* Posts by Ledswinger

5211 posts • joined 1 Jun 2012

Cheap, flimsy, breakable and replaceable – yup, Ikea, you'll be right at home in the IoT world

Ledswinger
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Re: London part of France?

Apparently, if you go by the headcount of

I'd guess it's probably Turkey's third largest city on that basis, Nigeria's fourth, Pakistan's fifth, Ireland's largest, and so forth.

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Dishwasher has directory traversal bug

Ledswinger
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Terminator

Re: Non-obsolescence

I bought my Miele dishwasher, washer, and dryer 17 years ago. They work great and never waste time on the Internet.

Hah! Your next one will be busy cruising the IoT web and downloading machine-porn instead of working.

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iPhone-havers think they're safe. But they're not

Ledswinger
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Black Helicopters

Re: Security through obscurity

Works well from me on Windows Phone!

So you think. There's certainly a "not rich enough to care about them" branch of Windows phone customers (not suggesting you're one of them, of course), but I suspect Windows phone is actually a high value target because there's a small but worthwhile number of corporates who have "Windows phones only" policies. If you can get through the phone OS, there's a good chance you can get email and network login credentials, and then the corporate network is yours.

And the sort of people who would be doing that - well, they're state sponsored actors, and they'd only leave a footprint if they wanted to. So you don't have any security through obscurity, but you do have a much better quality of hacker.

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UK digital minister Matt Hancock praises 'crucial role' of encryption

Ledswinger
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Re: I think they genuinely don't see the problem.

I suppose PPEs from Oxford have a magical thinking module.

PPE is the degree course for posh fuckwits. They can't think for themselves at all.

I wonder if we'd do better with Parliament chosen by random ballot, as a form of compulsory national service? At least the various skills sets and opinions of society would represented far better than the current system or rich tossers and career politicians with no expertise in anything.

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Toshiba's nuclear power plant business runs out of steam

Ledswinger
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Surely they should flog the nuclear business instead?

Nobody will buy it until they've rinsed away the liabilities through Chapter 11. Even then, there's a risk that other things come out of the woodwork on future contracts - would you risk your money?

Internationally, Areva have to all intents and purposed gone bust and been nationalised because of cost over-run problems on EPR, so it isn't a US or Westinghouse specific problem. And there's a further downside that those liabilities don't disappear just because Chapter 11 moves them off of Westinghouse - they simply have to be covered by utilities, insurers or taxpayers.

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Sources: Misco SOLD to Hilco Capital, care home for the distressed

Ledswinger
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More asset stripping. It's the modern way.

It's the sensible way. Misco UK accounts show a company with net assets of £25m made of largely of cash or cash-convertible assets but the company has been burning through its balance sheet for several years now, with no obvious sign of recovery. So the current owners gave it a go, it didn't work out, they're hoping to get out before there's nowt left.

Hilco hope that by nailing together the dog-eared Misco business with the equally dog-eared Staples business they'll be able to crop off a few loss making bits and then have something magically profitable that they can resell to some complete mug. This is akin to taking two mongrels, docking their tails, then breeding them and hoping for the offspring to be a pedigree labrador. Then again, it isn't our money on the line - until the taxpayer has to bail out any unpaid employee liabilities, like we did with Comet.

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Ever visited a land now under Islamic State rule? And you want to see America? Hand over that Facebook, Twitter, pal

Ledswinger
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Saudi Arabia is getting free passes all the time.

That's because it's a decent law abiding state with good democratic values, respect for women and minority religions, and hasn't been a source of either infamous terrorists or funding for IS.

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UK.gov confirms it won't be buying V-22 Ospreys for new aircraft carriers

Ledswinger
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Re: Jumbo Harrier

Couldn't they just make a really big Harrier? Just double everything up

Would be a complete new design, but the F35B is only about four feet longer than a Harrier, and about six feet wider across wing tips. It could certainly be done without doubling the size. As for speed, before the Harrier, Hawkers designed the P1154, which was a supersonic VTOL aircraft. It was cancelled by the great British traitor, Harold Wilson in November 1964, and shortly after that we had to buy F4 Phantoms to provide the required strike capability.

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Amazon dodges $1.5bn US tax bill: It's OK to run sales through Europe out of IRS reach – court

Ledswinger
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Re: parts of its technology and the trademark

One contra-intuitive solution is to abolish Corporation tax. Also abolish fines and lawsuits against corporations.

A nice, and rather purist idea that I like. I fear there are three reasons that won't work:

1) Most shares are owned by other corporations, banks, insurers etc. Follow through to the beneficial human owners and the majority of personal ownership that you'd tax on would be the world's richest people. That will mean some huge swings in which countries get to keep the tax income, meaning a windfall for places like Switzerland and Bermuda, and loss of tax income for countries where the corporation tax arises now.

2) Even if you say "let the beneficial owner be taxed in the country of incorporation of the dividend payer" that wouldn't be feasible because of the complexity of international and inter-company shareholdings. If you own shares in Aviva here in the UK, they own direct and indirect shareholdings in every country in the world where assets can be formally traded. Consider how would the Bolivians get you to pay personal tax on your share of a dividend paid by a Bolivian mining JV, 50% owned by an Mexican mining company, where the Australian Macquarie group have a 5% stake in the Mexican company, and Aviva happen to have a 2% shareholding in Macquarie as part of a global portfolio allocation out of (making all this up) their Singapore office's emerging markets fund?

3) And the main thing: Governments will never let it happen. The rich and powerful, and fat cat corporations made up of the same people will never allow changes to a system so weak and easily gamed. Will Trump really go after tax dodging corporations, when he's running the White House with family members like the best third world despots, and his cabinet is dripping with billionaires? And sadly, he's the only person with the bloody minded drive to actually do anything - the EU and the remaining Anglophone world are timid and ineffectual when it comes to corporate tax reform.

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Lloyds Banking Group to hang up on call centre staffers

Ledswinger
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Re: Dear Lloyds Bank

so I am currently researching where I will out-source my banking requirements to

All the commercial banks do it. Even, I regret to say, Nationwide Building Society are enthusiastic outsourcers. If you want a bank account with somebody who just might not have outsourced and offhored operations, I suspect the list is very short. Ignoring Nationwide (who have gone all "fat cat City slicker bastards"), the only mutual I could see offering a current account was Cumberland BS.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Welcome LBG staff.....

In essence, it means the contract with the old employer is deemed to be the contract of the new one - starting date included.

Outsourcing firms are past masters at the art of ensuring that employee rights get reduced over time. TUPE is only worth the paper it is written on if you;re dealing with a decent and honourable firm. If you ever find a company that fits that description, let me know.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Outsourcing to India? What could possibly go wrong!?

Sadly, the ITO and BPO companies have very slick sales operations. The decision makers at LBG will have been flown somewhere nice, wined and dined, introduced to young, intelligent, good looking, well qualified IBM employees, and the talk will have been on continuous improvement, and the opportunity that IBM offer to combine big cost cuts and miraculously offer better service along with contributing to improving and refining LBG's processes. It's a partnership after all!

Then as soon as the blood is dry on the contract, the sales team and the pretty employees disappear, and LBG's work is shipped out to some rat infested barn in Bangalore, where dissatisfied wage slaves are pressured to do the job as quickly as possible. And all that continuous improvement and quality talk turns out to be rat-shit on the floor of the barn, but by then its too late. And then, a couple of years later, IBM start to squeeze LBG's balls by charging through the nose for all the variations, change and "non-standard" orders.

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London councils seek assurance over Capita's India offshoring plans

Ledswinger
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Re: Government policy?

while exporting such money as we do make to outsourcers

Whilst having a very strong emotional sympathy with the argument you make, it is worth noting that by all credible indicators we have as near full employment as we can probably get (4.7%, ONS using ILO rules), and we will need additional labour to do the rising number of jobs in health and social care, the construction of new schools, homes, hospitals, commercials for our rising population, the incremental labour to clear the 5m homes backlog in the UK (I recently did the sums in my professional capacity, that's what the data shows), then there's big infrastructure plans like Heathrow R3, the circa 11 nuclear reactors BEIS want, HS2, HS3, Crossrail 2, Thames Tideway, billions in water, sewerage, electricity grid programmes, the future roads programme, continued build out of renewable power, the need to restore reserve capacity in electricity generating, and that's without touching other government dreams like the decarbonisation of heat and transport, or the retrofit of insulation and microgeneration across the bulk of the country's 20+m homes.

Then there's "industrial strategy". If government deliver even some of that there will be a degree of pull back from three decades of government policies that have actively encouraged the offshoring of manufacturing. That means more factories, more factory workers, more logistics and supply chain jobs, more energy and transport needs.

You rightly identify the severe economic challenge of offshoring (that we're importing too many goods and services and our balance of payments can't support that), there's also the challenge that an ageing population will be somewhat less suitable for the manual and skilled labour tasks described above, but all the above will require white collar and tech supporting jobs. If idiot companies and idiot public sector bodies allow jobs to be offshored, they'll get the standards of service associated with offshore delivery, but I can't help believing that offshoring is a fairly modest problem in the white collar sector.

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Coppers 'persistently' breach data protection laws with police tech

Ledswinger
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Re: @Solarflare

Sometimes I wonder why I bother to post factually correct information with informed, reasoned argument.

Worried about a few downvotes? Don't be. No matter how well informed and argued you are, there will be people who disagree without any supporting evidence (and people who disagree with supporting evidence).

In this case I think the gist of your post is (beyond your factual contribution) implying that full police officers are less likely to abuse the systems at their control than civilian colleagues. I think I've seen enough reported evidence of poor conduct in a whole range of situations by the police to reasonably believe that police officers aren't any more law abiding than any reasonable sample of the same socio-economic groups outside the police force, and I would similarly believe the same would apply to their civilian colleagues.

And no, I didn't downvote you.

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Calling your redundancy programme Baccarat? Immense Bummer, Management

Ledswinger
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Re: They called it Baccarat...

"Yes Sir, I can boogie..."

This'll make you feel yer age: The birds in Baccara are now sixty five. I can remember thinking "phwoaarrr" about them.

Anyway, can I offer you a Werther's Original?

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Ledswinger
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Re: And this ladies and gentlemen

I won't be recommending IT as a career to my kids

Speaking for myself, I shall never knowingly buy from, recommend, or assist any part of the vile, miserable business that is IBM. Given that they do little or nothing consumer facing the happy choice to boycott them rarely arises as an individual, but in a business context I make sure in any discussion of ITO or BPO, or even when talking about Watson and AI, I always make sure the shameful track record of IBM comes up in conversation, along with their poor corporate performance, and malignant addiction to offshoring.

Makes you wonder what they stand for these days, but at least we know what the letters stand for: Indian Business Machinations. And the unofficial motto: Nobody ever didn't get sacked for joining IBM.

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What should password managers not do? Leak your passwords? What a great idea, LastPass

Ledswinger
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Re: Local storage for passwords

is there anything wrong about the browser (Chrome) autofill method for low priority passwords (e.g. for the comment section of ElReg)?

That depends. It is less secure than not using autofill. Individually, does that matter, eg if your ElReg account was hacked, used to post spam or offensive comments, and got deleted? You might have to become SchultTheSecond, round these parts. As a one off, that's modestly inconvenient, but if you either reuse a common password, or a guessable config of a root-plus-site-related, then any other sites may be compromised - although an effective browser autofill hack could (like this) expose all of your saved logins anyway.

Curiously enough, I suspect that us pseudonymous types can cope with most of that, yet I think that any "proper" social media account is much more of a problem. Sure, nobody pays cash for Facebook or LinkedIn, but the damage that could be inflicted to your reputation by a hijacking, or the inconvenience of losing access to aggregated time-series content could be more costly.

As a general rule then, the logical approach would be that if the account is publicly associated with you and links to any form of network of your contacts, then don't use autofill. But I'm not taking my own advice.....

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Now UK bans carry-on lappies, phones, slabs on flights from six nations amid bomb fears

Ledswinger
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Re: non-public?

The carry-on is x-rayed, I've seen video screen, and I can easily tell what would not be authentic

I don't believe you'd be able to tell the deadly from the mundane with any reliability, and I've even less confidence that the minimum wage luggage screeners would, when they've spent hour after hour looking at the same x-rays of hold baggage.

In context, the amusing thing here is the assumption that terror threats would only ever be put on board in these destinations. Certainly these countries are unstable, and some have history on this, but announcing a ban? WTF?

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Huawei's P10 breathing on Samsung's shoulder

Ledswinger
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I've got flatulence. In both our cases I think we're a little off topic.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Whad I wanna know

Why isn't it dual SIM?

Probably is for markets where that's a common requirement. Here in the UK the mobile networks business model is split between being a carrier and offering lease purchase of handsets, so they're in no hurry to encourage you to use another MNO's sim.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Replacing the battery

Probably because 99.99% of customers don't care. It is not the issue it used to be.

It is broadly speaking the same issue it always was, but 99.99% of customers appear to treat a phone as a very short life product, almost disposable. Even for £500 handsets, because all they see is a monthly charge equivalent to a few high street coffees.

But as phones follow PCs, and the reason to upgrade disappears for most people, it will be interesting to see if people start to mind the fact that replacing a sealed in battery is a tedious process..

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Beijing deploys facial scanners to counter public toilet abuse

Ledswinger
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Re: six squares ?

"I think mine was under the impression that if she collected enough tokens, she could claim a free puppy."

All that kitten soft, and puppy soft advertising around bog roll, its a bit of a puzzle, isn't it? How do they know what "kitten soft" feels like round the back? Whilst I wouldn't put it past the marketing people to actually try it, I'd have thought there's a slight problem of claws and teeth (and growling and yowling as they get wiped upon would probably be offputting). In fact, I'd imagine that using Izal is pretty similar to try to wipe your arse on a furry animal - shit everywhere and a badly bitten and scratched arse, along with a bowl full of soiled wiping material that won't flush away.

I suppose at least the Izal isn't going to make a break for freedom, and run off rubbing its payload all over the house. And you probably won't find the RSPCA prosecuting you for using Izal.

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Ledswinger
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Re: six squares ?

Guess i'll have to stand in line twice then...

What will you present to the face-scanner, second time around?

And even that works, you're up to a miserly twelve squares of communist loo roll. I think the Chinese authorities shouldn't be looking to expensive and fallible technology, but should take a hint from UK local authorities, who for many years avoided the problem by only offering Medicated Izal* that nobody would steal.

* For any international readers who may not have encountered it, Izal was (maybe still is) a quite unique product, wholly unsuitable for its supposed purpose, managing to combine contradictory properties of being both slippery and abrasive. As comfortable to use as sandpaper, and as effective at wiping as non-stick baking parchment.

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Cisco reports bug disclosed in WikiLeaks' Vault 7 CIA dump

Ledswinger
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Re: Oh gosh wow

I'm sure Cisco is shocked,

Looking for the bright side, I presume the vulnerability doesn't work above 2,000m.

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Uber president quits, says company's values inconsistent with his own leadership style

Ledswinger
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Re: wait...what?

A marketing bod with a conscience?

I doubt it. Whilst the known extent of the problems has progressively come out, the battle against its own drivers and against regulators has been an ongoing war, and it looks to me that Jones only joined in September 2016.

I'm afraid I think that the man has worked out that things are going to get worse not better, that he'll be in the hot seat, and the only way to minimise the stain on his CV is to publicly turn against his own company For a regular employee at Uber, yes, you can leave as a matter of principle. But as "president" of Uber, he is the only one who cannot say "it was their fault".

He was earning almost $8m at Target, I'd assume Uber were offering a lot more, what his decision is saying is that he isn't up to the task of fixing the company. Great appointment, guys!

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US military's latest toy set: Record-breaking laser death star, er, truck

Ledswinger
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Re: OMFG this is an astonishing story.

LM spends own money on new weapons tech.

Only to proof of concept level. All they wish to do is persuade the sand-brains of the Pentagon that this is worth backing, and there's billions of dollars to do research for decades. Keep on about the promise, sweep all show-stoppers and shortcomings under the carpet, and the R&D becomes a huge earner in its own right. Matters not whether they ever make a single production unit.

So not at all astonishing, just good commercial sense by LM, "Toymakers to the Pentagon"

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Ledswinger
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Re: Just 2 mile range?

I wonder how long a 60 kw, presumably IR laser needs to dwell on the target to melt thru.

Depends on your assumptions. Some fag packet maths suggest that 0.1 kWh would be enough to melt 250g of titanium, which is probably a reasonable guess for the energy that might disable a missile that has no anti-laser protection (or so the military hope). A 60 kW laser would deliver that in about six seconds, assuming minimal diffraction or attenuation. Allow a small amount for both, and you might say eight seconds. A relatively slow missile travelling at 1,400 mph would travel 3.1 miles in that time. A Russian R37 missile is believed to reach mach 6, and in eight seconds would travel about ten miles.

Perhaps the interesting thing is that those numbers suggest that hardening a missile against the laser (when attacking the laser itself) is pretty easy - all you need to do is add an ablative coating, sufficient sacrificial mass, or a briefly effective reflective coating to give the missile the extra time to close on the target. In terms of that sacrificial mass, the R37 weighs around 600kg and has a range up to 400km. It would seem to me that trading two and a half kilos of fuel for the same sacrificial mass would have little impact on performance, yet would take the 60kW laser a minute or more to burn through. And that's enough time for an R37 to travel a staggering 75 miles.

If not head on, the maths is more favourable for the laser because you can't put the entire missile in a sacrificial coating but at hypersonic speeds the missile would not be in range for more than a couple of seconds.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Still not seeing this

Only a small amount of heating starts to darken the surface and then it's all over.

Against a slow moving drone that's fine. Against an incoming missile moving at mach 5 the laser won't have much time. The other problem is that this IS an arms race. We can build shielding to enable spacecraft to reentter the earth's atmosphere, so somebody can certainly build a missile with sufficient heat proofing to last for a few seconds, and that simply has to fly down the beam.

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Japan mulls semi-nationalising Tosh (memory biz) – report

Ledswinger
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"Separately, Toshiba is considering selling its disastrous US nuclear power plant operation. "

They'll need to find somebody even dumber than they were when the bought Westinghouse. Selling that may have been the only good thing Gordon Brown ever did.

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National Audit Office: Brit aircraft carrier project is fine and dandy... for now

Ledswinger
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Re: Beg, Steal & Borrow

Isn't the A the non VSTOL one? No cats'n'traps for them.

The A is the land version. The C is the version for proper aircraft carriers, with bigger wings, foldy bits, stronger undercart and cat and trap bits.

The British government couldn't have made a bigger mess of the new aircraft carrier project if the stupid, useless, retarded crooks had tried, even with specialist help from PWC. And the sad thing is that we did have a couple of aircraft carriers with cats, traps and supersonic strike aircraft just shy of fifty years ago.

Is it too late to have a gallows arm fitted to the front end of HMS Queen Elizabeth? And then hang every defence minister of the past half century, every treasury minister (actually, cut our losses, make that every MP), and every one of the tens of thousands of useless fuckers in the MoD. There'd probably be enough guilty people to hang a fresh one every single day of the ship's service life.

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Ledswinger
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we still have "just" a reasonable anti-sub capability this is what the type 23 was designed to do

13 type 23s. Assuming three in refit or repair, one in port for turnaround, ignoring international obligations, that's nine, so that's 855 miles of British coastline each. Can't see them being very effective when they're that thinly spread. And that's inshore, before considering the full extent of waters we might want to use them in.

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Ledswinger
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there are lot's of nations out there with extremely quiet submarines.

If hunting RN ships, they don't need to be quiet, because they won't be heard over the bag of spanners racket from the Type 45s.

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Bloke cuffed after 'You deserve a seizure' GIF tweet gave epileptic a fit

Ledswinger
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Re: What an asshole

Absolutely. Makes you wonder what the world's morons did before the internet came along.

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Brit firm lands £58m EU spy drone 'copter contract

Ledswinger
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"drones will be used on quasi-civilian ships"

Quick, phone Capita, there's a need for a zero-hours navy.

The only question is, will they provide their own ships? Nope, thought not.

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Spammy Google Home spouts audio ads without warning – now throw yours in the trash

Ledswinger
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Re: Personal Advisor

I do not have a Goofy account,

They don't need that. Your identity can be uniquely tracked by PC configuration data that your browser will supply, by combinations of cookies, browser history, geolocation, connection data.

You'll have some defence if using Ghostery, Ublock or other script and cookie blockers, or using one of the "privacy-first" browsers. OTOH if you're using Chrome or a Microsoft browser.....

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Google borks Nexus 6 with screwy over-the-air Android 7.0 downgrade

Ledswinger
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Re: Move along nothing to see

Want Android 7.1 on a Nexus 6? Go with LineagesOS

Still suffering from the Cyanogemod problem, that its great for devs and hardened tinkerers willing to risk bricking their phone, but as clear as mud for the rest of the planet. Depends on what success looks like for LineagesOS, but if those behind it want people to install and use it, they need to attend to three key failings:

1) What the software is and does - Android equivalence, fit with Google Play and Google apps - this just isn't obvious from the web site, and Wikipedia is better but fairly scant.

2) How to install it - clear simple instructions that an intelligent person can follow.

3) The install process needs to be far easier and more automated, since it appears to be the same convoluted series of additional packages and libraries that need installing. I have played with Cyanogenmod and Android sideloads in the past, and if I'm finding it tedious and problematic, then there's little chance that the masses will be able to use it.

And I've even got suitable handsets kicking around that I could try it on, I'd take the risk, but the whole process is just too clunky, time consuming and in my experience falls over at one step or another. One click install needs to be the ambition for the project, and in 2017 I don't think that's a big ask is it?

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Cybercriminals getting as good as nation state spies – report

Ledswinger
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Re: Yay for free market econmics

...some of the opportunities for making money if rather than predict the future, you actually know what's going to happen.

This type of fraud appears to be entirely legal if you have a banking licence.

Using HFT, you can skim the market time and again, but the manipulation to create the price differentials is never large enough to show up on the regulators' seismometers, which scan for huge and stupid types of market manipulation.

Or you just use the traditional banking moneymaker, of bullying your customers to buy unsuitable products, hoping you won't get caught.

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Ledswinger
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Presumably the targeting of the energy sector is to find out just how much power a company can expect in the future and how reliable that power will be.

As an energy company insider, I can assure you that the biggest secret my company has is that it has no secrets worth stealing - no clever business model, no credible strategy, no IP or technology.

I suppose the foreign hackers might be studying us as a "how not to..." case study.

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UK's National Cyber Security Centre bungles simple Twitter Rickroll

Ledswinger
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Pot meet kettle

Some joker registered a firm with Companies House back at the end of last year with this name:

Err, what name? Oh, I have to click on the link, and the text is redundant, or the link is misplaced.

Now, what were you taking the mickey out of NCSC for?

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Barrister fined after idiot husband slings unencrypted client data onto the internet

Ledswinger
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Re: £1,000 fine

.....and what do these people earn per hour??

Earn, or charge? The hourly charge to you isn't either average or take home pay, as our contracting and zero hours IT bretheren can attest. I'd expect your hourly charge to never be much less than £100 an hour and upwards from that towards £1,000 an hour. But out of that barristers have to pay their supporting clerks, admin, premises costs and the like.

A junior barrister in a provincial city could be earning less than £40k a year before their deductions, and even senior barristers can struggle to push through £100k a year, although it depends greatly on what they are specialised in. On the other hand, those doing top end commercial litigation out of a top flight London office ("Chambers") can exceed £1m a year gross.

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Fire brigade called to free man's bits from titanium ring's grip

Ledswinger
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Re: Titanium?

Balls of steel?

Looking at the linked picture, I'd say no.

I suppose the medics considered using leeches, but then thought the best way of discouraging this was to get the fire brigade in with power tools.

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Van Allen surprise: fewer nasty particles than NASA expected

Ledswinger
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Re: "Houston...we have a problem"

I fear you may fail that test.

You may be right, but in all that talk of euthanasia, I wonder if the OP is genuinely on the edge? A quick look at posting history looks as though the views are becoming more entrenched. And it doesn't look like simple day to day trolling.

I've reported the original post for moderation, not because I have a problem with its content, or that it is wildly off topic, but because I was about to post a mocking response, and then thought that if the OP is losing it, I wouldn't want to be blamed if, well, anything happened. Can't see The Reg doing counselling and support, but yeah, well.

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Headphone batteries flame out mid-flight, ignite new Li-Ion fears

Ledswinger
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Re: But a 14KW Power Wall...

I'm sure some enterprising person will manufacture cheap fakes in his backyard shed for a shitload less money than the real thing

95% of the benefits of the real thing, 5% of the cost.

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Ledswinger
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Re: But a 14KW Power Wall...

Dunno why you were downvoted on that one ledswinger.

No worries, Sir. I've added that to the preceding 5,981 downvotes I have, and I'm looking forward to breaking the 6k barrier soon. But since my cumulative upvotes are pushing 27k, I think the balance is reasonably favourable.

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Ledswinger
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Re: But a 14KW Power Wall...

A power wall doesn't have the same weight constraints as portable gadgets, so more safety features can be incorporated in it.

Given that even NASA's lithium batteries explode, I'd be very surprised by any "magic sauce" claimed by a commercial battery maker working down to a cost. I was at a trade working group a few months back, and the head chemist of a major battery company expressed the view that any high power density storage system is at high risk of unpleasant failure modes. It is also worth bearing in mind that the fault or failure doesn't have to be intrinsic to the battery - if you have a house or car fire, a battery storage device may go up through no fault of its own.

And personally, it isn't the fire from batteries that worry me, it is the combustion fumes, containing all manner of unpleasantness. If you want a Powerwall or any battery storage system, I'd recommend having it somewhere outside the house.

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This week's top token gesture: Google Chrome chokes energy-hungry background tabs

Ledswinger
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Another way to save that energy

Would indeed be if Google stopped serving ads, as they'd certainly save a lot more power than suggested because there wouldn't be a Chrome, Android, or the Google search engine.

Yes, alternatives exist, but clearly the majority of the world would prefer to trade privacy for services. And in many parts of the world, the only way they have access to technology is because of free to use services.

Moot question, but if you (believed) you had privacy, how much would you pay annually to use Google services, or as a device premium?

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National Insurance tax U-turn: Philip Hammond nixes NIC uptick

Ledswinger
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Re: I'm shocked! Shocked, I tell you!

Everyone should be on the look out for a cloven footed man with a goatie attempting to buy ice skates...

Why would Jeremy Corbyn be buying ice skates?

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Sources: Liberty Global, Vodafone take seats at negotiating table AGAIN

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Emotive?

Don't make me laugh. A natural tie up between two companies whose business model is high prices and poor service, albeit with an underlying network assets that are (by sector standards) pretty good largely for historic reasons than thanks to current management.

Sadly there's another common trend that looks set to play out again, and that is corporate shenanigans that invariably add billions of "goodwill" to the balance sheet, and result in ever increasing prices for customers.

Meanwhile OFCOM will be nowhere to be seen when the prices get hiked.

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IBM could have made almost all the voluntary redundancies it needed

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: First World Head Office only

First World Head Office only

Just that, it's the destination of the BPO and ITO shysters.

Because the directors don't intend to take offshore salaries themselves.

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This is where UK's Navy will park its 75,000-ton aircraft carriers

Ledswinger
Silver badge

if I had my choice, they would work on a naval Eurofighter

With no catapult capability on the carriers they still wouldn't be able to use a navalised Typhoon. Added to which, the design concept of the Typhoon was a high agility interceptor fighter using look-down, shoot down weapons, so not very suitable for use as a naval strike fighter, which generally fly lower, and need far greater capability for air to surface weapons (including heavy, long range anti-ship missiles). Then there's the need for larger wings that also fold, new avionics, new stronger landing gear, airframe mods to cope with an arrestor hook, weatherproofing for the corrosive environment etc etc.

It simply doesn't make sense spending five-ten years creating a naval Typhoon - by the time it comes into service the original design will be thirty years old, it would cost a fortune, and still be a compromised design.

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