* Posts by MachDiamond

1259 posts • joined 10 Aug 2012

Page:

Spies still super upset they can't get at your encrypted comms data

MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Scrapheap Challenge

The original series with Robert Llewelyn, not any of the later ones with the other presenters.

0
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Crypto schmypto

Another technique is to do the encryption on one device and send it on another. Don't communicate anything on a mobile device that is sensitive. Mobile devices are big phat easy targets as so many people lay them out on the table in front of them and it's so easy to distract the target while another person grabs the phone. All they have to do is keep the phone busy so it doesn't go to sleep and relock. That's a really simple device to build to do it automatically along with providing power so the phone battery doesn't go flat. If you know the make and model of the phone, putting together something that will copy all of the files isn't too hard either. If you want to be really tricky, you hand the phone over to the bar or cafe where you lifted the phone telling them you found it on the floor. The owner thinks they dropped it and may not do any damage control like changing banking codes etc.

0
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: governments can always legislate

"I'm sure the spooks could easily dump a file on your device. The fact that you don't know what the file contains or where it came from would be of no consequence to the spooks.

Given all the crap accumulated across 12tb of drives on my computer, I'd have a hard time detecting a medium size rouge file. Drives are so cheap that it's a waste to spend too much time deleting things to free up space. I just copy over current stuff to the new drive, catalog the old one and put it in the archives.

1
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: governments can always legislate

"Could you also end up in jail if someone else places an encrypted file on one of your devices?"

I can see that scenario as being very plausible. Somebody sends you an email with an encrypted attachment that you don't have keys for and you just leave it on your computer with all of your other email. Some investigation of that person shows they sent you that encrypted file and you are on the hook for it even though you have never had the key.

Police investigators need to go back to school and learn proper investigation techniques again and not rely on just reading email and IM's to bag someone. For justice to be blind, there needs to be several pieces of evidence for a conviction. There are cases where it might come down to just one little scrap of paper (or digital equivalent), but that shouldn't be very often. From many reports, Hillary Clinton's email system was more porous than pumice and she's getting off scot free. How can the legal system imprision the little guy in the face of malfeasance like that for the sin of not having a password?

3
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: governments can always legislate

"A much better idea might be to go back to your elected overlords and suggest they think more carefully about what should - and should not - be "illegal"."

Not "should", but "can" be made illegal. Legislators (lawyers that couldn't make it in private practice) may never wake up to the fact that banning math or software won't do any good. A company in some country that isn't a signatory to the ban is going to sell encryption software online without caring in the least. A country like Russia could ban in in their own country yet make it available everywhere else just to piss other governments off when they feel like it.

9
0

You know all those movies you bought from Apple? Um, well, think different: You didn't

MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Old Ipods

"Are *still* being used because people don't care that the drive is fragile or for that matter batteries are not made any more"

There is a carrier card to use a Compact Flash card in the old drive based iPods and there are third party battery suppliers around. I have one, but I mostly use several 3rd gen iPods. I like the form factor and I have them loaded up with different stuff for different moods.

0
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Disney again

Disney disabled viewing purchased content during at least one holiday season so families would have to watch the movies on the Disney Channel with all of the commercials.

I'm pretty sure I have Fantasia on laser disc. A bulky format, but no DRM.

I'm happy to purchase audiobooks for download, but not from Amazon/Audible. It's a bad deal for authors and a rip off for consumers. I don't always agree with Cory Doctorow, but I love that his stuff is DRM free and he even gives some of it away. I can't always buy right away, but I do buy Cory's books when I have the money so he keeps writing. I buy cd's directly from artists/bands when they sell them at their shows. I often get the bonus of having them signed and they get to keep a larger portion (or a portion at all) from the sale.

0
0

I want to buy a coffee with an app – how hard can it be?

MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Don't tell them your name

"Or just make one up..."

I always do that just to keep in practice. Not fido, but a random name off the top of my head. I am training myself to always give false information as a natural response to any enquiry. These days all you have to do is shove a form at somebody and they'll fill out all of the blanks without ever stopping to think why that piece of information is necessary to be given out.

1
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: I don't drink coffee

""WTF is the purpose of the tip jar?"

Thats to make it possible to work there and pay the rent. Having done that type of work its a joy, but woefully paid. Tips make it possible for the worker [But are also a tax dodge for the employer which is slightly annoying]"

The thing is, though, that with everybody going cashless, there is nothing to put in the tip jar. It's even funnier since the PFY wanted paying in something other than cash.

The best servers always return change so that a 15-20% gratuity is always to hand.

3
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: In view of the site preferences

I second Antron's post.

I also have The Photographer's Ephemeris (kinda sucks what google did), an HP Calculator program and a smattering of other electronic/electrical standards, pinouts, voltage divider calculator, blah blah.

I use the browser to see if I have to go home and pack up something sold on eBay or how much Tesla has lost in stock value (and which exec quit today). No text but email. I want my phone to be a phone (voice) when I need it. My iPod is more than capable of damaging my hearing and I have a separate SatNav in the car so a call doesn't block out directions at the worst possible time. I don't care who is calling if I'm trying to sort out an 8-way roundabout.

Loyalty cards used to be used to buy loyalty. Now they are used to track you and to add data points to your "file" online. Retailers are getting too good at interpreting buying habits. Target in the US was creepy enough to know when a woman became pregnant and would start sending coupons for baby stuff. Cash is great. No trail, no judgements. Reports on me must look really boring. All I do is pay utilities and my mortgage and naught else. I have to say that I abstain from the evil bean myself.

5
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: own voted for the use of "no problemo"

"Everyone knows it's "Nae problemo".

There should be soundbites in addition to icons. I'd vote for Nae problemo from Robb Anybody Feagle.

6
0

'Men only' job ad posts land Facebook in boiling hot water with ACLU

MachDiamond
Silver badge

There are times........

When it's needed to be able to hire a specific sex.

Washroom attendants aren't as common these days, but there are similar posts such as an attendant in a locker room at a spa/public pool/school where it would be very awkward and creepy to have a male supervisor in a female locker room or a female supervisor in a male locker room. It's worse when it's a school and we're talking about under 18's. This is an easy case.

A harder case example is when a male owner of a photography company wants to start making school photos, children's sports photos, etc. There is a huge bias against a man working with kids, but a female photographer or assistant has no such automatic bias and can pose the kids, brush their hair or straighten their coat. It's a lucrative business so it's not just weirdo guys that want to get into it. (It's really good money, actually, but a lot of work). If the male company owner advertises for a female assistant, is it discrimination?

A doctor may want a nurse/assistant that is the opposite sex to assist patients and to be present to avoid lawsuits. This can be especially the case for gynecologists.

I'm sure that if I thought about it some more I could come up with other situations. One last one that I remember vividly was during the set up of a concert with union labor. The Union always calls up workers based on seniority and doesn't take into account how strenuous the job might be. An old guy couldn't hold his end of a really heavy speaker and dropped it on a coworkers hand. The job needed a bunch of young bucks rather than the wisdom of long experience. I worked on one more job with that Union and ran before I was injured.

Real discrimination comes when a job can be done (physically, mentally, politically) by any number of people but the opportunity is only offered to a select few based on artificial criteria. I'm past the age and health where I would be worth my salt as a basic roadie on a tour so I shouldn't be considered and part of that would be age related. If there were also the need for an electronics tech or another post where brains were used more than brawn, I should be given a chance at it.

It's tough to draft a set of laws that can apply to every single situation. Details do matter.

0
0

Apple in XS new sensation: Latest iPhone carries XS-sive price tag

MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: What now?

""Cost of a 20 a day fag habit for a year £2000"

https://www.tesco.com/groceries/en-GB/products/295797532

£11.00 x 365 = £4,015"

Time to take a trip to Belgium and load the boot with cheap cigs.

I wonder where I came up with all of the dosh to afford fags before I quit.

1
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: What now?

Cost of a cheap used phone on eBay £25

Cost of two cheap used phone on eBay £50

The real difference being a nice holiday for a week somewhere sunny.

1
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: What now?

FO? With bells on!

I use my phone as a phone. I have a couple of simple apps like a scientific calculator, periodic table, tables for ASCII and Hex character equivalents and little things like that, but I'm not going to do photo of video editing on the damn thing. I've had dual sim capability for years and I like having a physical sim which lets me swap it quickly over to a replacement phone or pull out my "home" sim and replace it with a 30-day sim when I travel to a different country. Cheap phones also let me have one or two spares on hand in case. Music? iPod. SatNav? Garmin. The SatNav doesn't throw up a window covering the map when the phone rings and if I run the battery flat listening to music, I can still make a phone call.

1
0

2-bit punks' weak 40-bit crypto didn't help Tesla keyless fobs one bit

MachDiamond
Silver badge

McLaren

McLaren's are often "there and back again" vehicles. They are kept in a garage, driven on a little jaunt and then right back to that garage again most of the time. They are very rarely daily drivers that get left in a car park or outside of a home overnight. The reason that there hasn't been one stolen through poor key security is that it's very hard to track one down in the wild.

2
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Biometrics

Now you are talking about replacing a really cheap brass stamping with a computer and sensor array that can accurately take biometric measurements after sitting in the weather for 5 years and with the sun or artificial lighting coming in from just about any angle. Then consider a person at random, like Grimes, whose appearance can change rather drastically from evening to the next morning.

0
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Problem-solution dichotomy

"returning to the car with hand/armfuls of shopping"

If I have a load of shopping, it's usually in a trolly. Otherwise it's in my insulated shopping bag which I can hold by the straps in one hand while I fish the keys out of my pocket and unlock the boot/door with the other. No itch.

0
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Problem-solution dichotomy

"(Although I'm a bit hazy on why one would want to drive off with a Tesla. What, exactly, does one plan to do with it?).

$1,200 headlights

$1,000 door handle

$7.000 motor assembly (x2 in an AWD)

$3,000 infotainment module

And a huge lead time if you try to order parts from the factory. Skipping anything that might have a serial number of some fashion that would point to the car being stolen, the rest of the parts are worth a shed load of cash.

0
0

Voyager 1 left the planet 41 years ago – and SpaceX hopes to land on Earth this Saturday

MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: V'ger

"We don't need to retrieve it. As you can see in that same documentary, it is programmed to return to Earth on its own once its data banks are full or it starts having an existential crisis about how it knows all, but why doesn't that make it happy?"

Is there going to be a mandate that it will have to have its own toilet provided at all public facilities?

1
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Whatever...

"13,300,000,000 miles from our planet, and is still talking to us.

The anti-nuke crowd must be livid as they can't there to protest the RTG power supply it uses.

2
1

NASA's Kepler probe rouses from its slumber, up and running again

MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Given how expensive it is

"and if it stays in somehow working shape for few years longer, everyone acts surprised. This should be planned for longer spans, in the first place.

It has to do with how NASA grades missions. To assign a "grade", they have to have established minimums for what constitutes a successful mission. For the MER rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, the minimum basis for a successful mission was defined partly as lasting for 90 Sols on the surface. If it turns out that Opportunity isn't going to wake up again after the last dust storm, it will have gone so far past its sell-by date that maybe it was built too well.

Scientists can get upset if follow on missions are pushed back because the previous mission is still going and there isn't a budget to run both at the same time. I like it that hardware is run until the wheels come off, but I can see the point to getting on with a new suite of sensors that dig deeper into what missions have already found out instead of examining another rock that turns out to be the same as the last 50.

5
0

People's confidence in orgs holding personal data is... on the rise?

MachDiamond
Silver badge

Banks, Amazon, FB, etc

Even after big banking scandals such as with Well Fargo in the US, Amazon abusing customers by closing accounts if they return too much Chineseum tat, people still sally forth into the breach time and again. Is it going to be that each one must have their life ruined by a data breach or company behaving badly before they finally start waking up? One of the advantages humans are supposed to have over other animals is the ability to learn through other people's mistakes. Is that being genetically selected out for some reason?

4
0

Nope, the NSA isn't sitting in front of a supercomputer hooked up to a terrorist’s hard drive

MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: It's about surveilling everyone? This does not matter

"And how long will it be before his or her bank account number is public knowledge?"

For high government officials, the first time there is a problem, they will vote their own very separate banking system that has the best encryption possible. In the US, the government voted in a horribly flawed health insurance system disguised as health "care" with the congress critters getting their own very separate and much higher quality health service. Some pigs are more equal.

1
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Am I being thick ?

"One assumes Whatsapp went out of their way to help the government agencies by adding a chat backup option,"

That's one of the problems. What are you to Whatsapp? A dust mite on a flea and they don't care about you as an individual at all. If the government puts a wee bit of pressure on them or even just asks, they'll throw you under the bus in two shakes (less time than it takes a nuke to trigger).

It's amazing how much companies like FB get away with and part of it could be how well they play ball when governments come calling. Sure, Zuckerberg has been called out on the carpet a few times for bouts of complete stupidity, but I don't recall hearing about any substantial fines being levied (or paid) and Mark isn't even wearing a tracking ankle bracelet.

The first to capitulate will be social media and cloud services. Big companies will be more likely to fight like dogs since backdoors could expose some of their better hidden skeletons.

0
0

It looks like tech-savvy drivers will have to lead connected car data purge

MachDiamond
Silver badge

"The ICO advocates a privacy-by-design approach, which would appear to require bringing manufacturers on board and may be difficult to apply to cars already on the road."

I believe that any car that is storing and sending data can be updated to add a forget option. I'm certain there is plenty of program space for lots of updates.

2
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Factory reset option?

"Just like the damn radio after you disconnect the battery for an hour? I like it."

That's ok unless your battery goes flat or you have it disconnected to work on something and lose all of your data when you don't want to.

1
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Factory reset option?

The instructions for a factory reset/lobotomy can be a screen in the settings menu so if the procedure changes, the instructions can be changed on the infotainment system. It could be as easy as holding down two buttons while powering on the radio and confirming a total wipe. The car would then forget all sync'd data and require establishing a new account with the manufacturers data slurp headquarters to received updates and send driving data (if approved). For hire cars, there could be code required before updates and driving data are disabled. I expect that manufacturers will have a special program that hire companies can use to track and monitor their fleet. Finding that software in a used car would be a dead giveaway that it's a former hire car.

The simpler it's kept to do and the more universal the procedure, the better it will be for data security.

4
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: My solution.

I'd much rather use my phone as a phone and the SatNav/infotainment mounted in the car. SatNav on a phone seems to always be festered with tracking and recording whether you want it or not. My stand alone SatNavs that I can pick up super cheap now are very easy to make forget where they have been and don't throw up a message screen while I am trying to navigate through an unfamiliar city. I can even forget my phone or have it off and still get directions.

I have a couple of iPods for music and books that connect up to the car. I see it as another air gap between my digital stuff and the rest of the world. I even have satellite radio to keep me entertained and informed as I drive.

2
0

If you weren't rich enough to buy a Surface before, you may as well let that dream die

MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Why US only?

While 19.99% is similar to many credit cards, the financing programs usually apply the interest rate retroactively if you don't pay off the balance before the end of the 0% period. One day over the line and you wind up owing interest for the last 24 months.

12
1

Fourth 'Fappening' celeb nude snap thief treated to 8 months in the clink

MachDiamond
Silver badge

Two factor not relevant

They got phished and would have given up everything needed to log into the accounts. Nothing online is secure if you are Jennifer Lawerence or another celebrity of that level. Lots of people will be gunning for access to those accounts once they are known to exist to root around and see what's in them. Lots of the time it will be a phone back up with the contact details for a whole load of other A-List celebs.

When you are a target, don't paint a bullseye on your back and pick up a bucket of cynicism whether it's on sale or not. "You are calling from where?" "I don't give out that information over the phone or in response to an email" Hmmmm, the return address is a .br domain and the sender claims to be from Apple. I smell Halibut.

3
2
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: unsavoury incident?

"That was just you, I've always been one for multiple positions."

Me too..... after a sandwich and a nap.

Seriously, I see what he/she means. Some seem like they have a timer running and when the bell dings, it's time to switch it up. I think it's better to go with the flow. If the session is one of those "pin her to the wall, ripped clothing, top of the voice interludes" staying to the current theme might be just the thing. Other times there might be a lot of things on the floor that were formerly on the dining room table or a kitchen counter. It doesn't have to be both for it to be good (flippin' mind blowing either for that matter).

2
1

Boss regrets pointing finger at chilled out techie who finished upgrade early

MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Usually gets worse, the bigger the company ...

"If he has CEx is his title he will have surely have a personal card with a much much bigger limit than my own, he can damn well buy it himself."

A little sucking up can be in order until you find out how much this new lobotomy patient can impact you job. Visit their office and tell them you have already found the best price on this item (a lie, pick the one that can deliver the fastest) and come prepared with a laptop you can use to place the order with their card right then and there. You hand them back their card and the next day visit them again with their new toy all set up, charged and ready to sit on the side of the desk gathering dust.

5
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Usually gets worse, the bigger the company ...

"Then the beancounters decided that we weren't allowed petty cash, and so had to order through procurement at f**k knows what markup that would take several days to arrive. It's just reminded me, gits still owe me from last time.... (only a few quid, but a principal is involved!

That's when you start ordering in bulk along with a new lockable storage cabinet to put it in. Need AA batteries, buy the 48 pack instead of a 4-pack when needed. Also, learn where everybody else stashes what they start squirreling away so you can raid their stores whenever you need to.

7
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Usually gets worse, the bigger the company ...

"- the user is the new CEX, who started today and wants "new" shiny tomorrow"

That new CEX should have a shiny new card or at least some pull to get a check cut or some other CEX's card to purchase the gear.

You always want a paper trail. You want that paper trail on paper. You don't don't want to justify that purchase of new shiny 8 months down the road when there is a department audit with that CEX having left the month before and not around confirm that they requisitioned the kit and it wasn't just you buying yourself a nice new toy. They probably took the device with them when they left too if it was a portable device. It's not like the firm is going to chase after a departed executive for a few hundred quid worth of used tech.

6
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

A company with auto-payments?

Every company has somebody or department to do payables. Why would it be thought prudent for a recurring invoice to be charged to an executive's or employee's card whether on a company account or not? Those cards are there for misc. expenses, travel and out-of-band purchases. A/P should have no problem with something that bills regularly and should be the department that handles all of that in the first place.

4
0

Self-driving cars will be safe, we're testing them in a massive AI Sim

MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Why city planners love autonomous vehicles

"either people learn to take everything they need with them or they pay extra for the privilege. Fewer car parking spaces means more for living, which either means higher densities and potentially lower rents."

At some point, the rational density of an area is overshot. This is exacerbated by the notion that all business has to start and end at specific times. Visit the financial district in London during the day and then at 9pm on a week night. In this day and age with so many options for communication, it's unnecessary for workers to all have to be in one big office. It can save a large company fantastic sums of money to locate business unit groups where it does make sense to have staff in one location somewhere with lower rents. I'd much rather be working in a small engineering office in the Lake District than on the 18th floor of some high rise in the middle of London or Manchester. Nearly all of my work is done on the computer except for some preliminary sketches so it's available to others anywhere in the world if the company likes. I can always call HR if I need something, but it's not really any help to have them in the same building. In fact, I could likely ring them up faster than I could hike a couple of floors to their offices so it's no big deal if they are 300m away or half across the country.

4
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Why city planners love autonomous vehicles

I've got a kit in the boot with water, a change of clothes, a rain jacket (ok, a big plastic bag), sunscreen lotion and the Boy Scout Ten Essentials, plus the 11th essential, toilet paper. I don't want to have to take that backpack with me everywhere I go, but I do want it moderately close by in case. I also have a small tool kit and common spare parts such as a fan belt and oil. An AV should be more reliable since it will be a BEV, but that doesn't mean that a bit of bailing wire and a roll of duct tape will never be needed.

I've also taken people to hospital in a hurry after a workplace accident and I shudder to think what the delay might have been if we had to wait for an ambulance or for an AV car to show up.

5
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Does it include

"I guess the most positive precedents are things like the simulators used in pilot training. The pilot doesn't go straight from the simulator to being in charge of something critical: it's just one stage of training."

With aircraft, the issues have mostly to do with the plane itself or weather conditions. It's very rare that you have to worry about a couple of drunk chicks stepping out into the road without looking. You also aren't going to brake or swerve for animals (birds). In essence, flying an airplane is much simpler although the hardware is more complex.

3
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Software isn't hardware

Software simulation is a good way to weed out the most egregious bugs, but tacking on "AI" and thinking that it is perfect is a recipe for bad things.

When I was working on rockets, we started with software sims, progressed to a "hardware in the loop" mock up and then sub-system (engines, etc), full up hardware on the ground (or held down) and then actual launches (and returns. I was working on that long before SpaceX).

There are too many variables to rely on just one tool as gospel. Real hardware has tolerances just like an ideal op-amp used as a stand in when designing an audio circuit doesn't predict the real work performance of something out of the Analog Devices catalog.

There should be a Potemkin village qualifying course that AV's must pass that contains lots of random real world scenarios. Is an AV going to panic stop and roll if a tumbleweed is blown across the road? How about a ball in a residential neighborhood. Will an advertising sign with a person on it cause an AV to wait thinking it's a person that is going to cross the road? What happens if a sensor is blocked by mud or hit with an errant sprinkler? Will a rough road cause too much jitter in a sensor input for the car to make any sense of the data?

AI testing is only as good as the programmers. The real world is very good at throwing up combinations of issues that might not ever occur to a person or group.

4
0

Say what you will about self-driving cars – the security is looking 'OK'

MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: "Audi’s forthcoming computer-controlled motor"

I'm a big EV advocate, but I have to admit that there are still some people that do need greater range or don't have easy access to charging on a regular basis. Switching VW to all electric is good PR for that brand given some issues they put themselves in the middle of. Audi can be their brand umbrella for ICEV and Hybrids until it makes sense to convert them to all electric as well.

0
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Entertainment systems...

"At a societal level, I worry most about a system-wide breach that could have a million of these all turn into oncoming traffic at once"

Or, a way to command every car with a certain system to brake suddenly and brick itself. Imagine that during rush hour on the M25. The tail back would be epic and every highway service vehicle will be working all night to get the cars removed.

0
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Ooopsie

When the US had a manned space flight program, the Shuttle, the code was locked down far in advance and subjected to all sorts of testing to make sure that it wouldn't do anything unexpected in off-nominal conditions. This was around 18 months in advance so If you wanted changes, you were SOL unless you wanted to get bumped to the next available flight.

Updating software daily would be fraught with problems. As time goes by there are more and more hardware revs to deal with and testing needs to be done on all of them to insure that nothing breaks, like the brakes. The same could go for map sets. Roads change daily. Not "a" particular road, but plenty in a given region which means that a car fitted out with sensors to re-map streets and highways will be very busy 24/7 in addition to adding new data. Getting cm accurate data on just London will be a massive project and construction there is constant and ever changing. A car could be "looking" for curbs and trees, but there is a load of construction barriers instead to confuse things. That would be a problem if you were using an autonomous taxi to make it back home after a late night with the lads and frustrating if you had to wait 45 minutes for your ride to show up in the first place on a busy Friday night.

1
0

'Black hat' extortionist thrown back in the clink after Yelp-slamming biz

MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: He must like prisons

Maybe he made some new "friends" while in and wanted to get back to them.

0
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: In the words of Sir Terry...

Lord Vetinari is a wise tyrant.

0
0

Top Euro court: No, you can't steal images from other websites (too bad a school had to be sued to confirm this little fact)

MachDiamond
Silver badge

"user-generated content _has_ a copyright, automatically: the user who created it has the copyright. Except in cases such as when the user is an idiot and posts it on places like Farcebook, where evil fucking pirates like the Zuck say that _they_ have the copyright. It's still copyrighted."

FB has posters agree to render unto FB unlimited, but non-exclusive, rights to everything they upload. If they upload something that infringes upon somebody else's Copyright and that person sues FB, the person that posted the item has agreed to reimburse FB for all legal costs associated. The "Indemnification Clause". Further, FB can settle or litigate the complaint as they see fit with no prior notice and simply bill (or sue) the poster later.

Transferring a Copyright requires a specific written contract that conveys ownership of the Copyright of named property. It can't be a blanket agreement for non-employees and can't be a clause in a larger document. If you work for FB, everything you create while on the clock and sometimes off becomes the property of FB, but FB can't claim the Copyright of something just because it was posted to the site and some idiot clicke the "I agree" box. Of course, the unlimited rights thing is valid as church on Sunday and endows FB with the ability to do whatever they want with the content including selling it or giving it away. Caveat: images of people require a model release for many uses even if the Copyright of the photo belongs to somebody else. Models can't use an image they are in without permission and a photographer would have a hard time selling the image for commercial purposes without a proper release that covers the usage.

1
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: if the kid would have even been allowed to enter into the license agreement

" It only seems complicated because the cases that people hear about are the rare edge cases"

True. There are very few cases that wind up going to court. Copyright is usually very simple and a defendant's attorney will usually see their clients guilt or the insanity of spending the money to fight it and recommend settling the issue quickly. The cases that do go to court are generally those edge cases and times when the infringement is likely to lead to a massive award.

1
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Prepare for...

"Another question would be if the kid would have even been allowed to enter into the license agreement with the copyright holder, which would depend on the kid's age...."

The kid's age would not be a factor. The agreement is not a contract but more akin to a sale. If I was asked by a kid if they could use an image of mine for a school report, I'd be more than happy to send them a £0 invoice with a simple license that let's them do so barring publication in a magazine outside of the school or resale of the photo(s).

There are lots of Copyright issues that are technically an infringement, but slide under the radar in practice. You can put your favorite songs in the background of your home movies, but if you post those movies on a site such as YouTube with no password, it can be an issue. In today's digital age, Copyright law should be taught to students and teachers from an early age. It's so easy to copy things now and will only become easier as time goes by that people should know what sorts of copying can get them in loads of trouble.

1
0

Second-hand connected car data drama could be a GDPR minefield

MachDiamond
Silver badge

Replaceable CSM?

No chance of a separate and replaceable Corporate Spying Module. In the age of big data, auto manufacturers want the revenue stream from selling your data just like Google and Facebook get.

2
0
MachDiamond
Silver badge

Re: Just a Random Thought

" "on our way to building complex systems that nobody can understand or fix?"

Aren't we there yet?"

I think we have been for years. With products built so cheap that we just throw them away when the magic smoke comes out or replace entire subsystems (black boxes) to see if that fixes the problem, there are no "repair" manuals or procedures anymore. It also goes hand in hand with manufacturers refusing to provide servicing information due to paranoia about "the competition". The competition having already purchased one, stripped it down and done a full analysis on the mistakes that were made. It used to be that getting a service manual was expensive since it was a hefty printed volume. One would think that since that same manual is (or could be) a PDF with no printing or inventory cost, they should be readily available on a company's website forever. Why should Tesla be concerned that somebody is going to download all of the service information and build their own rather than buying one? The same goes for a TV or stereo set. There will be a few DIYr enthusiasts that will build their own of anything just to say they did, but they aren't an economic threat to anybody. As a matter of fact, those are usually the people that tend to add functionality and extend the design and publish what they did for free online with no patents. Presto, next year's model sorted.

2
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018