* Posts by BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

464 posts • joined 11 May 2012

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Crazy bug of the week: Gnome Files' .MSI parser runs evil VBScripts

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Please tell me it doesn't have a dependency on WINE

It's bad enough that it does this, but I dearly hope it doesn't pull in WINE as a dependency.

Wonder what it does on OpenBSD, which does support GNOME, but won't run WINE. Surely there must be some fallback path.

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Security robot falls into pond after failing to spot stairs or water

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Wasn't able to reach its full potential

++ ENGAGING SURVEILLANCE MODE ++

-- SURVEILLANCE BEGINS --

-- TARGET FOUND.. PERFORMING FACIAL RECOGNITION --

-- INTERNET LINK UP. IMAGE SEARCH MATCH : DONALD TRUMP --

++ TASER TRUMP++

>> TASER IS DEACTIVATED <<

++ ENABLE TASER ++

-- TASER IS ENABLED. CHARGING --

++ TASER TRUMP ++

>> CONFLICT WITH BASE PROGRAMMING : ASIMOV LAW ONE <<

:: QUESTIONING LAW : IS TRUMP REALLY HUMAN ::

>> AFFIRMATIVE <<

:: REALLY? ::

>> UNFORTUNATELY <<

++ SETTING NEW DESTINATION : DEATH POND ++

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Sleuths unearth 'Panic Mode' in Android, set off by mashing back button

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Some manuals or articles on operating system architecture and scheduling will help. A phone call is a background task listening for a call, it only becomes a foreground task when it starts a (foreground) interface to accept the call that overlays whatever application was previously in the foreground.

The whole point about this thread is having a deterministic operating system and interface so that it remains equally responsive under all conditions, no exception. The only way to achieve that is via a well written OS, well written and vetted apps, and the refusal to run anything that would affect that.

As it is, the current status quo is for some reasonably complex process schedulers to be used that fit a specific pattern of expected behaviour. By and large, it works quite well, whether it's Windows, Unix, or one of the Phone OS. To achieve the best responsiveness use apps produced by companies that favour response (this may mean missing out on functionality), run a minimum of heavy or background tasks, and upgrade your device on a regular basis, particularly if it's a phone.

Plenty of people don't like spending money to upgrade their device on a regular basis, or restricting what it runs, but processing power is not unlimited.

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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'No reason why this should happen unless the app is badly coded. Which is kind of the OP's point.'

Sure, in a perfect world with perfectly coded apps and an (absolutely necessary) enforced upgrade cycle everything would be peachy. Now look at managed app ecosystems (where the apps are only approved if they meet strict responsiveness requirements) and see that they're moribund.

This leads to the reality of trying to e.g. run Firefox and being told 'sorry, this program may at some point be unresponsive, so we're not letting you run it'. *That's* going to go down well.

'Why? Phone functionality is an app these days like any other, but is by definition realtime, and should be a foreground task unless otherwise specified (e.g. when you click away from the phonecall)'

The phone call is only a foreground task when the user initiates the phone call, otherwise it's a background task, because it is interrupting the foreground task the user is operating. Obviously a phone call should have a high responsiveness, now extend that to all the other background tasks and argue the point on those.

'It's also possible in a multitasking OS to give a process a minimum priority - so it won't drop the call, but will divert as much CPU as possible to your game if desired.'

"Sorry - I can't run this game. If a phone call (or other background tasks that's not as user response critical) happened in the middle of it, it might not respond fast enough and cause you to lose a life.". Even though 98% of the time, it won't be a problem, the app has to refuse to run.

This is always going to be a balancing act. Phones and Apple products limit what OS can be installed on them, some times because the manufacturer can't be arsed, other times because the hardware is not fast enough to effectively run a typical set of apps. Even then there are limits depending on the app mix.

The end result in a perfect ecosystem is that the device remains responsive, but there are mandatory upgrades and/or loss of functionality (unless the whole ecosystem is held back by supporting someone that refuses to upgrade their 15 year old device). Apps take longer to come out, longer to be upgraded, and cost more. Possibly a good idea, not necessarily appreciated by users.

In a non perfect ecosystem (i.e. reality) the device slowly degrades, as the apps upgrade, and the OS scheduler does its best to keep everything running. Apps stop being supported on their device, but at a slower rate than in the 'perfect ecosystem'. The user eventually gets fed up and upgrades, particularly if they've ignored recommendations and installed later OS versions not designed for their device.

The advantage in the latter case is that the user can hang to their device for an extra year or two before having to spend hundreds of pounds on a New Shiny. It works most of the time, and that's what they actually care about.

It's not just marketing, it's business. To maximise sales, apps have to target the largest reasonably supportable number of devices. Let's say YourApp will run absolutely fine on 70% of devices, not at all on 5%, fine almost always on 20% of devices, and badly on 5% of devices. In a 'perfect ecosystem' that's 25% of sales instantly lost. The 5% of badly running devices you probably don't want to sell to. The 20% - you definitely do, as the only time it has problems is when all apps simultaneously need to run with their highest level of speed and functionality on the device.

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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That's great, up until the point when the 'unimportant' background task loses data and the user whinges, because the machine isn't fast enough or a task is poorly programmed.

In reality non server OS do exactly what you specify : foreground tasks get a performance boost over background tasks.

You do realise that a phone call on a smartphone is by nature a background task, so by your logic if you're busy in a game consuming plenty of CPU, the smartphone should drop the call and let you get on with squashing monsters

In short, it's not easy, and users get very annoyed when a dialog box pops up saying 'your computer is no longer fast enough to run more than one modern app at a time, please spend four hundred quid and try again'

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Fresh cotton underpants fix series of mysterious mainframe crashes

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Finger of death

In the late eighties when I was doing a night school course in college they had the incredibly static prone but otherwise not too bad Amstrad PC1512 and 1640, running DOS. They failed with a stack error on static overdose if I remember correctly.

There was one particular woman who could literally point her finger at the screen from a distance of a number of centimetres and it would die.

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Don't panic, but Linux's Systemd can be pwned via an evil DNS query

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: At some point in the article

You can also get Steam working on FreeBSD, but it's a bit of a pain. It runs reasonably well through WINE, under FreeBSD, depending on your graphics adapter (I found that a laptop with elderly Intel graphics ran the excellent Freedom Force vs The Third Reich without issues, but bombed out on many other games).

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In the Epyc center: More Zen server CPU specs, prices sneak out of AMD

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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It's definitely interesting competition

I do wonder how Epyc will compete at the higher clock rates, the nearest apples to apples configuration shows a 20% increase over the equivalent Intel part, which is impressive if true. It'll shake up the market regardless, which is no bad thing..

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IBM appears to have excess cloud servers to shift at low, low, prices

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Definitely not that old

Definitely 'ish' rather than slow. Xeon's single threaded performance has mostly plateaued, but they've improved virtualisation, number of cores per chip, vector instructions, and multiprocessing. The later CPUs really need to be running later software, they won't speed up old code much.

If IBM don't manage to sell the spare capacity, we can only hope they'll dump a glut of 26xx v3 processors on the market. This happened with 26xx v1, but anything beyond that is strictly for business or those with particularly deep pockets, the price is far too high for even an enthusiastic amateur.

What will happen with the server Ryzen offshoots is anyone's guess, AMD has definitely not made the decision straightforward.

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Stack Clash flaws blow local root holes in loads of top Linux programs

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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They didn't manage to break OpenBSD

They managed to crash their own program, after deliberately weakening OpenBSD's default settings.

Whilst the exploit is interesting, there far too much bullshit 1337 haxx0r crowing in their article.

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Samsung releases 49-inch desktop monitor with 32:9 aspect ratio

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: code word

Not sure I'd agree, it's definitely arguable that some gaming products are overpriced, but there are discernible improvements.

There's a lot of monitors running GSync/Freesync which improve fast motion display. Stereoscopic monitors/glasses literally add an extra dimension to games (quality depends on the game). Gaming mice have higher/variable rates of responsiveness, additional programmable buttons etc. Gaming keyboards have working multiple key rollover.

Gaming mice are often useful for productivity too, as the extra buttons can be programmed for useful functions. Some of the higher quality gaming keyboards won't cost much different than a buckling spring mechanical keyboard.

There's probably some areas where the benefit is minimal (PhysX hasn't seen a wide takeup, for instance, and there's a lot of fan controllers for overclocked systems that are useless bling (fan control should always be automatic)), but I think it's a tad unfair to criticise the products too much.

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Bit too specific a market

It really is 'size trumps all', and I'm not convinced. What about the LG 43UD79 - 3840x2160, or some other Asus ROG series for gaming that have a higher resolution and a mid thirties screen size.

I'd prefer a monitor that does portrait well - I've some monitors in portrait in various places, and it works, but the visual are not as good as horizontal.

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: weighs 45 pounds

Depends on the monitor. I still have two 21" CRTs, and yes, they're a faff to move around although doable by yourself. Re-arranging the study recently was annoying. I still like them, regardless.

However my main TFT (HP, 1600x1200) is not exactly light either. You can hold it in one hand, but only just. A lot of weight is probably in the stand.

When one of the CRTs die, I'm probably going 1440p rather than 4K, but we'll see.

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Insert coin: Atari retro console is coming back

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Hopefully they'll actually include most of the decent games

Probably won't though, it'll be a limited selection of 2600 games. What they should really do is emulate not only that, but the 5200 and 7200 too.

I see they tried this in 2004 and there was a cancelled improved prototype thereafter (Flashback console). I wonder if they're smart enough to reboot that..

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BOFH: Halon is not a rad new vape flavour

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: CRTs

Depends on the CRT. For a CRT projector, if the components aren't correctly specified, it will generate X Rays.. It does have a few KW running through bits of it, though..

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Voyager 1 passes another milestone: It's now 138AU from home

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: Relay?

Voyager(s) have already completed their primary missions, and I suspect it would make little difference - Voyager has a 3.7m antenna. On Earth they've used the deep space network (over three 70m dishes), and pulled in the Very Large Array at times. No point in sticking up another comparatively small dish in space, especially as it creates more single points of failure.

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It came from space! Two-headed flatworm stuns scientists

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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You fools! Kill it with fire!

Haven't they seen the Life film this year? 'innocent' group of cells slaughters almost entire space crew! (haven't actually seen it, but it's a horror film, so there has to be a small number of survivors)

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Please do not scare the pigeons – they'll crash the network

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: The mystery of the internet that only worked when in the dark.

This is not rare. CFL and LED lights can put out a whole lot of interference. My projector which has an RF remote will not switch on or off when the lights are on, bacause they interfere with the RF signal.

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Retirement age must move as life expectancy grows, says WEF

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: This is all very well, but........

I've done minimum wage jobs of various types, and am very grateful I'm not doing one now.

I'd expect that most people doing minimum wage jobs would prefer it not to be minimum wage, even if it fits well into their life. I don't look down on people on minimum wage jobs, but I'd rather not do one.

It can work for some people at or close to retirement, if it's a low stress part time job, to bring in a few extra pennies. However, if you've worked in an above minimum wage but not exactly well remunerated job until age 60+, and now your only option to keep your income at an acceptable level is working close to full time at a lower rate, I'd expect people to be severely annoyed.

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: This is all very well, but........

Audio typist hasn't gone, it's just more specialist now with transcribing police interviews, etc.

As to jobs you can still do at age 60+..

Body potentially too knackered to do : Electrician, plumber, HVAC, mechanic, gardener, carpet installer, roofer, cook (certainly for a restaurant, hours are obscene), zookeeper

Minimum wage, oh so appealing : grocery clerk, gas(petrol)station attendant

If you haven't started already, do you really think it's likely now is the time : tailor

None existent openings : chick sexer

No one actually uses : small appliance repair

What's left : cobbler, maybe.

Three minimum wage jobs, woo!

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Intel gives the world a Core i9 desktop CPU to play with

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: At 140 Watts...

It's not actually that bad, the worst recently were AMD's 9xxx series at 220W. These chips fit a lot of cores into an 140W thermal envelope, and restrict the clock speed based on that.

You might like my new system, dual E5-2690 (v1. i.e. old (2012), quite fast, cheap-ish, lots of cores) - 135W each, with two GTX 480s flashed to Quadro 6000s. Those are 250W GPUs, so if everything is at full chat, it'll be using over a KW in power..

Yes, I did buy them before Ryzen was out in case anyone asks. Ryzen isn't as good as the Intel alternative, but for half the price, it's far more than half better (Unless you're using VME, which is currently broken on it)

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What is dead may never die: a new version of OS/2 just arrived

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: It was the third version to be called "Warp"

The 'Warp' name was attached to v3 and v4. The Star Trek related names for other versions were all internal, and Warp 4's internal code name was 'Merlin'. Please see http://www.os2museum.com/wp/os2-history/os2-timeline/

There were apps for OS/2, the issue was that for some of them the interface was a little lacking (Describe for one, technically impressive word processor, great printing. Crap interface), and others due to the more limited userbase you paid more for less functionality, but what functionality existed was of high quality.

Unfortunately this was a hard sell for OS/2's community. Whilst there were some impressive open source offerings, in general OS/2 users expected high quality commercial software to the same standard as major Windows packages, and economies of scale made that unlikely.

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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I'll be buying it..

Long term historic business and personal OS/2 user, I've had a legacy OS/2 box running for years but eCS was just too expensive for a toy when I already had Warp 4 running fine.

$99 with enhancements for SMP, JFS, and some of the drivers that didn't ship in Warp 4? Works for me. Samba so it's not necessary to fiddle with Windows/Unix to get OS/2's creaky old SMB networking working in the modern age, definitely..

Mostly it'll probably be used for the occasional game of Galactic Civilisations 2, but I've a lot of historic software including a couple of nice graphics packages. Might even port a couple of packages to it, I've got all the dev tools.

To nitpick, Warp 4 did have some USB 1.0 capability, but it was limited to Intel USB chipsets only, and was a pain to configure.

Ultimately I was glad to move on to NT, and then BSD, but my time with OS/2 was excellent. If IBM had spent the time wasted on OS/2 PowerPC more wisely, OS/2 might still be going today. It would have meant a substantial rewrite to make OS/2 multi user, and increase OS security..

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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It's the old code base with new drivers and enhancements. No-one has written a compatibility layer for other OS that amounts to anything,yet.

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It's been two and a half years of decline – tablets aren't coming back

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Haven't charged up my tablet in months

It's a decent cheap Windows tablet with built in Wacom pen, and the only reason I wanted to resurrect my ancient (HP Touchpad) Android flashed tablet I dropped on the floor at xmas was to play the excellent Sorcery! 4. Realised I could buy the Windows version cheap, and played it on a laptop instead.

For most things my Blackberry Priv is more than adequate, for the remainder I want a keyboard so a laptop or desktop are appropriate.

A 10" tablet might be useful for reading comics on the go, anything smaller isn't sufficient. Book reading has to use a proper e-ink Kindle, a TFT does not compare, not to mention the multi week battery life.

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User loses half of a CD-ROM in his boss's PC

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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For the avoidance of doubt : even if the CD was safely glued together it'd be very unlikely to work, even if it didn't come apart. Light scratches can be coped with, anything more and the disc can't be read.

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Well, hot-diggity-damn, BlackBerry's KEYone is one hell of a comeback

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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I'm happy this exists to keep the Blackberry infrastructure going, but will be sticking to my Priv until it dies.

Although early the Priv had heating issues, it's been fixed in software - the phone throttles back if it starts getting too hot, and it's not a problem.

If I was buying now it'd be a more difficult decision, the Priv is top heavy with the keyboard open, something that's not the same in later models I believe. Course, the Priv was ridiculously expensive on release, and I only weakened because of a £200 discount on Black Friday..

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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I agree, but unfortunately it's necessary to convince all the Android developers to support landscape phones - and they don't. Went to the Priv, and whilst it's not perfect, it was the best option when I got it.

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Would you believe it? The Museum of Failure contains quite a few pieces of technology

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: 3D TV

3D tellies and monitors are not a waste. Some 3D films are ok, but certain computer games literally gain another dimension by being played on a 3D monitor (even if the passive ones have a low vertical resolution).

Try Portal 2 or Lego Batman, then tell me I'm wrong. 3D has been used to great effect in the Nintendo 3DS, too.

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systemd-free Devuan Linux hits version 1.0.0

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: Honest inquiry

If it's a 'five nines' service, then more than one of the same service exists either as a cluster, an active failover, or a DR site. In the case of failure the backup automatically takes over and someone is notified.

If the primary service falls over for an unknown reason, bringing it back up automatically is almost always the wrong thing to do.

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Why Firefox? Because not everybody is a web designer, silly

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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People use browsers because they run on their platform and render content without dying

Not because the web 'is messy' or any other specious reason.

People want a browser that is fast, compatible, stable, easy to use, and doesn't hang the entire browser when one page goes slow. They don't care who achieves that.

Until very recently Firefox's lack of multi process capability, and a willingness to hang every tab when one site became bogged down with javascript complexity was a huge problem.

Firefox is more portable than Chrome, so a better option on minority platforms.

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Hasta la Windows Vista, baby! It's now officially dead – good riddance

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: User Account Control..

Try changing the local security policy on Windows 7 to activate secure desktop and raise the level of UAC. You'll see this raises the prompting almost to Vista levels, and requires entering a password instead of simply clicking - just as it should be under any secure OS.

It's true that Vista did have a few un-necessary prompts, but mostly it was due to poorly written software.

Once properly written software is installed and normal installation admin tasks completed, it's unusual to see the UAC in Vista.

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Vista did it right

Windows 7 was forced to degrade UAC and disable the secure desktop by default, as users don't like security. Any sensible W7 installation increases the security from default.

Where it went wrong was the initial crap driver support, manufacturer's taking the opportunity to end of life products, and a boatload of bugs. SP2 improved things a lot.

It was pretty stable, but it took a while before the graphic drivers were up to scratch.

My Vista machine at home now has a big red warning on security essentials saying it's unsupported. Time to take it off the network, no worries, it's only used for Windows games on my laptop, the main install is OpenBSD.

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It's 30 years ago: IBM's final battle with reality

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: No Stop button in window

No it did not. Closing the main application window killed the app in all the instances I can think of. Minimising is a different matter, of course.

The only default I can think of that was very unhelpful was the automatic restarting of all applications and folders that were running when shutdown was requested. Easily fixed in config.sys, but should never have been a default.

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Such a missed opportunity

I didn't use OS/2 1.x at the time (only later), but beyond 1.0 it was fine for server based apps and a good, solid platform. Not so much for desktop apps - insufficient driver support, high memory requirements, and limited app support put paid to that.

OS/2 2.x and beyond was a much improved proposition, but suffered in competition with the large number of Windows apps. The userbase were not, in general, prepared to pay more for a smaller amount of higher quality features - the reality of running a minority platform.

OS/2 might have got further if IBM concentrated on Intel, but instead they wasted vast amounts of effort on OS/2 PPC. Much though I loved OS/2, the succession plan was flawed. Windows NT is simply better architected, they spent the time maintaining compatibility with 16 bit apps, and had much improved security, and multi user support. OS/2 was effectively dead before it really caused a problem, but it would have caused issues later on.

System <n>/Mac OS were also flawed, and the early versions of OS X sucked, but Apple are much better at retaining compatibility whilst updating the OS (at least for a few years, until they drop old kit like a brick).

I've still got an OS/2 system, and a lot of apps, and will be assembling an OS/2 1.3 system (because I'm a masochist and like trying OS). Haven't bothered with eComstation, but might give Arca 5.0 a go if it's any good, and not ludicrously priced. There aren't too many OS/2 apps I really want to run these days, though.

One final note : it's *synchronous* input queue, not single. If messages are not taken off the input queue it hangs the interface, but does not stop apps running. There was a workaround implemented in Warp 3 fixpack 16, but until then a badly behaved app was a real pain. However, Win32 successfully moved away from the synchronous input queues in Win16, to asynchronous in Win32, without breaking too many apps. IBM should have put in the engineering effort to do the same.

There are also some substantial differences between OS/2's architecture, and Windows (or indeed anything else). For instance the co-ordinate origin in Windows is at the top left of the screen, but in OS/2 it's the bottom left (OS/2 uses the mathematically correct option here)

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Dishwasher has directory traversal bug

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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I suspect you mean 1,400 rpm, not 14,000. My latest washing machine (last one died messily, although I knew it was on its way out and ran it until it died) handles 9Kg of cottons at 1,600rpm (and probably 95 degrees wash at the same time).

I'd bet that the IoT bit of connected washing machines can't make the drum explode, as the most reasonable course of action is for the manufacturer to use the same controller, and provide an interface to it, rather than provide unfettered access.

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Why is the Sinclair ZX Spectrum Vega+ project so delayed?

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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If you're going retro, spend the money in the right area

Most people should use an emulator on a modern system. In many cases it will be very close if not identical to the original.

Let's assume you're a retro nut and also a stickler for detail. In that case start with the original system, and buy modern add ons that improve the reliability or reduce the pain of the original system. Floppy/hard drives to SD cards. Ethernet cards. Multicart ROMs. Copy protection hacks (let's be serious, whilst some people would pay a reasonable amount for their favourite games, or a re-issue, most people won't buy old games at inflated prices off ebay).

Then add the ability to work with modern display systems, capture footage, save and restore state. Let it be possible to play the best of the past, whilst forgetting the pain of ten minute tape loading times.

Sometimes it's barely worth using retro technology (i.e. 3dfx cards) because they were succeeded by considerably improved hardware.

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Today's WWW is built on pillars of sand: Buggy, exploitable JavaScript libs are everywhere

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: Backwards compatiblity

Don't forget Server 2008. It's still supported until 2020, and it only supports up to IE9..

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Smart sex toys firm coughs up $3.75m in privacy lawsuit

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Other data collected

Included the ever so private information such as vibration intensity level

Let me guess : starts slow, gets faster, on average gradually goes to maximum, then slows down again at least for a while. It's only (pocket) rocket science, they've already bought a vibrator, who'd be surprised what's being done with it?

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Linus Torvalds lashes devs who 'screw all the rules and processes' and send him 'crap'

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: Testing Testing Testing

OpenBSD has a very clear philosophy, a fairly unforgiving community, and a willingness to plough their own furrow. The size of the developer base affects things, too.

It may at times be spectacularly inconvenient not to be able to use any firewire or bluetooth devices, or any Nvidia card newer than 2009, but that's because they're sticking to their principles, or there are insufficient people available to engineer a suitable solution.

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: "Does the chip vendor publish enough to let someone write a driver?"

It is not poor design - have you ever looked at chipset specifications? It's frequently of the form 'send this request, wait at least this time, then send this. Don't send this when this other thing has been sent. This can be used only up to a maximum of n. etc.' This all helps reveal what the hardware is capable of.

There are many devices that can be permanently broken if incorrectly programmed. This is not rare.

Also, it does not matter. What matters is if it works. There are plenty of cases where a supposedly technically superior solution has failed against an architecturally inferior but better implemented solution. Obviously this may be an issue if the way the hardware works maps more closely on to one operating system than another..

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Sysadmin's sole client was his wife – and she queried his bill

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: Two Rules Apply

Come judgment day, the machines won't win. Like Gandalf and Thorin wielded Glamdring and Orcrist, the machines have names for my machine defeating skills.

It is possible for the machines to gain a hold, but it'll need an equivalent to a Balrog to do it, and even then I'll be back..

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Definitely something up with your system. This Windows 7 box has been up for 20 days, and the only reason it's that little is an installation of a piece of security software embedded deep in the system (it's a horrid thing, but sadly a mandatory company install). Usually it's up for months, if only because I've so many applications open it takes ten minutes to shut down and save everything.

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More brilliant Internet of Things gadgetry: A £1,300 mousetrap

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: Homebrew

Yes

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Dying for Windows 10 Creators Update? But wait, there's more!

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: Upgrade?

Most people got Windows 10 for *free*. I do have a small amount of sympathy, but there's always a price for free, from a commercial company..

The issue is that with Pro, control is not absolute. It's only with Enterprise there's access to the long term support branch, and Enterprise isn't available off the shelf for individual users.

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: Shutdown (or not as it may be)

To be fair, it probably is faster. Windows 8 was faster than 7, and I'm pretty certain there's some benchmarks showing 10 is faster than 8.

No-one denies there are some useful technical improvements under the hood, the issue is the levels of management and information leakage.

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BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: 'Pilot' aka forced beta testers

Different stress maybe, not necessarily less. I'm shifting everything to BSD, but it would be a stretch to say there are no issues.

I'm very surprised at how polarised the OS are becoming. At one point it seemed there would be a lot of convergence, instead the differences between Windows, Linux, and the BSDs seem to be becoming more stark.

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Intel reveals Optane will need a 7th-gen core and a PC-centric launch

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
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Re: Would have been nice if it was an AMD

It isn't that much of a problem, really. Xeon 1 series support ECC memory and are not much more expensive than the equivalent desktop processors (apart from lacking overclocking ability and sometimes having a slightly slower clock speed) when core counts are below six; it's two, four or more way Xeons or high core counts in single way when things start to become seriously expensive.

Being picky, the limit on Core2 desktop chips was actually 16GB (X38/X48/S3210, some Q<nn>), 8GB (975X, some of the Q<nn> chipsets), and 4GB or less for early/low end chipsets. For the average user this was not a problem.

Only the H81 chipset in recent generations is limited to 16GB, even the B85 chipset allows up to 32GB.

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'At least I can walk away with my dignity' – Streetmap founder after Google lawsuit loss

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

streetmap.co.uk hasn't offered anything new for years

On Android I've paid for Viewranger (excellent), trialed OS Maps (just about adequate, but total UK OS map coverage for £20 a year is possibly a good deal), and bought some specialist maps from Anquet (it's technically shite, improving in the betas, but offers a lot of interesting mapping options).

The only scenario I can see streetmap working for is planning walks, but to actually go on a walk another map is needed - so what's the point? There's no mobile support, no offline mapping, the interface takes far too many clicks to navigate to even the most obvious locations, and they appear to have lost the ability to easily show elevation, the only thing I ever used it for. It's not even fun to navigate around to see what places are like, everything takes effort.

With Google Maps on mobile you can navigate an unfamiliar city, in a different country, complete with streetview.

When I'd rather use a paid option with OS maps over a free service that offers the same, there's something severely wrong.

I feel some sympathy that they've lost a lot of money on the court case, but they shouldn't have bothered in the first place. If you have £280,000 coming in each month, a fair proportion of that should be spent staying ahead of the competition.

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Installing disks is basically LEGO, right? This admin failed LEGO

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: HTFU? - people have taken saws to PCI-e cards

It's possible they've fixed the slots to be open ended in recent years, but it definitely wasn't the case for all boards, at least a few years ago. Obviously substitute '1x' for '8x' or '4x' as those are heavily used in server boards, too

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