* Posts by Brenda McViking

251 posts • joined 28 May 2012

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Visa cries foul over Euro regulator's stronger authentication demands

Brenda McViking
Facepalm

Re: Good.

No, I'm criticising it because of the additional attack vectors a european government mandated system would inevitably bring to the table. What was it you were saying about ID theft?

And how does it make bank systems more secure anyway? It's the EU equivalent of mastercard securecode or verified by visa - which have been around for years as a bad solution looking for a problem, and you want to bring the eurocrats in to make it better?

I can see them now - mandate a hashing algo for your card number and password, which they'll contract crapita to implement, (so that'll be md5, to save costs), and it'll then be mandatory to use that from 2018 onwards (when the euro decline has reached 10EUR = 1USD), and no exceptions.

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The hated Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal will soon be dead. Yay?

Brenda McViking

That's half the story though, isn't it - jobs and wages. What about those very same hardworking people who also want to utlise their free time and money? Or is the definition of paradise 24/7 employment at 800$/hr for everyone?

Simplifying commerce allows you to get far more from your hard earned graft, because you can buy whatever service or shiny product pleases you from whomever in the world makes it the cheapest and the best. It's kind of the point of trade - you get stuff that fufils your desires that would otherwise be out of your reach.

Sent from my Chinese computer, over Taiwanese made fibre optic cable, through Korean made servers using British designed semiconductors, running American software (coded by Bangalore), operated by a German ISP to a UK website, hosted in Ireland.

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More movie and TV binge-streaming sites join UK banned list

Brenda McViking
Joke

I for one, will sleep better at night knowing that these hardened terrorist pirate scum have been sank to the depths of Davy Jone's locker by the brave and courageous MPA.

another 13 IP addresses blocked, just another 4 billion to go, then they will be truly victorious!

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C'mon, it's the current year! Report finds UK gov could save £2bn by modernising IT

Brenda McViking
Childcatcher

Re: Title Correct

Nah, 2bn is the saving - the cost to achieve half of that will be at least 25bn. The other half of the savings will be eaten up by "avoiding job losses." Because losing civil service jobs is bad mmm'kay?

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iPhone fatigue and fading Samsung. This planet is bored with big brand phones

Brenda McViking
Go

Re: "A radical redesign is in the offing..."

Here's a radical idea - how about putting things back in these latest flagships so that I might actually buy one. Stuff like micro SD card slots, a removable battery, and software updates for at least 2 years.

I'm still on my Galaxy S4. I've not seen any "upgrade" in features whatsoever from any of the usual suspects.

As for new stuff - I want holography, a projector, edge lighting effects, fully immersible, radar, lidar, sonar, a tricorder, taser, pen-knife, the ability to hover, a smoke generator, and replacable fuel cells giving me 10 weeks of charge at a time. And I want it for less than 200USD. When can you start?

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First World Problems: John Lewis clients forced to re-register after website 'upgrade'

Brenda McViking
Big Brother

Re: BBC just did the same to me

Pah - it's a thinly disguised attempt to make sure you're paying your telly tax like a good citizen. Now that they've got it into law that iPlayer requires one.

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Password1? You're so random. By which we mean not random at all - UK.gov

Brenda McViking

Re: Password managers FFS!

Password managers introduce a single point of failure, there is a serious trust relationship which is highly questionable for any password manager, and that's before you consider using a cloud-based one. Then there are issues with mutliple devices, lack of internet connectivity, or lack of ownership of devices you may be accessing secure accounts on.

They might work for you, but they are not a silver bullet.

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No NY love for Airbnb

Brenda McViking
Devil

Having just come back from an airbnb stay in NYC (Not an illegal one, landlord was living in the apartment) I can tell you that I simply wouldn't have gone had I had to rely on hotels. The price in Manhattan was eyewatering enough as it was at $80pppn with airbnb, the hotels were more like $110pppn + tax.

However, for that money we had a lovely host, who provided us with everything we asked for and plenty we didn't, like a welcome hamper. He gave us tips on where to go, and looked after us really well. With our friends staying in a hotel, they reported that they were forced to wait 2 hours (at 1am) for a hotel room as theirs had been double booked (despite their guarantee), wifi was $25 a day, and they were given nought but a free croissant for their trouble at check-in. Service, eh?

Much like the NYC taxi medallion insanity has been stemmed by uber, (they don't cost $1m a year anymore - a price that was being passed to the general public), the hotel industry could do with a royal kick in the ass and buck-up their ideas. I wish airbnb all the best with their suit. As far as I'm concerned, if you have an apartment, you should be able to do whatever the hell you like with it without some encumbant hotelier sticking their noses in.

I mean, maybe Starbucks should be able to fine you $3 every time you boil a kettle when you have friends around, because you're eating into their profits because your water supply doesn't have to abide by regulations that apply to them. Or have Subway pass a law that says you can't make sandwiches for yourself and the kids if you only do it once a week. How is this any different?

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Finally, that tech fad's over: Smartwatch sales tank more than 50%

Brenda McViking

Re: I like mine

I have a Sony Smartwatch2 which I got for 50 quid. Lasts around 4 days on a charge.

At that price point, the thing made sense to me. And after around 6 months of ownership, I wouldn't go back to a dumbwatch now - whilst the added features are somewhat limited, they are useful on a daily basis, to the point where I would now be annoyed if I didn't have them. I no longer get my phone out of my pocket 20 times a day to see nothing but a linkedin notification for example. I can actually have a working speedo on my wrist riding the bike, and the "find my phone" feature alone has saved me about 10 hours of back-of-the-sofa searching by itself. I've stopped leaving my phone in the car too, as I lose connection accompanied by a buzz when it's 10-15m away.

Equally I'm not going to shell out GBP250+ on a brand new shiny one - my watches have typically lasted me 3-5 years before looking tired and that isn't going to change just because this one has a microprocessor. So I agree with the other posters saying those that want them, probably have them by now.

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Mercedes answers autonomous car moral dilemma: Yeah, we'll just run over pedestrians

Brenda McViking
Go

Lets play a game

There is a research project going on at MIT for "morality" of self driving cars which anyone can have a go at - The MIT Moral Machine

Very similar to "the trolley problem" mentioned elsewhere

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'Please label things so I can tell the difference between a mouse and a microphone'

Brenda McViking

Labelling

I work in a corporate with a load of engineers in an office, we have manufacturing too.

We had an initiative to tidy everything up, after a few years back a 28m order was delayed by 2 days whilst they tried to find the right socket on the shop floor. Now we have "a place for everything, and everything in its place." Which C suite decided was such a good idea, everyone must do it, and made it mandatory not only for the shop, but all the design and research offices too.

It also applies to individually owned engineering desks. Cue Mike from R&D, who is a genius but about as organised as a street-hookers diary (you know, desk permanently bowed from the stack of paper which has probably been there since 1992.) After recieving his 6th weekly red card in a row, HR sent their best droid to tell him that he was not immune and would face disciplinary action if he didn't conform to the new policy.

He mumbled about quitting, but he still had about 8 months until his retirement, so he got on with clearing his desk. Took him the best part of a week to dismantle his paper mountains, and he was so cross by the end of it that he labelled everything on his desk, phone, keyboard, mouse, and even put coloured taped rectangles for his laptop, keyboard position, phone position, mouse position and a little rectangle labelled "Green Card" for the HR droid to place on his next rounds.

Said droid came on the Friday and stopped dead looking at Mikes desk. Mike was in attendance at the time with a murderous glare fixated on him. Both Mike and the droid remained entirely silent throughout the ordeal, but the rest of the office were wetting themselves trying to stifle the giggles. He got his green card that day.

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Amazon supremo Bezos' Blue Origin blows its top over Texas desert

Brenda McViking

Re: The crew capsule of death?

Well acceleration of a mass with a force is Newtons second law. I'm going to assume it's that simple.

70,000lbf against 8000lbs (from the article) = 8.75g acceleration

A typical flighter plane ejection is around 20g (mostly because the seat and pilot don't have much mass and you have to get out quick enough to avoid the tail of the aircraft hitting you) and bones break around 25g, it's not excessive. You might well be incapacitated for the time you're under that much g but that doesn't exactly matter.

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Amazon to hire 20,000 seasonal workers in UK

Brenda McViking
Go

Re: Oh good

It's fine.

As soon as zero hours contracts are gone and everyone is on the living wage, these warehouses will be able to justify the cost of full automation so they won't need 20k unskilled employees over Christmas, they'll make do with about 20 technical overseers and a few mechanics for the robots.

Stop the exploitation of the people! Make them unemployed instead...

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A year living with the Nexus 5X – the good, the bad, and the Nougat

Brenda McViking

Re: But why did they use USB-C?

I'm sure Europe are putting together a prosecution for it - to be fair they've only just got onto the anticompetitive CD drive sales after CRT monitor price fixing - Apple will no doubt get their come-uppance in 2042.

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UK will build new nuclear bomb subs, says Defence Secretary

Brenda McViking
Trollface

Re: Vanguard, Victorious, Vigilant and Vengeance

I think we need to ask the internet what to name them by popular vote

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Can you make a swarm of 20+ flying military robots? UK.gov wants you

Brenda McViking

Re: The EASA might have something to say about drone usage.

Well consider that in the US, thanks to kneejerk FAA regulations, that a drone swarm with 20+ drones would need a human swarm with 20+ operators on the ground keeping line of sight and a killswitch for each drone.

Drones do need regulating as in the hands of moron consumers, they do pose a real danger to aircraft. Model aircraft in the hands of a moron lasted 1-3 flights, so it was a self-controlling problem, but these multirotors are just too damn easy to get hold of and fly with no skill, no awareness and no clue. I agree that regulations however need to be properly thought out rather than just outlawing perfectly responsible flyers.

A licence already exists for flying these things, so rather than wasting effort in regulating the industry out of existance, it would be far better to introduce a licencing and qualification system to ensure those people with access to drones which pose a hazard to aircraft are aware of that fact and recieve some semblance of training to ensure that they too become responsible flyers.

My first port of call would be getting the model aircraft hobbyists onboard - and their clubs & societies could easily become the licensors much in the same way as gun clubs act in the safegaurding of legal firearms, or diving centres qualify divers, or yachting, motorsport - Virtually every hobby with an element of danger to it operates in this way.

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QANTAS' air safety spiel warns not to try finding lost phones

Brenda McViking

Re: The ultimate iPhone destruction video waiting to be made?

On long haul business class, BA is fully lie flat. Emirates and Etihad are fully lie flat. Heck, even Air India does fully lie flat in biz. You don't need to fly first to get a fully flat bed - this has been the case for at least the last decade.

And yes, a phone is all too easy to lose into one of those seats and will be crushed - these seats are designed to raise a 250lb truely "fat" cat exec sat in it from flat to bolt upright in 15 seconds, they'll happily crush anything in their mechanisms.

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Brexit and data protection: A period of shock and reflection

Brenda McViking
Pint

The 7 stages of Brexit

From the remainers perspective...

SHOCK - Woah, WTF?! The polls and markets didn't see this coming...

DENIAL - its not legally binding anyway, right?

ANGER - FUCKING PENSIONERS! UNEDUCATED TWATS! NORTHERN RACISTS! FARAGE!!!

BARGAINING - *signs petition for 2nd referendum on facebook*

DEPRESSION - Fuck. I'm really stuck on this little island now...

TESTING - *googles how to become an Irish citizen*

ACCEPTANCE - It's Friday, that means it's beer o'clock!

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Sea of outrage after 'migrant-spotting app' turned out to be bogus

Brenda McViking

There are crowd-sourcing sites like zooniverse.org which really do help with problems that computers still aren't very good at such as image recognition (mapping solar flares, deforestation, ocean floor analysis). They can simply rely on lots of amateurs pre-ranking images for expert analysis, which helps in putting those needles you're looking for into a much smaller haystack.

Yes, there are plenty of ludicrous premises - real time refugee monitoring of the high seas isn't a clever one. But there are plenty of actually useful applications for this sort of technology.

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TalkTalk CEO Dido Harding pockets £2.8m

Brenda McViking

Re: Revolting shareholders...

Because, being in the FTSE250, the vast majority of talktalk shareholders are people like me and you with pension funds that they never look at, never vote at company agms, and generally don't care about so long as it provides a retirement in the future.

The pension fund managers are incentivised by the firms to go along with the board recommendations, which just mean executive remuneration packages are almost always passed without question - the fund managers simply vote with the board with everyone's shareholdings, made up of millions of smaller shareholders. A few well placed business lunches never seem to harm this arrangement either.

And nothing ever changes, until a single large shareholder with an agenda comes along, which requires several billions in clout.

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You Acer holes! PC maker leaks payment cards in e-store hack

Brenda McViking
Headmaster

Re: Happens All The Time

I'm afraid I take issue with your brutish command of the English language good sir. So naturally, after a cup of tea this fine morning, I have re-written it for you.

Consider:

Those devilish blighters working for Acer mailed sent me a letter about this last week via the outfit pretending to be Her Majesty's postal system that one uses here in the Americas. This happens so often in America the former colonies, my that of course one's card number had already been compromised prior, through some other merchant another scallywag masquerading as a purveyor of goods, so one took the liberty of disposing of this card is long gone quite some time ago as a suitable precaution. What?

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EU referendum frenzy bazookas online voter registration. It's another #GovtDigiShambles

Brenda McViking

Re: Cut the late registrants some slack

Indeed.

Whilst I was registered for a postal vote (have been for years) My flatmate only realised he wasn't registered when he didn't get a poll card through the door when everyone else did. They arrived last Friday. I also note that if the peak was around 22:15, that is suspiciously close to the BBC 10 o'clock news announcement that it was the final day to register.

People will behave like people. That black art pseudoscience, psychology, apparently shows there is a preference for organisation or spontaneity, which dictates that a large proportion of the population will indeed leave it to the last minute. Just as the other large proportion will have sorted it out months ago, and are now loudly denigrating those who aren't wired the same.

This is not new, it is not surprising, and those blaming those who do what they do naturally and register at T-5 minutes should levy their ire just as much as those who had planned the system - they too, had no excuse for not thinking this would happen and not implementing the necessary elastic capacity. The difference between these two groups, is that one were paid to do this, and the others were the reason they were employed in the first place. Hell, registering to vote should finish 2 days after the announced deadline.

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Why does an Android keyboard need to see your camera and log files – and why does it phone home to China?

Brenda McViking
Joke

My car lit up a little light and told me to "check engine"

So I did.

It's still there, under the bonnet. Silly car.

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In-flight movies via BYOD? Just what I always wan... argh no we’re all going to die!

Brenda McViking

I'll introduce the concept of a Minimum Equipment List - i.e. what can fail on an aircraft and how quickly it should be fixed (a period usually between Cat D - 120 days to Cat A - immediate). I'm guessing it a was a Cat B if the engineers tried for a couple of hours but then let it go (they might have 3-10 days under regulations) - something like a radio or autoland button. Not necessarily needed as pilots are qualified to fly without it's use but certainly a nice-to-have.

There is an example here Cessna Citation 560XL MEL

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Brenda McViking
Megaphone

Do not disturb

Is available, in the form of bose QC-series noise cancelling headphones. Several shades more than £50, and if you're an audiophile then you'll probably want to throw yourself out at 37,000ft due to their inability to reach ultrasonic, "unfaithful" 14.7kHz frequency response or some other reason I don't understand.

However, they are incredibly good at blocking engine noise, cabin announcements, screaming babies, and usually the dollies get the hint that you're completely oblivious to any attempt at communication whatsoever whilst you remain blissfully unaware. They don't stop you being tapped on the shoulder, but you can avoid that by not sitting in the aisle. Assuming you get a choice.

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Shakes on a plane: How dangerous is turbulence?

Brenda McViking

In this case, the AAIB do indeed use the word "Accident", with a specific definition that can be found here: AAIB Accident definition (GOV.UK)

Because they determine the facts, rather than apportion blame, political correctness doesn't get a look in. As it should be.

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Apple's iOS updates brick iPads

Brenda McViking
Gimp

What are you on about? I thought everyone knew that if you didn't buy your apple shiny in the last 7 days then it is no longer supported. The "bricking" is a feature, not a bug. It allows you to use old devices as an aesthetically pleasing antique paperweight. Or perhaps a tray/coaster for your single-farm-arabica soya-milk Lattes.

I mean what are you, poor?

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LG: Stop focusing on Apple and Samsung. There's us. And our G5. Look at it. Look at it

Brenda McViking

ditto. All ready to buy a flagship, only non negotiable requirement was a removable battery. LG pop up with this and yet I'm hugely uninspired by reviews.

A plastic case I could have lived with. Unibody metal cases are "apparently" what everyone wants (not me, give me good old plastic any day), so LG make one, supposedly solve the "impossible" problem of all-metal cases and removable batteries and then make it feel like... plastic. Guys, come on.....

Modularity - could be a game changer, but already I really feel as though LG are doing it no favours. High bar to becoming a developer for modules, for a single product which will of it's own accord become too niche to develop for unless something happens quickly. Classic chicken and egg scenario. LG haven't got decent modules for it - a 32 bit DAC (the phone already has 24bit audio, plus no FCC approval for the modular DAC so it wont sell in the US), and a camera grip - nothing of very much interest then, won't drive sales, risks unpopularity = no market for devs to tap into.

A wide open market to developers with super low barriers to entry might have saved the G5 - I mean, things like a projector attachment? sign me up. FLIR module - niche but I'd take it. But LG vetting applicants, all this talk of oversight to "ensure quality" just sounds like when my companies brand droids want to get involved - they'll just stifle ideas and generally prolong the process which ends up guaranteeing failure. I have to ask myself would I take the risk and develop for LG? the answer is probably no.

I really wanted to like this phone. I was all set to go out and buy one. But I have been stung by LG before, and it's making me hesitate, particularly as the reviews all find it currently lacking, with great potential upside. In my experience LG promise but don't deliver. I only hope that if this fails it isn't pinned on the fact that it had a removable battery - as this is the only thing right now that is making me consider buying one.

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HTC 10: Is this the Droid you're looking for?

Brenda McViking
FAIL

Re: Meh

I don't own a HTC, but the one thing I would consider them good at is high quality front facing, stereo speakers. The M8 did extremely well because of them, but they bring out the 10 with a different speakerset which is, judging by reviews, worse than what they previously had. Still might be the best of the bunch of the current crop of smartphone flagships, but phone speakers are generally shite. The only phone speakers that weren't were the M8's well engineered ones. But they've changed them, and as this review states, it's for the worse.

Whoever made the decision to mess with and deteriorate their one distinctive offering and strong selling point in the smartphone sector - sound - is a complete eejit. I'll bet it was to save costs - and I'll bet that the decision to save pennies ends up costing them the company. After all, the first thing an M8 upgrader (who HTCs largest target market should be) is going to want to see is that the speakers are as good, if not better than what they're supposedly "upgading" from. I'm not convinced they're going to be satisfied. We shall see.

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Woz says wearables – even Apple Watch – aren't 'compelling'

Brenda McViking
Devil

I bought a sony smartwatch 2 when my conventional watch died.

Most of the uses are completely, well, "meh" - telling the time, message notifications, having a wrist calculator, fintness apps, remote camera button. Yeah, I use them, there are fringe cases when they're useful, no, they aren't worth buying a smartwatch for. I can live with charging it once or twice a week.

There is only one thing that made it worth the £50 I paid and that's the "Find my phone" button. Means I can track the blighter down!

Squirreling it's way down the couch or hiding under cushions no longer works for the devious little smartmobe anymore, I no longer have to search 12 pockets to find which one it's in, and the watch even vibrates when it's lost connection so I know when it's tried to stay in my car without me.

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Brenda McViking

Re: Cars

However "reasonable" it is, you can still be prosecuted for going through a red light to let an emergency vehicle through.

A useful site on what you should and shouldn't do with regards to emergency vehicles in the UK:

www.bluelightaware.org.uk/

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HTC 10: Flagship goes full Google – but the hardware's top notch

Brenda McViking

Re: Yet another landfill flagship

A battery lasts me 8 months before I typically replace it. Because yes, I abuse the life out of it. I visit countries with climates that kill lithium-ion cells. My phone is in constant bluetooth communciation with other devices, and is utlised most of the working day. For £500, I get my monies worth, I am what the industry considers a "power user." Something your average happy iPhone 4S user is never going to relate to. I recently got my mums 4S battery replaced because it was completely dead. took 4 weeks for the resulting apple fuckup to get resolved.

Would you accept a non-removable battery on your car? No, because batteries are consumable - they die before the device dies. Which means any engineer worth their salt will make them replaceable. Why make that process difficult?

Power banks are no replacement for a removable battery. Bulky. Require cables. Require attachment to phone for HOURS. Very difficult to find ones that output 10W+.Their use is banned or restricted by various countries' FAAs and CAAs on aircraft (not all, but enough). They are of dubious quality even when branded (EE fiasco?). I own some, they are completely inferior to the removable batteries I also own. Need I go on...

Car charger - you try pursuading a foreign taxi driver that you need to unplug his satnav. Go on.

And as for getting wet - I'm talking complete immersion. I have a chance to get the back cover off my phone and rip out the battery before it's completely internally shorted. You don't. Niche case, perhaps, but I'm sure you know someone who has water-damaged their device. Call it my replacement for phone insurance.

Removable batteries are not a gimmick. They are a necessity for some people, particularly those who travel a lot. Back in the day, phones used to last 2 weeks between charges. Maybe when that rings true for smartphones, will I consider that it is no longer a necessity to have a removable battery. Though probably not, because of the obsolecence argument.

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Brenda McViking

Yet another landfill flagship

No removable battery = dead brick after 2 years that can't hold charge

No removable battery = can't go away for a weekend without power

No removable battery = a guarantee to kill the phone if it gets wet

No removable battery = no sale

If HTC thought they might revive their fortune with this - I can't see it, unless its pricing undercuts the wileyfox swift. The audio offering might have been impressive had the LG G5 not already grabbed the audiophile niche with their B&O tie-up, the reversion to stock android is a welcome change (though sounds like bloatware is still an issue) , but otherwise, what is innovative? what spells it's flagship status? Airplay? do I look like an Apple supporter? OIS for selfies? yes, because teenage girls can afford flagships... Did they even put in a micro SD card slot? The only thing I can tell from this review is that it isn't the droid I'm looking for...

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Europe's biggest radiotelescope in fast-burst-finding upgrade

Brenda McViking

There is also a film called "The Dish" based on the Ozzie Parkes telescope and it's role within the tracking and televising of the Apollo 11 moon landing.

It's currently on Netflix, I watched it last night, and it's really rather good.

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Homeland Security report hoses down energy-sector 'cybergeddon' talk

Brenda McViking

Re: Reality Check

Nah, the biggest threat is squirrels. Just look at the evidence!

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Brexit: Leaving the EU could trigger UK science patent law rejig

Brenda McViking
Meh

Aside from these articles being hard to read

I'm not sure they even make sense. It's claimed that the EEA provides the restrictions. The EEA is NOT the EU. Our membership of the EU has little effect on the rules we'll follow in the EEA, because it is a different supranational body. It's bloody confusing, but it also is kind of key to the article, isn't it?: Supranational european bodies (Wikipedia)

So "intellectual property rights owners that place their goods for sale in one country within the European Economic Area (EEA) generally cannot use their intellectual property rights to prevent these goods from being bought and sold within the EEA." will be completely unaffected by a brexit, unless my understanding is flawed.

As for the proposed advantages of the loss of price arbitration if we leave the EU, that's an advantage to whom, exactly? arbitration is actually a good thing, economically. It means the consumers aren't screwed by artificial price differences from place to place - so your average UK national is only charged £10 for antihistamines the same as your average French national is charged 13EUR Rather than say, £500 and 20c where some guy pays and the other guy freeloads.

Now in medicines, I agree we do need some dampeners on arbitration due to the fact that the third world cannot afford the development costs to do with drugs and the first world can. By all means vaccinate in both - I'm happy for the first world to pay 3x as much for their vaccines to cover the cost of vaccinating the third world as well. It benefits the human race as a whole. But the EU is comprised of largely 1st world countries. Price arbitration between the lot of us is surely the fairest way to do it? Why would we vote to leave for this reason?

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Blighty starts pumping out 12-sided quids

Brenda McViking
FAIL

Re: Huh?

Because it was never an April fool...

Royal mint website

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Which keys should I press to enable the CockUp feature?

Brenda McViking
Mushroom

I've been april fooled

Dabbs you Bastard.

I've messed up my displays reading this. Ctrl+Alt+right arrow isn't undone by Ctrl + Alt +Left arrow, not when you've got two screens. Arrrrggghhhhhhh. They seem to be sequentially changing and I can't revert them both.

And of course display options where I could fix it is blocked and requires administrator priviliges. HELLDESK? HELLO? I'VE BEEN AN IDIOT....

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Samsung Galaxy S7: Big brand Android flagship champ

Brenda McViking

Re: no removable battery

Damn right.

Though I'm really not the only one am I? - battery life isn't exactly down there with GLONASS support as a spec is it? No, it's just ever so slightly more important - the biggest complaint of modern smartphones by a mile in fact.

I, like many others, aspire to a phone that can last a full weekend without access to electricity - something that phones used to do, Sony's crop just about manages, and everyone else fails to do unless they slash their margins and put in a 5000mAh battery. When they gave us the option years ago to pop off the cover and replace the battery that met the requirement. Nice and simple. Not to mention the forced obsolescence of a glued in battery which as an engineer goes against my profession's moral practices regarding sustainability.

Clearly however, I've misjudged the thinking that an android flagship is designed for the bleeding edge power user, when in fact it seems nowadays it's trying to appeal to the same crowd that likes the iPhone. Shame.

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Brenda McViking

no removable battery

NO SALE.

My current phone is an S4, which I've been happy with, and I have purchased 3x new batteries to keep it going for the 3 years I've had it. I am not going to buy something that will be landfill in 2 due to its inability to hold a charge. I also like to be able to FULLY charge a phone in 15 seconds flat.

I've read the article and it looks like more of the same, incremental refinements. Nice. Sounds like what Apple would do... No doubt it is a lovely device. but it's crippled.

And whilst the author clearly doesnt think much of LG due to what was it, the lack of a decent official case? (Errr... ?) they at least have tried something different with add-ons, and have finally done the thing I've been waiting for a flagship to do for over 2 years, and thats put a removable battery in their device.

I've been waiting for Samsung through the S5 (not worth an upgrade from the S4) the S6 and the S7 (no removable batteries) and they've failed, for 3 upgrade cycles now, to produce a phone suitable for my uses. So bye Samsung, due to your repeated failure to get that most basic of requirements right, I'm off to buy an LG G5, because LG seem to be the only company actually listening.

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Swedish publishers plan summer ‘Block Party’ to thwart ad blockers

Brenda McViking
Thumb Down

Good Luck

I wish them good luck, and will be hoping that they realise how much of disaster blocking the blockers turns out to be.

Ads are an enormous parasitic drain on the internet. Blocking them is fast becoming mandatory for anyone who gives a shit about security and any semblance of privacy, and the ad companies only have themselves to blame.

Whilst online "content" needs to be paid for somehow, it doesn't mean we should allow consumers up to be mugged. Publishers need to find some middle ground, demanding that people stop using security software is never going to work. They seem to like adding "share to facebook" buttons everywhere, but never seem to have made the step to micropayments services like flattr, produced by those very same bad people who ran the pirate bay. I'll happily give you a few pence per article, but I'll boycott you if you penalise me for using an adblocker.

33
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Seagate says it's scooped the 'fastest ever PCIe drive' record

Brenda McViking

Well according to this:

Corsair DDR3 vs DDR4 bandwidths

It would appear that quad-channel DDR4 at high clock speeds (Sept 2015 figures) could manage between 60GB/s read and 50GB/s write.

EDIT: shifty powers beat me to it

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Brenda McViking
Trollface

Trevor, are you listening?

Paging Trevor Pott

This changes everything - THERE'S A FASTER SSD OUT!

Dear storage industry: shut up

SSD go fast. This is not rocket surgery. If I see another press release about an internet catfight regarding just how much beyond "more than fast enough" some bit of overly expensive rubbish can go, I think I'll lose what's left of my mind.

If you'd be so kind as to film yourself losing your mind and upload the video to youtube for our general amusement, it'd be much appreciated.

7
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Nearly a million retail jobs will be destroyed by the march of tech, warns trade body

Brenda McViking
Holmes

A million jobs lost

I read this in Worstall terms - the retail industry is now getting more efficient and will have lower operating costs to pass on to consumers. Those who are employed will soon be free to do something more valuable within society, and as society we are as a whole, richer for it, as we are getting more productivity from fewer people.

After all, no doubt there was hand-wringing when combine harvesters put a million threshers out of work, but then again it doesn't cost 3 hours' minimum wage for a bag of flour any more does it? And whilst some of the previously employed languished for the rest of their days on the dole, telling mail journos that immigrants and the old prime minister were to blame for their ills, more of them went and got higher paying jobs in other sectors, and so society progressed...

7
4

LG’s modular G5 stunner shuns the Lego aesthetic

Brenda McViking

Re: Sorry LG, the idea is doomed.

Well I'd go for it.

Better grip and extra battery, together with dedicated camera button - why not? Agree that it is a niche product, but that'd be the whole point of this kind of modularity - if I'm going on Holidays, I'd take this attachment. Off to the office, I won't bother.

Whether this works depends on who LG partner with (or better yet, make it open source and see what comes your way), but high quality DACs are wanted by the audiophile market, and you've got potentially many offerings for those who want something a bit different within their own niche.

How about a FLIR attachment? night vision, an extender offering a USB hub? Much higher quality microphones, or a conference speaker set up. Laser measuring devices, LED projection equipment. If this was done properly then it could really be a full differentiator and actually really rather useful. There are plenty of things that could be used with the processing power of the phone which would add too much bulk by themselves (or their permanent inclusion would just provide too much of a power drain) but incorporated into an add-on like this and designed for temporary use could work rather well.

We'll see. If Apple had come up with this then everyone would be praising their ingenious foresight. As it's LG, well, someone has to continue the innovation to let Apple "change the world" by including it in their products in 5 years time once the bugs are ironed out. and then sue you in 10 for "copying."

12
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No tit for tat, or should that be tat for tit ... Women selling stuff on eBay get lower bids

Brenda McViking
Paris Hilton

Re: What's in a name?

But you'd pay me 7% more if I got with Alison, right?

Paris because she's also a naughty girl.

1
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Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge: Betting on VR with a dash of Vulkan

Brenda McViking
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Woooaaa we're halfway there....

So I have £700 burning a flagship sized hole in my pocket for my long-awaited Galaxy S4 upgrade. and I do mean "upgrade." And I have 2 features I will not compromise on. 1 - uSD card slot. 2 - removable battery.

But this is yet another downgrade due to the fact it has no removable battery. SGS7, you're fired. NEXT!

...well hellllooooo LG G5, what do we have here? a manufacturer who actually gets it?

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There’s a module for that: LG launches G5 smartphone complete with 'friends'

Brenda McViking
Thumb Up

Finally.

Someone was listening.

a removable battery, and an SD card? was it too much to ask? No! of course it wasn't.

And this also looks like a proper flagship for a change - something that does it differently, tries something new in the flatlining smartphone technological arena - whilst the whole modular thing is open to debate as to whether it is useful, it does mean that LG might be the first manufacturer in 4 years that might actually pursuade me to part with my SGS4! Flagships are supposed to be those which push the boundaries, and this is the first i've seen in years that qualifies. Type C USB? about ruddy time.

I was going to look at the S7, but due to the fact it is landfill in 2 years with a welded/glued/rivetted in battery, Samsung can get lost. No doubt a refined smartphone, but nothing new, so of no interest to me.

Bravo LG, you appear to have listened and innovated, unlike every other manufacturer out there right now. Now if only you hadn't burnt me with (horrific lack of) android software updates in the past...

5
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Helpdesk? I have a software problem. And a GRIZZLY BEAR problem

Brenda McViking
Devil

Re: animal influences on the job.

Ha ha, that reminds me of Cyber Squirrel 1, the website dedicated to all the animals engaged in infrastructure-destruction terrorism.

4
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Did water rocket threaten Brum airport Airbus?

Brenda McViking
Holmes

Re: Strongbow?

If you grew up in Birmingham you'd know that Basall Common is a proper posh neck of the woods. I mean its so far on the outskirts that people don't even speak with a brummie accent.

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