* Posts by MachDiamond

664 posts • joined 10 Aug 2012

Page:

Autonomous cars are about to do to transport what the internet did to information

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Instead of delivery, build on-site

3d printing works for some items and to make models of an idea, but if you need an impact wrench, not being built with forged steel parts is going to be a problem as it fly apart and removes your thumb. We are still a long way off from being able to nano-assemble things with the same physical material characteristics as we get from "subtractive" construction.

0
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Just wait...

….because the companies have more money than an individual's insurance. For the right price it will be cheaper for the companies being sued to just settle rather than engage the blood sucking lawyers.

0
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: We're forgetting the most important part....

The pundits (to avoid a less polite word) are saying that hand in hand with autonomous vehicles is the notion of "sharing". This means that after closing time on a Saturday night, most of the cars you request are going to be splattered with sick.

Thanks, but I'm fine with MY car only being used 10% of the time.

0
0

Forget robot overlords, humankind will get finished off by IoT

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Full contact sports

As an old hockey player, it's great to have so many players with their heads down to take into the boards. I just had a load of fun being sarcastically apologetic to my victims at a recent convention. Yes, that's right, digital zombies buried in their phones as they pace the aisles ignoring the booths. freewwouh, why don't they just stay home?

0
0

Uber is a taxi company, not internet, European Court of Justice advised

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: About damn time

In the US, setting prices is a huge test between who might be an independent contractor and who is an employee. Uber also sets requirements on other things that lean more towards drivers being employees; Rather stupid employees that can't do enough math to see that they are making less money (with the wear and tear on their car) than they would by working at a chip shop.

2
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Finally some common sense

"Don't forget that all the drivers must already adhere to standards - at least in the UK they need to be licensed."

In the US, taxi drivers must have a commercial license with an an endorsement for carrying passengers. They must also hold commercial insurance as all private insurance policies do not cover any commercial transportation activities.

0
0

Vegans furious as Bank of England admits ‘trace’ of animal fat in £5 notes

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Vitamin B12

Looking at most vegans, they aren't getting their B12.

0
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge
Thumb Up

I'm not fussy. MORE FIVERS FOR ME!

0
0

We are 'heroes,' says police chief whose force frisked a photographer

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Power tends to Corrupt...

All good except for the part about flight attendants. By US law (and much of the first world) you are obliged to obey a flight crew's reasonable instructions. If you are battling them on whether you can have your fondleslab out, play your music without headphones or won't hang up the phone, you aren't in a good position. If you haven't read and understood the contract you agreed to when you purchased your ticket, don't bang on about "your rights"; you probably don't have many. If they asked you to peel down and dance in the aisles because the video player has a fault and they need some entertainment, you can decline. "Handling people" isn't done much better by sworn officers. TSA agents are people that haven't been able to get a job in fast food, so don't expect them to even be able to give concise directions to the loo. If they tell you to stop, it's best to obey them or they'll sit on you and you've seen the size of them. It could hurt.

8
1

It's been two and a half years of decline – tablets aren't coming back

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Consumer device

The fondleslab is a consumption device and even with loads of developers writing applications and marketers trying to convince people that they can do anything on a tablet that they could do with their laptop, nothing has changed. I use a tablet to remote control my camera, read email while traveling, visit the odd web site and read books and manuals. To edit photos, write or draw, I use my desktop with a proper keyboard and mouse. My phone gets used as a phone so it doesn't have to be plugged in several times a day to charge.

There hasn't been a new use for tablets for ages that can't be done with one's existing kit. I'll save my money for that trip to Iceland next year.

1
0

Don't stop me! Why Microsoft's inevitable browser irrelevance isn't

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Follow the money

Google's main source of income is "Big Data" ie: selling your data to other people. Chrome is an excellent way for them to record an even more detailed look at what you do online in much the same way that FB does.

There doesn't seem to be a perfect web browser, but M$ and Google are at the bottom of the scale.

0
0

Speaking in Tech: Glassholes are COOL now Apple's doing it

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Same same

Glassholes are glassholes regardless of the manufacturer. I don't see how the use in boardrooms, construction sites and workshops is going to fare. Companies tend to be much more paranoid about recording devices than Joe Public who thinks he has nothing to hide. Many company boards require the members to deposit their wireless devices into a sealed box before sitting down for a meeting. Even certain government offices have a requirement of no recording devices (unless your name is Hillary whereupon you just spout obscenities and stamp your foot until you get your way).

0
0

FCC kills plan to allow phone calls on planes – good idea or terrible?

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Bah!

It's nearly impossible to travel by ship anymore. Cruises are often round trips and those that aren't only stop at horrible places that have evolved into machines to fleece people.

It doesn't take "weeks" to go from NY to the UK. It's about one week, but you will be hard pressed to find more than a few of the voyages each year and they can be expensive. It's tricky to find freight ships that accept passengers, but they are much more frequent. I just found out that they can carry up to 12 passengers without a ship's doctor and there are other restrictions that you have to work with.

0
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: why stop there?

ahhh, the "Sleep Field" from The Fifth Element. I wouldn't mind that at all. It would be much better than fighting through the cramps from too small of a seat.

0
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: United Airlines

"I beleive United airlines are happy with this Ban and want to prosecute everyone who filmed the Denied Boarding Incident the other day for using electronic devices when not allowed to."

I don't think United would mind so much of those people also recorded the discreet and polite requests from the air crew for the passenger to leave and the complete dialog with security before he was bodily removed from the plane. I'll put money down that the security officers were initially respectful when they first approached him, but that doesn't make for good vid so we'll only see that footage if anybody bothers to post it from the trial proceedings.

0
1
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: So Airline phones to be banned too?????

"Why just cell phones - this logic would ban all phones - including the premium priced calls made with airline phones."

The premium priced seatback phones make random babbling and pointless business calls self-limiting in comparison with smart phones that have unlimited talk with a nominal flat rate connection fee imposed by the airline. If the airline was required to charge $7.50/minute for passengers to make phone calls, only rich buggers in first class or those with very real needs will be on their phones and then only for a limited amount of time. You aren't going to be privy to what Aunt Pam told our Kev, the extended remix version.

1
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Ajit Pai: "Even a broken watch..."

They could also have all of their luggage "deep searched" while they watch.

0
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Trains

"Don't suppose he can ban them on trains as well can he?"

On a train you are more likely to be able to move away from a self-important chatterer. There are sometimes "phone free" cars. On a plane, you are expected not to budge from your allocated 1/4 sqM and the person sitting next to you is closer than you might be to your spouse when siting on the couch watching TV. (Might be different when watching movies).

0
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: If it's THAT urgent that you talk to someone

"the overtly friendly seat neighbor who wants to see what you're reading."

Since the seats have been downsized to the point where you are sitting in their lap, it's hard not to see what you are reading. It's the bugger in the seat behind an to one side of year that is looking through the gap at your laptop screen anyway since the angle is better. Put on some noise canceling headphones with a good audiobook and fade out is my recommendation.

0
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Thank goodness.

"It could be the spouse with a sudden medical condition you're worried about (thus why you're on the flight rushing home)."

While you want to be up to date, there isn't anything that you can do and you may want to be in a non-public space if the news is bad. The last thing the rest of us want to hear is your volume up to 11 lament or screams at the hospital receptionist to give you more information.

0
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Thank goodness.

"How do you send an e-mail to someone that ONLY has a landline phone, though?

Wow!

0
0

Boeing-backed US upstart reckons it'll be building electric airliners

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: 10-50 seat commercial passenger aircraft are a thing.

"I think screening rules differ for smaller and/or private aircraft. Also, any screening would much quicker if (a) there's 20 passengers rather than 200 and (b) there's a few dozen flights per day out of a small airfield rather than a few dozen flights per hour from a major airport"

For small operators of "flight on demand" services, screening isn't required. Any regularly scheduled flight of the public requires screening and also any aircraft over a certain size. I was aghast when a group of business people rented a 737 and visited a nearby airport (non-commercial) and the TSA had to bus a gaggle of gropers out to fondle everybody before they reboarded the plane. These were all high powered business leaders traveling together on a plane they had rented just for their trip. A state governor was also part of the party.

I would love to be able to get closer to my destinations than a commercial airport provides. In the US there are small airports all over the place. One problem is that screening requirement for regularly scheduled flights and there are regulations/permits/requirements for an airport to be able to have non-private passenger service. In many cases, it isn't worth it financially for the airport to get all of the permissions and put in all of the upgrades to make it worthwhile.

I just looked into this after seeing an add for a flight subscription service that uses 8 passenger single propeller planes for flights on demand. It's about US$2,000 month for unlimited trips and they only travel to certain airports within the state that have a Part 1XX (can't remember the number) permit.

1
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Reality check time?

Solar insolation is about 1kw/sqmeter at the top of the atmosphere and is 700-800w/sqmeter for most of the areas with the largest populations. Solar panels are around 22% efficient at turning that energy into electricity which yields about 170W/sqmeter of solar panel (ish).

Transportation takes much more energy than solar panels can provide in any form that is useful. The Solar Challenge cars that race across Australia aren't exactly comfortable and nobody would be using them for a school run or weekly shop. I believe that a few have been flipped over on the road from lorries passing on the other side, so they aren't particularly stable either. These are highly engineered vehicles often with the most advanced and expensive solar cell technology. Cells that might not have a very long life span or be so expensive that they would never be able to compete with grid power. It's encouraging to see the technology advance since somebody will find a way to take one of these cell technologies to a commercially viable product or they might point to ways in making current panels a bit more efficient and extend their useful lifetime.

1
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Reality check time?

bombastic bob, I hope your comment about 100 years of oil supply is sarcastic especially when you put the qualifier "at current consumption levels" in the statement. Usage isn't static, it increases all the time. Growth in the world's population is a major factor even if standards of living were held constant. Do a search on YouTube for Al Bartlett. He has passed away but put out an excellent talk on energy and increasing rates of usage. His statement "Modern agriculture is the use of soil to turn petroleum into food" should make people stop and think. With shrinking oil reserves, the price will go up and people will die as food prices shoot up as well.

Just in the past few days I read an article about how Mexico might be on the downward slope of oil reserves and they are a major supplier to the US market.

2
2
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Reality check time?

Richard 12, The easiest way to extract the oils from algae based fuels is to just not worry about killing the bacteria. All that needs to be done is to take a sample from the goop before processing and add it to the next batch just like you would do for sourdough bread.

0
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Just a matter of timing

The nuclear powered bomber was a convenient rouse to get the funding for research into Thorium MSR reactors. A couple of iterations of the reactor did very well but the program was cancelled by President Richard Nixon for reasons that some say relate to the fact that LFTR reactors don't produce weapons grade nuclear material to any usable extent.

There is plenty of Mr Wind and Mr Sun to power electric cars. A study done at Argonne National Laboratories found that it takes 7.43 kWh of electricity to refine one US gallon of gasoline. Most electric cars will go further on 7.43kWh of electricity than a car with good efficiency will on gasoline. There is also the matter of the latent energy in the gasoline itself and the infrastructure cost to move liquid fuels to where they are wanted. From a pollution standpoint, an electric car charged exclusively from coal derived electricity will have a smaller carbon footprint than a gas/diesel powered vehicle due to pollution controls installed on coal power plants. The upside is that in most countries coal plants are being replaced with cleaner natural gas plants (not "clean" but "cleaner"). Solar and wind stations are going up around my area like weeds. Once I've populated my entire south facing roof with solar panels I'll be able to power an electric car for nearly all of my transportation needs. A full "tank" every day and I'll never show up on a date smelling like gasoline.

2
1

US border cops must get warrants to search citizens' gadgets – draft bipartisan law emerges

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Another political 'feel-good' move

It's two. The congress (House of Representatives) and the Senate are the legislative branch of the government. The White House (aka, the President) represents the Executive Branch and the courts comprise the third branch, the Judicial. The legislative creates (inane) laws, the Executive enforces them and the Judicial interprets laws and passes judgement. The org chart has become very messy in the last couple of hundred years so there are lots more shapes and lines and more are made up everyday. We've got Homemade security/DHS/NSA/TLA that do …. stuff… and FISA courts that rubber stamp stuff and military armored police that break down doors in the wee hours of the morning and shoot small dogs.

5
0

Startup remotely 'bricks' grumpy bloke's IoT car garage door – then hits reverse gear

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: There's a reason some of us call this stuff IoS.

…and the time constraint. I might get tricky and slap an arduino in the loop that requires a certain cadence to the key presses. That would definitely be 3-factor.

0
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Pointless complexity and unnecessary dependence

Surprisingly, Adobe's implementation of a subscription service hasn't been too bad. It's cheaper than buying boxed versions of LightRoom and Photoshop and they do provide valuable updates more than once a year.

The path that MS is taking with Windows is going to give Linux a bigger push than anything the Linux community has been able to put together.

4
2
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Toxic company

Idk. There are people stealing oxygen that can barely work out how to use a toothpick (mostly CEOs). Working in CS puts them in touch with you all day every day. If your product has more than 3 steps to make it work, over 50% of the population of a first world country aren't going to be able to make it work without at least twenty minutes of very specific handholding. Ever wonder why companies have to devote 2 pages in the manual just for selecting and installing the batteries in a device? Better look at that intelligence curve again. It's not symmetrical.

4
4
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: There's a reason some of us call this stuff IoS.

The remote was stuffed in the home I bought but the opener worked just fine. Got a 4 channel receiver and fob off of some Chinese eBay seller and wired up a 3 factor activator. I have to hit 3 buttons in the proper order within 15 seconds or the circuitry resets. The 4th button is to turn the light on separately. The 433mHz switch kits are so ubiquitous that I wanted a bit of extra security so 3-factor.

No internet, not replacing the whole stinkin' opener. Fun Saturday afternoon product.

I can't imagine ever compromising my personal security by having IoT devices that breach my firewall. I would prefer not knowing that my garage door has been opened while I'm on vacation. There's nothing I can do about it and it would ruin my peace of mind. I have good neighbors that will call the police and/or my local friend that has a key to my house to come over and secure things for me.

7
0

Boeing details 'Deep Space Gateway' for Mars mission staging

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: More USS Gravy Train than USS Enterprise

The problem with robots is they have to be built for a relatively narrow range of tasks or they become too unwieldy and still don't have as much flexibility as a person. The problem with the MER rover on Mars finding signs of life is that it's a geologist and not a biologist. Same with Curiosity.

Lots of mundane things are better to do with a robot such as making inspections to see how bad a problem is and whether it can wait until lunar morning/evening or when radiation is lower for a human to tend to it. They might also be able to slap a patch on something as a temporary fix until a proper repair can be made. 3M or Henkel need to get to work on a vacuum compatible version of JB Weld and Duct Tape.

Any operations on (in) the moon are going to be very automated. There aren't going to be any minimum wage jobs or intern/grad student openings. The people are going to have to be very capable engineers with excellent fabricobbling skills that can work under massive pressure (or vacuum).

2
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

"Falcon Heavy will fly because Elon Musk wants to go to Mars. He's the only human being on the planet with a sense of purpose. We'll be doing it because Musk wants to, and he's the only one with the money and the intent."

He has a sense of Bravado, not purpose. His money is all on paper so Tesla/Solarcity better not tank or SpaceX is in trouble. SpaceX loaned money it got from The Man® at fantastic interest rates to Tesla. A nice article sometime back provided an interesting look into how all of PT Musk's ventures are financial entangled. If one goes down, the others are likely to be severely impacted. Possibly fatally.

0
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Lunar H20

Blue Origin is looking at landing near the south pole of Luna to get to the water supply.

Russia just announced plans to send manned missions to the moon.

China's space plans include an orbiting station and a permanent base on the moon.

The US's program is all about generating jobs in the districts of senior politicians. Accomplishing anything is not a requirement.

3
0

NY court slaps down Facebook's attempt to keep accounts secret from search warrants

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Who goes to jail?

If the court holds FB in contempt, who goes to jail? That's something of a problem with corporations. They are a "person in law" but not a tangible person and the C-level execs of large corps are immune from any personal responsibility as far as I have ever seen. Wouldn't it be entertaining to see a 4am raid on Zuck's mansion to apprehend the miscreant and haul him off to the calobozo? I don't think that it would take any more than 50 fully outfitted SWAT members and only a half dozen Humvee's with just one or two Bradley fighting vehicles. In and out, no sweat. Would an armed Predator be overkill? Nawwwww.

6
0

SpaceX wows world with a ho-hum launch of a reused rocket, landing it on a tiny boring barge

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Congratulations to SES and SpaceX

oh yeah, whoopee. He has done what others have done before this time with more fanbois and tweets. There's nothing new here. Masten Space Systems, Armadillo Aerospace, NASA, Blue Origin and several other companies have all done it before (other than landing on a barge). Only time will tell if it lowers the cost of launching satellites. The Space Shuttle was supposed to bring the cost of operating in space down to very accessible levels and that didn't work out so well when it needed a standing army to turn them around and a couple of massive fails that killed the crew.

We get in our cars or onto another form of transportation most days that is being used for decades before being thrown away. At one point in the past some MBA decided that it was cheaper to throw rockets away after each launch rather than recover them and use them again. I'll bet that it was never revisited as technology improved since it was just a given across the industry. That's how it was done because ______________. Elon didn't suddenly get the idea on his own to look into reusing the first stage. He was taken by technology developed by teams that worked on winning the Northrop Grumman Lunar Lander Challenge in 2007-2009 and the DCX program. He even said as much.

This is one of those things that looks all exciting and new from the outside and not if you have been in the industry and seen it all before. Frankly, I'd dig having a 1910 Baker Electric car with modern electronics and battery upgrade. Not nearly as aerodynamic as a Tesla Model S and nowhere near as fast, but much cooler in a retro sort of way.

0
6

'Clearance sale' shows Apple's iPad is over. It's done

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: In certain niches, they're still revolutionary

Management types (and governpukes too) look for the Golden Nail to do all things in one app/device/format. When I want to edit photos I don't grab for a tablet, I power up the desktop. When I want to remote control the camera I use the tablet. When I need to write a report, I don't pull out the tablet, I use the desktop. If I need to edit the report while traveling, I use the laptop. The cell phone gets used to talk to people. I had the text function blocked and use email instead (better message error handling and better records).

Read Michael Crichton's "Airplane" for a great prediction of where tablets (and this was long before tablets) could shine.

0
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Computers in education

Some studies I have seen reported on show no improvement in core skills between kids that are given a computing device (tablet or laptop) and those that are taught in a more traditional manner. There is a huge difference in school budgets to support the technology which might lead to less investment in the classroom.

There are some things that computers are very good at, but they can't think and they only do what they are told. I find it frightening to see younger people at the post office that can't properly address an envelope. I see job postings with bad spelling, incorrect word choice and horrendous grammar. I would think that in the very least, the spelling would be correct.

If you need to calculate the stress of a mechanical part in an assembly, a FEA application can greatly speed up the process but if you don't know the basics and can set up the problem all you will get are incorrect results. If you need to hand in a book report, a computer will compensate for poor handwriting, catch spelling mistakes and count the words for you, but it can't do the writing.

3
0

What went up, Musk come down again: SpaceX to blast sat into orbit with used rocket

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: stoked to see this happen

The fist Space Shuttle external tank was painted white, but the mass of the paint was significant which is why subsequent launches had ETs with just a protective primer coat. Every gram counts in the rocket business.

0
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Collection of low cost cube-sats instead

Cubesats go up as a secondary payload where the primary payload is paying nearly all of the launch bill. 100 cubesats launched on a $50m rocket makes the launch cost $500,000ea. That's a tidy sum of money for a high school or college group to find funding for and 100 cubesats is a lot to flush out on one launch.

0
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

@bazza, Yep. If the payload was one (or a fleet segment) of a constellation of identical satellites, building another copy isn't as big of a deal. They can snag one reserved for a future launch to fill in a hole. If an operator is putting up a replacement and the old copy has been on station for a decade, the new one is likely to be different. The old one in orbit might not have 2 more years left in it if that's the delay to get a replacement remade and launched.

0
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Don't call it "re-used"

The first stage of the Falcon 9 is sub-orbital. Past a certain point (~1km, maybe less) it doesn't matter how much higher a recoverable rocket goes. If it gets to terminal velocity on the way down, that's as fast as it's going to be going and that's what has to be slowed down and landed.

0
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

"But how much does it really cost to rebuild an exact copy of a satellite you have already built once ?

What is the real cost of the loss ?"

Most Satellites are hand built one-off pieces of machinery so making another isn't much cheaper than the first. They are also a very low quantity item so companies that build them charge all the market will bear.

The real cost of losing a satellite is massive. The operating company was planning on using or leasing capability that suddenly evaporates and they will have to wait years more to loft another bird if the company can survive the loss. A competitor may get their satellite up ahead of the replacement and take a major portion of the business that the first company planned on. The first company may have contracts with penalty clauses with customers. Just getting the cost of the destroyed satellite back might not be enough.

With 2 accidents in the last two years, insurance companies might have raised their rates to insure satellites on SpaceX rockets.

1
1

US Senator snaps on glove, probes insecure IoT toymaker CloudPets

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Risk vs. Reward

Retailers, especially small shops, don't have the expertise to safety/security test items. They buy a load of stuff from a wholesaler to put in their shop and that's all they know. The people at the £ shop can barely tie their own shoes.

0
0

Barrister fined after idiot husband slings unencrypted client data onto the internet

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Top Tips For Barristers...

Just a day after I make a post about laptops going missing with sensitive data on them, a US Secret Service agent has a laptop stolen from her car, in her driveway containing, presumably, unencrypted details about presidential security at Trump Tower and evacuation protocols and information regarding the investigation of Hillary Clinton's private email server. Whoops!

Any bets that it might have been done on purpose so some leaked information can be attributed to the theft?

0
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Top Tips For Barristers...

Top tip topper. Don't put all of your sensitive data on a laptop and carry it around with you. Transfer working files encrypted on a thumb drive kept in a pocket (not a purse or bag). Laptops loaded with sensitive data seem to go missing all of the time.

A further lesson is Cloud = Public. Even knowing that barristers struggle with maths, that one should be easy enough. Now where did I put those naughty pictures of Jennifer Lawrence?

0
0

Speaking in Tech: Taxing robot labour for benefit glorious taxpayer

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Already taxed.

In the US, fixed assets are already taxed based on their acquisition cost. If I buy a machine for $100K this year, it's taxed based on the purchase price for as long as I own it by the county. I can depreciate it on my Federal and State taxes over a period of time since They don't want me to deduct its cost all at once and deprive them of money They want today.

0
0
MachDiamond
Bronze badge

What is a robot?

Is an electric sewing machine a robot? How about a CNC mill? A conveyor belt? Big factories often have unmanned trolleys for moving stuff around. Are they a "robot"? They displace a forklift driver. What about its big brother, the big movers that put pallets on skyscraper racks in a warehouse?

I have a hard time believing that a herd of non-technical, blood sucking lawyers, aka politicians, can write legislation that delineates the difference between a machine and a robot in a way that makes sense, is non-ambiguous and won't be obsolete in a week.

1
0

Facebook investors yell at CEO: Get the Zuck out of our boardroom!

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Re: Stupidity! ...

"Without Zuck, the company starts slowly sinking (initially) then it just capsizes. "

You say this as if it's a bad thing.

1
0

'Nigerian princes' snatch billions from Western biz via fake email – Interpol

MachDiamond
Bronze badge

Acceptance of poor grammar

The biggest give away on scams is usually very poor grammar and spelling mistakes. As standards decline in the western world, many workers may not notice that a phishing email looks suspicious on the basis of its grammar. I hated english classes in school and could barely keep awake, but I've never been taken by a phishing email and can spot the vast majority of them from across the room. The best 2% take an extra 15 seconds.

The last one I received a couple of days ago was due to a hack of a newsletter I receive. The give away was that it was signed "The Chase online team" where the newsletter had nothing to do at all with banking. Also, the grammar and word use was odd.

2
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017