* Posts by Ledswinger

5412 posts • joined 1 Jun 2012

This is where UK's Navy will park its 75,000-ton aircraft carriers

Ledswinger
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if I had my choice, they would work on a naval Eurofighter

With no catapult capability on the carriers they still wouldn't be able to use a navalised Typhoon. Added to which, the design concept of the Typhoon was a high agility interceptor fighter using look-down, shoot down weapons, so not very suitable for use as a naval strike fighter, which generally fly lower, and need far greater capability for air to surface weapons (including heavy, long range anti-ship missiles). Then there's the need for larger wings that also fold, new avionics, new stronger landing gear, airframe mods to cope with an arrestor hook, weatherproofing for the corrosive environment etc etc.

It simply doesn't make sense spending five-ten years creating a naval Typhoon - by the time it comes into service the original design will be thirty years old, it would cost a fortune, and still be a compromised design.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Gunboat Diplomacy

That may have worked against the Chinese back in the 19thC

Well, this time round it's their problem given that it's mainly their exports, and there are for all practical purposes no UK owned or operated cargo ships (although a princely 2.9% are UK flagged).

Even if the Suez transit routes were disrupted, that just means ships have to use the Cape Town route which adds, what, ten days, for clothing and miscellaneous manufactured tat. If the Straits of Hormuz are blockaded, then oil becomes a problem, but you'd need more than a navy to fix that because the trouble will be local.

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Force employees to take DNA tests for bosses? We've got a new law to make that happen, beam House Republicans

Ledswinger
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Re: "They still believe in Social Darwinism of course."

the attitude of the British upper classes in the late 19th and early 20th centuries

Maybe. But isn't Trump of the finest Teutonic stock? I'm pleased he's not making out that he's got any British ancestry. And he certainly seems to follow the Austrian school of political communications*.

* Yes, I plead guilty as charged under Godwin's law. But so should Erdogan, in other news.

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'Nigerian princes' snatch billions from Western biz via fake email – Interpol

Ledswinger
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Re: Acceptance of poor grammar

The best 2% take an extra 15 seconds.

Whilst you're absolutely right, it isn't a huge endorsement of the tech sector that an important line of defence is the poor language skills of the crooks, is it? Clearly most scammers don't feel any need to evolve - but imagine the impact they'd have with a better eye for detail, some token research, decent grammar and spell checking, and only a very modest uplift in their tech skills, particularly in respect of email spoofing. Treat it as a thought exercise - what would you have to do to get a savvy colleague to open a booby trapped email if they can currently spot a dodgy one?

We're in 2017, and there's still shed-loads of code vulnerabilities across all manner of software, Windoze can still be persuaded to compromise itself, users are unwittingly allowed to open executables and other booby trapped files, firewalls and filter software routinely allow internet connections to servers where you'd expect trouble, etc.

In summary not a good mix: Many people are gullible, much software is riddled with security flaws.

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Get a GRIP! Robolution ain't happening until TOUCH is cracked

Ledswinger
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Re: someone somewhere will have to pay the tax

Claims like this have been made since the Luddites first started throwing spanners in the works of cotton mills.

Indeed. But if we automate a load of the manual labouring jobs, what exactly will those people do? In previous rounds of automation there were plenty of other demands for manual labour; I'm not so convinced that's the case if we can make technology that will replace warehouse packers, fork lift drivers, truck and van drivers etc.

I can't see that we'd train many techies from those currently performing manual jobs, and even if we could there's not going to be an equivalent number of jobs created in coding, app design and the like.

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BT agrees to legal separation of Openreach

Ledswinger
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Re: Cautious optimism@ IHateWearingATie

I wouldn't see this as making it any harder than it is now

With all due respect sir, you are wrong. Full legal separation INCLUDING assets is essential, and Steven Jones is right. It looks like OFCOM have fucked up again, as the sceptical amongst us expected. I've worked for a few regulated businesses, and for holding companies that have owned ring-fenced, legally separated operations. Done properly it works well (surprisingly, for both consumers and investors), but OFCOM have yet again snatched defeat from the jaws of victory.

Earth to Sharon White! How much are you paid for being as totally ineffectual as your lacklustre predecessors? Never mind, eh? When you retire you'll get a gong on the honours list for "services to diversity". I wish I was a public sector Gravy Trainer.

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Royal Navy's newest ship formally named in Glasgow yard

Ledswinger
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Re: OMFG

You mean BAe Systems has actually delivered a naval vessel on time?

Yes. But sadly all we've got is a piss pot gin palace with the same armament that Islamic State mount on a Toyota pickup truck, AND we've paid the same money for what other countries have paid for fully tooled up corvettes capable of deep water use against air, surface and submarine targets.

This wouldn't matter so much if we had a strong destroyer and frigate fleet, but we don't - they're short in numbers, and similarly spec'd by pacificists, although I suppose there's no point in having escort vessels for carriers without aircraft.

Oi! Twats of Whitehall! What's the point in having a navy if you only give it a few dinky, under-armed ships, and have huge gaps even in that limited capability?

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Tesla 'API crashes' after update, angry rich bods complain

Ledswinger
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How much more buttock clenching is the thought of bricking a $60,000 motor?

There's talk on the Tesla forums that suggest the average selling price is more like $90k, so presumably that difference is 50% more buttock clenching than whatever premium owners put on a bricked car over a bricked phone.

Moral of the story: Buy the cheapest in the range, and no options.

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CIA hacking dossier leak reignites debate over vulnerability disclosure

Ledswinger
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Re: I've been saying this since the Snowden revelations came out...

The U.S. Cyberwarfare Command needs to be moved out of the NSA and Fort Meade.

And that would stop the TLAs using exploits? Without oversight they'll continue to find their own, so moving Cyberwarfare to a separate place achieves nothing, surely?

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Smut-scamming copyright chaser 'fesses up, will do hard time

Ledswinger
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Re: Lawyers

Does my heart good to hear of lawyers like this getting a custodial sentence.

Don't count your chickens before the fat lady sings like a canary in a coal mine. Or something like that.

He's a lawyer, and a crook, I'm guessing his plea bargain is to plead guilty, so long as he's only told not to do it again.

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Salford and Liverpool City Councils plan IT trading venture

Ledswinger
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They've read the reports on SouthWestOne ?

Most unlikely. I work in a sector where local authorities are piling in to commercial business, believing that although they can't even empty bins weekly, they can do a better, more efficient job than large, long established companies who have been fighting it out for decades in a ruthlessly competitive sector.

In any line of business, there's how the rest of the world think you make money (and they always think it is falling off a log), and the commercial reality (where there's a range of requisite resources plus commercial and technical skills just to win the business, never mind make a profit).

If local authorities are so confident of their competitive abilities, good luck to them - oh, and by the way, I'd like a choice of who I pay my council tax to.

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Come in King Battistelli, your time at the Euro Patent Office is up

Ledswinger
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I bet he won't be punished in any way.

Blame the liberals and their aversion to "cruel and unusual". Personally, I'd have him branded across the forehead with "WANKER" or a suitable French alternative, and regard the job as done. Or surgically remove his pecker and reattach it to his forehead...

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Iconic Land Rover Defender may make a comeback by 2019

Ledswinger
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Re: Which market segment will they go for?

We have plenty of empty factory space because we have shut down so much, use some of it

Actually we don't. Most old factories are quickly flattened and turned into light industrial, business park or housing sites, because factories are dirty and unfashionable if you're a planner. Moreover, few old factories would meet the needs of today, for large scale, high power demands, comms, ventilation, insulation, load bearing, transport infrastructure etc, so you'd be better off starting again in most cases.

Having said that, the similar closures of military sites means there's plenty of land to use - St Athan is supposed to be Aston Martin's new production site, and there's plenty of other sites. And given the amount of prime farmland disappearing under crappy, ineffectual solar farms, I'd also suggest that if government hate farmland so much, manufacturing plants would be a better use than a few PV panels milking subsidies for a bank.

A more pressing concern than land is why government allow scabby US tech companies to dodge taxes that manufacturers and all types of SME are not allowed to dodge, and why government continue to deliberately inflict damage left right and centre with business rates and carbon-obsessive energy, planning and environment policies that make the UK an expensive and difficult place to conduct business.

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Salesforce joins 'smart' software bandwagon

Ledswinger
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Re: Complex things?

Indeed. Utterly shameless to seize the name of one of the greatest physicists who ever lived, and then plaster it on some shonky marketing software that does nothing clever, nothing groundbreaking, and has no relationship to either Einstein or his scientific interests.

I suppose the Newton set an unwelcome precedent; at least Watson was a second fiddle fictional character rather than a scientific great having their name abused by marketing twats.

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Stop the press: Journos not happy losing jobs to journo bots, say journos

Ledswinger
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Why rely on mere humans to read the output...

...when machines can do all of this soooo much better.

Of course, I'm feeling quite vulnerable in my role as commentard: If third rate algos are churning out pap, then presumably we meat sacks of the commentariat will be likewise displaced by robocommentards. There is a school of thought that says Amanfrommars1 is in fact a robot. Presumably all he needs to do is virtualise some additional instances, and the rest of us can hang up our keyboards.

Mind you, imagine multiple instances of Amanfrommars1 arguing with each other. Quel horreur!

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UK Home Office spy powers unit pretended it was a private citizen in Ofcom consultation

Ledswinger
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Re: Get what you wish for

I cannot imagine the circumstances in which this would be allowed under the Civil Service Code.

"And thirdly, the Civil Service Code is more what you'd call guidelines than actual rules".

Which is just as well, because it doesn't seem to be challenging the conscience of any civil servants in the Cheltenham branch.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Get what you wish for

about time Matthew Dine became a private citizen

Why? Seems like he was doing only what he was paid to do.

Unfortunately, the problem is that here is not the author's actions, but the clear implication of the government (a) lobbying itself and (b) pretending to be a private individual. That is a a wilful abuse of the "democratic" consultation process.

I'm regularly involved in enough consultations (not on this sort of matter) to know that the democratic credentials of the policy consultation process are very, very weak, but this latest is particularly egregious act. The people who should be shown the door are the boss of HOIPU and the Home Secretary, and ideally Theresa May, who appears to be a passionate supporter of the establishment of a British Stasi.

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1.37bn records from somewhere to leak on Monday

Ledswinger
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Re: why would you believe a government "statement"

The sad part is that the lowest strata just don't have enough money to do this kind of thing, and they're the most at risk from a mass biometrics leak and misuse.

Well, they certainly don't have the money after the Indian government "demonetised" the 1000 and 500 rupee notes, in perhaps the most blatant act of confiscation by any (nominally) democratic government.

Although it does at least mean that being robbed is socially inclusive in India: Rich or poor, cash or digital, your money belongs to somebody else.

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Did your in-flight entertainment widget suck? It's Panasonic's fault, claims software biz

Ledswinger
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Re: Oh, spiffy, another problem with air travel

Fuck air travel. I'll walk.

Given the tedious journeys getting to many airports, the hours spent waiting, the delays and unreliability, it's a miracle nobody has restarted a transatlantic steamer service (transport, not "cruise"). I'd rather spend four days on a ship than three hours in airports, and eight hours in a tin can full of foul germ ridden air, with my knees round my ears.

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If we must have an IoT bog roll holder, can we at least make it secure?

Ledswinger
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Re: "maybe even IoT could be eventually useful?"

3) I know that I normally use <20 sheets per day.

Somewhere, this data is being stored for evaluation and future use. They may conclude that you're constipated, or very unhygienic, or that you hold your guts until you get to work, or that you have a very healthy diet, always get a clean break, and that you're a "folder" not a "scruncher".

Future employers are already blacklisting you just in case, toilet roll makers are preparing a smear campaign against the likes of you, and a whole range of product retailers are preparing to offer you everything from organic vegan wholegrain products to stool softeners.

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COP BLOCKED: Uber app thwarted arrests of its drivers by fooling police with 'ghost cars'

Ledswinger
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Re: You gotta give them credit:

Quite an impressive corporate culture they've instilled. Rotten through and through.

I offer the world an addition to the dictionary:

Uberis: noun, a vast excess of confidence that you and your over-valued, toxic cultured tech company are above all rules and social norms, enabling you to steal other people's IP, flout the law on employee rights, block law enforcement efforts, harass your direct employees and hound them with private investigators, and also swear at your own indirect employees, whilst dodging taxes as widely as possibly.

Sadly applying to more than just this company.

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Ledswinger
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Icon --------> Waiting for the big one....

You don't think this is the big one? Has a strong whiff of VW's dieselgate (using software to avoid regulatory compliance in the pursuit of profits).

Looking at the horrifying list of negative news that has been pouring out with regard to Uber, I'd have thought that at the very least we'll see a change of management soon enough, and the collective fines they will incur over this should be a good chunk of their market value.

Sadly, this isn't just Uber - what we see here is the not merely amoral, but totally immoral culture that pervades Silicon Valley and the big US tech companies. The same mind set as 1990's "masters of the universe" fund managers, they honestly believe they are different, and that rules don't apply to them.

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Uber loses court fight over London drivers' English language tests

Ledswinger
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Re: Talking of Language

Without, it looks more the "uber, uberis" Latin word - which means "abundance", but also "breast"

Well, there's good evidence that Travis Kalanick is a tit?

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Ledswinger
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Re: Talking of Language

Über is a German word

Shouldn't cause any problems since the company's business model is banned there, isn't it?

In my experience of German taxis, Uber was a solution searching for a problem that didn't exist.

Here in my provincial UK location, the taxi drivers already speak little or no English, don't know the rules of the road, and don't own their vehicles as they operate a car pool where four or more driver use a raddled, dirtty, unroadworthy old shitheap on a near continuous shift basis, so there's certainly a problem waiting for a solution, but Uber seems to be a wrapper with exactly the same contents.

A bit like "Just Eat", which seem to be a wrapper for the very worst food outlets that you'd never voluntarily set foot in..

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HMRC emits IR35 tax calculator onto the web for UK contractors

Ledswinger
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Anonymous, because at least they can't immediately jump me.

Thinks you. Under RIPA they (HMRC) can compel the Reg to out you - and that's assuming they don't just get GCHQ to help themselves.

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UK's first Investigatory Powers Commissioner: Lord Justice Fulford

Ledswinger
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All very well

Although Lord Justice Fulford is experienced and respected, all he can do here is interpret the law, and then mostly behind closed doors. So where all the "investigatory power" laws were drafted by utter monkeys working for control freak simpletons, there's little he can do other than to offer a very intelligent interpretation of the shoddy work of clowns, and for the most part whatever he concludes we'll never know.

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RAF pilot awaits sentence for digicam-induced airliner dive

Ledswinger
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Re: Not wishing to add to his woes...

The RAF runs its own annual photographic competition

So they encourage the practice? Personally, I'd rather my pilot was either asleep whilst the autopilot did the work, or focusing on the job of flying, instead of dicking around with distracting objects on the flight deck.

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Awkward. Investigatory Powers Act could prove hurdle to UK-EU Privacy Shield following Brexit

Ledswinger
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Orwell's 1984 is supposed to a warning, not an aspiration.

Sadly in Whitehall it is a "Dummies Guide".

I've not checked, but I suspect that the EU requirements apply to their citizens data, not that of the processing country. So all the knob-ends of the Home Office have to do it tweak the act so that it is only UK citizens privacy that the British government is shitting on, and job done.

As for resigning if they don't like limits on their Stasi-esque spying, the chances of the lard-arse bank bench gravy-train'ers resigning is almost as remote as that of the talent free fat cats of the Civil Service doing likewise. Look at the disgusting makeweights on most New Year's Honours lists, and you'll see that there are no rewards for serving democracy, only rewards for being a useless time-serving bureaucrat, or a friend of whichever bunch of tossers is in power that year.

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SAP eyes up BT's biz ahead of £550m EE integration

Ledswinger
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Re: Integration? Hopefully they thought ahead and the new system...

Hopefully they thought ahead and the new system...Is also capable of full separation of Openreach

I would imagine that the corporate twats at BT plc have indeed thought ahead, and intentionally have created arrangement that make it expensive and difficult to demerge Openreach. That way they can plead to Ofcom and greasy politicians that demerging Openreach will inflict unreasonable costs on BT's shareholders and/or customers.

USO effectively on the BT group isn't the answer, full legal separation is. If BT plc wish to remain the owner of Openreach that should be fine, but at arms length, ring-fenced and regulated. And then put the USO onto the transparently financed and managed Openreach.

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Li-ion king Goodenough creates battery he says really is... good enough

Ledswinger
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Re: When can I get it?: 2025

No need to rush.

Oh there is.

We're reading here about the lab stuff. There's lots that is in between lab and product development, and could be in your hands in a couple of years. One example - lithium sulphur batteries are fairly well developed, have much better specific energy density than conventional lithium chemistries, and are being proven in high value applications as we speak - the main challenge is that for mainstream (=low value) applications they need to reduce the degradation rate. We have managed that with Li-ion, no reason to expect that other chemistries won't follow suit, although LiS looks like only a candidate for transport and static batteries, not for mobile devices.

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Ledswinger
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Sounds like the Tesla wall batteries might be using Na in two or three generations.

Don't bet on any technology unless you're a gambler! There's no magic bullets, and the choice of battery in the Tesla Powerwall is driven by Tesla's needs in automotive applications, rather than the optimal tech for static batteries. Considerations of duty cycling, maximum power, operating conditions, mass and density, charge rate all differ.

Re-use of automotive batteries is worthy of consideration because static batteries have a charmed life compared to the brutal demands of traction use, so a cell that is no longer suitable for vehicle use may still have decades of life in a static array. The consideration is cost of alternative disposal options for the end of life traction batteries. I've seen well argued articles conclude that the incremental cost of disassembly, test and repurposing of traction batteries will be too costly to justify the effort as and when high volume cell recycling is available, and I think that's probably right - but we're not there yet.

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Ledswinger
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Re: When can I get it?: 2025

Actually, there's been a phenomenal amount of R&D going on for years now, initially driven by phone and tablet needs, not looking at cars and grid scale storage. Last year for which I saw data, the ten largest patentees of battery technology had pocketed over 40,000 patents between them. Obviously that doesn't mean the patents are worth anything, just an indicator of how much research is and has been underway.

Sadly, it's typically seven years from breakthrough in the lab to mass market product, because the lab breakthrough merely shows that something works there. At that point the technology doesn't have any supply chain, any manufacturing experience, or any products designed around them, and these take time to get in place (IP legal work, design work, contractual legals, safety testing & certifcation, manufacturing construction, battery manufacture and device manufacture and marketing). I anything, seven years is incredibly fast....

Even if that could be done in a third of the time, no sane person would risk a mass roll out of a product not proven at smaller scale - even if the battery is provably safe, there's huge commercial risks of real world durability, performance and economics. And sadly there's typically another seven to ten years to completely optimise a given chemistry or major tech break through. So at launch a new battery chemistry will typically be at around 40% of its theoretical potential (based on chemistry), but that can be steadily increased over time, and if you're lucky and invest enough in R&D, you might get that to 80% before something else comes along to replace it.

All of which assumes no technology or cost roadblocks are discovered on the journey to commercialisation, and that other more promising technologies don't appear that research funders choose to back instead.

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Prisoners' 'innovative' anti-IMSI catcher defence was ... er, tinfoil

Ledswinger
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Re: A cheaper option in the long run?

But it keeps them off the streets. Or would you rather have them looking for YOU next?

The problem is that with the lack of jail places in the UK, we don't actually keep them off the streets for very long. At an emotive level, I LIKE the idea of punitive sentences, endless years breaking rocks, cold gruel, regular beatings from savage warders, and cold stone walled cells on Dartmoor. But sadly logic and fact shows that doesn't stop the bastards re-offending when they get out, so all that prison does is act a a bit of a buffer in a system that can also serve as a criminal meeting ground and skills sharing college. And I'm paying for that.

Certainly there's a lunatic or irredeemable hard core where the only solution is to lock them away forever, and a few whose crime is so heinous that they should forfeit any chance of release, but that's probably a couple of big prison's worth, not the rotating army of perhaps 300,000 regular reoffenders who make up the bulk of the UK's 100,000 prison population.

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Ledswinger
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Re: A cheaper option in the long run?

Still amazes me how we're looking for a tech solution to basic prison functions - in other words confiscating banned items regularly.

Still amazes me that we have so many prisons, and claims that we need more. Expensive, clearly not much deterrent, and pretty ineffectual in preventing re-offending.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Wouldn't it be cheaper...

by way of a deterrent to others?

The lags haven't been deterred by the threat of "up to" life imprisonment, and even in territories where capital punishment is still used regularly and with gay abandon (like Saudi, or China), it doesn't seem very effective in stopping transgressions.

On the other hand, in the phone-in-jail context, humiliating corporal punishments might be effective, like supergluing the phone back in its original hiding place, and then force feeding the lag a big curry, whilst all the other inmates watch and jeer.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Wouldn't it be cheaper...

The effectiveness of Faraday cages requires very detailed, careful application (many years ago I worked with TEMPEST kit). I've had my phone in biscuit tins, and in steel filing cabinets, and the thing will still have a signal and ring when a call comes in. Chicken wire's also probably too big a mesh to block a mobile phone signal, due to the ratio of the holes to the wavelength.

My solution is to lock the convicts in steel shipping containers. That wouldn't stop mobile signals - until I'd had the containers dumped at sea.

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Dyson backs Britain plc with $2.5bn AI and robotics investment

Ledswinger
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Re: "It currently banks £1.5bn annually."

What relevance is turnover?

I don't know. Perhaps you could ask those US tech giants that make no taxable profit and pay no dividends.

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Ledswinger
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ou do have to wonder at the power of the German lobby in the EU

Do you? So long as the French get their precious farming subsidies and national champions, the Germans can have a free hand on setting rules for industry. Every other EU nation is simply a bit part player hoping to catch a few crumbs at this Franco-German bring and share.

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Move over, Bernie Ecclestone. Scientists unearth Earth's oldest fossil yet: 4bn years old

Ledswinger
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Re: Trace of lifeforms 3.7 bln years old

about the same as trace of life on Mars or even different planetary system

The same as finding life elsewhere? You stick with the rocks sir. I'll take the transport to Pandora, and breed with lithe, attractive cat-like aliens.

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This ferry is said to weigh 250 cows. We say that is actually 20,600 Lindisfarne Gospels

Ledswinger
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Re: East Cowes, home of BHC and the largest Union Flag in the World

"The British Hovercraft Corporation was responsible for the largest Union Flag in the world"

As the only enduring result of BHC, I wonder how much that painted flag finally cost in today's prices?

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Upstart Datrium has a soft blanket to wrap up your data if security is giving it the shivers

Ledswinger
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All a bit pointless...

When all major state actors are demanding backdoors, hoarding zero days, and developing APT tools to grab your data, with further rights to demand decryption at the whim of low grade state employees. If the TLAs can't crack your encryption, be certain they'll either outlaw it, or lean on the software makers to give them a backdoor. And that's "friendly" state actors. The hostile state actors will just use old fashioned bribes and threats against individuals.

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Health firm gets £200k slap after IVF patients' records leak online

Ledswinger
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Re: "The £200,000 monetary penalty..."

Not even £200k - it is reduced to £160k for prompt payment, and as HCA self-reported, they'll not be tardy in paying up.

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Revealed: UK councils shrug at privacy worries, strap on body cams

Ledswinger
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Re: Councils and the public

the article suggests that filming somebody dropping litter is a bad thing. Coujd someone explain how?

There's a concept called "proportionality" that appears to have passed you by. Of course, if you've genuinely NOTHING to hide in any aspect of your life, and you don't mind that lack of guilt being continuously checked and recorded, then maybe we should have more recording.

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Ledswinger
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Re: plastics

I assumed thats what they did because they are always going to get stuff put in by idiots . stuff that isnt even plastic.

Why "idiots"? I pay the local council taxes, its their job to get rid of my waste. Why should I have to sort it all out into loads of different categories, and know every tin-pot rule for sorting different materials?

As it happens, my local council does single bin mixed recycling, and they use machinery to sort metals, glass, paper and plastics, and all the plastics get sorted by an infrared analyser. Everything that doesn't get graded as metal, glass, paper, or pass into accepted types of plastic goes to landfill. And there's an alternate week collection for dirty and putrescible waste. Works well enough.

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Germany, France lobby hard for terror-busting encryption backdoors – Europe seems to agree

Ledswinger
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Re: openpgp

and all the wishfull thinking of the worlds politicians cannot stop it.

But they can make it illegal. That won't stop real criminals, but it would give politicians and the local Stasi the power to snoop on everybody else, which is presumably what this is about. And having made it illegal, ISPs would be under an obligation to identify people using illegal encryption (including VPNs and software that isn't "backdoor compliant"), and the guilty would be subject to RIPA style compulsion to turn over the unencrypted content, and be prosecuted and fined for use of this terrorist technology. In response to business pressure, business VPNs would have a cop out, but the masses would be expected to just hand over their privacy, all in the name of "defending our freedom".

If you take two steps back, it seems as though this panicked need for universal surveillance has little or nothing to do with left or right, with the trivial volumes of terrorism, or the moral panic of child abuse, but is simply part of a concerted effort by the Establishment to try and regain control of the population.

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Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online'

Ledswinger
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Re: Two words spring to mind...@ m0rt

Your comment should be forcibly tattooed on the forehead of every single member of parliament. Can we setup a Kickstarter campaign to raise the money to do this?

MPs: Tossers every one of them - either for doing the wrong thing, or for being ineffectual in opposing the apparently universal shit-headedness of all recent governments.

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Telco Orange to open bank next month

Ledswinger
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Re: Bank?

It depends how well they do it.

If they stick to minimalist consumer only deposit taking and lending, there's not much can go wrong. Ask Northern Rock...oh, wait! Dunfermline Building Society...no, no, erm, Co-op, ooh, maybe not. Anyway, moving on....

Orange are a lard arse telecoms incumbent. If they're struggling to make enough money (in their eyes, evidently) from their core business, without even a handful of competitors, why would they be so stupid as to think that they can make money in a risky, complex, heavily regulated world of banking, when low interest rates mean low spreads and low returns? I suppose they could mis-sell products, and hope to get away with it, which seems to be the business model of all the other banks.

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New prison law will let UK mobile networks deploy IMSI catchers

Ledswinger
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Re: Ok...

At least our backpacking bar workers know how to pour a bloody beer, have yet to meet a pom out here on holiday who has half a fucking clue on how it's done.

In a spirit of Commonwealth camraderie, I'd like to ask how would you Aussies know how beer should be poured, when you don't even know what real beer is, of either ale or pilsener traditions?

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Ledswinger
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Re: Ok...

Seriously though, why don't we just make Wales a prison.

Probably because our lords and masters have already signed treaties against that sort of cruel punishment.

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Licence-fee outsourcer Capita caught wringing BBC tax from vulnerable

Ledswinger
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The BBC actually needs the money.

Of course they do. To pay for all that "talent".

What news do you prefer watching?

After the BBC were neutered by Blair in response to the Iraq war whistle blowing, not them.

Who do you trust?

See above. When did the BBC last do any high grade investigative or political journalism?

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