* Posts by MachDiamond

888 posts • joined 10 Aug 2012

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Tesla launches electric truck it guarantees won't break for a million miles

MachDiamond
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Re: It's not about the range

"Aaaaaarrrgrghhhh! Will you lot PLEASE stop focusing on the range. Hauliers don't buy trucks based on range they buy trucks based on lifetime cost per mile."

The upfront price will be a huge factor too. These will not be cheap and there is a cost to service the financing. A more expensive truck will be more expensive to insure. All of the proposed safety tech won't mean a thing to insurance companies until they can look at real data and it proves itself to be true. Service costs will also be a factor for insurance. Tesla is very expensive when it comes to parts and service outside of warranty. If a comparable repair is 3x more for a Tesla than a Kenworth, that will just raise the cost of the insurance. Little things will still go wrong on a vehicle that is driven all day every day that aren't covered under warranty. Can a company get those parts quickly or will there always be a long wait. Will there be unreasonable entanglements that require that a factory technician does certain repairs to be able to get the replacement parts?

TCO is a valid argument, but ROI over time is as well. If it takes 10 years to break even with costs compared to an equivalent diesel truck, why would a company buy a Tesla and have to possibly spend another large sum of money to install charging infrastructure? Will Tesla still be around 10 years after the purchase and still supporting ten year old trucks? It's a big gamble that they will unless things change radically over the next couple of years.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Silent (but deadly) trucks on the roads?

"So will it have to generate an artificial engine noise or will the motors, wheels on the road and its load jostling about be loud enough to alert other road users and pedestrians of its existance & speed?"

It's going to weed out all of the people that walk around looking at their phones. Yea! Even if they are great fun at conventions for a little "hockey" practice.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Orphans?

"US Interstate highways where you can drive for 10 hours without stopping if your bladder is big enough. "

There are "appliances" used to overcome that problem. It's the other waste product that needs stopping for. It's too expensive to stop just to have a pee.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Impressive

"In some situations it's possible to imagine closed loop systems that produce CH4 from excess power and use it as storage instead of batteries"

There are other large scale storage systems that can do much better. "Power Mountain" in Wales is a good example of gravity storage. Water is pumped up to a high reservoir when there is surplus power (from wind mostly) and let out through a power plant when needed. Batteries convert electrical energy to chemical energy and back. Phase changing materials can be very efficient at storing thermal energy derived from renewable sources. sunamp.co.uk

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MachDiamond
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Re: Impressive

AND they beef up the national grid to handle the added load required to charge them.

Petrol takes 7.46kWh/gallon (US) of leccy to refine from crude. A 60kWh battery pack stores the electricity it takes to refine 8 gallons (~30L) of petrol. If you have an EV and own your home, fitting solar panels is a no brainer. There is even a company that is coming out with a kit to turn a previously loved vehicle battery into a mini DC fast charger for the home. Forget net metering. If it isn't sunny you could recharge the stationary battery off-peak or just plug the car in if you aren't in such a big hurry.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Interesting

"I think it's a con. That trailer... it's just an extra, swappable battery pack."

What? Like the Puppeteer second quantum hyperdrive that took up all of the room in a General Products #4 hull and only had enough space left over for the pilot?

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MachDiamond
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> I'll bet in the fine print that the "won't break down for a million miles guarantee"

> only applies to hardware, not software.

>From the article, drivetrain

Taking 40 US tons from 0-60 in 20 secs is going to require motors with a BF armature. Any ME's here that want to take shot at estimating the diameter using common materials of those shafts? I've seen modders twist apart drive shafts and dynos pushed over their limits until they break and it's not pretty. The same can go for regen with a fully loaded truck. Can the motors survive a full lock up if the driver stands on the brakes?

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MachDiamond
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Re: Delivery

> Yeah I don't think any trucking company is going to be looking too hard at Tesla

https://www.cnbc.com/2017/11/17/tesla-shares-pop-after-trucker-jb-hunt-reserves-multiple-tesla-semi-tractor-trailers.html

In business, we have a series of habits. One of those is called market research.

Read those PR reports much more carefully. JB Hunt and the Walmart Division of China Manufacturing haven't written checks or signed agreements. They've "expressed an interest" and other wiggle words.

I'll bet that those demo trucks were mostly a shell and pretty rough underneath the covers. To have a proper deliverable vehicle in 2019, they need to have a dozen or more trucks on the road being driven hard every day right now. It's going to take a couple of years of all weather driving and breaking things to get it ready for production. They will also have to get premises to build them, make tooling, create testing jigs and on and on. A company such as Navistar already has facilities, experience and legacy components to draw on and Tesla will need to come up with all of that from scratch. There is also the matter of certifications so they will need some pre-production units that can be destroyed and possibly more if the design changes substantially.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Delivery

" I suspect there would be a huge bun fight to see who would get to buy them, "

Tesla is currently carrying so much debt that It's doubtful that anybody would see value in buying them out. If the company completely folds, there may be a melee over parts of the business.

Who wants to inherit billions of dollars of Solar City debt?

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MachDiamond
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Re: Delivery

"Even if the tax credit is not killed off by the politicians (which The House of Representatives wants to do), it automatically starts to phase out once manufacturers sell 200,000 vehicles."

The real killer is going to be having competition. With other manufacturers releasing they own EVs, Tesla won't be the only fish in the pond and those companies won't have to buy carbon credits from Tesla either and that's been a healthy chunk of Tesla's revenue.

The real kicker is that Ford, GM and Chrysler can lose money on some of their EVs and the carbon credits they get in return allow them to sell more big phat SUVs with much higher profit margins so the bottom line improves. Gut Tesla's market for the Model 3 and that could kill them.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Tesla semi?

wide open US freeways.

Which ones would they be?

Wyoming on the 80…. in the middle of winter.

Seriously, when you get away from major cities on the interstate system, speeds are pretty good.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Tesla semi?

Yes, F1 can be very tedious as the order doesn't change very much and if Lewis Hamilton doesn't win he throws his helmet and acts like a spoiled little brat. I'll put on an audiobook and go work in the garden instead.

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MachDiamond
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Re: @Zog

"Work out the energy flow for 60litres in 5 minutes, in electrical terms that's well into the special-clothing-and-training range, and one poor connection means an explosion that will kill anyone within a few metres."

Let's see 60L rounds off to 16 US gallons with an energy of about 32kWh/Gallon which is ….. 512kWh. Or, 8.5 Chevy Bolts all topped up.

Yep, I'd want a face shield and would be measuring the contact resistance first on that one.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Tesla semi?

"Stuff the battery where does the driver sleep?"

At home. This version is only good for regional deliveries.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Tesla semi?

"...and we could run them on special tracks so they could be much longer with a whole series of trailers. They would need to be more powerful for the long train of trailers. But, instead of batteries, they could take power from overhead lines."

Or, they can have batteries And a diesel engine And work from overhead lines depending on where they are while running on special tracks for less rolling resistance. I bet that those would be much easier to automate.

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MachDiamond
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Re: @Zog

"This is more Muskery - self promotion, rather than a practical solution."

Not self promotion so much as diverting attention away from record losses and lack of delivered Model 3's outside of employees and investors.

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MachDiamond
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Re: @Zog

"recharging that to 80% full in 30 minutes is going to need a 1MW supply. Connecting that safely and dealing with the waste heat is a non-trivial engineering challenge in itself. Dealing with 10 or 20 electric trucks simultaneously …"

Exactly. What's the electric company going to charge to bring in 20MW of capability to an ET truck stop? That's about 167,000 square meters of solar panels (600W/sqm @ 20% efficiency) to be "green". I'm also disregarding other losses in the system or I'd be typing and doing sums all day. 600W/sqm is a very rough UK insolation yearly average in those years when there IS sunlight hitting the ground.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Tesla semi?

"Finally, it'll still have normal brakes. They just won't, normally, be used much."

I guess you don't drive a truck. The friction brakes will still get used. Every time you leave a proper gap between the truck and the car in front, somebody moves into the space and hits their brakes causing you to hit the brakes too. I pity the armatures in the motors and still think that it won't be enough.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Tesla semi?

" As electric motors are far more efficient that diesel there won't be the heat source in the first place."

There is still all of that surface area soaking up IR from the sun and in a area like the southern US where temp and humidity are way up there in the summer, AC is still required.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Tesla semi?

"Can any commentards here add to this?"

Yeah, keep your foot out of it and you will get better range. Same as with a petrol car.

On longer trips you (or at least "I") don't get range anxiety, I get bladder anxiety. I also get hungry. After 4-6 hours of driving I HAVE to take a break and often sooner than that to stretch my legs. Having an EV just means making those stops somewhere with a charger on long trips. The other 50 weeks a year you just plug in at home.

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80-year-old cyclist killed in prang with Tesla Model S

MachDiamond
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'I think it has front facing cameras and if the Police demand the evidence required to investigate a road death, I'm sure Tesla will be forced, if necessary, to hand it over."

The question is whether those cameras are recording video or just using the feed in real time for navigation. There might not be anything to hand over.

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MachDiamond
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AutoCrasher

It is known that Tesla's, ehem "AutoPilot" has problem correctly identifying bicycles and allowing for them. Another big problem is that the AutoPilot wants to exit the motorway all of the time even when the route continues on. If you really want something self-driving, take the train.

Autonomous cars either need to be perfect (well, 7 or 8 9's to the right of the decimal) or not used at all. The greatest danger is a self-driving system that works in most situations. People will be apprehensive and constantly vigilant for a little while when they first start using it and then become less attentive until they are watching a movie, reading or applying makeup more of the time right up to the point where they smash into something. The constant refrain is that computers are so much better at driving than humans, but that hypothesis doesn't have very many data points yet. You could be fine on the motorway that has fresh lane markings and bouncing between hedge rows on a country lane.

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Anonymized location-tracking data proves anything but: Apps squeal on you like crazy

MachDiamond
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The Clancy method

The early Tom Clancy novels, the ones he wrote himself, contain great insights into the intelligence world. Once you get into the mindset it's so easy to glean all sorts of information from what seems on the surface to be innocuous data. People that believe they have nothing to hide so don't take personal information security seriously take a course in intelligence gathering.

If a phone sits someplace routinely all night someplace without outgoing use, that's probably where the owner lives. If the phone sits all morning, moves and they comes back and sits all afternoon, that's probably where they work. Correlate that with just a little bit more tid bits and it's not hard to put a name with the data. Lives on 123 Main St., works at 456 Second street (Acme Widgets), spends sunday Mornings at Our Lady of Random Effects and afternoons at 789 Elm st (Mr and Mrs John Doe). Pretty soon the list of likely people is 99.9% James Doe, 23, Single, no kids, ……. The more names that a database has associated with address like from public phone listings the faster a program can create a narrow statistical probability.

Anonymity is getting harder to achieve. It takes a lot of money and the ability to live and work using only cash and no technology. The best defense is to use cash as much as possible, not use "social media" and rewards programs that are there to harvest data and lie randomly when asked for information that isn't relevant or important to the requester. Obviously, it's not a good idea to lie to the police, they have highly tuned BS detectors and will find out quickly if you aren't giving them good information. If a shop wants your phone number and address when you make a purchase, give them the local trading standards information and the stupid spammers might step into the trap.

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MachDiamond
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Re: If you're not doing anything wrong

"An example; I passed by the Old Bailey a few minutes before the IRA bomb went off there, if they had had this kind if tracking in those days maybe they could have placed me there and accuse me of placing the bomb."

Read "Little Brother" by Cory Doctorow. The story has some great examples of data harvesting gone bad. The data looked at one way makes the person look like a terrorist and looked at another way shows that the person is a university professor that consults for industry on the side. The difference is that government commandos prefer the former interpretation.

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MachDiamond
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Re: But...

"Let's say you hide your phone in the bushes outside a diner while committing a crime, and if arrested use discovery to find out if the prosecution had sought mobile phone records."

You also want to find a diner that doesn't have CCTV (if there are any left) or they might want to look at that to see if you were there.

I find it hilarious that criminals carry a phone that is registered to them on "jobs" and not a burner that they just trash periodically.

I keep my data off unless I'm actively using it. I don't find any reason to leave it on. I also don't load up on every cute app that comes along. I have about 10 that I use all of the time and that's it. If I suspect that any of them are doing something I don't want them to do, they get replaced.

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Universal basic income is a great idea, which is also why it won't happen

MachDiamond
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Saudi Arabia

Citizens of Saudi Arabia get a cut of the country's oil revenue. That was fine and grand until the bottom dropped out of oil prices. They have a very large swath of people that live on money from the government and have very few skills otherwise.

What UBI will do is let more employers pay minimum wage. Where employees were getting £400/week, new hires will start at £300/week. That's great for Zuckerberg and Musk. Elon built an auto manufacturing plant in an area with some of the highest cost of living figures in the US and Zuckerberg operates a company that produces nothing.

People that slept through math and economics will see UBI as a boost in income, but will be blind to the tax increases that will shortly follow to gobble up that money. The people that educate themselves and work hard to earn a good salary will start re-locating to the first country that creates a low-tax environment for more than the very wealthy. Lots of Soviets were more than willing to get the hell out of the USSR and didn't care what country crest was stamped on the front of their new passport. This is the same as raising the minimum wage artificially until robot burger flippers and ordering kiosks become very cheap in comparison to low skill labor.

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MachDiamond
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Re: RE: Richard

"They are talking £60 a week!!!

What job do you do that you would be able to quit because the government paid you £60 a week?"

£60/week for you, £60/week for each of your 5 kids, £60/week for your "partner" and it's a couple of thousand a month besides the cash from selling a little pot and meth on the side.

I don't see the merit in bankrupting a country just to give every Oxygen theif 60 quid a week for nothing.

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Munich council: To hell with Linux, we're going full Windows in 2020

MachDiamond
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Re: Not sure about Office?

"I do must say.... everything else OTHER THAN WINDOWS basically SUCKS THE BIG ONE !!!!"

If all you do all day is work with the OS, fine. I started using Windows, moved to MacOS and picked up linux skills 10 years ago. My goal is to get the work done that I need to do in the most efficient way and that includes not having to take time out to deal with malware, blue screens of death, files being put in random places, etc. Linux for Dev work and network services, Windows for CAD/CAM and Mac for everything else. For safety, I keep the Windows VM from connecting to the network. Everything runs on my big silver MacPro that I peer into via 4 monitors when everything is up and running.

I find Windows too invasive. It constantly wants to "help" me and gets in the way. M$ must have a pact with hardware vendors to keep bloating the OS so one has to upgrade computers and buy new peripherals every couple of years. My MacPro is 9 years old and rarely slows me down although I am ready for an update. I keep hoping that Apple will release a Pro version with some internal upgrade space and an 18 core processor option like the new iMacs.

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Uber loses appeal against employment rights for workers

MachDiamond
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Re: Not an employer?

"Ah. This explains it. So I needed to go from Orlando to Sarasota to pick up a repaired vehicle, which is about 150 miles, and I called an Uber."

If a driver only wanted to work another couple of hours that day, they certainly wouldn't want to pick up somebody that needed to go 150 miles and then possibly have to dead head 3 hours back.

What was the fare? 6 hours of driving and around a tank of gas and the driver might have been further ahead working a shift at McDonalds.

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Sean Parker: I helped destroy humanity with Facebook

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'There has never been a right to absolute privacy' – US Deputy AG slams 'warrant-proof' crypto

MachDiamond
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Re: There's a difference

"And still the 2nd amendment is about generic "arms" - not firearms- a sword or a bow should be enough…"

One has to go back to why the right was put in to start with and that was to prevent government abuses. If it ever became necessary to protect oneself agains the military, bringing a knife to a tank battle is a good approximation. I don't advocate the automatic weapons and grenades be sold to the public, but reliable and accurate firearms are fine by me. Full auto is usually a waste of ammo and used mainly to keep heads down while soldiers advance across defended territory. The cat's among the pixies so there is no use crying for a perfect world that doesn't have firearms.

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Computing in schools improved, but still needs major patching – report

MachDiamond
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Re: Same old same old

The younger the child, the more they need to be taught core competencies and some studies are showing that providing every child with a computing device either doesn't help or hinders their learning the basics. The other side of providing computing devices is IT support to keep them and the school's network running. While parents can't be bothered to supervise their children's internet usage at home, a school could get into huge amounts of trouble if kids can access "adult oriented" web sites or any site that has information that a parent might object to.

It has to be said that many "kids" know for more about operating a computer than their "teachers". Many times, in many courses, the computer becomes just a fancy typewriter. Driver's Ed and auto shop (do they still offer shop classes anywhere?) are different. It's a good thing to know how to check and add oil (for now), but being able to troubleshoot and swap out an alternator is a different skill. The same goes with computers. It's not necessary to know how to program to use a word processor.

The bigger question is not how to improve computing in schools but to ask if it belongs in the main track at all. Too many kids get out of school with zero understanding of science and can't balance a checkbook/bank account. HR departments are being staffed with people that can't write a simple job description and applicants will happily send in resumés with glaring spelling and grammar mistakes.

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Facebook's send-us-your-nudes service is coming to UK, America

MachDiamond
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What does FB sell?

Facebook sells information about it's users that they have been more than happy to submit in various forms. FB and other companies collate that information with information they acquire from other sources. What would keep them from matching up nude photos with individuals using facial recognition/body recognition? You don't even have to have an account if some horrible person you thought of as a friend posted a picture of you and tagged it with your name. FB has a nasty habit of turning private things public without notice and even sometimes by accident. They might even "accidentally" make the nude photos available to their customers (not users, people that give them money for user information) due to a misconfigured flag or something. After noticing that bandwidth is off the hook, they might plug the leak, but the valley below will already be flooded.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Worthless?

"Whenever I upload a picture, I first crop and resize it. At that point what good is a hash of the original image?"

I searched on an image the other day on Google and it not only returned the one I gave it, but also the same photo flipped horizontally and another one that was cropped. Recognition software is getting better all of the time.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Only someone as disfunctional as Zuk could have come up with this

"Is that a point-to-point or a broadcast protocol ?"

It's an FTP protocol since everything in "The cloud" is potentially public and the repository will be hacked at some point.

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You know what's coming next: FBI is upset it can't get into Texas church gunman's smartphone

MachDiamond
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Re: The reports so far with some editorial....

"I am fascinated with anthrax, sarin gas, and biological weapons.

Why can't I own them? MY RIGHTS ARE BEING INFRINGED"

And, what if this shooter blocked some doors and lobed in a gas bomb of something nasty? It's not hard to find out how to make that sort of stuff online.

I dont' suggest substituting one for the other, but in places were firearms are harder to obtain, there seems to be no problem with finding a means to commit mass murder. Delivery/rental trucks being in fashion recently.

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MachDiamond
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Re: The reports so far with some editorial....

If somebody breaks into my home, I intend to shoot them. The police are, at best, at least 10-15 minutes away if they aren't already on another call.

In regular practice, the only things in danger of being shot by me are cans, paper and over-ripe fruit.

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MachDiamond
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crime vs. phones

In the case of the San Berdo shooter, there were questions about affiliation with terrorist groups and after investigators screwed up and reset passwords for the associated iCloud account to the phone they were lost to figure out how to use any other avenue to investigate. I guess they become so used to gleaning data from phones that if they can't, they're stuck.

In the case of this shooting, there doesn't seem to be any connection to a network of nutjobs, this whacko was most likely a solo act. If there is a question, why can't the FBI send a query to the NSA to have somebody look and listen to this guys cell phone recordings to see if there is anything there? Does the FBI need admissible evidence for something or are they just fishing? Obviously, they can't outright admit that the NSA is recording everybody's texts, meta data and voice calls even if it's widely suspected.

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MachDiamond
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Re: FBI can't unlock smartphone

"Obama regulation that mandated the Social Security Administration must report on mentally ill recipients and people deemed unfit to handle their own financial affairs."

There are companies that get judgements against older people to declare them unfit to look after themselves and sell all of their belongings, their home and put them in a managed care facility all with no day in court.

The Social Security Administration is not equipped to determine the mental fitness of people. If there is a court approved custodianship, that would be firmer ground to assume that a person is not fit to purchase firearms provided the person involved had been evaluated by a licensed shrink and had the chance to appear in court or submit a deposition if they were physically able to be there.

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Would insurance firms pay out if your driverless car got hacked?

MachDiamond
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Re: New Scam for Thieves

I still think the best scam is to blackmail a large city by threatening to shut down a whole load of cars on the motorway at 5:20pm on a Friday evening, during heavy weather.

Autonomous protests might be another avenue. Have a load of cars park in ranks right in the middle of London or New York or Beijing and then blow their fuses except for the horns, those will be pegged on until the batteries go flat.

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MachDiamond
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"An electrical charging point at a garage for a car that takes a few hours to charge is a waste of time."

What!? Why not charge up your car in the wee hours while you are asleep instead of paying some third party 2-3x the cost of the leccy for the privilege of using their cable?

Chargers in car parks, markets, theaters is all fine, but I don't spend a couple of hours each day at the shops. I DO spend many hours a day at home.

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Tesla share crash amid Republican bid to kill off electric car tax break

MachDiamond
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Re: Coal Powered Vehicles

The life of a vehicle battery is now estimated at 20 years before being recylced. 10 years of duty in the car and another 10 years as a residential or business storage battery. They won't be sitting in landfills, the component materials are too valuable.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Charge time & Range

The price for "fuel" is about 1/3 to 1/2 the cost in an EV vs. petrol. In addition, the tech in EV's means that when you put your destination into the satnav for longer trips, it will tell you where you need to stop to recharge. You can accept a closer charger anytime you like if you feel like stoping and there is no requirement that you have to charge to 100% every time. There won't be a need to put a charger at the bottom of every off-ramp.

The "battery swap" idea has been out there for ages. It doesn't work. No manufacturer wants to be constrained by a standard battery pack size and configuration. Car batteries are very big and heavy modules that would need expensive connectors for power disconnect and cooling lines. Those connections will wear out over time and you don't want to get lumbered with a used battery pack that has barely acceptable capacity when your original pack was nearly new. If you are on a trip and need to recharge the car, chances are you need to visit the restroom and get some food too. Relax, eat your meal slowly chewing eat bite thoroughly and walk around a little to stretch your muscles. In very short order, you have enough charge for another several hours of driving.

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MachDiamond
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"Musk is a billionaire only due to the largess of the American Taxpayer. "

Elon is a billionaire on paper, but that paper is tied to his various business ventures. If he started selling a bunch of stock, those stocks would plummet in value. He has also intertwined his business ventures financially so if one fails, it can drag the others down too leaving him having to ask his friends for some cash loans to feed his kids and make his house payment, again.

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MachDiamond
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"Ever try to pull a twelve foot trailer loaded with tools with an electric car? You might make it ten miles before your recharge."

Bjorn Nyland tows a trailer behind his Model X. Likely a lighter load than what you are talking about, but you wouldn't try to tow your trailer with a Honda Accord either. It's not the right vehicle choice if you want to tow, but your full sized truck is not the best vehicle to run the kids to school every morning. Fuso has a couple of ET's, medium duty box trucks that would likely fit your needs and there is a company building a full size EV pickup fitted out for contractor's needs.

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MachDiamond
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"Once the neighbour effect kicks in it wont even matter if they remain a bit more expensive than the ICE equivalent."

Van, you hit it right on the head. One person on a block gets an EV and answers some questions from curious neighbors. In a few months, somebody else on the block gets an EV and after they had them for 6 months and the owners are still very happy with their purchases, more people will buy in.

There is so much conflicting information online that people still believe that running out of battery happens twice a week to EV owners and it takes several days to recharge one. Word of mouth will be the way EV sales really take off.

The Toyota Prius had horrible initial numbers, now you can't throw a brick from an overpass without hitting one.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Subsidizing specific technology fails

In a "free" society subsidies are the best way to nudge attitudes or technology in a certain direction. The outright banning of things doesn't always work out for the politicians that support the legislation.

The US Federal Tax credit for purchasing an EV should have had a purchase price limit, but since it does place a limit of 200,000 vehicles per manufacturer, it at least isn't open ended. It should be remembered that Tesla isn't given this money, the purchaser is allowed to take the credit in the tax year that they purchase the car with no carry over. If they don't have $7.500 in Federal Tax due, they lose out on whatever might be left. Tesla or any other manufacturer gets a nominal price advantage if they still have vouchers ready to hand, but the buyer still has to pay the full invoice for the car including finance charges.

How does a country that professes to be free and democratic reduce the emissions of pollutants and greenhouse gases as promised in international accords and treaties? Fine companies that are in heavy industries so they relocate to other parts of the world? Pass laws to restrict citizens from driving over a certain number of miles without an approved permit? No. Policies have to be formulated that make it financially more prudent to replace something that pollutes with something that pollutes less. There aren't enough "greens" to make much of a difference other than in noise levels in public spaces. Money talks, hippies………… well, hippies sing songs and get stoned rather than "Walk" so the saying sort of breaks down. I'll just say that more people are motivated by their wallets than their beliefs.

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MachDiamond
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"Tesla sells to the world, and the rest of the world are increasing these subsidies"

There are now countries that are putting price restrictions in place so the subsidies aren't being paid on luxury cars like a Tesla. If you can consider purchasing a $100k vehicle, a $7,500 tax credit, while nice, isn't going to make or break the purchase. It is a much bigger deal for a Model 3, Bolt or Leaf and will allow more people move to an EV that would benefit the most from the lower operating costs.

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MachDiamond
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Re: producing just 220 of them against its 1,500 target

Elon wanted to top-down design the most automated vehicle assembly plant in the world. Now he's getting schooled on why nobody else does it that way. If he would have automated some of line in places like spot welding and painting, then added new cells as they were perfected off-line, they would be building at least a few hundred cars a day instead of just 2 or 3. The ramp up might have been slower, but each month the figures would go up as new cells were put into the mix.

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MachDiamond
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Re: Electric Cars Burn Coal

"Electric cars burn coal. Where do you think the electricity comes from?"

Crude oil is refined into transportation fuel using electricity to power the refineries. Where do you think that 7.5kWh/gallon comes from?

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