* Posts by JCitizen

539 posts • joined 16 Jul 2012

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Equifax's IT leaders 'retire' as company says it knew about the bug that brought it down

JCitizen
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Pint

Re: What you knew yesterday (or when you graduated) about cyber security is already outdated

You hit that right on the nail head - have a sip for me!

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JCitizen
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Megaphone

The US Congress has been threatening...

to pile more regulation on the credit reporting industry for years, but the big 3 always manage to convince them that they got it down pat. I hope this if the straw that broke the camel's back and they finally lower the BOOM on them!!

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JCitizen
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Black Helicopters

Re: The Elephant in the room

A permanent credit freeze is the only way to address this effectively for now. If this article is suggesting that it will be done - I don't believe it. I called my congressman and demanded that Equifax do this for free and give at least 3 free "unfreeze" actions for the future.

I don't think all readers here know that all other reporting agencies synchronize to catch up to the same level of data accuracy within a maximum of 3 months, So it isn't always necessary to write a letter to all three of the big ones. They all get the same data eventually. I only had to put a free fraud alert on one of the big three, and it spread to the other two automatically. Unfortunately they only last 90 days. I be damned if I'm going to pay for Equifax's mistakes!!

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Red panic: Best Buy yanks Kaspersky antivirus from shelves

JCitizen
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Gimp

Re: Counteract stupidness or it will spread

"Ban McAfee, Norton, Fortinet and Webroot and play them at their own game."

I don't know about Fortinet, but I won't take a client that uses those other products - it just isn't worth the effort to try and keep their machines running.

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JCitizen
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Coffee/keyboard

Re: Classic whisper to reality campaign

"I guess they just HAD to go because they didn't support US efforts to plant malware"

- Emisoft is well known for telling governments (including their own) to stick it up where the sun don't shine, when pressured to put nation state spyware on their customers machines. When I was using it, this anti-malware would even find the digital rights managment (DRM) in my machine governing my HD content. At first I was able to get it to leave the DRM alone so I could enjoy my content, but eventually I had to get rid of it, becauser that featrue stopped working. However if you REALLY like a serious malware weapon; I'd say it is the best in the world at this time!

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Stand up who HASN'T been hit in the Equifax mega-hack – whoa, whoa, sit down everyone

JCitizen
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Devil

Re: those responsible for stopping the hacking have been hacked...

Where's that squirrel? It must be ALL his fault! LOL!

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JCitizen
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IT Angle

Re: Customer Help Web Site No Help

I wonder what's up with that? I am not getting that on Firefox 64 bit (latest version) on Windows 7?! I'm not getting an SSL warning on Chrome (latest version) either. However Web of Trust has a grey rating for that web site!! That should be strange, as they should have had plenty of time to gather a good rating by now??!!

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JCitizen
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Facepalm

Re: "exploiting a vulnerable website application"

Aughhhh GEEZE! That figures!

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JCitizen
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Pirate

Yeah - S&P

doesn't exactly sound like an IT security expert corporation to me. Sounds like someone in upper management has absolutely no clue. That is, unless they just want to ignore the problem and let a financial audit substitute for what really needs to get done.

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JCitizen
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Megaphone

Re: Oh Well

I could get worse - ever been arrested for something you didn't do? It can take 10 years to clean up the mess, and break the bank to boot.

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JCitizen
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Unhappy

Re: I'm safe..

I'd laugh, but unfortunately, when I think of all the trouble a criminal can do to make your life absolutely miserable, I just can't LOL!! :p

I've seen people put in jail, in and out, arrested, you name it, because some crook used their identity to throw off the police when they get stopped. It can take 10 years and a LOT of personal finances to clean it all up, and it isn't even our fault. THAT is why I think the Feds need to take the toys away from the credit agencies until that can help us clean up the damage that THEY allowed to happen!!

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JCitizen
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Stop

Re: On the bright side

I'm sure that you are just being sarcastic, but it would be better if they LOCKED your credit report until you need a free unlock in case you applied for anymore credit. Too many things DON'T show up on regular credit reports to really tell if you've been dinged or not.

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JCitizen
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FAIL

Re: 'We pride ourselves on being a leader in managing and protecting data'

Wadda crock! How much you want to bet the other two agencies are compromised now, and just haven't discovered it yet, like Equifax did? Credit monitoring is NOT enough, They should lock down ALL our credit for free, and lift it when we need it with a simple phone call, for one transaction each, like opening another account. We shout NOT have to pay for their stupid mistakes!

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House Reps grease the wheels for hundreds of thousands of robo-cars on America's streets

JCitizen
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Terminator

I for one..

welcome our robot over lords!

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Remember when Lenovo sold PCs with Superfish adware? It just got a mild scolding from FTC

JCitizen
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Coffee/keyboard

Not excusing bad behavior but..

I remember when DELL computers came with something just as bad and maybe worse. Every time I got a Dell client the first thing I'd do is scan for it and remove it. I don't remember the name of the offending software. but they got away with it for over 5 years before the uproar finally got loud enough, and they started losing market share. I'd wager all the big players were guilty of the same or similar at least once.

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Calm down, internet. Elon's Musk-see SpaceX spacesuit is a bit generic

JCitizen
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Alien

As long as it is...

"alien" bug proof, I'm okay. =)

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WikiLeaks a 'hostile intelligence service', SS7 spying, Russian money laundering – all now on US Congress todo list

JCitizen
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Coffee/keyboard

Re: yeah,,,,

So far, I haven't seen one national secret worth guarding in the information leaked by that organization. Maybe I'm forgetting something, but it is ridiculous what we classify in this nation!! It costs a lot of tax dollars to keep all those "secrets", so I think congress just ought to get a grip, and practice more transparency, and quit worrying about embarrassing information that they should have thought about before they did it anyway.

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Snopes.com asks for bailout amid dispute over who runs the site and collects ad dollars

JCitizen
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Holmes

Sort of true - but...

we need at least two "fact checking" sites on the web, and so far I've not found one the qualifies as a true opposition to Snopes. Oh so you think Snopes needs no opposition? That is the BIG problem here!

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Google unleashes 20m lab-created blood-thirsty freaks on a city. And this is a good thing, it says

JCitizen
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Pirate

Re: Having had Dengue Fever,

I've had better luck building Cliff Swallow and bat houses, and having a thriving community of these wonderful creatures eating away at the bugs. I never get bit by one mosquito when I set this up properly. However, I also learned how to build traps for biting flies and mosquitoes. but they are now available at hardware stores. They waft CO2 in the wind, and simulate the temperature of a human around 98 degrees F. Then there is a suction system that traps them in the unit as they fly too close to carefully designed ports and/or landing points. These gizmos are very successful, and the price has been dropping since NASA released the public license to build them years ago.

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Beware, sheep rustlers of the South West of England! Police drone spy unit gets to work

JCitizen
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Deleted

by author

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JCitizen
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Go

I always wanted to run one of those things.

If it were me, I'd park occasionally on a high point, like the top of a pole or high rise building, and save flight energy for when I see an event, or a person of interest! I'd have a whole map of strategic perch points for my little electronic vulture!

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Astroboffins spot tiniest star yet – we guess you could call it... small fry

JCitizen
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Meh

Re: habitability of tidally-locked planets

@stepharsh - your statement is totally logical. Just for argument's sake though. One advantage of our earth is that the core spins (at a retrograde I suspect) to the spin of our earth. This creates the Van Allen belt attributed to protection of our atmosphere. We need another model to protect the atmosphere of your theoretical planet - no? How will such a slow moving planet generate a magnetosphere?

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Uncle Sam says 'nyet' to Kaspersky amid fresh claims of Russian ties

JCitizen
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Coffee/keyboard

I'd probably still recommend Kaspersky..

However, even when I do, it is with one caveat. I always admit that I don't trust them. But if you are not a business that has Intellectual Property (IP) to guard, or government contracts, I also say you have nothing to lose in the first place. Most entities will never be a target of a serious Russian breach. One would be more worried about ransomware, which I doubt will ever be hosted by Kaspersky.

However I also tell them it will be VERY expensive and usually always results in system instability of some kind. If I were going to pay for an AV product I'd go with ESET, or if an Enterprise, SOPHOS, so that is my usual recommendation - but since most of my clients are indigent, I always recommend the free ware that is abundant and does the job good enough that the risk margin is pretty thin compared to paid for solutions. So any of these companies will certainly not be making much money off my recommendations.

Since I didn't hear it brought up though - seriously - if you are a large successful company in Russia, do you seriously think that a criminal oligarchy is not going to notice you? Does the media seriously think if Putin comes knocking on your door, you will see him out?

I didn't think so!!

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Trump Hotels left orange faced: Hackers plunder systems for credit cards

JCitizen
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Windows

I was wondering how long...

it would take before a Trump hotel of related service was hacked. With almost every chain out there getting it long ago, I'm really surprised it took this long. Now maybe Trump will finally realize just how pervasive the problem is, and quit denying it like it will go away, if you just ignore it.

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Talk about a hit and run: AA finally comes clean on security breakdown

JCitizen
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FAIL

Well...at least

they didn't come out with that tired old axiom of "your security is very important to us". That statement is so cliched that I can't even take any company using that line as "serious" at all!!

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RED ALERT! High-speed alien fugitives are invading our Milky Way

JCitizen
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Unhappy

Even at those speeds..

which seem fantastic - it will probably take them forever to even get close enough to a star system to perturb it. In fact they may pass right though our entire galaxy and NEVER hit anything at all. That saddens me as I love collisions, but by that time the Earth will probably be destroyed by something completely unexpected. I certainly will not be around any more! I hope these massive computer simulations show data that can be made into a video - maybe even a 3D video to show them prancing through our universe without a care in the - uh - world. Heh, Heh!

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Boffins with frickin' laser beams chase universe's mysterious trihydrogen

JCitizen
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Coat

Hmmm!!

Since there are no frickin' laser beams in space, the first substitute that comes along, in my mind, is gamma ray bursts! I probably should get my coat!

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Boffins' five eyes surprise: Bees correct colour for ambient light

JCitizen
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Boffin

Bees have more than one sense

they can smell, and even sense direction to discovered food sources - I'm not sure scientist have figured out what kind of "GPS" this is, but the workers do a dance when they come from a new source of food, and other workers can tell what direction to take from the movements - Also I wonder if this behavior lets them get a whiff of the pollen on the bee's storage pockets, so they also know what kind of pollen they will detect.

I've seen nature videos showing bees recognizing an enemy by color and from several yards - and they claim it is visual alone. I'd imagine you wouldn't want to look, smell like, or wear any black or brown shirts, or they may get the idea you are a bear, their worst natural enemy next to fire. I really wonder why smoke calms them down so much - you would think it would be like the biggest panic you could think of. I guess that is one of nature's greatest mysteries?

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Elon Musk reveals Mars colony rocket capable of bringing pizza joints to the red planet

JCitizen
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Childcatcher

@ I ain't Sparticus

If you read the "Ride Report" you will see one of the most thoughful processes at that time for planned exploration of the solar system. Sally Ride wrote it and it was very inspiring to a college kid like me at the time. I think Musk discounts the Moon in this plan because he knows we can bypass it if what we wan't to do is just get there. However you brought up points that make me think the Ride Report is still valid.

I propose that we mine He³ on the moon - it has the most dense source of this excellent fusion material that any other known source worth looking at. If we take advantage of the Moon's low gravity, we may be able to accelerate progress on accomplishing fission, and with that wonderful process you can make ANYTHING. The fusing of any atomic atoms, can result in anything you want from the periodic table, so you could throw moon dust in the process and make fuel, gold, whatever you want to enhance the next hop to Mars. Even if we establish this base and end up bypassing it, the lessons learned will go a long way toward building any base on Mars, and we would be much closer for any rescue missions that may come up.

And there again, many a rich folk might want bragging rights to being one of the first civilian moon walkers! Tourism might actually help pay for the next step.

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SpaceX nails two launches and barge landings in one weekend

JCitizen
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Black Helicopters

Re: Grid fins

Actually ALCOA holds that record for forging the under (belly) pan of an Army tank.

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Meteor swarm spawns new and dangerous branch

JCitizen
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Joke

Re: Interesting use of statistics... "lies, damned lies and statistics"

@Pompous Git - Noah forgot to put the 19 mega-fauna on board? Heh! Heh!

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Obama's intel chief says Russia totally tried to swing it for Trump

JCitizen
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Happy

Re: I would be ashamed to push this line

@ atrum - #2 it depends on how you view the majority - In a Democratic Republic all people count.

https://scatter.wordpress.com/2017/02/19/sunday-morning-sociology-first-edition/

This was published in The Washington Post - so I doubt any argument of FAKE news can be attributed.

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JCitizen
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Thumb Up

Re: I would be ashamed to push this line

SOOOOO true Tikimon!!

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JCitizen
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Mushroom

Re: Reeaaallly....

I actually approved of that sale - because we were looking at an uncontrolled former Soviet nuclear warhead stockpile with woefully inadequate guarding - so trading old nukes for uranium for maintaining their new weapons instead, was actually a brilliant move in my best estimation - it was one of the things that surprised me about that administration, and the guts it took to do it. There is still missing weapons that haven't been accounted for to this day - but it was too late for them. Keeping the damage to a minimum was all we could hope for.

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JCitizen
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Holmes

Yep!

@ Prof - WWS

There is no "just the facts ma'am", any more - no money for actual fact checking or good old gum shoe reporting!

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JCitizen
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Facepalm

Re: Fake News ?

I would say there is no such thing as "real" news - that is the problem - the news media could care less about the real facts at all. They are all on an obvious agenda, and all of it would make Edward R. Murrow turn over in his grave!

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JCitizen
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Alert

Re: "potential jeopardy to the very fundamental underpinnings of our political system"

the purchasing of power with OUR MONEY - There - FTFY

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JCitizen
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Megaphone

Re: Its a great narrative..

I would like to add another thought here - the US badgered the Russians during the entire cold war, with Radio Free Europe transmissions, and all kinds of dirty tricks to foul up Soviet progress at every step. The US interfered with other nations using NO rules of fair engagement to attempt to blast Soviet influence at all cost. And now we complain about innocuous interference in elections? Geeze! The US did lot worse over the cold war against the Russians; and they didn't care who's toes, or small country they had to step on!

And as far as hacking the DNC and their politicos - the fact is the information was the truth wasn't it? Probably the only time in recent history, that Americans found out the straight facts!!

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JCitizen
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Mushroom

Assumptions that US elections can be easily swayed..

I think the world is making a silly mistake assuming voters can be so easily swayed in US elections. The public has lost too much confidence in not only their government but even more in the media - they have no confidence the truth is told at all.

If you have people who are already mad about one side or the other, they are ready to make assumptions about each side of the political spectrum - what they suspect is even worse than the fake news! I can say with confidence that the interference had minimal change in the result of the election, and if anything it may have back fired very badly for either side of the fence.

For those that actually bothered to vote. the outcome was literally up for grabs - and a coin toss could change everything. Many of the silent majority stayed home in disgust - but some of them had finally had enough and decided to throw a bomb into Washington no matter the consequences - Trump was that bomb - and now it is DAMN THE TORPEDOES FULL SPEED AHEAD!!

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Avast blocks the entire internet – again

JCitizen
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Alert

@ davews

I have better luck with Avast's web shield than trying to use NoScript - webmasters pump so many scripts out now that NoScript is virtually worthless.

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JCitizen
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Coffee/keyboard

!st computer virus..

@Mark 110 - chances are the 1st antivirus I ever had was Avast as it is probably the oldest one I've ever used. This is certainly the most serious issue I've ever heard of in regard to Alwil's fine free software. I've not heard reports from any of my clients. However I have had to use the "Avast clear" tool to get new versions of Avast to work properly, so it is not perfect. At least it doesn't blow up peoples computers like so many of the other brands out there.

To my best knowledge G-Data was the very 1st anti-virus, and probably wasn't called that in its inception. I believe Atari may have been the company that developed it.

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Microsoft founder Paul Allen reveals world's biggest-ever plane

JCitizen
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Boffin

Re: Hang on...

Obviously this must be a project 'Brains' concocted - he's the glasses wearing geek behind it all!

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Scientists are counting atoms to figure out when Mars last had volcanoes

JCitizen
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Black Helicopters

#DJO

Plus, I'd imagine that a cool or solid core in Mars is why there is no magnetosphere left.

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WannaCrypt: Roots, reasons and why scramble patching won't save you now

JCitizen
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Coffee/keyboard

I've not heard one suggestion...

That for almost ALL encryption malware, the Microsoft Management Console can cut off the main vector of damage by these type of attacks. Will the worm and/or virus part of the attack do damage? Perhaps - But no backups will be compromised and by isolating the machine, and scanning after zero day, the malware can be removed. I've done this sort of thing for a long while, but I'm not the author of the snap-ins and MMC concoctions; you'll have to configure them your self, or buy into some coders that can make the changes for you with configuration tools. It probably takes about 100 actions to properly configure the MMC to block these attacks. If you combine that with a good enterprise anti-malware solution, you put yourself well above the low hanging fruit for sure!

None of my clients tested their backups before disaster - so I had to do them anyway, and I certainly found what works. With those kind of backup applications you never have to worry about a recovery, as long as the drive you are imaging has the same geometry as the original. I always scan the backup drive outside the operating system, even if it was isolated during the attack - invariably I find the original attack package sleeping in the files. By removing it, I have always had a successful restoration.

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Don't gripe if you hand your PC to Geek Squad and they rat you out to the Feds – judge

JCitizen
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Big Brother

Re: The bigger picture

Under US HIPAA regulations the doctor might even be required to encrypt patient files to keep them confidential, when giving up the files for computer maintenance. Our whole organization was under HIPAA, and we were very cognizant of every move we made to maintain compliance. I really wonder how much training doctors get along these lines, though.

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JCitizen
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Holmes

Re: a prominent California gynecologist

Doctors find themselves in the distasteful position of having to treat victims of child abuse - so it would not be unusual to find pictures of such cases in the doctor's computer. They have to gather photo graphic evidence for the child's medical case as well.

They would have to give a doctor wide latitude as long as they are case histories, only as records of private patients. Many doctors have to go to special training seminars on child abuse, and it would be no wonder they would have graphic training details in the files as well.

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Just so we're all clear on this: Russia hacked the French elections, US Republicans and Dems

JCitizen
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IT Angle

Re: Landslide ?

Pretty much same with the US election. When you see the pie chart of who voted for who and who didn't, Hillary's popular vote doesn't count for much. Wake me up when a US candidate actually gleans the MAJORITY of the registered voter population.

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Webroot antivirus goes bananas, starts trashing Windows system files

JCitizen
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FAIL

Never

I learned a LONG time ago to never use anything made by Webroot again. My new clients keep proving this to me for years now.

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Microsoft says: Lock down your software supply chain before the malware scum get in

JCitizen
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Coffee/keyboard

Re: Microsoft Store?!

Sounds reasonable - Apple does it - right?

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Uncle Sam backs down on slurping passwords from US visa hopefuls

JCitizen
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Pirate

Re: Fuck America

There are a lot worse places to visit:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3076470/How-does-country-fare-MURDER-MAP-Interactive-graphic-shows-homicide-rates-world.htm

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