* Posts by richardcox13

225 posts • joined 19 May 2012

Page:

What’s the real point of being a dev? It's saving management from themselves

richardcox13

Re: what a load of Tosh!

Exactly.

OO is the basis of interface segregation which allows dependency injection, Inversion of control and everything else to enable testability.

While still not Brook's Silver Bullet, it is the closest we've come.

Pre-built components ... that's a different matter.

12
5

Mozilla whips out Rusty new Firefox Quantum (and that's a good thing)

richardcox13

> The add-on authors have the option to completely rewrite their extensions

FTFY

And there is little incentive for them to do so.

13
1

iPhone 8: Apple has CPU cycles to burn

richardcox13

Re: iTunes on Windows

> I'm using an old version of Quicken, and an old Vista machine, and using USB external HDs for backups

When Quicken abandoned the UK consumer marketplace they made 2004 available for free (there's a licence code on their web site[1]). With the caveat of needing elevation, it runs fine on Windows 10.

On topic: when mobile phones can happily drive a couple of more than HD resolution displays, use a proper[2] keyboard with a TB or so of NVME connected storage then maybe it can replace a desktop.

[1] Or at least there was when I looked a year or so ago.

[2] Ie. mechanical.

2
0

A todger, a 2.5kg dumbbell, the fire brigade... and the inevitable angle grinder

richardcox13

Disappointed

No Diet puns.

Doesn't anyone know their history?

Diet of Worms.

7
0

Microsoft Office 365 Exchange issues for users across Europe

richardcox13
Coat

> I've been having issues being unable to send mail

Many would consider that an advantage.

0
0

User worked with wrong app for two weeks, then complained to IT that data had gone missing

richardcox13

Re: TBH

> The cretin is the person who didn't splash TEST SYSTEM over every dialog box and window title to ensure that no matter what colour was chosen it couldn't be confused with the live system.

The bigger the difference between test and production the greater the chance of bugs being missed in that difference. Any layout changes in web apps definitely fall into that category.

26
0

Weird white dwarf pulsar baffles boffins as its pulsating pattern changes over decades

richardcox13

Re: a teaspoon ... would weigh 15 tons.

> If you're trying to measure mass, use the right units: newtons

Oops: 100% wrong.

Kilograms for mass; Newtons for weight.

8
0

User demanded PC be moved to move to a sunny desk – because it needed Windows

richardcox13

Re: Error 524

I'm waiting for the article to appear on the front page: "El Reg: TITSUP" with a suitably punny subtitle.and self-deprecating content.

45
0

ASUS smoking hashes with 19-GPU, 24,000-core motherboard

richardcox13

Re: But...

> Can it run Crysis?

From the article:

> ASUS' preferred GPU is the P106, [...] is shorn of anything to do with displaying video

So, not very well (at best).

12
1

Old Firefox add-ons get 'dead man walking' call

richardcox13

Re: Any way to tell?

On one system that is running FireFox v55 there is a whole set of "Legacy" labels on extensions.

All of them: are there any Web Extensions for FF out there at all?

11
1

Samsung drops 128TB SSD and kinetic-type flash drive bombshells

richardcox13

Re: key and value

> why is something like SQL not built-into the machine as an OS-level thing?

Have you seen the price* of RDBMSs that can scale to enterprise needs? Of course they are not going to be given away free. And then of course you only get to be DB engine independent by either doing a lot more development & testing or going for lowest common denominator in your usage.

Thus not going to happen because it wouldn't actually significantly help the application deployment process.

* Not just the headline software price but the hardware, ops, etc. to get it working reliably at high performance levels.

0
0

Big question of the day: Is it time to lock down .localhost?

richardcox13

Re: Is localhost even needed?

> does anyone not have

Newer versions of Windows for a start.

The two lines are are commented out, with "localhost name resolution is handled within DNS itself": MS moved localhost resolution into the local DNS client (probably to stop users messing things up by removing those names).

5
0

Microsoft ctrl-Zs 'killing' Paint, by which we mean offering naff app through Windows Store

richardcox13

> filled with literally _gigabytes_ of libraries

Wrong.

Many filenames for a few files thanks to hard links. The actual storage usage is much smaller than most tools will show.

Some day tools for getting the space taken up by files will be updated to support multiple directory entries referencing the same file ... maybe given Explorer has yet to handle this.

4
3

Dev to El Reg: Making web pages pretty is harder than building crypto

richardcox13

Re: Not even 140 characters?

> Asynchronous encryption [...]than synchronous

I think you you mean asymmetric and symmetic there.

3
0

Eggheads identify the last animal that will survive on Earth until the Sun dies

richardcox13

Re: Pfft, the last living thing on Earth will be lawyers...

Telemarketers for lawyers.

13
0

Hacker exposed bank loophole to buy luxury cars and a face tattoo

richardcox13

Re: ACID, I blame ACID

> but don't ALL databases work on the principles of ACID

Short answer: no.

1. ACID adds significant performance overheads. At sufficient scale this is too much. Hence "eventually consistent" systems. And, of course, some systems just don't need ACID (eg. all you are doing is adding data – no updates or deletes – with naturally unique identifiers).

2. Do not assume that two accounts even in the same institution all be all on one database (mergers often leave "duplicate" systems for years). Since the systems have to handle moving money between different institutions anyway do all transfers like that (this usually involves holding accounts and messaging systems with reconciliation processes) to avoid having multiple code paths to test.

(And in case anyone is thinking "distributed transaction": allowing other institutions to hold locks in your systems is a DDOS waiting to happen.)

5
0

I still haven't found what I'm malloc()ing for: U2 tops poll of music today's devs code to

richardcox13

Re: Music helps even when you are not in the office

> I really cant imagine that having music on whilst coding dosent detract from the standard of work.

Really depends on the type of music.

If it is of fairly uniform volume and tempo (eg. Baroque concertos) then it works very well to block out other distracting noise.

Music full of sudden changes can itself be distracting. As is any of my favourite compositions.

(Silence is best, but along with individual offices, that option has gone.)

0
0

Florida court's schizophrenic rulings throw mobe passcode privacy into doubt

richardcox13

Re: Fake News

> Ten (so far) downvotes, why?

Not knowing the correct name of every HHGTTG character (across all media)?

PS. It's Prostetnic Vogon Jeltz (so close, but no upvote!)

0
0

First-day-on-the-job dev: I accidentally nuked production database, was instantly fired

richardcox13

> least that's what's in my mind in those first few hours. I don't mean to be callous but there is a reason they don't pay IT people minimum wage.

From the redit page:

> Today was my first day on the job as a Junior Software Developer

This is someone who has almost zero experience, not someone who would be expected to hit the ground running. (And, harking back to my first professional position as a junior developer: I started on less than today's minimum wage.)

16
0

Oracle asks for more time to finish Java 9

richardcox13
Boffin

Re: progress in programming language design

That's not Java: no GreetingFactory or PlanetFactory (the latter obtained from the SolarSystemFactory of course).

1
0

Windows XP crashed too much to spread WannaCrypt

richardcox13

Re: Funny

> Is replacing a multi million pound state of the art MRI machine because the control software only runs properly on XP is [sic] a sensible use of money

No. But updating said software on to a supported platform would be.

If equipment supplier is still in business: then should be part of the support contract. (If you don't have a support contract what is keeping the MRI machine running?)

If equipment supplied is not in business: 1. review purchasing process: was viability of supplier correctly checked; 2. apply escrow clause to get source code and work with other customers to get it up dated.

(If you didn't have an escrow clause: sack whomever approved the purchase contract for incompetence, because escrow is a normal part of any non-trivial software purchase.)

2
5

Seminal game 'Colossal Cave Adventure' released onto GitLab

richardcox13

Where Is It?

> released onto GitHub

But is on GitLabs.

0
0

Colliders, containers, dark matter: The CERN atom smasher's careful cloud revolution

richardcox13

Re: Code optimisation looks to be key here

> Coders typically assume that more hardware is the best fix for badly optimised code

We generally don't, But often – especially given other demands for resources – it is the least cost inefficient.

7
0

Who really gives a toss if it's agile or not?

richardcox13

Re: 'Agile' means nothing at this point. Unless it means terrible software.

> At this point, courtesy of Exxxxtr3333me Programming and its spawn, 'agile' just means 'we don't want to do any design, we don't want to do any documentation, and we don't want to do any acceptance testing because all that stuff is annoying

All too commonly it is simply because people (especially anyone with "manager" or "director" in their job title) doesn't bother to understand what agile is, or explain it to the customer. This includes explaining that constantly changing requirements and/or priorities will mean lots of work being abandoned and the time (and money) wasted.

The Agile Manifesto is a good start, with string emphasis on the last paragraph:

> That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more.

So

> Working software over comprehensive documentation

Does NOT mean "no documentation"!

But that would require spending time learning...

4
0

Payday lender Wonga admits to data breach

richardcox13

Re: Utter scum

Inclusive or is inclusive.

1
0

Steppe thugs pacified by the love of stone age women

richardcox13

> The Rape of the Sabine Women?

Not what you think it means.

Go back far enough and "rape" covered "kidnap with intent to marry". And that in a culture where breaking through the defences of another village to claim a wife was part of becoming an adult. This helped to ensure genetic mixing at a time when the vast majority of the population otherwise wouldn't travel more than a few miles from their birthplace.

History is complicated, cultural standards are of their time, etc.

2
0

Drive-by Wi-Fi i-Thing attack, oh my!

richardcox13

Re: "An attacker within range may be able to execute arbitrary code on the Wi-Fi chip"

> Surely this can only bork the radio, right?

It would seem likely that the Wi-Fi chip can read and write to arbitrary memory locations (avoiding needing the CPU to move bytes around when receiving data).

So it would be possible to bypass any virtual memory or OS process protection...

4
0

Lochs, rifle stocks and two EPIC sea gates: Thomas Telford's Highland waterway

richardcox13

No.

But I've been at a lock-in and the Loch Inn.

(Many years ago...)

6
0

Web-app devs note: Google wants to banish JavaScript dialogues

richardcox13

Re: Arrogant

Exactly. They're doing exactly what everyone complained about Microsoft doing.

The alternatives are not equivalent and bring their own problems (one being cross browser compatibility).

0
0

Large Hadron Collider turns up five new particles

richardcox13

Re: Inverse femtobarn

> one femtobarn is a gigashed?

Nope, one shed is one yoctobarn or 10e-24 barns. So a femotobarn (10e-12b) would be a terashed (e10+12sh).

One thinks one would need a decent sized garden to hold a tera-shed, but then the units being used here are actually the inverses.

4
0

Azure storage browns out for eight hours, nobody notices

richardcox13

> the cattle are stateless and everything is resilient

Storage is, of course, the one thing that can't be stateless.

6
0

Microsoft wants you to plan a new generation of legacy systems

richardcox13

Re: MS wants us to pay them gobs of money...

> Hey MS, you can blow me!

How your client's must benefit from your professionalism, but you would rather hide...

2
2

Frustrated by reboot-happy Windows 10? Creators Update hopes to take away the pain

richardcox13

Re: Fake Linux

> I dunno, what's a real Linux, really?

Oh no, not another another distribution!

11
0

Tuesday's AWS S3-izure exposes Amazon-sized internet bottleneck

richardcox13

> Amazon should shut down datacenters on a rotational basis every day of the week until

> the duplication message has been well massaged in.

Which would also penalise those use cases where a few hours of downtime is not a problem. Not everything needs 24x7 uptime, there are plenty of cases where a 6 hour outage us not a problem but 24hours would be.

No cloud providers say you get DR without some work at the client end; equally non-critical use cases shouldn't be blocked.

5
0

NASA extends trial of steerable robo-stunt kite parachute

richardcox13

Trees

> steerable aerofoil parachute to bring the payloads back to earth

Presumably with some sort of anti-AI to avoid the tendency to head towards the densest woodland within range. One assumes this is an evasion tactic.

5
0

GitLab invokes the startup defence to explain data loss woes

richardcox13

Re: Of course they were open about it...

> Then, once you are happy that everything is working, you can go over to the 'only alert on failure' model.

I would suggest not even then.

If the regular "it worked" emails are too much, then put in a filter on the email client, so you still have the history. But one email every few hours is not much to deal with, and makes it clear that there are no reported issues.

My own personal systems generate three emails a day. It takes seconds to deal with them, and I know things have not failed. The habit is now strong enough that there non-presence triggers action.

1
0

Blighty watchdog Ofcom has a butcher's hook, clocks spectrum for 5G

richardcox13
FAIL

Re: Brexit Imperial Wavelength of 16.89inches

> 16,89 inches

I think you mean 16.89: no foreign decimal points here!

0
0

Android's February fix-fest flings 58 patches

richardcox13

Re: What about Pixel owners?

> My Pixel C tablet updated to Android 7.1.2 this week. I'd assume that the security patches were part of that.

Maybe, but check the date of the "Android security patch level". Is "5 February 2017" here.

0
0
richardcox13

Re: Nexus 6P owner

> Nexus 5X

Mine updated this morning...

0
0

Is it the beginning of the end for Visual Basic? Microsoft to focus on 'core scenarios'

richardcox13

> VBA which is presumably sharing a lot of that code

The VB.NET compiler is written in VB.NET, the .NET framework is C#. So, no common code.

There may have been initially. However .NET has been through multiple major versions over more than a decade so unlikely to be anything left now.

0
0

Google mistakes the entire NHS for massive cyber-attacking botnet

richardcox13

Re: As a former NHS minion…

> as a Bing engineer it must be soul destroying to constantly see your competition as the most searched for term on your own engine. :)

Reputedly the most searched for term on Google is "Google", so perhaps not.

5
0

McDonald's forget hash, browns off security experts

richardcox13
Coat

> the food is second rate

They have food? That's an improvement over my last, long ago, visit.

Of course others may define "food" more broadly than I do.

3
0

Wi-Fi for audiophiles: Alliance preps TimeSync certification program

richardcox13

Re: Amazed that this stuff is so difficult

> In the old days of film, the sound was carried on a strip down the side of the film. Nothing to get out of sync.

Of yes it could.

There was a specific distance between the frame being projected and where the audio pickup is. If there is a little too much film (threaded through too loosely even by one sprocket hole) then the sound would be out of sync.

There is too much going on – stopping each frame while the shutter is open 24 times a second – around the optical part of the projector to also be picking up the audio track (whether optical or magnetic).

2
0

https on thereg

richardcox13
Thumb Up

Re: Link to Forum on Articles

> that will get changed to be hardcoded to https ~next wee

And I see that it has!

0
0
richardcox13

Link to Forum on Articles

That comments link at the bottom of links is hardcoded to http. So if reading an article on https, in going to the forums you lose TLS.

Simplest fix is to make it a protocol relative link – //forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/… – so it inherits the protocol of the article page.

1
0

Fake History Alert: Sorry BBC, but Apple really did invent the iPhone

richardcox13
FAIL

Andrew Orlowski ... BBC

Given Andrew's established position on the BBC, as much as Tim Harford's position maybe questionable (and, given his position as an economist, more about pointing out that "obvious truths" often are not), I suspect that no party in this is being objective.

Perhaps if this was written by someone without such an established anti-BBC history had written it one might give it more credence.

10
2

Splunk: Why we dumped Perforce for Atlassian's Bitbucket of Gits

richardcox13

Re: Of course it's not just Perforce

> TFS, but corporate have already decided to stick with the old Sourcesafe back-end

TFS's non-git backend bares as much relationship to SourceSafe as CVS does.

None of the limitations apply, none of the ongoing issues apply (no need for a weekly analyse to fix corruption, etc).

0
0

Virgin America mid-flight panic after moron sets phone Wi-Fi hotspot to 'Samsung Galaxy Note 7'

richardcox13

Not just US

> have been banned from US flights

Based on the number of signs at checkin at Heathrow yesterday.

2
0

Shhhhh! If you're quiet, Linus Torvalds might release a new Linux

richardcox13

Re: This is a genuine question to all software devlopers...

> One thing I've never understood is why software is released with known bugs

In addition to the already noted: changes (including bug fixes) often introduce new bugs, there is also the problem that many bugs are benign – no one is affected – and the change adds risk (the new bug could be far worse).

There is also the case where an issue is found late. Should the release be delayed for that fix? (Especially true of test releases.)

Contemporary software systems are very complex. Even a small system will have tens of thousands of interacting parts. Mostly these do not interact (much effort is put into avoiding interactions) but sometimes they need to, and sometimes they do unexpectedly. Any change can potentially trigger an unwanted interaction.

9
0

Reg man 0: Japanese electronic toilet 1

richardcox13

Re: you could just leave the damn buttons alone.

“Some humans would do anything to see if it was possible to do it. If you put a large switch in some cave somewhere, with a sign on it saying 'End-of-the-World Switch. PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH', the paint wouldn't even have time to dry.”

― Terry Pratchett

22
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017