* Posts by Ledswinger

6453 posts • joined 1 Jun 2012

UK's BT: Ofcom's wholesale superfast broadband price slash will hurt bottom line

Ledswinger
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Re: Whaaat...

Alan Brown: "and a broadband market which is amongst the most competitive in the world despite the challenging topography and low population"

That may be so, but that doesn't make universal high speed broadband economic for all properties. So either the "competitive market" has cross subsidy costs added to everybody's bills, or the uneconomic-to-serve properties have a choice between very expensive broadband, or no broadband. What is the NZ solution to these remote customers?

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Ledswinger
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Re: Bad move

Because aren't Openreach mostly subcontractors anyway?

Technically, Openreach ARE a subcontractor who maintain and operate the network owned by BT Group, although OR are of course owned by BT, just a separate regulatory and legal entity. Openreach in turn use an army of subcontractors themselves.

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He's cheesed it! French flick pirate on the lam to swerve €80m fine, two-year stretch in the clink

Ledswinger
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Re: Running in France

Could it be about an army of almost 340000 who run like no army has ever run before at the first encounter with the enemy.

Come now Lars. Who were your countrymen? What part did they play in the overthrow of tyranny?

Did they put up a token defence and get occupied? Did they haul up the white flag of neutrality?

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Ledswinger
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Re: This:

Those people down voting you would be the first to throw a massive hissy fit if it was THEIR hard work getting stolen

Hold on a mo', sunshine. MOST OF THE PEOPLE who worked on any film just get paid a day or piece rate. They don't keep milking it for a century. Likewise, the people who crafted 99% of your modern lifestyle, eg making toilets, or your house, or your car, they don't get paid every fucking time you use it, and again if you sell it.

All this "stealing from women and orphans" shit that the copyright lobby keep pumping is a load of dishonest shit. The majority of people who benefit from copyright either were not the creative talent involved, or are already rich beyond most people's imaginings.

I'm not advocating a free for all, copyright free world. But let's be clear that the current system enriches the few by the work of quite a few, and the majority of copyright "payers" earn vastly less than than beneficiaries.

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We all hate Word docs and PDFs, but have they ever led you to being hit with 32 indictments?

Ledswinger
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There's a worrying implication

Which is that the bank did (or would normally) accept emailed electronic documents as proof of income or assets. I suppose bankers are the most over-rewarded, least competent trade on earth, but after all we've seen, is it still the case that a few token alterations can create a document that the buggers trust?

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Worldwide smartphone shipments DOWN for first time ever

Ledswinger
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Re: In other news…

Given that they've launched innumerable varieties and sizes of handsets, and all the iTat devices, they might struggle to grow hardware revenues as fast as the market have come to expect. Which means that services income will have to grow.

The obvious thing, given the very low price elasticity of their customers is some carefully crafted gouging of services customers, and a big push to get more customers paying services subscriptions, and the hope that the Homepod will open up new opportunities for selling services. This time last year Apple were reportedly starting to look for exclusive video content, they'll have to up their game, and partner with studios and producers. Amazon (being device agnostic) have it easier here than either Google or Apple, because for a studio, going exclusive with either would exclude roughly half the US market. Google can sell on Apple devices (eg Netflix) if Apple permit them, but relatively few Android buyers will want to pay a premium for (say) AppleFilms (tm).

Over the next two years, I think we'll see Apple still being immensely profitable, but become even more diffuse, and finding new high margin growth increasingly difficult - the outcome of replacing Jobs with a supply chain plodder.

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Lloyds Banking Group to splash £3bn on tech

Ledswinger
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Re: Dear Lloyds

5) Send a memo to all staff stating in plain speaking that you are no longer a bank. You are a technology company that handles banking deposits. The real value isn't in your management chain or board of directors. The real value isn't in your front office staff. The real value is in your IT staff.

This is true for almost all large businesses providing services. So all mobile telcos, ISPs, fixed line telcos, gas suppliers, electricity suppliers, airlines, logistics companies, banks, insurers. And most don't get it, at all. You can see this because so many of these companies are unable to provide any decent customer service, and I'd single out the telecoms sector in particular because they are useless at all matters of voice or electronic communications.

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A game to 'vaccinate' people against fake news? Umm... Fake news

Ledswinger
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Perhaps the public also need to take responsibility for who they vote for?

Unfortunately entrenched voting patterns mean the only change is one bunch of out-of-touch hooray henrys for another. Both have the same lack of competence and honesty, and an addiction to misinformation and obfuscation.

The only real difference is one lot want the economy to be run by their mates, the other bunch want to run the economy themselves.

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Bright idea: Make H when the Sun shines, and H when it doesn't

Ledswinger
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Re: Hydrogen is a terrible

Your logic is absolutely right, but you need a source of fairly concentrated (possibly purified) CO2 so the atmosphere isn't really a suitable source. You could concentrate the atmospheric CO2, but when you factor in all the energy use and losses that's just bloody mad. If instead you're taking (say) a power station exhaust stack as your CO2 source, it doesn't look terribly renewable (even if it has merit).

I have been moving in the field of energy policy for some years, and I can summarise the current EU and government policy direction as "Do renewable stuff. Don't ask us how, we don't have a fucking clue."

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Crunch time: Maplin in talks to sell the business

Ledswinger
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Re: £85M for a failing business?

"I often wonder if the folks who make these kind of decisions have any connection with reality"

Two things were going through their heads. The first was "retailing is easy, the current bozos just haven't got a clue. We'll buy it, streamline it, and clean up". The second was "even if we can't turn it round, there's always a greater mug. We don't need to be profitable - run it for a couple of years, and sell on at a great profit to somebody as a fantastic growth opportunity".

As the current and previous owners have discovered, THEY were the greater mugs, the ones at the back of the queue when strategic thinking was being handed out.

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Ledswinger
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Re: They need fewer people

"Horrible I know but... but if they could get the wage bill down, maybe they could compete with the online giants."

Nope. They have to pay the shop staff the going retail rate or they end up with higher turnover and higher costs. Average salary per the accounts was about £21k per full time equivalent for all employees, so allowing for the professional staff, head office and store managers, the run of the mill shop workers won't be getting much more than about £15-17k. Paying less than that and you won't retain staff, and the costs of recruitment exceed the savings. Not to mention, how little do you think they should be paid?

"I bet there's lots of bricks and mortar value hidden away in Maplin shops for the vultures to feed on."

I very much doubt that - the properties will all be leases. Company cars will be leased. Corporate IT and furniture is worthless on the secondhand market. The brand is worth perhaps a few tens of thousands. Even the stock in the shops is worth only about 20% of the retail sale price.

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Ledswinger
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Don't think there is one - the annual report only references a defined contribution plan, so other than potentially a missed payment when the cash runs out, there won't be a material deficit between the actuarial value of a fund and long term obligations.

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Ledswinger
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Re: margin

'relatively low margins made on the kit' - what??

Low net margins.

Maplin's gross margin (difference between wholesale cost of product and retail price) is quite healthy, as we've all noticed (around 47% for the full year ending March 2017). The operating margin is what matters, and that is after all the staff, lease costs, business rates, utilities, head office and corporate costs like HR, IT, procurement, etc. That operating margin was about 1% of sales in the same year. Now take out the "non-operating" costs like interest payments, and Maplin were making a loss of 2.5% of sales. For any retailer with no real assets, making a loss sucks the life out very quickly.

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Ledswinger
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Re: A great shame, but probably inevitable.

Probably their best bet now is to "store share" as Argos are now doing, moving their Argos stores into Sainsburys etc.

That's not a voluntary or necessary thing. Argos were part of HRG, and were making a credible profit for a high street retailer. Sainsbury's "won" an acquisition battle that cost them 40% more than their first bid, and were doing so in the belief that Argos was merely a couple of order points and a sales desk, which could easily be done by the customer service desk in the Sainsbury's stores.

I think they'll find that they are wrong - one thing Argos were brilliant at was stock control - very high levels of availability, yet not relying on having thousands of items of low turnover stock in each store. Sainsburys of course are famous for the reverse - crap logistics, high prices, poor availability. From the outside, the world of general mechandise looks simple, and flogging a few high margin extras in your supermarket is indeed profitable and easy, but there's a world of difference between being a wide range general merchandise retailer and running a supermarket, where everything revolves around short shelf life groceries and cross subsidies between the stuff people will pay a lot for (like booze, branded goods) and the commodity stuff that's often sold at a loss (milk, bread, etc).

All of this will take a few years to unravel for Sainsburys because at the moment Argos is still largely operationally independent. The real fun will be when Sainsburys try and integrate the IT via their offshore & outsource "partners".

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Ledswinger
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Re: Remnant of the 1980s

My thoughts exactly, like various other dinosaur companies they refused to see change coming

Well, all the investors who've sold Maplin over the past few decades (of which there are several) saw the change coming. Most, I suspect, didn't even intend to disrupt or try adapting - all they hoped was to run the company long enough to find a greater fool willing to buy it. It hasn't been conspicuously successful, but whilst PWC work their evil work, along came Edinburgh Woollen Mill, purveyors of the finest faux-Scottish tat to Japanese and American tourists.

EWM is of course where retail brands go AFTER they've died - Austin Reed, Jaeger, Peacocks, even bits of long forgotten gone-bust outfits like Rosebys and Jane Norman. I'm surprised they didn't snap up BHS, although I suppose they're waiting for Debenhams or House of Fraser to shuffle off their retail coil, or perhaps more in keeping with their previous purchases, Laura Ashley. Maybe they can keep open the Maplin stores in Windsor, Stratford Upon Avon, and Bicester "Shopping Village", and offer VAT free sales to long haul tourists? Get the Chinese manufacturers to screenprint a Union Jack on all the merchandise, and it'll fly off the shelves.

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iPhone X 'slump' is real, whisper supply chain moles

Ledswinger
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Re: Samsung needs to find Android buyers?

Random search found a phone with a rather similar looking screen.

But you got to laugh at the cutoff bar at the bottom!

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Ledswinger
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Re: Samsung margins

that a few months time the S9 would be worth peanuts

So what? Other than burglars and robbers cashing in at BREX*, nobody sells their flash new phone a few months into a pricey contract. For regular owners, after two years, the next shiney is on offer, and they happily take whatever they can get on Ebay, or palm the device off on a family member.

* You know who I mean.

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Ledswinger
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Re: So Someone Learn me....

And given it's Apple, they may well be able to cut the order on a whim. (And Samsung may well be able to do the same to their supplies.)

Well, the buck stops somewhere. Not everybody has the power to say "contract your order, then take or pay!". Samsung might have that muscle, in which case Apple have to pay up. But Samsung's suppliers probably don't and they wouldn't get the moolah - even if Apple had to pay Samsung for ordered and cancelled screens.

They can stop the run when they get to 20E6 rather than 30E6.

That's true, but the price agreed will have been based on a volume number, because so much of the average costs are volume dependent. If production is lower than the estimates, the fixed costs have to be recovered over smaller volumes. If the production volume is the same, but the rate of production is reduced, then the variable costs increase.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Maybe Apple

An interesting test for any Apple product these days is "would Steve Jobs have let this see the light of day?".

Looking at the notched screen, the poo emoji, the $1,000 price tag, and vast proliferation of iPhone models I think I can safely conclude the answer is "no".

This is what happens when you put some spreadsheet-head in the position of being the creative leader of a successful business. Cook should have that poo emoji engraved on his tombstone.

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Capita data centres hit by buttload of outages

Ledswinger
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Re: Capita is "too complex"?

Still I completely agree with Tiggity that all CEO bonuses should be delayed by 5-10 years to ensure some long term thinking.

If all the bonus is delayed for that timescale, then crap managers benefit from remedial actions by competent successors (if any, natch), and at the individual level, chances are that your bonus this year comes from the last job you did, or the one before that. Effectively, that would encourage MORE seagull managers, not less - why work hard, stay in the same job for bloody years, when the rewards are the same for flitting around doing not much, and never staying long enough to take either decisions or flak?

What would be much more effective than managing the bonus structure would be retrospective bonus clawback going back up to ten years. So if Crapita, Carillion or whoever end up in the shit, the Insolvency Service should go back and publicly recover money from those senior managers who ran the business as the problems were built up. Even if they've squirrelled it away or spent it, at least they'd be publicly humiliated, but in most cases they will have extensive pension promises that could be reduced to if they haven't got the cash. If those rules had been in place a decade ago, Fred the Shred and his pocket-picking cronies could have been held partially to account for the mismanagement of RBS, instead of retiring on a million quid a year pension paid for by the bank we all had to bail out.

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KFC: Enemy of waistlines, AI, arteries and logistics software

Ledswinger
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will stop at KFC, that's not a bug it's a feature

Nope, its a bug. I'm quite partial to fast food, and to chicken. But if KFC were the last fast food outlet on earth, I'd still pass up their revolting greasy, horrible offerings. It doesn't help that they also seem to specialise in disinterested staff, and dingy poorly cleaned interiors with all the charm of a municipal toilet. Give me a McD's "chicken legend" anyday.

If my self driving car took me to KFC I'd be demanding my money back.

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Farts away! Plane makes unscheduled stop after man won't stop guffing

Ledswinger
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Re: Reminds me of...

They probably can't work out the right dope tests to catch cheaters. Is there a test for vindaloo?

Top level sport has been a freak and drugs show for decades, and the days of "clean" amateurs excelling through grit and energy are long gone. Even now, there's a very strange prevalence of "therapeutic use exemptions" for many top athletes, and then you've got the state sponsored doping by the Ruskies and probably others. And a whole lot of research into "special diets" that don't fall foul of the tests.

So, personally, I;d take the freaks and drugs show to the next level, by having two parallel Olympics - Clean and Dirty. Dirty would be far more exciting and interesting, where ANY substance is permitted. And bringing this back to farting, the same would apply - vindaloo or chemicals I wouldn't mind - the spectacle and the performance are all that count and any drugs you like are welcome (like competitive cycling, I suppose). This could even lead to exciting new technologies that might trickle down to the amateur sportsmen, like visible farts, and then coloured, visible farts. Wouldn't that be ACE? Being able to crack off a paint-peeling stench in the lift at work, that hung round as thick yellow green miasma. Maybe even some nano-tech that kept the cloud coherent, so that it didn't easily disperse. Or stenches that don't fade away through reactive chemical decay, but linger for hours.

If there were money in my technological, entrepreneurial vision for the future of farting, I'd be as rich as Elon Musk.

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Ledswinger
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Re: The French have a saying ...

Confine the poor old fart to the toilet? He was doing everybody a favour:

https://www.cnet.com/news/how-smelling-farts-could-save-your-life/

If this had been Ryanair, the other passengers would have had a surcharge for health benefits.

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Ledswinger
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Re: even a direct order from the pilot didn't take the wind out of his sails

"You've obviously never decided to cook baked bean and brussels sprout curry..."

Did you ever know that you're my hero,

And everything I would like to be?

I can fart like a cheese-eating beagle,

For you are the wind beneath my wings.

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Ledswinger
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Re: Reminds me of...

This is just the more world championship level version.

Considering some of the garbage that the Olympics include as "sport", you'd have thought that farting would have been included long ago.

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Ledswinger
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One of the side effects of eating some food you are intolerant to like Gluten, Cumin, etc is that you get the flatulence from hell. It is hell in both quantity and hellish smell.

DISCRIMINATION! What about those of us with no known intolerances? About time scientists got off their lazy duffs and produced a "Satan's Breath" potion, able to produce foul flatus reliably, quickly and safely.

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Opportunity knocked? Rover survives Martian winter, may not survive budget cuts

Ledswinger
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Re: Crowdfunding

congress will think "we don't need to fund anything at NASA anymore,

Have a look at the other project funding on the image that is in the article. On this excerpt, seems to me that Mars project funding is actually pretty constant, and somebody has reasonably decided that they will get more than $12m of benefit doing something else. Personally, I'd be surprised if using the same fifteen year old asset would continue to give good returns, and throwing more money at it in future because it was successful and great value in the past is hardly a sensible investment strategy for science, any more than it would be in financial markets.

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When Samsung reveals the S9 at MWC, at least try to act surprised

Ledswinger
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Can I take the battery out?

You already know the answer.

Judging by the various reports, what is being launched contains a few tiny incremental changes on the current model, and the most innovative development is that the model number increments by 12.5%, and the faithful will see enough value in that to fork out.

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US docs show Daimler may have done a Dieselgate – German press claims

Ledswinger
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Re: What about the monkeys?

Not to mention the fact that the same companies are under investigation over allegations of being part of a cartel to fix steel purchase prices.

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If you don't like what IBM is pitching, blame Watson: It's generating sales 'solutions' now

Ledswinger
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Re: It can't be worse than

Queensland health wasn't mostly IBM's fault - it was given a very tough brief that kept changing.

That was why IBM took the job. The shitbag public sector "IT" specialists that keep on being employed, failure after failure all have the same business model. Bid cheap, knowing that you will lose money if the customer sticks to the brief, but also knowing that the brief will change over the life of the contract, and you can then make your obscene margins purely from the variations.

Crapita, Indian Business Machinations, Acunture, Arseos, Dreadful Experience Corporation....you know of whom I speak.

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UK mobile customers face inflation-busting price hike

Ledswinger
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Funny how whenever we have to pay someone else more inline with inflation, RPI is used, but when someone has to pay us it's always CPI.

Well in this case you can thank Ofcom, and their total lack of customer focus. There's other UK regulators who believe it their duty, nay very reason for existence to kick the shit out of the companies they regulate. Ofcom, on the other hand, regard their duty as being to work for the companies they regulate.

There is a technical terms for this, of "regulatory capture".

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Hands up who HASN'T sued Intel over Spectre, Meltdown chip flaws

Ledswinger
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Re: Software next?

"but haven't heard of any class action in the UK, yet ?"

Whilst "group litigation" is permitted in the UK, and is similar to the concept of US class actions, there's some important differences. Firstly, UK civil law custom & practice usually means the losing party have to pay the winner's legal fees. That makes taking on large corporations very risky, because the company will often engage large and very expensive legal advisory teams (and they know this, and act accordingly). Second, the UK limits the success fees that a law firm can charge, meaning that the group's law firm can't load massive fees into a winning contingency arrangement - although no win no fee is permissible, it'll usually only be offered for a sure fire winning case. And third, the actual settlements in UK civil cases are typically much lower than a US court might award.

So overall, a very unfavourable climate for class actions for things of this nature. That does stop frivolous legal action, but equally it makes large companies essentially immune to legal action unless the claim is very high value.

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Kentucky gov: Violent video games, not guns, to blame for Florida school massacre

Ledswinger
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Re: What a load of Trump...

"However if the UK had the same gun controls as the USA we'd probably have just as many mass shootings as the US does."

I doubt that. The US culture is largely to blame. But the UK comparison is only hypothetical.

Compare the US instead to other countries with high levels of gun ownership, such as Switzerland, Finland, Canada, Austria, you find relatively little gun crime.

What's specific to the US is three things: the casualness of gun ownership, the weak and amateurish regulation, and a bizarre tolerance of selling assault rifles to those with no valid reason to own such weapons.

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UK.gov: Psst. Belgium. Buy these Typhoon fighter jets from us, will you?

Ledswinger
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Re: Maxi

I believe Rover remains with Ford and not the Indians

Tata bought JLR and their brands, I take it you mean the Chinese, who now own the remnants of MG?

Because they couldn't buy the Rover brand, SAIC created the brand Roewe (which in Chinese speaking markets is much the same pronunciation), and they still make a variant of the Rover 75, marketed in the UK as the MG 6. Quite a smart looking car (neighbour works at the UK engineering development facility still in Longbridge, so often drives one), but sells in tiny numbers in the UK.

The SAIC cars aren't fully competitive yet with the best European price equivalents, but I'd emphasise the "yet".

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Ledswinger
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That's a bit like the Mini Cooper, isn't it? Version 1 was fully British too. But you can't really compare it to today's version.

Not really. The ACA concept aircraft is clearly very similar to the Typhoon. Whereas to compare Issigonis' brilliant Mini to the revolting, lumpen, lard arse German versions of today, well...... the only relationship is the name on the badge. The Mini Countryman in particular looks like it was originally intended to be the Mini Countrypanzerkampfwagen.

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Astro-boffinry world rocked to its very core: Shock as Andromeda found to be not much bigger than Milky Way

Ledswinger
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Re: If the mass is 800 vs 700...

Wrong. The escape velocity from a given body is sqrt(2GM/r), where M is the mass of the body you are trying to escape from, r is the distance from the centre of mass that you start at, and G is 6.67E-11. Density does not matter.

Tell me about it. I find it impossible to get away when annoying fat colleagues start talking shit to me. Doesn't matter whether they extremely dense, or quite bright but exceptionally annoying, so density is not important. I can also confirm that it is more difficult to achieve escape velocity from those buggers who invade your personal space and poison your air, proving that distance is important.

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Chrome adblockalypse will 'accelerate Google-Facebook duopoly'

Ledswinger
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I blame online advertisers and marketers. They've crossed the line a long time ago and what Google have introduced is just a result of this.

I blame web users for responding to these ads. If they didn't work, advertisers wouldn't persist with them. You and I might actively boycott the companies concerned, but the ad-spewers aren't worried. It is purely a numbers game. And that, I suspect, is why this won't work. As a short term thing maybe, but longer term, if glittery, flashy, in-your-effing-face advertising works for the ad companies, they'll find ways round this. No matter what users want, this is an arms race - but despite their protestations about "improving the experience" Google actually want to sell more advertising, not less.

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Iran: We have defeated evil nuclear-sensing Western lizards!

Ledswinger
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Re: Translation?

when you remove the democratic filter, all sorts of crazy get into power.

Looks like that filter hasn't been working too well in much of the Western world of late.

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We already give up our privacy to use phones, why not with cars too?

Ledswinger
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Re: Software solves anything!

Never owned a car with points as even my 1970s cars had electronic ignition.

Points on cars: A work of great evil. Back in the 70's most UK cars had mechanical distributors, and any vaguely damp morning would see entire street loads of cars failing to start, to the anthem nnnnaaaaaaaahhhhhh....nnnnnaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhh...nnnaaaaaaaggggghhhhhhh, although after a few short minutes both the pitch and volume dropped as the defeated motorist flattened the battery. Of course Britain's then state owned car basher and its lazy, bolshy workforce were perhaps more responsible for this than the underlying technology.

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BBC presenter loses appeal, must pay £420k in IR35 crackdown

Ledswinger
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I'm sure it's right since it went to court but does seem a lot.

Well, don't forget that the bulk of her "salary" would be in the higher rate (40%) tax rate anyway, she would be hit by various steep withdrawals of the tax free allowance where her income is over £100k that mean between £100k and £121k the marginal tax rate is 60%, and if she claimed expenses through her PSC that an employee couldn't have claimed, she'd be taxed on those at the 40% rate (or even 45% if that took her over £150k). What are the chances there were quite a lot of "expenses" that you and I wouldn't be able to claim? So 40% overall seems in keeping with the prevailing tax rates.

But I must say that I am utterly unsurprised that the Beeb are paying some gobshite who fronts up a dull regional news programme as much as the prime minister, and then conniving in tax evasion.

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Home fibre in the UK sucks so much it doesn't even rank in Euro study

Ledswinger
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Re: It doesn't help

Maybe they count the woven copper sheath of the coax as "copper fibres"? Don't forget 99% of Virgin Media employees are sales and marketing dweebs, and they wouldn't know.

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Ledswinger
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Investment in fibre

Whilst the plans by Vodafone, Talktalk and others sound good, there is a fundamental problem that under current rules only Openreach have unbundled local loops. In electricity or gas any licensed company can provide a connection to a property, but have to allow other companies to use it on request (for which the connection asset owner gets paid). That energy model should be applied to broadband.

If the clowns at Ofcom don;t address this soon, then people getting new Talktalk, Vodafone or Cityfibre connections will be permanently locked into single ISPs providing high speed broadband at whatever price they like. Customers of Virgin Media will be familiar with the "benefits" of this lock in, such as appalling customer service, ineffective technical support, a monopoly mindset, and rampant price increases. And once an area has one high speed broadband network, who would invest to duplicate that? Nobody in their right mind.

So far from encouraging competition, there is a danger that Ofcom's dithering and lack of foresight will result in millions of homes being offered no choice of high speed broadband in coming years.

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Stephen Elop and the fall of Nokia revisited

Ledswinger
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Re: Why can't Elop take credit for his achievement?

Much of the decline during Elop's time was down to the fact that Nokia hadn't been developing the right products in 2008-2010, and the competition were offering better. No matter who'd taken over, sales would have collapsed.

Take capacitive screens - in the volume market, Nokia were still using crap resistive screens until the X6 launched in 2009. But the original iPhone had been offering a lovely capacitive screen since 2007. And up until then Nokia had been obsessively pushing candy-bar formats when the market wanted thinner devices with larger screens, or they'd been offering niche devices like the N97. Nokia had the Ovi store, but functionality was a big bit crap, their Symbian software was not seen as modern and effective, and it didn't help that so much of the Nokia world was proprietary, so that they rapidly lost ground to the open source aspect of Android.

Elop may not have been a perfect steward, but Nokia phones failure (as part of the Nokia group) was Made in Finland in the years 2006-2010.

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Ledswinger
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Then Nokia fucked up again, choosing Elop. Just a dumb cookie cooker idiot MBA from America. No consumer device knowledge.

I think you're wrong. Nokia's board knew his background. Elop was brought in to staunch the losses and sell the phones division, because Nokia's board knew that they couldn't turn it around. In terms of the deal he secured for his employers at Nokia, Elop did a stunningly good job, all things considered. Given the urgent need to axe costly and unprofitable activities, in his relatively brief tenure, Elop couldn't have done much extra about new handsets and software development.

The subsequent decline and fall of Microsoft phones is entirely down to the incumbent mindset of that company, and their lack of responsiveness to the market's needs. Microsoft inherited the potential to lead on audio and camera quality at a time when competing devices were mediocre in those areas, but they squandered that; They ignored the obvious business need for a truly secure smartphone (given that Blackberry were very clearly circling the drain). And as everybody knows they screwed up their own phone OS repeatedly, despite the underlying potential. Even then, it was within Microsoft's gift to launch an Android phone, but they continued to plough the lonely furrow of Windows on phones.

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Ledswinger
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Today you'd have to go into the Chinese countryside to find a bad Android.

From my happy experience of mid to low price Chinese phones, I think you'd find that the Chinese countryside was actually enjoying some pretty good products at prices people in the UK wouldn't believe.

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Crypto-gurus: Which idiots told the FBI that Feds-only backdoors in encryption are possible?

Ledswinger
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Re: Exceptional access to WHICH governments?

What do you think? Here in the UK we have clueless twerps like May and Rudd involved. Those two understand nothing.

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Bloke sues Microsoft: Give me $600m – or my copy of Windows 7 back

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Don't forget to sue them for time lost...

Except there needs to be a justification for an amount that high.

Seems an appropriate sum in view of the emotional distress of dealing with Windows 10.

119
25

You're decorating it wrong: Apple HomePod gives wood ring of death

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: I'm absolutely shocked

Surely it should have been the iHomePod.

How about Homiepod. For homies everywhere.

13
0

Three in hospital after NSA cops open fire on campus ram-raid SUV

Ledswinger
Silver badge

What were they thinking?

Presumably that it was cheaper than three tickets to Dignitas. But even so?

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0

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