* Posts by Ledswinger

5227 posts • joined 1 Jun 2012

US visitors must hand over Twitter, Facebook handles by law – newbie Rep starts ball rolling

Ledswinger
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Re: But

Did the Senator not learn about logic, proofs, and the impossibility thereof in some cases?

You've not come across the US education system, then? And this man was such an Einstein that before politics he was in the US Navy Supply Corps.

Jim Banks:

He Knows No Fear

He Knows No Danger

He Knows Nothing

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Cheer up, pal: UK mobe networks are now 8% less crap, tests show

Ledswinger
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First law of thermodynamics also applies to telecomms

I have a hypothesis that there's a fixed amount of reliability and speed to go round. So if your service gets better, somebody else's gets worse. This isn't anything technological or backhaul related, it is just some cosmological constant, with the reliability doled out from a fixed pot by Nepalese monks on a remote mountainside.

And due to convergence, the reported 8% improvement in mobile reliability has been offset by a 30% worsening in reliability inflicted solely on Virginmedia's cable customers.

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Apple nabs smartphone top spot from Samsung, but for how long?

Ledswinger
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Re: "I care about what I get for my money."

My ideal manufacturer of almost anything is making a reasonable profit, and rewards its workforce adequately

Go on then, tell us who this is.

No conflict minerals, no child labour, no sweatshops & dormitories, no abusive trading raps, full trade union recognition, obviously a zero carbon footprint, and a fair return to investors. Seems to me the list will be very short. And shorter still when you include the criteria "competitive on the high street".

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Rasputin whips out large intimidating tool, penetrates uni, city, govt databases – new claim

Ledswinger
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"This well-established but easy-to-remediate problem continues to vex....

...the lazy, fuckwitted, and incompetent. Like TalkTalk.

Field validation is soooooooo basic, so fundamental, it should be a crime to not do this properly. I was designing and coding systems that did this back in 1987, three decades ago, it wasn't rocket science then.

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UK credit broker fined £120k for spamming folk with five million texts

Ledswinger
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so its high enough to hurt, but low enough that the lowlives won't immediately go into receivership?

Nope. Buying an off the shelf company is cheap enough circa £50, and that's the marginal cost for the bottom feeders. The forces of government could follow up "wilful insolvencies" through the Insolvency Service and the courts, and bring them to book, get them struck off as directors, but its slow and ineffective.

The only real recourse is to prevent directors and shareholders hiding behind limited liability in this way. Government could have closed this loophole years ago, but they're too sluggish and idle. Limited liability is a hugely important concept, and should be protected and encouraged, but at the moment government simply let the status be abused.

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Hold the phone! Crap customer service cost telcos £2.9 BEEEELLION in 2016

Ledswinger
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they'd have the regulator to answer to...and we all know how fearful a prospect that could be :-/

Yes, but in this case ICO are backstopped by the very aggressive Ofgem, who rejoice in doling out multi-million quid fines. Energy companies need a licence to operate, and the licence has a specific condition requiring companies to treat customers fairly. Last year Scottish Power were fined £18m for failures under a range of licence conditions, and npower copped a £26m spanking. I'm very surprised npower had the competence to provide a response to your demand, I'm not at all surprised that they would want to.

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King's College London bods recruit members for penis ring study

Ledswinger
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Re: I hope the rings are large enough

There were nine callouts involving "men with rings stuck on their penises"

So that's nine rings for mortal men, right? Certainly seems that in the darkness they got well and truly bound.

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GRAPHENE: £120m down, UK.gov finds it's still a long way from commercial potential

Ledswinger
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Re: "but no one seems quite sure where such a sizeable amount is being spent."

So yes it would seem that much has been spent on 'pencils' by architects et al.

This is the curse of government funding: When government commit money, they want it spent. They have no concept of getting value from it, or spending wisely. Look at Hinkley Point C, HS2, foreign aid. The point of spending public money is purely the act of spending, and being seen to do so.

If we posit that a fully funded academic (plus facilities, materials, support functions) costs £100k per year, then £120m would have paid for 1,200 man years of full time research if they'd used existing facilities. By p****ing the money up the wall on shiney new buildings, the amount actually spent on research is what might we guess, 1/8th of that?

But graphene isn't being treated any differently to other areas. Look at the "investment" in the new Francis Crick building. £700m sprayed up the wall on a fancy building in one of the most expensive property locations on Planet Earth, where most academic and research staff won't be able to afford to live locally. Imagine what £700m would have done if that had been spent on real science and real scientists, rather than real bricks and real navvies.

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Russia and China bombard Blighty with 188 cyberattacks in 3 months

Ledswinger
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Re: Fuller disclosure

Unless there is a war what good does it do to know the Russian or Chinese military's secrets?

By the time there's a war on it is a bit late to think "Ooh, we'd better hack their military secrets". As a general rule, a successful cyber-espionage campaign takes a lot of scoping, planning, and execution (plus design, coding and testing if you need new spyware able to infiltrate nation state defences).

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Kids these days will never understand the value of money

Ledswinger
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Re: Help the aged

When did the Reg become a site full of old timers who don't get new technology and reminisce about paper?

Since forever?

Is there a site out there where the audience is a bit younger and accepting of new things and new technologies?

Methinks you'll be wanting Wired. "Where tomorrow is realized", apparently.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Is there any great change from our point of view?

If you cant learn to control your impulse spending when you get a list every month of what went where you are beyond help.

Well, the evidence of maxed out credit card debt in both UK and US, where each month people get a list of what they've spent with whom, and still accrue debts they can't repay would suggest that a very large number of people are beyond help.

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Ford fills up ex-Google, Uber engineers' tank: $1bn pours into Argo AI

Ledswinger
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I can see the day when "Self Driving Cars" are common place around towns and on motorways

To judge by the inattention of human truck drivers to events going on around them, self driving trucks are already almost universal in the UK.

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Crack in black: Matte iPhones losing paint at alarming rate, gripe fans

Ledswinger
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Re: How many of you do this sort of weekly maintenance??

anyone who cares about their device

<Ring, ring> Sounds like reality calling - that'll be for you:

It's a mass produced phone, mate, not a cuddly toy or a pet.

If you want to fondle your electronics, then there's no law against that (well, certain religions get hot and bothered about all manner of trivia, I'm assuming you're not in those places), but even so, if I was going to cuddle an electrical device, it's be something genuinely covetable, like Quad electrostatics, or something similarly classy. And even then, I'm thinking that maybe the religions are right - cuddling any digital device....welll, it's just wrong.

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Samsung's Chromebook Pro: Overpriced vanilla PC with a stylus. 'Wow'

Ledswinger
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Reviews with a real sense of humour:

"and I suspect it's going to be a real selling point once Google finishes the software "

Bwahahahahahaahahahaaaaa! In this reality, or a different one?

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All of Blighty's attack submarines are out of action – report

Ledswinger
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The reality is we are much reduced in stature, being unable to maintain or afford the type of defence force we once were used to

Actually, we have the third largest defence budget in the world, and spend more than enough for a very well equipped and scary military. Unfortunately MoD and HMT ensure that it is mostly squandered.

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Ledswinger
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perhaps, they're doing it wrong.

Rather worrying that either the crew/commander were incompetent, or that the sub can't detect something like a 36,000 tonne tanker until it goes "bonk" into it. Particularly when the sub was taking part in an exercise at the time.

Whichever applies, it doesn't bode well.

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Ledswinger
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Re: It is not UK defences it is other places UK should worry about

The BIG "STOP" sign for Argentina somewhere on the way to Port Stanley is not the rather impotent Typhoon wing stationed there.

I think the Argentine air force is now so dillapidated that it couldn't put up the aircraft to do anything these days, partly because the government has been less militaristic, but mainly because Argentina is broke. Of course, they might counter that our military is dilapidated and we're broke, and that would be true.

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Ledswinger
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Errata

I think you meant to close with:

"The Ministry of Defence does not conduct submarine operations."

Twats. Total fucking twats. There's about 57,000 civilian staff, god knows how many military on secondment and similiar, and the useless, useless fuckers can't build carriers with aircraft, cancel ASW programmes without any replacement, build surface vessels that break down all the time and make so much noise the deaf can hear them coming, they evidently can't even organise a fleet of largely defensive nuclear powered subs. The RAF are trying to sellotape bombs to the Typhoon because there's no strike fighters available due to the MoD being asleep at the wheel for fifty plus years, the Army are only just overcoming the tragedy of snatch Landrovers, and still have equipment challenges. The A400M is more expensive than a far more capable C17, but you press on with your useless Eurocrap projects for missiles, aircraft and helicopters.

And to cap it all, the MoD have been actively complicit in the witch hunt against former soldiers. A message to the Ministry of Defence: You should be ashamed of yourselves, you couldn't organise a piss up in a brewery. Is it any wonder the military are struggling to recruit, when traitors like you lot are accruing gold plated pensions in return for your wretched incompetence?

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USMC: We want more F-35s per year than you Limeys will get in half a decade

Ledswinger
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Re: UCAVs?

If you think several £Billion and 148 aircraft is a token effort .....

For a nation the size of the UK, which wants to have a credible defensive capability for the British Isles, and have international "force projection" capability, that is a token effort. A third of the aircraft will be unserviceable or in maintenance at any one time, so we're down to barely a hundred aircraft. Buying any SVTOL aircraft guarantees a high accidental attrition rate, so perhaps one or two airframe losses per year.

Now divide the less than 100 airframes between the RAF in the UK, RAF overseas, and the carriers, and fairly quickly you're down to perhaps twenty or so operationally available for UK homeland defence. If you assume nobody wants to or would attack the mainland UK, that's fine - but then why bother with any military forces?

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Ledswinger
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Re: Aerospace Ignorance

Speed and height is king along with being able to make fast, tight turns and maintain energy.

This is only true if you're dog fighting. So perhaps it still works for lard-arsed Pentagon generals (and their Whitehall poodles), who are still fighting the Korean air war, but dogfighting is irrelevant in modern air warfare, other than in low-magnitude confrontations against third rate air powers.

Ignoring the most common use case of bombing rebellious tribes, the point of the F35 is a general purpose strike fighter. In the event of an air war that justify its expense and ambition, the F35 superiority over the Harrier is pointless - even in the unlikley event that it is more capable as a dog fighter than an Su 35 or a J20 and their predecessors, risking F35s in close quarters dog fighting is idiocy - that is high risk, low benefit warfare, against enemies with greater numbers of aircraft to sacrifice. And for all the claims of US stealth and countermeasures, both Russians and Chinese have their own stealth programmes, they'll known what the vulnerabilities are - I wouldn't fancy my chances in an F35 flying in airspace defended by a modern missile system like an S400.

We live in the age of the missile and the UAV. There are definite uses for manned aircraft, fast combat jets are rapidly ceasing to be one of those uses, and the need for dogfighting capabilities is merely to put on a show at air displays and please the old solidiers at the top of the pyramid.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Not completely stupid

Not to mention having no aircraft to do long endurance maritime patrols until the Boeing order is completed.

Given a free hand, I'd have David Cameron publicly hanged for that decision alone. And I'd take the family along with a picnic, make a day out of the event, and explain to the kids why the pudgy faced toff is going to dangle.

A big part of the tragedy of Nimrod MRA4 is the persistent inability of MoD to consider as separate weapons systems and platforms. This applies to armoured vehicles, ships, subs, and all combat aircraft. So in 2010 we were still bashing out Comet airframes by hand to a design concept that was not far removed from state of the art in 1949 (when the Comet first flew). And because of that foolhardy decision, vast costs were incurred trying to completely modernise a layout that had been outmoded since the 707 first flew in 1958 (edit: 1957, Boeing 367). And because the original engines were so ancient, they had to throw money at trying to get brand new modern engines for this 1940s engine-in-wing design. Sadly, this was a re-run of the similar debacle platform + avionics bungle during the embarrassing failure of the Nimrod AEW3 project.

I suspect if MoD had treated the avionics that went into MRA4 as a standalone project to fit in a modern airline airframe, the outcome would have been different. Our expertise in sub-hunting was world class, and the challenges of the MRA4 avionics could have been addressed appropriately. A suitable airframe would perhaps be a load of ex-airline, relatively low hours A319s, and the installation challenges and costs would have been far more controllable. We'd also have built an exportable product, whereas nobody in their right mind would invest in the Nimrod (and the necessary specialist support infrastructure).

I mentioned some great British aircraft. Sadly the Comet, whilst innovative, was not really part of that group, and you have to ask yourself why the British government has persistently scrapped good and useful projects, and then continued with the Nimrod airframe. My teenage son could make a better job of military procurement than the combination of politicians, civil service and the military.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Not completely stupid

If the idiot hadn't scrapped Ark Royal, Lusty an Invincible we could have had more aircraft carriers carrying more planes for a fraction of the cost.

Sadly, all three were long in the tooth, and would have needed such signifcant work it would be better to start again. All three villlage idiots (Blair, Brown and Cameron) certainly deserve their tag, but primarily for ordering replacements too late (assuming there's a need, I'm with Voland's Right Hand above), scrapping the existing assets too early, and for orderng carriers big enough to have proper catapults, but then not specifying them as mandatory. And then they made it worse by selecting the camel that is the F35B. Back in the day, the UK made some fantastic carrier aircraft - the Harrier was interesting, but more of a solution searching for a problem (the problem, as in so much military procurement eventually turned out to the clowns at HM Treasury). The best carrier aircraft was probably the Buccaneer - a purpose built naval strike fighter, designed from the outset for low level performance from carriers - very strong, incredibly manouevrable, with some very clever tricks to enhance lift for take off.

Given that the UK designed and built incredible aircraft like the Vulcan, Hunter, Victor, Bucaneer, TSR2, Lightning, Harrier, you have to wonder how the British government have backed themselves into a corner of having no domestic ability to originate a modern combat aircraft (other than crappy Euro-collaborations). And it isn't as though the need isn't obvious - the requirement for a new strike aircraft to replace the ageing Tornado or Sea Harriers has been obvious for the past thirty years. And it isn't as though it is too expensive to originate a very competent single country modern combat aircraft - Sweden has a population of less than 10m, barely above greater London, yet produced the excellent Gripen on its own. France, of the same size as the UK built the Rafale.

Even when it comes to transport aircraft on most figures (but not maximum payload), the A400M may beat the Belfast, but all things considered the Belfast came into service half a century ago. As for choppers, Lynx was good in its day - but that was forty years ago. Whatever happened to the brilliant aerospace expertise and engineering talent that Britain once had?

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Ledswinger
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Re: Irrational

You'd lose.

Maybe, but the source you quote (and all the way back to the Pentagon and Lockheed) I wouldn't trust an inch. The F35 programme is long on cost, short on delivery. Having some token exercise to generate some impressive "kill" figures is mere marketing by the military-industrial machine, and I don't believe it.

Against a third rate air force, certainly, and in an environment with no modern air defence weaponry. But against modern air defence assets, I'd expect the F35 to suffer significant losses (and the same for any other state of the art military aircraft from any nation).

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Conviction by computer is go, confirms UK Ministry of Justice

Ledswinger
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Re: What about the consequences of admitting guilt?

I can see no advantage to going to court and pleading guilty over doing that online. In fact, going to court would likely be the more expensive option.

For the likes of you and me, yes. But that's because we would expect to be paying costs. But that will only work for "amateur" criminals, whereas for any hard core crims (the sort that never pay their fines or respond to bail) why wouldn't they elect for a day in court? If they have no legitimate income or assets, then the costs will never get recovered, and there's always a chance, no matter how remote, that their legal aid funded defence will get them off. Quite logical for those people to elect for a court appearance.

A bit like long term convicts appealing their conviction when they know there's no chance of success: For them it breaks the monotony of clink, and costs nothing.

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Ledswinger
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Re: What about the consequences of admitting guilt?

I don't think it does your insurability any good to do so....Sounds like there would be more reason to appeal and refuse the "one-click convict" system being proposed here.

I don't like this proposal because I don't trust the British government (of any political colour) as far as I could throw the fat, talent free fuckers, and therefore expect this to be extended far beyond the original scope at their whim......But, but, but, the negative impact on employability and insurance will be no different to either pleading guilty in court, or pleading not guilty in court and subsequently being found guilty, so I'm not sure that your rationale is terribly strong.

As currently proposed (and as others have noted) this is no different to the machine justice of red light, speeding and bus lane cameras (which can affect insurance and ultimately employability). The costs of running even a volunteer magistrate's court are considerable, and if we can get some of those caught red-handed to 'fess up and pay up online, that might be a good thing. Until government abuse the scheme....

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Streetmap loses appeal against Google Maps dominance judgement

Ledswinger
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Has everyone forgotten? - Google maps do THREE - FRICKEN - D !

Yes. And now you've reminded us, we can all forget again.

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Virtual monopoly on UK cell towers and TV masts up for sale

Ledswinger
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Boffin

Re: "The truth is that the strong British Pound..."

The pound is doing rubbish against the US dollar,.....

That depends on your definition of "rubbish". As we are a country with a massive trade and balance of payments deficit, the devaluation of sterling should be welcomed. Obviously that makes imports more expensive, but equally it makes our exports more competitive, and gives domestic industry a relative advantage in the home market. We'll all see the effect of this in price inflation over the next year, but that's a sad necessity of our prior enthusiasm for buying foreign goods on tick, and exporting jobs en masse through offshoring.

In fact, everybody's responsible for a piece of the action that necessitated the devaluation - government for spending more than it taxed, and borrowing the rest from furreigners; the commercial sector for exporting jobs, reckless borrowing and lending; And individuals, happily running up debt to buy foreign trinkets.

if you prefer your alt-facts, then the pound is doing just great

It most certainly is. I don't mind that Audi buyers are having to pay 20% more, or holidaymakers to Disneyland Florida having to forego a few rides and a couple of excursions - sterling never merited the previous exchange rate whilst the behaviours described above were going on. The adjustment isn't comfortable, but it is a good thing.

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Intel's Atom C2000 chips are bricking products – and it's not just Cisco hit

Ledswinger
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Re: MTBF?

Beyond a certain point you know you are going to have regular failures.

But that's true of most components, and for those running really big networks this should (yeah, right) not be a problem since they ought to expect individual devices to go "phut" without destroying the entire network.

Think HDDs or SSDs in a DC as the best example, but it's true for the majority of components: If you've got enough, they'll always be some failing. The trick is to have failover systems, sufficient analytics to know what's gone down, and the logistics to replace the failed devices. In this case there's an apparent risk of a spiking failure rate, but knowing that any sane DC or cloud provider would initiate proactive replacement before failure of some of the devices, so as to spread the replacement workload.

If there's only a few then just replacing all of them makes sense, but if you've got thousands, and your maintenance workload is stable, then spreading that peak makes more sense than panicking to get every one changed this week.

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Chinese pirates are facing lifelong 'social credit' downgrade

Ledswinger
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Re: Mixed bag of emotions right now

On the one hand, obviously it is a good thing that China be cracking down on all the fake Vuitton and the rest, no denying that.

Why is that obviously a good thing? Nobody buying the fakes would pay for the real thing, nobody with the money for the real thing will buy the fakes. Whilst the brand owners will deny it, I suspect that fakes are actually a marvellous form of marketing, spreading the idea that the brand is aspirational, desirable, and worth copying. And as some buyers get older and wealthier, they'll stop buying rip offs and gravitate to genuine products. Conversely, if the hoi-polloi are conditioned that they can't have those brands, they'll grow up like me: Totally indifferent to those brands, to advertising, and joyously ignorant of what the brand owners want people to be buying this season.

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New SMB bug: How to crash Windows system with a 'link of death'

Ledswinger
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Re: If it compiles, ship it

you cant sue them"....Except where it fails on the ground of statute law

You could in theory sue them, yes. But under UK rules that lawyers have to abide by, they'll want proof that you can pay your own and Microsoft's costs if you lose. In the putative case of Syntax vs Microsoft, no lawyer would be allowed to take the case unless you're a billionaire. Nobody would even take the case on through a no-win, no-fee basis, because you or they would still be exposed to Microsoft's costs if you lost. The only way that statute law can be used in civil cases against Microsoft are:

a) Small claims they can't be arsed to defend, for perhaps a couple of hundred notes

b) Where the state takes a civil case against Microsoft

c) Where a third party litigation funder will finance the case (and take most of any settlement)

And there are companies that exist solely as litigation funders. But they are an extension of the patent trolling industry. You only go to these people when you've got a bullet proof, high value case yet nobody else will touch it. And even then, you still need to find a law firm with the competence to take on the legal A-listers that big companies will happily pay for. Sadly, you and I have little or no redress against big companies if they want to take a stand.

Note for US readers: In the UK, in a civil law case, the losing party usually has to pay the winning party's legal costs. That normally works much better than the US "each to pay their own" system, in that it discourages risky or frivolous cases, but it does mean that your lawyer has to believe (or in high value cases, have proof) you can cover the costs of both sides before a lawyer will take the case.

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Chinese hackers switch tactics for spying on Russian jet makers

Ledswinger
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Re: similar looking aircraft

The appeal of stealing details of the F-35 is that it will make it possible to screw not only its flight & fighting systems but also its logistics & maintenance systems.

The evidence is pretty clear that Lockheed Martin are doing a sterling job of screwing the flight, fighting, logistics and maintenance systems on their own, without any Chinese help.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Look on the bright side

And they might actually work. Once you re-solder all of the joints, at least

I doubt the cheap Chinese F35s would have that problem, because the Chinese probably haven't copied the idiot Europeans and banned lead in solder.

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Ledswinger
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Re: That is worrying...

These ain't the times of cruisers-with-steam-boilers any more. I don't understand why the chinese don't get this.

I do. In any state sponsored espionage, it's a combination of fuckwit nationalist politicians, military jar-heads, and spooks who don't get out enough who come up with the idea of stealing other people's designs and then making a variant on them.

If they stopped and asked proper, qualified engineers who knew about designing shit and making it work, and then actually producing it, and maintaining it, they'd be told that stealing other people's designs was a shit-headed scheme. But in China (and Russia back in the day) not only do the engineers and manufacturers only find out after the event, they're also in grave personal danger if they then say "Don't be bloody stupid, we don't have half the skills or materials to make this fucker!".

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Ledswinger
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Re: Look on the bright side

We could save a huge pile of cash by buying F35s from China.

Won't help the UK: You don't think they'd be daft enough to copy and build the B variant do you?

If they stole the B designs, it would only be by mistake, or to laugh at them.

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Ledswinger
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Re: An impressive list

China, like Russia, will continue to be treated with the utmost caution so as to not push them too far.

I think both the US and the Russkies have hardly treated each other with caution, and if anything the US have been particularly aggressive, eg meddling in Ukrainian politics to the point of provoking the Russian invasion, moving tanks 5,000 miles round the globe to park on the Poland/Russia border, flying military aircraft right along the boundary of Russian airspace, etc. I'm under no illusions about the Russian provocations and interventions, and China's outlandish territorial claims to the South China Sea are a provocation of enormous magnitude.

Seems to me that there's no caution at all, just an expectation by the major powers that they can do roughly what they want so long as they don't directly attack another major power with military force. OTOH it is absolutely fine for the major powers to invade any non-nuclear armed country they choose - which seems to be an approach that (in the modern age) the US are cheerleaders for (aided and abetted by Britain?).

Of course, all of this is bad news for nuclear non-proliferation, because the obvious lesson is that you don't get invaded if you've got the big stick. Why end up like Saddam or Gadaffi, when you can build your own talisman to protect against invasion? Despite the claims about WMD, it is obvious to a two year old that nobody would have attacked Iraq if they actually believed that the country had a working WMD arsenal, since it would undoubtedly have been used.

Back to espionage: Does it matter? No. The big guys still aren't going to fight each other, and the US and Russians will be just as keen to steal any Chinese technology when the opportunity exists.

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Ledswinger
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Re: similar looking aircraft

Thanks to the laws of aerodynamics and materials science, there are only so many ways you can lay out an aircraft performing any given role.

Up to a point, but there's a question of HOW similar the Chinese version is. Rafale, Gripen, Typhoon are all somewhat similar designs, but I don't think I'd conclude that they were the product of espionage, whereas some aircraft designs are so similar that you have to conclude that they are copies.

Mind you, when it comes to keeping up with the military Joneses, the Chinese have a long way to go before they overshadow my favourite modern aircraft, the Iranian Q313 "stealth fighter"......

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Mars isn't the garbage wasteworld you think it is: Swirling polar ice cap photographed

Ledswinger
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Deteriorating cognitive function?

That's a worry. I suggest the initial space explorers are politicians. Being universally dim they've got less far to fall. And being universally narcissistic they'll do anything to get their faces in front of a TV camera. Computers can do all the difficult stuff, so it won't matter that we're sending people not clever enough to complete an expenses form honestly, and who believe that smart meters, Hinkley Point C, or HS2 are all good investments.

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Thought your data was safe outside America after the Microsoft ruling? Think again

Ledswinger
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Re: America's increasing isolation

A few cases brought under GDPR once it comes into force and they'll give more than two hoots. They'll give some substantial fines.

I can't see that myself. I think you'll find there's plenty of cop outs in the name of security and the war on paedodruggyterroristfurreigners. And even if Germany (in particular) don't like it, are the German government really going to say "boo" to America? I think not. Particularly when they're busy hiding behind the NATO shield, whilst spending proportionately far less on defence than the US, UK or Poland.

The Mighty Orange is of course wound up about that issue of European freeloaders, so there will be pressure....but even so, any European government will eventually pony up its citizens data if asked, although I doubt that the Yanks will even bother to do that.

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HPE raises 'at risk' flag over hundreds of Brit services techies

Ledswinger
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If you chart the progression, presumably it is possible to forecast a date when EDS/HP/E/CSC will cease to have any local employees in the markets it purports to serve. A few useless obscenely overpaid fatcat C-suite types back in the Land of the Not-so-free-anymore, maybe a token greasy salesman in the territory, and everything else subcontracted to zero hours providers (like Manpower in the UK), or offshored to the cheapest crappest location they can find in the third world. I believe IBM have actually articulated this as a formal strategy for their enterprise services activities.

You can understand that through their own greed and stupidity the client companies got conned into an outsource deal, but given the truly shite service that then gets provided, you have to wonder why any of these clients put up with the exorbitant and ever rising cost of outsourcing and the deteriorating service. I can only assume that they tolerate it because the PHBs can't bear to admit they were wrong, and because bring IT (or BPO) back in house is hard work that is beyond the meagre talents of those companies who chose to throw themselves on the mercy of the likes of HPE.

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Motivational speaker in the slammer after HPE applies for court order

Ledswinger
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Re: Classic sociopath

Connect on Linkedin? Bah. That's so passé.

Indeed. But well worth looking to see whether anybody you personally know has been daft enough to "connect" with him. If you do know anybody like that, it'll be fun to ask why they're connected to a convicted criminal under further investigation for a multi-million pound fraud.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Classic sociopath

Take a look at his list of 'achievements' on his site. I wonder how many of them are fabrications - petersage.com/about/

That all needs to be updated, with words like "Peter Sage is now a member of a select community of multi-million dollar international criminals" and "Achievements recognised and rewarded by the UK's High Court". And maybe he can add some photographs of himself in the slammer. And report that due to massive demand for his time, he only has the most limited availability for the next nine months, and probably a lot longer. Also, he needs to update the contact details as well for Wormwood Scrubs.

But I see that he invites people to connect on Facebook - anybody care to try it, and post details of his unfortunate lack of availability? Maybe connect on LinkedIn, where 500+ unwise mugs are now touting their connection and endorsements for a convict:

https://www.linkedin.com/in/petersage

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Ofcom splashed 11% more cash on legal costs with £4.9m war chest

Ledswinger
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£4.9m doesn't go far

Competition and regulation law are two of the highest priced specialisms in the legal world - for a competition partner from a City law firm you'd be looking at something of the order of £750 an hour.

So either they aren't using much legal advice (and by implication aren't upsetting the industry enough), or they are using cheapskate lawyers who the big companies; lawyers will run rings round. Either way it explains why consumers might think Ofcom to be a waste of space.

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Brexit White Paper published: Broad strokes, light on detail

Ledswinger
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What is also needed is a detailed cost benefit analysis

Why? Nobody voted for some tosspot cost benefit analysis.

Of course, nobody would believe any government cost benefit analysis (HS2, HR3, Hinkley Point, etc).

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Ohio bloke accused of torching own home after his pacemaker rats him out to cops

Ledswinger
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Re: "pacemaker that called his alibi into question"

* Other lie revealing devices are available.

The future looks bleak (although for Americans, the future is indeed orange).

If my various white lies about why I was late, how much I enjoyed my wife's cooking, how I was or wasn't doing some specific thing, how I forgot event "X" are all to be revealed, then its time for me to become a cave dwelling hermit in Nepal.

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HMS Queen Elizabeth is delayed, Ministry of Defence confesses

Ledswinger
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Re: Flying the flag

I thought the reason (or one of them) was quite well known; surface ships are often used for "flying the flag" in other parts of the world.

Well maybe that's the thing to fix. Waving firearms at the natives hasn't worked very well for quite a few years now, not to mention the benefit of sticking an aircraft carrier into (say) Singapore's harbour is less than tangible. A policy from the days of empire has now been institutionalised as idiot thinking about flying the flag, and in turn gifted us a couple of vastly expensive, crippled naval assets that will be of no use in projecting a positive image abroad.

From the point of view of non-sabre-waving international relations, Queenie and the royal yacht used to do a magnificent job before that ghastly, republican twat Blair had it decommissioned without replacement.

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Ledswinger
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This proved so difficult that eventually the contractor had paid all the penalties and the incentive to do any more was gone.

Was that requirement essential?

If it was, the MoD screwed up (yet again) by capping the penalties too low. There are always categories of criteria ranging from essential through important, desirable, down to "nice to have". Anything essential should have had a penalty equal to the contract value. If the contractor doesn't meet the essentials, they eventually give you a substandard product for free. If the contractor says "we're not signing that!", then redraw it to their satisfaction, but with a new final clause that confirms they're requesting a formal "non-preferred bidder" status in the next really big value equipment auction.

Its always the same snout in the trough bunglers bidding for defence contracts - they'll come round rather than be blackballed.

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Ledswinger
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before they get pushed off to let the F-35 do the same.

Trump's moved ahead on many of his far more controversial promises. Why does anybody think that F35B is going to continue? USMC can be mollified by giving them some other toys, like more troops or ships, and then the only people who want the F35B are the sad-sacks of Whitehall who dreamt up the idea of building two enormous carriers without catapults.

BAES would of course love that outcome, because they then get to charge another $2bn for sticking on EMALS or retrofitting some botched boiler plus steam catapult arrangement. Plenty of opportunity for more procurement bungling by MoD both with the catapults, and with the revised contract to buy F35Cs (because there's no way they'd take the more sensible F18 option). Or worse still, they'll ask BAES to re-engineer the unwanted Tranche 1 Typhoons for carrier operations, which will give the RN an even less suitable aircraft, with an excess of interceptor performance, low suitability for low level and strike duties, and all the challenges of making the airframe capable of catapult launch.

So there's my bet: The worst and most expensive of all possible outcomes - retrofit steam boilers and catapults on the carriers, and mis-use of unsuitable aircraft designed for totally different purposes..

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MEEELLIONs of Brits stick with current broadband provider rather than risk no Netflix

Ledswinger
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Re: I hope

allowed for all the Virgin Media cable users who could save money by going to ADSL. This may save money, but can't match the performance.

But given Virginmedia's persistent and aggressive price hiking, and deteriorating reliability, I would not advise people to join, and I've got to the point where I'm shortly to tell VM to sling their hook. Also worth noting that Virginmedia upload speed is crap, whereas if you're on a premium ADSL package (and the line delivers) you'll have upload speeds 2 or 3x as fast as VM.

IMHO very few users will see the difference between a good ADSL package and VM's supposed superior speed. They will however benefit from Virginmedia's patchy reliability, and legendarily poor customer service.

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Ransomware killed 70% of Washington DC CCTV ahead of inauguration

Ledswinger
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what would of happened if they tried this in London ?

About the same:

Pointless video spying on the public gets interrupted,

Howls of outrage from bureaucrats and the Stasi,

World keeps turning, public oblivious.

The only real difference would be the fact that there's something of the order of 400,000 CCTV cameras in London, so interrupting their recording for a few days would save several petabytes of pointless data being committed to disk or tape.

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Facebook ad biz comes under scrutiny in MPs ‘Fake News’ probe

Ledswinger
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Re: It's all fake anyway - The picture

you'll hear about real hacks putting together made-up "special investigations" for years. Sad, really.

Why so sad? A few people enjoyed writing them, millions enjoyed reading them, and (back in those days, at any rate) they were chip wrappers within a couple of days. Nobody really gave too much of a toss about pot boiler stories. The only reason this is news is because the elite are trying to fnd a reason why nobody believe their side of the story anymore.

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