* Posts by Brenda McViking

350 posts • joined 28 May 2012

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Punctual as ever, Equifax starts snail-mailing affected Brits about mega-breach

Brenda McViking
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Re: WTF..?

Driving licence numbers will have been harvested from people trying to get car insurance quotes and passed to equifax for insurance fraud checking, and that will be their excuse for keeping it until year infinity + 1. I notice the usual suspects on the price comparison websites tempt you into giving driving licence numbers for "better quotes."

An example needs to be made of Equifax. I think the last 10 years of their UK subsiduaries' profits is a good starting figure for a fine for criminal negligence, ought to bring the risk-reward ratio into the realms of reality, rather than the current situations of no risk, all reward for profiteering from our data.

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Viasat: We're going to sue Ofcom over EU-wide airline Wi-Fi network

Brenda McViking
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My guess was that Inmarsats lawyers knew damn well Ofcom would have to change their licence being as it transpried EU law was to force their hand, and thus took a calculated risk. Viasat might have been blindsided but so what?

Ofcom of course should be looking out for the interests of UK consumers and not private companies (albeit with scant evidence that they actually do). I'm not seeing downsides for the UK consumer here and thus conclude that it makes no difference to me if Viasat are a bit miffed, if they have a grieviance they're free to sue - from my perspective it doesn't make much sense to sue a regulator for changing a competitors licence from one which is potentially unlawful to one that is in compliance with EU law. The rules & regulations change, especially at the cutting edge of tech; history is littered with examples of this.

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Compsci grads get the fattest pay cheques six months after uni – report

Brenda McViking
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Might be, don't think there is that much money for CompScis in gaming (could be wrong). But J P Morgan Chase have a big site there, and that's probably what is driving the salaries IMHO.

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Kebab and pizza shop owner jailed for hiding £179k from the taxman

Brenda McViking
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Joke

Re: Sub heading should read

I think the IT angle is that someone managed to successfully use the Craptia/Iain Duncan Smith implemented IT benefits system to claim £49,528 in Child Tax Credits

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Shock: Brit capital strips Uber of its taxi licence

Brenda McViking
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Holmes

Harold Shipman, let's not forget, was fully licenced and regulated by the public sector medical profession. I wonder if he'd have been caught sooner had each patient rated him with that rating aggregated and publically published for all to see?

I will repeat myself: Uber are not above the law, and need to clean up their act. Nonetheless, these ride-hailing apps (and Uber are by no means the only gig in town, Lyft, Ola, Gett) exist now in many cities throughout the world and provide a service used by millions every day. The idea that it's fundamentally dishonest, dangerous and detrimental to society to the extent that it needs to be blanket banned is shortsighted. no? I find it hard to believe that TfL are literally at the point where they have no other option to sort this out than revoking the licence- this feels far more like a conflict of interest, not a regulator looking out for the best interest of their consumers.

I'll watch with interest. Perhaps I'm wrong and it's exactly the boot up the backside Uber need to sort their own house out.

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Brenda McViking
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Whilst this doesn't affect me as I'm not in London, nonetheless this shortsighted approach to taxi-hailing apps will hurt cities that insist on working to 1890s omnibus public transport models and keeping the rent-seeking gravy train of taxi & minicab licencing going full steam ahead.

I realise Uber are hardly a bastion of corporate responsibility and agree they need to clean up their act and work with authorities rather than against them. Nonetheless the reason people use them is because they offer a service which is seen by some as superior to conventional taxis - let's not forget, no one is forced to use Uber, drivers and riders both. There is certainly room in the market for competition (it's long overdue in London)- and this looks like a thinly veiled attempt to stamp it out by TfL.

Dissapointing, not least for the 3.5 million people who have been using the service despite its perceived shortcomings by officials. If it was so dangerous, maybe, just maybe, it wouldn't be voluntarily used by quite so many people? (Oh, and I'd be quite happy for Uber competitors to also show up, as, seemingly, do quite a lot of others)

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You forgot that you hired me and now you're saying it's my fault?

Brenda McViking
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Re: Ah, memories.

As a millenial, I know exactly what an OHP is thank-you-very-much - it's what the twice a year supply teacher used to wheel out from the back of the classroom after just having written all over the 10-grand computerised smartboard with permanent market.

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Brenda McViking
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Re: You were doing so well...

All trainees having the software in advance? you try that with us and we'll probably tear up the agreement you're negotiating to give us the course. Licences cost capex. Beancounters ensure we don't have any of that until shit actually physically hits the fan- opex is fine though, if you can get a rent agreement in place.

As for installing trial licences, on the day no less, well, that would also never happen. Software version (that'll be a no as it's a trial) not on the company whitelist? thats a 3 week SLA for IT, not forgetting that you have to provide 3 quotes from different manufacturers, so I hope the product has mutliple resellers...

And I think we have 1 guy on the 8,000 employee site with the admin password for the standard install, and he only works 2 days a week (just on the weekends when no one else is here).

You'd be showing us stuff on your laptop. Well, we might be able to get the OHP working I suppose, you'd better hope the bulb holds out as we can't order a new one until the year after it's blown. (Capex)

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Cloudflare coughs up a few grand for prior-art torpedoes to sink troll

Brenda McViking
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I applaud all efforts to wipe patent-trolls from the map.

Nonetheless as an engineer I see this as typical reactive behaviour - expensive, ineffective and doesn't solve the underlying problem, which to my mind is the fact that the US Patent Office is guilty of gross negligence and professional misconduct of the highest degree by awarding these damn things in the first place whilst clearly doing no due diligence.

How do we solve the patent problem? We can't get rid of it as it does have a useful purpose, but its current implementation is more cack-handed than a talk-talk developed banking app running in IE6 using flash player.

Damned if I can solve it. Answers on a postcard?

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Hi Facebook, Google, we think we might tax your ads instead – lots of love, Europe x

Brenda McViking
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Re: Both places

What benefit is an export to Japan? They only thing they get out of the deal is some UK currency to buy some UK stuff.

Imports make us richer. Exports merely pay for our importing habits.

As for taxes on turnover, that's simply a catastrophically stupid idea. I was a remainer through and through, but with the EU railroading through ideas like that, then perhaps Brexit is for the best.

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Mobe reception grief turns LTE Apple Watch 3 into – er, a dull watch

Brenda McViking
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Facepalm

Re: The article is wrong about iOS Wifi and Bluetooth.

One subset of apple users include those who are clueless about tech. This is why my mother has been given an iPhone. It's why my company have the iPhone as the corporate device, because it's the only thing Deborah from accounts and Gary from HR can get to grips with. As far as they are concerned, the control centre is where wifi is turned on and off. Apple have made a point of having one setting in one location and preventing things that are perfectly possible to avoid confusion to their precious technically illiterate users. This absolutely flies in the face of that - a button where off doesn't mean off. I'd expect this from the likes of windows, and perhaps even android, but not apple.

So whilst it's perfectly possible to disable wifi and bluetooth properly, this is no longer default behaviour due to the fact that they've messed with the control centre buttons.

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UK PC prices have risen 30% in a year since the EU referendum

Brenda McViking
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Holmes

Nothing stupid about the price rise, perfectly well predicted in fact, and has been obvious for months that it would happen.

Markets decided that Brexit was worth a 15-20% cut in Sterling. THAT was the damage the remainers warned about (even if most of them are clueless and don't realise it.) That means we'll have some nice growth in UK made exports as they're cheaper for Johnny Foreigner to buy (though why we really care is open to debate, though of course it allows us to purchase imports with all that foreign currency)

And imports prices rise by 20% as our Great British Pounds have less purchasing power than they used to. Overall, Brexit hurts average UK society member as we can't afford as much stuff made by Johnny Foreigner anymore (and boy, do we get a lot of stuff from Johnny Foreigner), but he is slightly more likely to keep his job as on a worldly scale, as cost of labour has dropped by 20%

It also means that all the hand wringing about what will happen after actual Brexit will all turn out to be a bit of an anticlimax as it's already been decided and priced in. The fundamental change happened about 2 hours into counting the votes when it was realised the media and their predictions were all wrong. Everything since has just been inertia of the flow of global goods.

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European Commission proposes more powers for EU's infosec agency

Brenda McViking
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"Not optimal" depends on what you're optimising for.

If it's the feel-good-factor of the people working for said agency and those working on it's funded programmes and attending all-expenses-paid conferences, then it probably is pretty optimal.

If it's looking at value for money for your average EU taxpayer, it's distinctly sub-optimal. Regulators & think tanks ought to be phycsially close to those they regulate and think-for. In the infosec sphere, I'm fairly sure that isn't a Greek Island mostly known for holidaymaking, and rather more next door to Steve Bong in silicon roundabout, Shoreditch...

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Samsung's Galaxy Note 8 is hot, but not much more than the S8+

Brenda McViking
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I give Orlowski a hard time over lack of specs in reviews, so it's only fair Sharwood also gets chastised for not having the following basic spec info in the article:

what charging slot? Type-C usb

MicroSD card slot? yes (and some markets hybrid microSD/2nd SIM)

3.5mm jack? yes

removable battery? no. okay, I admit defeat. I think this one is looking pretty dead and never to return. doesn't mean I have to like it though. My last smartphone purchase was an LG V20, and the removable battery was the fundamental reason.

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Noise-canceling headphones with a DO NOT DISTURB light can't silence your critics

Brenda McViking
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Re: That eight hour flight...

Yes. Unsurprisingly airlines have figured out that running their engines at peak efficiency burns less fuel, which is now required given the huge competition in the airlines business.

Thankfully gas turbines tend to have peak efficiencies at high-end of their power range, so we're not pootling around at 56mph like your average Prius hyper-miler, but we're going slower than we did 20 years ago.

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Brenda McViking
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Re: Lower frequencies only

That lifewire link shows the cancellation characteristics of some fairly terrible noise cancelling headphones though, as an awful lot of them are.

The gold-standard has been the Bose QC series. They just happen to have a lifewire test on the in-ear QC20s - showing significant attenuation in the usual low frequencies, but also above 300Hz all the way to about 5kHz.

The reason no one else comes close is because bose have significant patents regarding noise cancelling, filed between 2001-2010 which have plenty of life left in them, and in the real world, mean if you're buying anything other than bose for noise cancelling, you're more than likely wasting your money because nothing else comes close - they did some innovation in the noughties and have the market stitched up for the next few years.

Of course, it's a pity for audiophiles as they have the old adage - no highs, no lows? must be bose.

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Apple's adoption of Qi signals the end of the wireless charging wars

Brenda McViking
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Re: Choices

Chee? I had no idea it was pronounced like this. I'm still going to call it Queue-Aye, ryming with fanboi-in-chief Stephen Fry...

As for chai being expensive, it's about 5 rupees a cup here where I live in India, even with brexit that's about 6 pence. But then Apple's execs have always had their own alternate reality which the rest of us have to conform to, and no doubt it's 5 quid a cup in Shoreditch/Cupertino/Whereever's trendy right now.

As for the choice of Qi, then yes, I think that's been obvious for the last 4 years or so, not that I've ever used it.

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Auto-makers told their autopilots need better safeguards

Brenda McViking
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It's a problem - Is the human in control, or is the machine?

In the aviation industry, experience would tell us that even with intensive, professional training on the human side, an semi-autonomous system failing over to a human will often produce a startle effect which the human cannot process in the given time (which is usually tens of seconds in the air because you have height on your side- cars are going to have mere seeconds, if that). There are elements of mitigation involving clear display of information to said human, forcing them to take-over every now and then to stay attentive, and training them to deal with such situations, but they don't prevent the issue completely, and it's probably not feasible to give this type of training to your average driver as they aren't going to want to pay for it.

Creating a safe semi-autonomous system is probably a lot harder than creating a safe fully-autonomous system, and until that changes, I think we'll be seeing more accident reports stating that the computer needs more control, humans need to RTFM, and wherever humans get involved, lots of holes appear in your layers of swiss cheese because they never behave as expected. I note however, that fundamentally, this accident was caused by the errors of 2 humans driving the truck and the tesla respectively - it's not going to sound a death-knell to autonomous driving aids.

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China: Cute Hyperloop Elon, now watch how it's really done

Brenda McViking
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Re: Pressure suits?

unpleasantly high acceleration? 1g? sitting down? nah. You hands might feel a bit heavy, and whilst it would be noticeable, you could put up with it all day, unless you're a particularly fragile little snowflake.

Have you ever experienced prolonged g? I have, in light aircraft, and I'm 6ft and the taller you are the more susceptible to high g you are too. For me 5-6g is where it really starts to get unpleasant. 3g is very typical on rollercoasters and doable for minutes at a time. fighter pilots can pull 12g for tens of seconds with a suit. The human body is fairly resiliant to it, particularly when your spine is perpendicular to the force (as it would be in a train.) Plenty on g-forces and human limits on wikipedia. I'll quote one - test subjects were able to complete simple cognitive and physical tasks at 6g for 10 minutes.

You could quite easily have a acceleration of 3g on a system like this - your passengers can realistically withstand that for 20 seconds at the start and end without much of an issue, provided they're harnessed. Plenty of people will think this is really scary and choose alternative options, yes, but they already do with aeroplanes too. It's a mach 3.2 train - I think passengers will probably expect a bit of an adrenaline rush. I would.

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'Driverless' lorry platoons will soon be on a motorway near you

Brenda McViking
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Go

It's completely doable if you've ever done proper convoy driving and everyone in the convoy knows how to act - the front vehicle signals, the vehicle behind it does the same and so on all the way down the chain and the rear vehicle is the one to move over first but keeps constant speed once manoevured, thus opening a gap for the rest. You can only sensibly do it on 3+ lane motorways but it can work.

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Google tracks what you spend offline to prove its online ads work. And privacy folks are furious

Brenda McViking
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Re: This is why you want anonymous payments

Yup, I've had this too. Aged 24 I went to have a look at and purchase a (used) 400hp supercharged Jaguar, which I did buy in the end. 55 year old seller just assumed I was a tyre-kicking test-pilot, until I came back with a several grand in cash. Admittedly the bank had a procedure whereby they made me wait quite some time, and asked a lot ofl questions to allow me to withdraw such a sum, but it took less than 30 minutes in branch.

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UK spookhaus GCHQ can crack end-to-end encryption, claims Australian A-G

Brenda McViking
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Re: Confirmed endpoint breaks

At least with Whatsapp, if you backup your whatsapp messages to google drive, as is the default setting, then they're stored unencrypted.

Thus, given no-one ever bothers changing the defaults, governments with data sharing pacts with 'Murica are free to view the vast majority of the public's messages by asking Google. I'd guess with iMessage it's the same - simply demand a handover from iCloud. Use secret courts if necessary.

The only messages they can't easily read will be those between tech savvy people who have disabled backups, in which case you've probably reduced the population enough to be able to brute-force the keys with your anti-terrorism funded NSA-o-matic 2017-spec supercomputer. Or any other number of endpoint break-ins, sure.

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Guess who doesn't have to pay $1.3bn in back taxes? Of course it's fscking Google

Brenda McViking
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Re: In other news...

Why we would be volunteering for employees, your pension and consumers to pick up this so-called "tab" that the French think they are owed is question I believe too few are asking.

From what I can see, profit taxes like corporation tax are primarily designed to ensure the 1 or 2 man contractor outfits actually pay taxes if they decide to draw no income and have their company pay for their lifestyle (house, car, utilities, food - everything the rest of us pay out of taxed income). They fall down flat when applied to a multinational - the incidence of corporation taxes fall in some split between the employees of that company, shareholders i.e. your pension fund (who give up [taxable] income) and consumers, who are indirectly paying more for their products. A corporation cannot ever have the incidence of tax, because only flesh and blood people pay taxes.

I know it's fashionable to hurr durr blame the evil corporations, but surely anyone can follow the logic that taxing their profits only makes sense if you think that government can spend that money in a way that benefits society more than said corporation. Which we see time and time again, they don't - they just hire diversity talent manglers and give Atos another trillion pound IT contract to spaff everyone's medical records over the internet. I'd choose another Google labs product over an extra 10 government employed telephone sanitisers, or the employment of an additional tax tribunal member, any day of the week.

Happy for someone to explain to me how I have this all wrong.

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Good news: Samsung's Tizen no longer worst code ever. Bad news: It's still pretty awful

Brenda McViking
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Trollface

Re: 40 zero-days??

Come now, 40 zero days isn't that excessive - Let's not forget that a 7 year old kid could find that many in an hour in Flash, and they've been fixing that for over 20 years!

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Good luck building a VR PC: Ethereum miners are buying all the GPUs

Brenda McViking
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Rejoice

This just means that a few months down the line, the 2nd hand market will be flooded by these things and knock-down prices as the Eretheum miners have all moved on to ponzi-scheme ASIC suppliers after GPUs have had their day and are too slow to compete. It's almost like this happened before with bitcoin...

And the end result is that VR capable hardware is affordable for a (graphics card) generation.

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Britain's warhead-watcher to simulate Trident nukes with Atos supercomputer

Brenda McViking
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Trollface

Re: What are ATOS contributing?

Atos? they're there as the government gaurantee that the nuclear weapons are fit to work.

Even if when you view them with the Mk 1 eyeball they have clearly rusted through, primers are missing, a puddle of red fuming nitric acid has burnt through the floor, the oxidiser tanks are showing 2% of fuel remaining and the bit where the warhead is supposed to be has been hacked off with a crowbar...

But Atos will simply declare that it is fit to work and that's the nuclear deterrent sorted. move along.

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Brit prosecutors ask IT suppliers to fight over £3 USB cable tender

Brenda McViking
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Re: Tender

"Not what you needed?", thats a cancellation fee then. Plus a change management fee right there, plus handling fees, restocking fees, admin fees, redistribution fees and naturally because this is a government project, green fees.

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Brenda McViking
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How hard is it, if you're a small supplier, to script an auto-generated response to such requests with a standard 99GBP cost for said item?

That way if you win, quids in! (and I think you'd be surprised - even in the private sector with a lumbering no-room-to-manoevure purchasing system which seems to require a 6 month audit just to get a new supplier of coffee coasters on board - I've certainly bought such mundane and cheap things like a 10m of hookup wire for 35 quid a reel just because they were the only supplier to quote and provide next day delivery.

Due to insurance purposes for offsite working, it was mandatory for me to hire a car for a day from Avis if I wanted to drive to Maplins - I had to provide that option to purchasing as well to get the go ahead - that option was 7 quid more expensive. Took me 45 minutes to be compliant with the process - which charged out at engineering rates of 90GBP/hr. Pork barrels and troughs? they're everywhere.)

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America throws down gauntlet: Accept extra security checks or don't carry laptops on flights

Brenda McViking
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Re: "having a load of Lithium batteries in the hold sounds like a bad idea to me."

The hold is pressurised - if you think about an aircraft cross section (image), the pressure bulkhead is the fuselage itself. It may get a little colder down there as it isn't actively heated, but it's not -50C like outside the fuselage at 35,000ft either. Where people "stow away" and freeze, they tend to be in wheel wells outside the pressure bulkhead.

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Brenda McViking
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Flame

Re: Last I read...

It's not the bomb threat that is the most dangerous thing about this. Putting more lithium batteries into the hold is asking for trouble. As with all risks, it's simply a matter of time until one catches fire, cannot be controlled and brings a plane down.

I trust that these anti-terrorist rulemaking idiots who apparently are trying to make us "more safe" are going to be tried for pre-meditated murder and gross professional negligence when this inevitably happens.

The aviation safety authorities are warning that electronic devices containing lithium batteries are classed as dangerous goods and should be carried in the cabin. to quote EASA "We must take all precautions to make sure that mitigating one risk does not lead to another risk." That's about as strongly worded as EASA ever get and should be treated extremely seriously. Politics and aviation safety should not ever mix. EVER

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Blunder down under: self-driving Aussie cars still being thwarted by kangaroos

Brenda McViking
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Holmes

I've had it on good authority that some development is going on in India and that women in saris are a real problem for existing tech. I think there will be plenty of unintended consequences when it comes to recognition - something that evolution has had millenia to perfect.

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'No decision' on Raytheon GPS landing system aboard Brit aircraft carriers

Brenda McViking
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Thumb Up

The UK already made the mistake of buying American with the pathetic excuse for a plane known as the F35, not to mention having a bunch of useless Chinooks directly due to American manufacturers marketing a solution they were incapable of delivering. Not that MoD procurement are competent either but it's fashionable nowadays not to blame the victim...

So pipe down Raytheon, if you want to go and moan, do so to Lockheed Martin and Boeing as they've already taken all of the available budget. The UK taxpayer has spent quite enough on useless American military tech for one Millenium.

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TalkTalk customers complain of being unable to load Amazon website

Brenda McViking
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Re: normally

AA ISP

The only UK ISP to be xkcd/806 compliant

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US is Number One! In sales register hacking attacks, at least

Brenda McViking
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Re: Bzzt... wrong

I remember flummoxing a store assistant in macy's in NYC when I used my UK card in the terminal and just keyed in my PIN which authorised immediately. She still tried to make me sign the box that quite clearly said "no signature required" on the receipt.

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No, really. You can see through walls using drones and Wi-Fi

Brenda McViking
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Wifi isn't a particularly good radar frequency for imaging houses. 2-3GHz is used in aicraft surveillance typically, 5GHz for weather mapping. Better for range (at markedly higher power than typical domestic wifi equipment, obviously), less good for resolution. You want much higher frequencies in the 20GHz+ ranges really for decent resolution at ranges like that. Your car parking radar sensors are circa 75GHz to give you an accurate idea of how close you are to that car behind you.

More on this sort of stuff at radartutorial.eu

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Uber wants your top tips to mend its rotten image

Brenda McViking
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Meh

Add tipping - yes, absolutely, and keep your filthy paws off any money there.

Don't you dare reduce the time riders have to cancel drivers - half the time in India it takes a few minutes just to see if the driver is trying to take the piss (e.g. not move until I have called him, or if they're incompetant - if they don't follow the satnav, then a wrong turn could very well mean I'm waiting 20 minutes for the driver to rectify the situation, due to the horrendously badly engineered road layouts here. I've also had drivers demand to know where I'm going to cancel seconds later because it's not where they want to go. Uber charges the rider by default for this behaviour which is also wrong.)

I object to being fined for something that is the driver's fault. Uber also need to recognise that they aren't a monopoly, and that the consumer (the riders) are still king in this situation. You make it anything less than super-easy to use with predictable results, and I'll go elsewhere. At the moment, they really are the best of the bunch in India, but that can change overnight. Drivers will moan, but they're getting paid, and with Uber, they can quit any time they like if it's really getting that bad. If Uber need to patch it up with the drivers, then do so, but leave me, the paying customer, out of it.

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It's 2017, and UPnP is helping black-hats run banking malware

Brenda McViking
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Re: Who uses UPnP?

As recently as last year, Running 2x Xbox Ones with 2 players on a home wireless required UPnP to allow them to work properly with group chat running alongside mutliplayer online gaming. It also required that it was implemented properly on the router, most of the cheap ISP provided ones wouldn't work due to poor UPnP implementations, and my housemate switched ISP twice to get it working properly.

But I'd be the first to admit that sort of setup isn't applicable to 99% of users, but you wanted an example...

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Amazon.com just became a 90,000-seat Azure case study

Brenda McViking
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Re: Gut feeling?

I can just imagine Jeff Bezos at home doing his weekly grocery shop via his amazon echo: "Alexa, buy whole foods, confirm purchase."

Oooops!

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British Airways poised to shed 1,000 jobs to Capita

Brenda McViking
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I heard a recent presentation saying their costs are 500% of the likes of Ryanair and other low cost carriers(LCCs). I can believe it - they're an old (but still respected) company with too much legacy baggage and in need of an overhaul and a diet to become competitive again.

Absolutely the wrong way about it is to (as a first step) make the experience like Ryanair in order to reduce their costs - indeed, the passenger experience should be the absolute last to be cut if they're going to survive - their customer base is different to those that opt for LCCs and their current CEO Alex Cruz doesn't seem to understand that at all. If they want to be the Apple of the skies charging the premium that people will pay, they know what to do.

Reputation takes a lifetime to build and a day to destroy - and no doubt BA have enough overpaid "brand" managers to tell them that. Pity they're taking no heed of it right now.

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I still haven't found what I'm malloc()ing for: U2 tops poll of music today's devs code to

Brenda McViking
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Pint

We've had talk of grey-noise trials in our office - there are actually more noise complaints in the allocated desk space than the so-called "agile" area where they just removed 30% of the desks, put a lot of ad-hoc meeting spaces and invited an office-scrum for a desk. All it actually did was get people in earlier in the morning so they could take "their" spot, but I digress...

Back to my point - because the allocated desk area does tend to be quieter, just one rogue PM will disturb a lot of people because it's too easy to tune-in (and I've seen people there working with ear defenders on, my preference is the Bose QC series as their noise cancelling actually works). In the agile area though, there is a lot more background noise but you can't pick out individual conversations: people there are reporting that it's actually easier to concentrate.

Indeed, at university I liked to revise in the student pub (stop scoffing at the back), because it was easier to concentrate with a constant level of background noise, than in the library with a bunch of sociology students quietly discussing "the societal disadvantages of capitalism." Plus once I'd finished, having the bar 10ft away was never a disadvantage...

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Raspberry Pi sours thanks to mining malware

Brenda McViking
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Childcatcher

Captain Bodge-tastic speaking

I wouldn't overestimate the abilities of your average raspberry pi user - it's become very easy to follow a simple set of instructions in an online forum and without understanding a lot about what you're doing, and in doing so open the thing wide open to abuse. An awful lot of them are connected to the net.

I had to double check that my one of mine, which is online and will accept SSH connections, is not visible from the public IP it's on. I've changed the default password as I do for all devices, but aside from a weekly cron job to perform an automatic update, it is sat there, as a VPN server. I think that I've firewalled everything off with iptables (apart from the VPN port used), but I set this up 3 years ago and I really cannot remember. I'm currently 7000km away from it without a computer so it's difficult to check right now... (posting from a mobile)

I imagine there are a lot of such devices out there connected to the net, as some ameteur project set up by an enthusiastic hobbyist. In my experience it was hard enough getting it working as intended, let alone hardening it against attackers beyond the basics of changing a password (which I think is enough to defeat this malware if I RTFA properly)...

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Pop-up Android adware uses social engineering to resist deletion

Brenda McViking
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Headmaster

Re: No other options but to press "OK"

Lots of the present continuous being used with a lack of pronouns and a style that I find quite familiar. My guess (living here right now and reading English like this all the time) is that it is Indian in origin.

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Hotel guest goes broke after booking software gremlin makes her pay for strangers' rooms

Brenda McViking
Silver badge

Re: never use a debit card for credit ?

For the UK at least, here is the breakdown of payments in 2016: Card association report (pdf)

An average cardholder made 10 debit card transactions and 5 credit card transactions per month. Just 60% of the adult population in the UK had a credit card. Debit card spending was 486bn GBP, compared to Credit card spending of 174bn GBP.

So all in all, it's less surprising that a debit card was used, as it remains by far the most popular card payment mechanism.

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UK PM Theresa May's response to terror attacks 'shortsighted'

Brenda McViking
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Meh

Re: FFS!

I'm undecided also.

It's only ever going to be between blue and red where I live. Whilst I fundamentally disagree with the tech, surveillance and terrorism inspired policies of May, I also fundamentally disagree with the economics policies of Corbyn. I also see a lot of people telling me to "look at the policies" when indeed looking at policies of both Labour and Conservative in previous elections has led to said policies not ever being implemented because we all know that politicians will say anything to get elected, then backtrack when it involves doing actual work and decision making.

Think I might spoil my ballot this time. Neither option is palatable to me in the slightest.

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Class clowns literally classless: Harvard axes meme-flinging morons

Brenda McViking
Silver badge

Re: It's called "drawing the line"

What, because sharing a bad taste image on facebook is in any way equatable to death by drink-driving?

Privilege might the reason some undergrads will be accepted. The others are probably rather clever, and many will be present on some part of the autistic spectrum as well - and there is a higher chance such people may well see nothing wrong with and actively seek out "darker" humour.

However, there is an enormous difference between finding a bad-taste image funny and acting in a way which actually causes others harm. Undergrads are still very young adults and they will still be testing boundaries to find levels of societal acceptability. Extricating them from their academic lives before they've even started the course is extreme, particularly given that this is purely about sharing images (on a private group no less), something virtually every teen does on a daily basis.

In my opinion this is a collosal overreaction based on theoretical offensiveness. Deserving of a reprimand? absolutely, but not more. This is from the same chain of thought that videogames cause killing sprees and books are corrupting the morals of the edwardian youth.

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Every time Apple said 'machine learning', we had a drink andsgd oh*][

Brenda McViking
Silver badge
WTF?

iDonbilivit

El Reg actually got an invite to an Apple event? Pull the other one!

Ow, no, not that one, it's cybernetic and it's supposed to be learning...

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IBM: ALL travel must be approved now, and shut up about the copter

Brenda McViking
Silver badge

I'm thinking that despite the historic mantra, and given all of the things we've seen, buying IBM now carries a very significant risk of getting you fired.

Particularly when the brown stuff hits the fan and your customer support doesn't show because they're still waiting for personal travel approval from Tesco Coagulante, or whatever the name of that big cheese was...

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Edinburgh Uni email snafu tells students they won't be graduating

Brenda McViking
Silver badge

Re: three or four years of sex, booze and drugs...

Very noble of you for paying off 30k of your grandsons debt.

Also rather foolish - it could well be you don't understand the system properly. If you did, you likely wouldn't have done so - the student "loan" is not a conventional loan by a long shot. The government backing of such loans expects full well that the MAJORITY will not be repaid in full. It's actually a temporary graduate tax on successful graduates, but to actually pay off the balance in the time alloted, you have to be a very high earner indeed. Most professional engineers like myself for example will not pay off the balance before it is wiped, because we don't and wont ever earn enough. Lawyers, doctors, bankers - perhaps. But marginal, and it assumes they never have a career break.

Far more details on why paying off a post 1998 student loan is usually a bad idea at moneysavingexpert

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Britain's on the brink of a small-scale nuclear reactor revolution

Brenda McViking
Silver badge

Re: Has there been anything beyond some marketing graphics yet?

You mean aside from the fact that the article states that SMRs have been operational on the UKs nuclear deterrent submarine fleet for the past 60 years?

How proven a technology do you want?

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PayPal peed off about Pandora's 'P' being mistaken for its 'PP'

Brenda McViking
Silver badge
FAIL

I despair for the human race...

I went to pay for my pet rock on ebay and I accidently ended up listening to Kanye West because I was confused, and the music was so dreadful that I was forced to sue.

I mean seriously, can we not just invite these plaintiffs and all the lawyers to court (actually a 400ft deep molten-tar pit with the word "court" above it - trust me, it'll fool them) so that they can perform their legal flatulence without actually dragging down the general intelligence of the world's population any further? BTW, I'd also have no qualms if Kanye also joined them...

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