. He'd done this because it eliminated the need for rewiring the house.

My mates dad asked him if he could perhaps change the UHF channel numbers that he was using as they across the stream had no watchable tv channels at all. This was readily agreed to I suspect so he wasn't shopped to the authorities for using unlicensed transmitters. There was an interesting side note to this my mate discovered. If the set top aerial was pointing at the neighbours portable tv in the bedroom he could receive the satellite channels being watched. He found that he could receive Filmnet on one channel and watched some "very interesting" late night films.

15
1

At last, someone's taking Apple to task for, uh, not turning on iPhone FM radio chips

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: How does an FM radio "save lives"?

I was in an area where mobile phone signals were patchy at best and had no signal before during or after the hurricane went by. I had the radio and the television on all the time because the direction of the hurricane was crucial. If the eye wall had gone the other side of us we would have had it far worse. The power line went quite early on and we were reliant on battery powered devices. There was also the risk of a nasty storm surge which would have had a mandatory evacuation coming with it. So having access to a radio was essential in that case.. Sitting in a house where you can see a very angry looking ocean from the ground floor is not fun.

14
0
JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: Antennae?

If headphones plugged into the 3.5mm are used for the antenna, I wonder if it would even work for headphones plugged into a Lightning or USB-C port? If you're using wireless headphones, forget it.

I had a Samsung feature phone that didn't require headphones to pick up FM radio. Admittedly it did work slightly better with headphones in but used USB ones so a USB cable worked just as well. In a hurricane (and I have sat through one on the Eastern Seaboard of the USA) getting any news when the power has gone off is potentially a lifesaver. It is not fun to have the EAS tones sounding on your tv and radio informing you that there is something potentially life threatening coming your way. I travel with a small Sony ICF-SW 100 which picks up SW/LW/MW/FM and uses two AA batteries. Despite this I still only buy phones that have an fm radio

6
1

Shock: Brit capital strips Uber of its taxi licence

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

A friend ordered an Uber from a drinks evening we'd been at in South Kensington despite there being a plethora of Licensed London Black Cabs. Up pulled a car a few minutes later we both got in and noticed that this wasn't going to be the most luxurious ride we'd ever had. The car made a Black cab look like a Rolls Royce. Then we headed off and the driver was totally relying on sat nav for his directions which always worries me. My friend says she needs to give instructions on getting to her place as it's surrounded by a relatively new one way system and difficult to reach.

The driver didn't speak amazing English but just pointed at the sat nav when she asked him to turn left or right. After he missed the crucial turning for the second time she said "Just drop us here please" and we got out. She also said there are quicker routes of getting to her place than the route he took and he clearly either didn't know them, or his sat nav didn't.

I won't use Uber because I don't like the fact that they wanted to track the movement of every user even if they weren't using the app. Greyball (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greyball) etc. Also anyone who can pass The Knowledge is better than me at remembering stuff and has earned some respect for that.

18
2
JimboSmith
Bronze badge

It would be nice if they knew where they were going without having to resort to SatNav. Oh yeah and didn't try and block any attempts to get them to conform with things I would have expected them to have done so anyway. Like drivers speaking English in England (Scotland, Wales & Northern Ireland) https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/03/01/uber_english_law_in_london/

6
1

Mobe reception grief turns LTE Apple Watch 3 into – er, a dull watch

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: Bluetooth & wireless still alive?

It shuts down that whole chuck of silicon (which is annoying because in Qualcomm devices one loses the FM radio.)

It's designed to stop any spurious emissions from the FM radio causing interference apparently. I cornered a manufacturers rep at a exhibition and asked about that very thing.

I was very disappointed when I found out that Android/Apple don't allow you to disable but not delete a wifi profile. I had that on Blackberry products e.g. the Playbook and found it extremely useful when somewhere where there are two or more different wifi networks that I have previously and can now connect to. At home I have one wireless network for a security camera set up that is not connected to the internet. I have another for the browsing the web etc. If I want to check the cameras I have to connect to that network which is fine up until I find I'm on the other network because the signal was stronger or some such. It's worse when I'm bidding on Fleabay and suddenly I can't connect to the site because the camera network has taken over.

0
1

RIP Stanislav Petrov: Russian colonel who saved world from all-out nuclear war

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

He was a true hero, someone who despite having saved the world just shrugs it off and says they were doing their job.

I would also recommend reading Raven Rock by Garrett M. Graff which mentions Colonel Petrov and his heroic actions. It also lists how badly the US would likely have fared in the event of the worst happening. Some of it reads like a comedy for example there is a bit where one presidential adviser (I think, I read it on holiday...) advocated a limited strike on just the nuclear targets in the USSR to prevent and deter them. He did concede that if it didn't work it would likely result in the deaths of seven out of every ten Americans.

Colonel Stanislav Petrov RIP

6
0

Senators call for '9/11-style' commission on computer voting security

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: Not The Real. Problem

One of my friends was horrified when Fox News was removed to try and save the merger because of low viewer numbers. He complained that the comedy channels on Sky had gone down by one. I wouldn't know I haven't watched Fox News because I won't subscribe to Sky.

3
0

Why the Apple Watch with LTE means a very Apple-y sort of freedom

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

What I can't understand is the reason for the iPhone in all this. If I have a device that can make and receive calls/SMS etc. why do I need to have the iPhone? If Samsung can fit a Nano sim into their watch so I can use that out of my phone then I don't need to pay the network fee for the watch. Okay so Apple want to sell some (more) iPhones and didn't like the idea that someone might skip their phone altogether. I quite like the idea of having something on my wrist that I can wear and means I can ditch my phone for a few days or even longer. The trouble is I don't like the iPhone because I'm a heavy user of widgets and rely on being able to bluetooth files around. Also it likely won't work going abroad which is where I would most like to ditch the phone. So I won't be going down my local Apple shop and splashing out on a Watch 3. Oh yeah and when it isn't tied to EE let me know.

3
0

123-Reg customers outraged at automatic .UK domain registration

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: TSOHOST just did the same thing

FreeParking sent me an email saying I could have one free .uk domain to match every .co.uk domain I owned. I had to have registered the address by a certain date and some other T&C's. However they weren't doing it automatically you had to claim your free .uk domain. As I don't have any .co.uk domains, i junked it.

1
0

Defrosted starter for 10: Iceland home delivery site spills customer details

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: not quite the same..

But the internal doors to the secure areas of Argos / Homebase was just the store number too. Guess it's a common thing.

Almost as bad....I once visited a supposedly secure storage place and whilst waiting for the door to open I noticed that the door keypad hadn't been cleaned in a while. When it opened, the woman I was there to see invited me in. She was rather shocked when whilst discussing security I asked if the electronic door code was 2479 or a variation of those digits. She couldn't work out how I'd come up with that as no staff member had entered whilst I was waiting. She couldn't let it go asking me continually how I'd worked it out. I said it wasn't hard if you had a "dirty mind" like mine which only seemed to confuse her further. I eventually said they needed to clean the keypad as the only numbers that were showing any use (i.e. were clean) was the digits 2479. The next call was to the facilities manager to get it cleaned and serviced and the code changed.

7
0
JimboSmith
Bronze badge

I would say this is shocking but I'm now quite desensitised to the stupidity of some companies.

6
0

Apple: Our stores are your 'town square' and a $1,000 iPhone is your 'future'

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

@Hans1

You missed the inability for iPhones to receive files sent over bluetooth

0
0
JimboSmith
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

One thing I've never understood is the obsession with showing off the Apple Logo. I don't mean by Apple I mean by the people using the products. I had someone on my team who dismissed a very nice case for their iPhone 6 because it didn't have a hole to show the logo on the back. She is then concerned about using it in some places because "People steal expensive Apple phones you know."*

Now call me odd if you like but I cannot see why I should give companies free advertising of their products for them. I refuse to walk round in clothing plastered with the name of the brand for this reason. My phone is in a case that doesn't identify the maker of either the case or the phone. Now my bag does have the name of a company on it, it was the company who gave me the bag for free a couple of years ago. Quite prepared to do it if I get something for free and the company in question doesn't suck.

*Years ago we did come up with a fun idea though to help prevent iPhone theft. It was a case that made your expensive iPhone 5S look like a 5C because we figured who'd want to steal a 5C?

5
0
JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: These "new" iPhones

Almost Bezel-less screens*.

*well according to what I've** seen

**No pun intended

6
0
JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: Can't wait

Facial tracking will be interesting with ApplePay, can't wait to see people doing that as they get on the bus on my journey to work. Yes they can set it up in advance but get held up by more than a minute as happened this morning and you've got to do it all over again.

6
0

Apple's adoption of Qi signals the end of the wireless charging wars

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Ever tried to Bluetooth a photo from your Android phone to your Mum's iPhone?

Not quite my mother but we recently did go to see some old friends who got married earlier in the year. They'd made a short (around 4mins - 15mb) highlights video of their wedding. They wanted to share it with us all to say thank you for being there on our big day or here's what you missed if you weren't. We all agreed to receive it via bluetooth or wifi (Xender) which was fine for two of us. We're not iPhone users but when they tried it with the other couple who were there for dinner (but not the wedding) it didn't work. Both were very perplexed that they had these expensive phones that didn't offer what was considered by everyone a basic function of bluetooth. After dinner we watched it on the tv instead.

5
0

44m UK consumers on Equifax's books. How many pwned? Blighty eagerly awaits spex on the breach

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

@BoldMan

A nightclub in Leicester Square London, (and others around the country with the same name) used to be next to the Empire cinema .

1
0

Three challenges UK watchdog to a duel over mobile spectrum rules

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Well I can see the argument Three are making. BT are allowed to buy EE and in doing so end up with the largest amount of spectrum. Three attempt to buy O2 so as not to be left out and are told to take a hike by the regulators. Then let EE-BT buy more in the forthcoming auction and really add to their dominant position. Seems perfectly fair and probably nothing to do with the fact that the blue light services will be using 4G on EE for their comms. For full disclosure I've got a phone on EE and one on Three

15
0

Terry Pratchett's unfinished works flattened by steamroller

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: I'm touched by the weirdness of this request...

Richard Coyle was an epic Albert Spangler/Moist von Lipwig, however the absolute standout from Going Postal was the inimitable Charles Dance as Vetinari.

I agree Charles Dance was inspired and brilliant casting as was David Suchet as Reacher Gilt.

5
0
JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: I'm touched by the weirdness of this request...

Whatever you decide to start with don't be afraid to take "Miss Felicity Beedle The World Of Poo" on holiday with you. The nice person who was searching my bag at security at Heathrow looked at me with surprise when they found that.

7
0

Enterprises gooey for Windows 10 as OS helps Computacenter rake it in

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Sir Peter Ogden owns 6.5 per cent of the company, and was the 15th richest person in Britain according to the Sunday Times Rich List with an estimated wealth of £350m, albeit down £20m and one place from the 2016 version. ®

Actually Sir Peter Ogden was the 336th= richest person in Britain (Sir Peter Ogden entry) The list you linked to was for those associated with motorsport and he is listed there because he owns part of Donnington Park.

For completeness/comparison Sir Philip Hulme was 537th= richest person in Britain

(Sir Philip Hulme entry)

3
0

Bombastic boss gave insane instructions to sensible sysadmin, with client on speakerphone

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: One side is not enough

I had someone (aren't clients wonderful) potentially defaming me over the phone once. I said I was going to put the call on the speaker phone which he didn't object to but just kept at it. He was upset because I'd advised not to switch from one software prog to another. He'd then gone ahead & done so anyway which he then had issues with. He was telling me over the phone that I'd advised him to switch and he'd talk to his lawyers etc. I said I had emails and written reports explaining my views.

After a few more defamatory statements I said he'd now defamed me I had a witness to this and was liable to sue. "Yeah like you have lawyers" I pointed out that the rest of my immediate family were lawyers: three solicitors (one a partner in a major law firm) and two barristers. The phone went dead quite and I asked if he was still there, which got a mumbled "Yes". He didn't say anything for a minute and then came out with "Oh never mind." and the line went dead.

18
0

Paris nightclub red-faced after booze-for-boobs offer exposed

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: Surely men should be offered a free shot

Have an Upvote for the Sir Pterry reference.

0
0

Lottery-hacking sysadmin's unlucky number comes up: 25 years in the slammer

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Collecting it

There was a woman who I saw on telly in the US who explained how she and some friends had done over a casino. Her and an accomplice would go to a casino and play at the Blackjack table on a girls night out. They'd mark the back of the higher value and face cards with a dab of invisible marker (disguised as a cosmetic which they would apply) and they might lose a little but that didn't matter. They'd depart the table with their remaining cash and two men would take over but wearing glasses that could see the mark on the rear of the face cards. They could then gamble knowing what the expected value of the next card/dealer cards would be giving them an edge. They could collect their winnings with the certainty that they couldn't be accused of counting cards etc. You can't just turn up at a blackjack table and start winning by counting cards.

She said if caught the girls didn't have anything on them that was illegal and the men were only wearing normal looking glasses. So the risk was minimal and when the interviewer asked why she'd now talked about it.....the statute of limitations had run out.

0
0
JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: HIS FIRST MISTAKE WAS...

Except if you play the Scratchcards over the pond where some clever bloke workd out how to win (legally) on them. The cards were pulled.

https://www.wired.com/2011/01/ff_lottery/

0
0

Sonos will deny updates to those who snub rewritten privacy terms

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: "Couldn't see the point of getting a Sonos. "

I do get the idea of convenience and the fact that it's one box only etc. Indeed I also own a portable bluetooth speaker for use elsewhere. It took me all of two minutes to hook the bluetooth adapter up to the amp in the living room and then connect to it. I just didn't see the point for me - when I already have the hifi set up in the living room - of getting a Sonos as opposed to a bluetooth adapter. Cost was another factor. Since posting that my housemate announced that he has a Sonos speaker coming and wants to add it to the living room tech. Nothing wrong with that but it still won't work with my feature phone which holds a good deal of my music. That only does bluetooth and works beautifully with the battery lasting more than the smartphones. I've got a smart phone or two but I still use the feature phone for playing music.

0
0
JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Couldn't see the point of getting a Sonos. I have a bluetooth adapter box attached to the hifi separates in my 19"racking in my living room. The bluetooth adapter appears to do everything that the Sonos does and works with my feature phone no app required. Then I discovered the app wanted my location - Why???

The adapter was this one this one which looks suspiciously like the more expensive logitech version https://www.amazon.co.uk/Logitech-Bluetooth-Receiver-Audio-Adapter/dp/B00IJYG4FY/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1503446099&sr=8-3&keywords=bluetooth+audio+adaptor

3
4

Google's Android 8.0 Oreo has been served

JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: So still can't do what Microsoft could do?

Oh I'd love to be able to remove the bloatware on my Samsung without having to root it.

1
0
JimboSmith
Bronze badge

Re: Next Gen

Can they pick something that those bastards at Mondelez/Kraft don't make please. After reneging on their promise to keep the Somerdale factory open if they gained control of Cadbury I want nothing to do with Kraft/Mondelez.

1
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017