* Posts by Spazturtle

312 posts • joined 26 Jul 2012

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Yikes. UK military looking into building 'fully autonomous' killer drone tech – report

Spazturtle
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Re: Fewer witnesses

These drones would still have video footage, Manning leaked the footage, none of the actual witnesses reported the incident.

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UK.gov fishes for likes as it prepares to go solo on digital sales tax

Spazturtle
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Re: Tax isn't my strong point...

A UK company places an advert on Google Ads for £10k to be shown on other UK websites to UK viewers, Google pays £0 tax on that. With this proposed tax they would pay £200.

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Spazturtle
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Re: Mihn Gott!!

"The consumers who enjoy the products and services available."

Then those who want those services can use a competitor who does pay tax on the money they make.

"Take Google and Facebook. We all have equal access to it regardless of our incomes"

We all have access to it because we all pay for it in lost tax revenue, even people who don't use it are paying for it. People who can't even afford food and rent are being forced to pay for facebook and youtube though services they depend on having their budgets being cut due to Google and Facebook avoiding paying tax on the money they make.

"And who decides what is a net drain? ... They employ people, assist commerce and are popular. So not a drain and successful."

They remove more money from the economy then they put in, that makes then a drain.

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Spazturtle
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Re: Mihn Gott!!

Who cares if they do walk away? Foreign companies that are a net drain on this country should be kicked out to begin with.

If they walk away in response to this tax then we will still be better off then before.

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Two fool for school: Headmaster, vice principal busted for mining crypto-coins in dorms, classrooms

Spazturtle
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"On a related note, did the crowd-compute schemes for protein folding ever produce anything worthwhile, relative to the energy used?"

Yes. Super computers don't get replaced often and they can only be upgraded by adding more of the same hardware. With distributed computing the computers in the network continually get replaced with more efficient and more powerful ones.

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Upgraders rejoice! The 2018 Mac Mini heralds a return to memory slots!

Spazturtle
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Backups can use software encryption and be stored in a locked safe.

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Junior dev decides to clear space for brewing boss, doesn't know what 'LDF' is, sooo...

Spazturtle
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Re: Something is missing about this tale

Whilst he was using Windows 2000 to VNC into the SQL server it doesn't say that the server itself was running Win 2000.

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Bruce Schneier: You want real IoT security? Have Uncle Sam start putting boots to asses

Spazturtle
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Saw and advert for an 8k Samsung TV the other day, not sure which of the 4 million HDR formats it supports though. Guess I'll wait a bit longer for it all to settle down.

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Townsfolk left deeply unsatisfied by Bury St Edmunds' 'twig' of a Christmas tree

Spazturtle
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This tree was donated so the council didn't even pay for it.

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Can your rival fix it as fast? turns out to be ten-million-dollar question for plucky support guy

Spazturtle
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Re: I'm just going to say...

"Coffee and bacon roll"

Sounds interesting, do you put the beans in the roll whole or grind them first?

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As if connected toys weren't creepy enough, kids' data could be used against them in future

Spazturtle
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Re: I must have missed something

Of course they count, you have signed a contract saying you will pay £X every month for 1 year, and they are trusting you to actually pay every month. If you have an amazingly bad credit score they will ask you to pay it all up front.

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Spazturtle
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Re: Reminds me of China

We already have a similar system here in the UK, customs use a scoring system to decide whose packages to open and inspect.

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GDPR USA? 'A year ago, hell no ... More people are open to it now' – House Rep says EU-like law may be mulled

Spazturtle
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Re: Inquiring minds

If the US wanted something as tough as GDRP they could just adopt GDPR and become a GDPR compliant nation.

If they do introduce a data protection law it will likely be weaker.

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4G slowcoach Three plans network and IT overhaul to get foot in the door with 5G

Spazturtle
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Re: Replace Home Broadband Unlikely

"We hear this with every new technology from the mobile operators. We heard it with 3G, 4G and now 5G."

It never pans out because nobody builds their network to support it, for 4G broadband you want to use 400Mhz LTE but none of the networks support that.

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Former Intel love rat Krzanich finds his calling, lands at biz that sells tech to car dealers

Spazturtle
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"They need someone who can dump the old x86 design"

"And either embed or emulate for backward compatibility."

They have already done that, all modern x86 CPUs are internally RISC cores with a x86 decoder.

One of the big advantages of doing this over simply switching to another arch is that the internal instruction set is not stable, it can be changed with each new model in order to maximize efficiency and performance.

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Upset fat iOS gobbles up so much storage? Too bad, so sad, says judge: Apple lawsuit axed

Spazturtle
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Re: Crappy SD != internal flash

"But we're just not buying that Apple really has to charge several hundred dollars for its NAND without some kind of rude margin."

The iPhone has a single NVMe NAND chip in it. A single 256GB NVMe chip costs around $100 and Apple charge $149.

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Russian computer failure on ISS is nothing to worry about – they're just going to turn it off and on again

Spazturtle
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Re: Could be worse

Yeah HAL was performing exactly as he had been instructed to, he was programmed to answer all questions 'without distortion or concealment' and also to ensure that the crew did not learn of the true purpose of the mission.

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'Blockchain SAVED my Quango'

Spazturtle
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Re: "Do you need a blockchain?"

3rd one down isn't quite correct, you can updates records in a blockchain, you do it the same way you update stuff with Git. All you cannot do it delete the version history of a record.

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British fixed broadband is cheap … and, er, fairly nasty – global survey

Spazturtle
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Re: Downloads

"my photography habit can quite require an order of magnitude more data to be backed up."

And it will require a lot more this month if you use Flickr for your backups since they are introducing a 1000 photo limit, they will be enforcing this limit by automatically deleting your oldest photos so that only your newest 1000 remain.

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Mobile ops and Wi-Fi set to scrap for spectrum in the glorious 5G future

Spazturtle
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Re: Replace WiFi?

This feature creep is really fucking '5G' up.

Original all 5G was meant to do with improve spectral efficiency, allow more concurrent users to the same tower, and improve range.

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Oracle 'net-watcher agrees, China Telecom is a repeat offender for misdirecting traffic

Spazturtle
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Re: Meh!

The US military had lots of involvement with early internet infrastructure so it makes sense that router nodes would be in or around bases as that's where all the backbone cables meet up.

The US and UK don't do wide scale interception like that themselves, it would cost too much tax money. Instead they pass laws mandating that the people running the backbone intercept data. That way the cost is spread around and pass on to customers.

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Tata on trial: Outsourcer 'discriminated' against non-Asian workers, claim American staff

Spazturtle
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Re: Who would have thought

"Citation needed"

https://metro.co.uk/2018/01/19/bbc-criticised-for-banning-white-job-applicants-for-trainee-role-7243601/

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-36443113

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/10/01/bbc-axe-award-winning-comedian-of-18-years-for-being-white-and-m/

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/jon-holmes-bbc-presenter-sacked-white-man-mail-on-sunday-a7341831.html

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Spazturtle
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It can be quite easy to prove in some cases, like in the recent case in Canada where a Chinese man took over a company and started replacing all the staff with Chinese staff. If the person doing it doesn't believe they are doing anything wrong then they might not take steps to cover it up.

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30 spies dead after Iran cracked CIA comms network with, er, Google search – new claim

Spazturtle
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Re: Karma?

"Posting something which can easily be backed up with even a rudimentary search of the Internet along with a perfectly valid opinion is not stupid."

What are you even on about? He was celebrating civilians getting killed and said that "they got off lightly." People explain how getting killed by ISIS for supplying the US with information is 'getting off lightly'.

What the CIA has previously done is completely irrelevant to whether informants deserved to die or not. If you report a crime to the police do you deserve to get hurt because the police have done bad things in the past?

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Spazturtle
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Re: Karma?

Do you tell your friends and family that you support ISIS and Al-Qaeda? Or do you just post stupid things on the internet to sound edgy?

I'm sure it makes you feel good to know that some poor Iraqis who gave information regarding ISIS movements near their villages to America got killed.

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Spazturtle
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Re: Face facts

LOL stop making shit up, members of the US government are allowed to use personal devices to do personal things. What Trump is doing is the correct thing, using a personal device for personal communications and using a secure device for secure communications.

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Google: All right, screw it, from this Christmas, Chrome will block ALL adverts on dodgy sites

Spazturtle
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Re: Still worse than an ad blocker (by design)

I much preferred the internet back when websites either ran off donations or where the person running the website accepted that their hobby was going to cost them money, or where they were making money from selling stuff. Websites had a value then, you had forums where discussions could go on for years, no clickbait, no sideshow websites, none of the shit we see today.

Ads are not keeping sites free to view because those sites could never survive as pay to view because people wouldn't pay, they would find something else to do.

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What the PUC: SK Hynix next to join big boys in 96-layer 3D NAND land

Spazturtle
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Re: Thanks but

There is a form factor called NF1 which is the same as M.2 but slightly wider so you can fit 2 rows of chips on the PCB. Image: https://i.imgur.com/bZgwLq8.png

These come in sizes up to 16TB (currently) and you can fit 32 of them in a 1U server.

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Solid state of fear: Euro boffins bust open SSD, Bitlocker encryption (it's really, really dumb)

Spazturtle
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Re: Perhaps its just as well

"There has to be a way for the system to access the disk before getting the password since normally with bitlocker W10 boots first and asks for the password later."

There first part of the boot process is stored unencrypted, once it reaches a certain stage it asks for the password to decrypt the rest of the drive.

The unencrypted part is protected by UEFI Secure Boot to prevent tampering.

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Spazturtle
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Re: the Group Policies for determining whether it should use Hardware Encryption or not

No Microsoft should have made it so that by default it would only use the hardware encryption on devices if Microsoft had verified and certified that device.

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Spazturtle
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Re: Really?

"Just the same as it trusts your TPM module or the security certificates you've installed. Because that's normal."

Windows will only trust TPM modules that Microsoft has validated and certified, it doesn't just assume compliance.

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Seagate HAMRs out a roadmap for future hard drive recording tech

Spazturtle
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Re: Should be interesting

I believe the idea is that the write head isn't powerfully enough to actually write on it own. The big issue has been making the write head smaller, but HAMR bypasses that. The laser is smaller then the write heads writing area, but as the write head can't write without the laser it can only write to the area that the laser has heated.

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UK.gov to roll out voter ID trials in 2019 local elections

Spazturtle
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"We don't have ID cards."

What are you on about?

You are required to show ID to attend an educational institute, get a job, receive benefits, rent a property, check into a hotel, drive a car, buy alcohol/knives/solvents, open a bank account, ect.

ID is effectively mandatory in this country.

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Which scientist should be on the new £50 note? El Reg weighs in – and you should vote, too

Spazturtle
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Bank notes have a person and a location/building on them. I still think that having Margret Thatcher and a coal mine would be fitting for the £50.

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Boom! Just like that the eSIM market emerges – and jolly useful it is too

Spazturtle
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Re: I'm confused.

It is not really any different, except one of the sims is a flashable chip so instead of needing to go to a store to get a SIM you can just download one.

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Spazturtle
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You can if your carrier permits multiple devices to use the same sim simultaneously.

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Spazturtle
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I'm not sure I buy the argument in favor of keeping physical sims. Instead of SIMs shops could instead sell cards with a QR code contain all the SIMs data which the phone reads and installs as an eSIM.

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'Privacy is a human right': Big cheese Sat-Nad lays out Microsoft's stall at Future Decoded

Spazturtle
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Re: Eco credentials?

"So dumping excess heat into the ocean vs the air may or may not be a good idea."

It doesn't really matter were you dump it, as the heat will dissipate, what matters more is how much heat you generate. Active cooling produces heat itself, so not only do you have the heat that your servers produce but you also have the heat that your cooling produces. Running your AC is worse for the environment then opening your window to let cool air in.

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Now Europe wants a four-million-quid AI-powered lie detector at border checkpoints

Spazturtle
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Re: Good luck!

It's become acceptable to discriminate against autistic people again so politicians won't care about that.

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UK and EU crawling towards post-Brexit data exchange deal – reports

Spazturtle
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Re: Er "draw up new contracts" ?

GDPR doesn't require members to be compliant with EU law, only that they are compliant with GDPR itself. Non-EU members can be GDPR nations, the US could join GDPR if it wanted to.

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Sensor failure led to Soyuz launch failure, says Roscosmos

Spazturtle
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"Iirc, Apollo era fault detection, and probably Soyuz too, consists of a long piece of wire that runs up and down the length of the rocket. If the rocket goes boom, the wire is broken, which triggers abort."

It uses multiple wires, and if more then N are severed the system activates. This prevents a single wire breaking erroneously from aborting an otherwise normal launch.

I assume modern manned rockets will use a similar system, it is a reliable system that works at wire speed.

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It's been a week since engineers approved a new DNS encryption standard and everyone is still yelling

Spazturtle
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Re: The whole thing is just utterly depressing

@JohnFen

DoH is not browser only, my system's DNS process has already been updated with DoH support, so my whole system can use DoH.

"Doing this is also a security problem because it makes it difficult-to-impossible to selectively block services you don't want your network to be interacting with."

That is an issue for the network operator not for the user, DoH is designed to protect the user from the network operator by preventing them from seeing what the user is doing and/or blocking it.

@stiine

I'm sorry but that is the exact purpose of DoH, to take control away from the network operator and give it to the user, and to make inspection harder and more expensive.

In your case as you are the one doing the snooping it is going to make things harder, but that doesn't make DoH bad for users.

When designing a secure protocol you can't make it secure and also make it easy for the network operator to manage and inspect, they are mutually exclusive.

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Spazturtle
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Re: Cat herding

The part where they say "We’d like to turn this on as the default for all of our users" is talking about DoH not TRR.

From the TRR Bugzilla: "Provides an optional resolver mechanism for Firefox that allows running together with or instead of the native resolver."

The actually mailing lists and bug trackers are the best way to find out what is actually going on.

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Spazturtle
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Re: Cat herding

"What changed this were the public pronouncements from Mozilla engineers that they wanted to make DoH the default method for doing _all_ DNS lookups from inside the Mozilla browser, and that they would take it upon themselves to chose the default far-end resolver DNS service (initially Cloudflare) on your behalf."

They didn't do that though, that is just for the opt-in test. Once DoH is added to Firefox stable it will use whatever DNS resolver you configure. Over time more and more DNS revolvers will add DoH support. DoH is just a protocol, it doesn't do anything in regards to centralisation or de-centralisation.

There are already quite a few independent DoH revolvers to pick from.

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Concerns over cops' crap computer kit: UK MPs call for cash, capacity, command

Spazturtle
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Re: But?

The police still have plenty of time to go and visit everyone who posts things the government disagrees with on Twitter and Facebook. So clearly they still have too much money to waste and there needs to be more cuts.

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We're Zuckers for a sequel: Brit MPs' battle to grill Facebook boss continues

Spazturtle
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If the court summons me to stand as a witness what happens if I decide I don't want to turn up?

The government need to actually enforce the law on businessmen who seam to think it doesn't apply to them, they should freeze all of Facebook accounts and operations in the UK until he shows his face.

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Chuck this on expenses: £2k iPad paints Apple as the premium fondleslab specialist – as planned

Spazturtle
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"A professional tablet is repairable, extensible, and, er, not Apple."

Companies don't repair professional equipment, they ring up their supplier and they get a replacement to you next day and pick up the broken one free of charge.

"And please convince me how could "apps" originally designed for mobile substitute for real productivity packages on a desktop?"

Clearly you haven't been paying attention because the iPad Pro can run full productivity packages like Photoshop and AutoCAD which are the same as the desktop versions.

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Spazturtle
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Re: 2000 quid?

It's a similar price to it's nearest competitor the Wacom MobileStudio Pro 13.

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Mac users burned after Nuance drops Dragon speech to text software

Spazturtle
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Nuance also have a habit of suing small competitors and dragging out the case, it doesn't matter that they usually lose because in the US you don't pay the other sides legal fees.

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Spectrum-starved Wi-Fi vendors look at DSRC band, sharpen knives

Spazturtle
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Re: Playing nice

Vendors tend to ignore all bands that are region specific anyway.

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