* Posts by BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

436 posts • joined 11 May 2012

Page:

Would you believe it? The Museum of Failure contains quite a few pieces of technology

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: 3D TV

3D tellies and monitors are not a waste. Some 3D films are ok, but certain computer games literally gain another dimension by being played on a 3D monitor (even if the passive ones have a low vertical resolution).

Try Portal 2 or Lego Batman, then tell me I'm wrong. 3D has been used to great effect in the Nintendo 3DS, too.

0
0

systemd-free Devuan Linux hits version 1.0.0

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Honest inquiry

If it's a 'five nines' service, then more than one of the same service exists either as a cluster, an active failover, or a DR site. In the case of failure the backup automatically takes over and someone is notified.

If the primary service falls over for an unknown reason, bringing it back up automatically is almost always the wrong thing to do.

1
0

Why Firefox? Because not everybody is a web designer, silly

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

People use browsers because they run on their platform and render content without dying

Not because the web 'is messy' or any other specious reason.

People want a browser that is fast, compatible, stable, easy to use, and doesn't hang the entire browser when one page goes slow. They don't care who achieves that.

Until very recently Firefox's lack of multi process capability, and a willingness to hang every tab when one site became bogged down with javascript complexity was a huge problem.

Firefox is more portable than Chrome, so a better option on minority platforms.

14
0

Hasta la Windows Vista, baby! It's now officially dead – good riddance

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: User Account Control..

Try changing the local security policy on Windows 7 to activate secure desktop and raise the level of UAC. You'll see this raises the prompting almost to Vista levels, and requires entering a password instead of simply clicking - just as it should be under any secure OS.

It's true that Vista did have a few un-necessary prompts, but mostly it was due to poorly written software.

Once properly written software is installed and normal installation admin tasks completed, it's unusual to see the UAC in Vista.

0
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Vista did it right

Windows 7 was forced to degrade UAC and disable the secure desktop by default, as users don't like security. Any sensible W7 installation increases the security from default.

Where it went wrong was the initial crap driver support, manufacturer's taking the opportunity to end of life products, and a boatload of bugs. SP2 improved things a lot.

It was pretty stable, but it took a while before the graphic drivers were up to scratch.

My Vista machine at home now has a big red warning on security essentials saying it's unsupported. Time to take it off the network, no worries, it's only used for Windows games on my laptop, the main install is OpenBSD.

7
1

It's 30 years ago: IBM's final battle with reality

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: No Stop button in window

No it did not. Closing the main application window killed the app in all the instances I can think of. Minimising is a different matter, of course.

The only default I can think of that was very unhelpful was the automatic restarting of all applications and folders that were running when shutdown was requested. Easily fixed in config.sys, but should never have been a default.

0
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Such a missed opportunity

I didn't use OS/2 1.x at the time (only later), but beyond 1.0 it was fine for server based apps and a good, solid platform. Not so much for desktop apps - insufficient driver support, high memory requirements, and limited app support put paid to that.

OS/2 2.x and beyond was a much improved proposition, but suffered in competition with the large number of Windows apps. The userbase were not, in general, prepared to pay more for a smaller amount of higher quality features - the reality of running a minority platform.

OS/2 might have got further if IBM concentrated on Intel, but instead they wasted vast amounts of effort on OS/2 PPC. Much though I loved OS/2, the succession plan was flawed. Windows NT is simply better architected, they spent the time maintaining compatibility with 16 bit apps, and had much improved security, and multi user support. OS/2 was effectively dead before it really caused a problem, but it would have caused issues later on.

System <n>/Mac OS were also flawed, and the early versions of OS X sucked, but Apple are much better at retaining compatibility whilst updating the OS (at least for a few years, until they drop old kit like a brick).

I've still got an OS/2 system, and a lot of apps, and will be assembling an OS/2 1.3 system (because I'm a masochist and like trying OS). Haven't bothered with eComstation, but might give Arca 5.0 a go if it's any good, and not ludicrously priced. There aren't too many OS/2 apps I really want to run these days, though.

One final note : it's *synchronous* input queue, not single. If messages are not taken off the input queue it hangs the interface, but does not stop apps running. There was a workaround implemented in Warp 3 fixpack 16, but until then a badly behaved app was a real pain. However, Win32 successfully moved away from the synchronous input queues in Win16, to asynchronous in Win32, without breaking too many apps. IBM should have put in the engineering effort to do the same.

There are also some substantial differences between OS/2's architecture, and Windows (or indeed anything else). For instance the co-ordinate origin in Windows is at the top left of the screen, but in OS/2 it's the bottom left (OS/2 uses the mathematically correct option here)

1
0

Dishwasher has directory traversal bug

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

I suspect you mean 1,400 rpm, not 14,000. My latest washing machine (last one died messily, although I knew it was on its way out and ran it until it died) handles 9Kg of cottons at 1,600rpm (and probably 95 degrees wash at the same time).

I'd bet that the IoT bit of connected washing machines can't make the drum explode, as the most reasonable course of action is for the manufacturer to use the same controller, and provide an interface to it, rather than provide unfettered access.

1
0

Why is the Sinclair ZX Spectrum Vega+ project so delayed?

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

If you're going retro, spend the money in the right area

Most people should use an emulator on a modern system. In many cases it will be very close if not identical to the original.

Let's assume you're a retro nut and also a stickler for detail. In that case start with the original system, and buy modern add ons that improve the reliability or reduce the pain of the original system. Floppy/hard drives to SD cards. Ethernet cards. Multicart ROMs. Copy protection hacks (let's be serious, whilst some people would pay a reasonable amount for their favourite games, or a re-issue, most people won't buy old games at inflated prices off ebay).

Then add the ability to work with modern display systems, capture footage, save and restore state. Let it be possible to play the best of the past, whilst forgetting the pain of ten minute tape loading times.

Sometimes it's barely worth using retro technology (i.e. 3dfx cards) because they were succeeded by considerably improved hardware.

1
0

Today's WWW is built on pillars of sand: Buggy, exploitable JavaScript libs are everywhere

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Backwards compatiblity

Don't forget Server 2008. It's still supported until 2020, and it only supports up to IE9..

2
0

Smart sex toys firm coughs up $3.75m in privacy lawsuit

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Other data collected

Included the ever so private information such as vibration intensity level

Let me guess : starts slow, gets faster, on average gradually goes to maximum, then slows down again at least for a while. It's only (pocket) rocket science, they've already bought a vibrator, who'd be surprised what's being done with it?

0
0

Linus Torvalds lashes devs who 'screw all the rules and processes' and send him 'crap'

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Testing Testing Testing

OpenBSD has a very clear philosophy, a fairly unforgiving community, and a willingness to plough their own furrow. The size of the developer base affects things, too.

It may at times be spectacularly inconvenient not to be able to use any firewire or bluetooth devices, or any Nvidia card newer than 2009, but that's because they're sticking to their principles, or there are insufficient people available to engineer a suitable solution.

2
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: "Does the chip vendor publish enough to let someone write a driver?"

It is not poor design - have you ever looked at chipset specifications? It's frequently of the form 'send this request, wait at least this time, then send this. Don't send this when this other thing has been sent. This can be used only up to a maximum of n. etc.' This all helps reveal what the hardware is capable of.

There are many devices that can be permanently broken if incorrectly programmed. This is not rare.

Also, it does not matter. What matters is if it works. There are plenty of cases where a supposedly technically superior solution has failed against an architecturally inferior but better implemented solution. Obviously this may be an issue if the way the hardware works maps more closely on to one operating system than another..

0
0

Sysadmin's sole client was his wife – and she queried his bill

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Two Rules Apply

Come judgment day, the machines won't win. Like Gandalf and Thorin wielded Glamdring and Orcrist, the machines have names for my machine defeating skills.

It is possible for the machines to gain a hold, but it'll need an equivalent to a Balrog to do it, and even then I'll be back..

3
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Definitely something up with your system. This Windows 7 box has been up for 20 days, and the only reason it's that little is an installation of a piece of security software embedded deep in the system (it's a horrid thing, but sadly a mandatory company install). Usually it's up for months, if only because I've so many applications open it takes ten minutes to shut down and save everything.

10
1

More brilliant Internet of Things gadgetry: A £1,300 mousetrap

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Homebrew

Yes

7
0

Dying for Windows 10 Creators Update? But wait, there's more!

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Upgrade?

Most people got Windows 10 for *free*. I do have a small amount of sympathy, but there's always a price for free, from a commercial company..

The issue is that with Pro, control is not absolute. It's only with Enterprise there's access to the long term support branch, and Enterprise isn't available off the shelf for individual users.

0
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Shutdown (or not as it may be)

To be fair, it probably is faster. Windows 8 was faster than 7, and I'm pretty certain there's some benchmarks showing 10 is faster than 8.

No-one denies there are some useful technical improvements under the hood, the issue is the levels of management and information leakage.

0
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: 'Pilot' aka forced beta testers

Different stress maybe, not necessarily less. I'm shifting everything to BSD, but it would be a stretch to say there are no issues.

I'm very surprised at how polarised the OS are becoming. At one point it seemed there would be a lot of convergence, instead the differences between Windows, Linux, and the BSDs seem to be becoming more stark.

2
0

Intel reveals Optane will need a 7th-gen core and a PC-centric launch

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Would have been nice if it was an AMD

It isn't that much of a problem, really. Xeon 1 series support ECC memory and are not much more expensive than the equivalent desktop processors (apart from lacking overclocking ability and sometimes having a slightly slower clock speed) when core counts are below six; it's two, four or more way Xeons or high core counts in single way when things start to become seriously expensive.

Being picky, the limit on Core2 desktop chips was actually 16GB (X38/X48/S3210, some Q<nn>), 8GB (975X, some of the Q<nn> chipsets), and 4GB or less for early/low end chipsets. For the average user this was not a problem.

Only the H81 chipset in recent generations is limited to 16GB, even the B85 chipset allows up to 32GB.

0
0

'At least I can walk away with my dignity' – Streetmap founder after Google lawsuit loss

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

streetmap.co.uk hasn't offered anything new for years

On Android I've paid for Viewranger (excellent), trialed OS Maps (just about adequate, but total UK OS map coverage for £20 a year is possibly a good deal), and bought some specialist maps from Anquet (it's technically shite, improving in the betas, but offers a lot of interesting mapping options).

The only scenario I can see streetmap working for is planning walks, but to actually go on a walk another map is needed - so what's the point? There's no mobile support, no offline mapping, the interface takes far too many clicks to navigate to even the most obvious locations, and they appear to have lost the ability to easily show elevation, the only thing I ever used it for. It's not even fun to navigate around to see what places are like, everything takes effort.

With Google Maps on mobile you can navigate an unfamiliar city, in a different country, complete with streetview.

When I'd rather use a paid option with OS maps over a free service that offers the same, there's something severely wrong.

I feel some sympathy that they've lost a lot of money on the court case, but they shouldn't have bothered in the first place. If you have £280,000 coming in each month, a fair proportion of that should be spent staying ahead of the competition.

1
0

Installing disks is basically LEGO, right? This admin failed LEGO

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: HTFU? - people have taken saws to PCI-e cards

It's possible they've fixed the slots to be open ended in recent years, but it definitely wasn't the case for all boards, at least a few years ago. Obviously substitute '1x' for '8x' or '4x' as those are heavily used in server boards, too

2
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: HTFU? - people have taken saws to PCI-e cards

PCI-e comes in a variety of lane lengths, once it's beyond 1x physical the rest of the connections are just data. Server boards tend to have PCI-e slots that are less than 16x physical. It's useful to use graphics cards in server boards sometimes, they're practically all 16x, and 1x graphics cards are ludicrously expensive.

Enter.. the hacksaw. Carefully saw off any part of the connector that's longer than the slot. Alternatively use a scalpal at the end of the PCI-e slot to cut it open. People have done both, and it works.

I looked at the feasibility, likelihood of ruining a board, ran away screaming and bought a slot adapter cable. It does mean the cards sit higher than they should, and that it's more difficult to get them into a case, but at least no hardware is ruined.

2
0

FAKE BREWS: America rocked by 'craft beer' scandal allegations

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

..except for the most part gourmet cat food is more expensive, looks of higher quality, and generally cats love it. If you're stupid enough to buy that when they'll eat cheaper food, however..

(I can get away with feeding the cats a bit of 'select' (but not gourmet) Aldi cat food, but there's mutiny if you attempt to only give them dry food)

0
0

Xen Project wants permission to reveal fewer vulnerabilities

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Please stop this ill informed and click bait 'journalism'

I'm sure you are reporting issues, but being a virtualisation desk, it's certainly possible to be more proactive about covering all products. What I'd expect from a journalism site is not just the prepackaging of a public blog post, but searching out details of information that is not immediately obvious, such as the issues in KVM.

Whilst I accept that you have not claimed that KVM is any better, it is an unfortunate part of human psychology that people will believe that the thing not being actively criticised (technology, politics, whatever) is an improvement over the thing being criticised. Additionally, a number of options in the poll could be considered leading questions.

There's little criticism of projects like Qubes, who keep complaining that they have to handle Xen issues in their OS, when as far as I can see (please, either you or Xen people correct me) they contribute very little upstream. In the time when they've been complaining, FreeBSD had implemented their own KVM like hypervisor (bhyve) from scratch.

On that note it would be nice to see some coverage of bhyve other than in FreeBSD release announcements, as from what I can see it's really quite usable now. The occasional vmm (OpenBSD) update would be nice too, but that is currently in a state of flux, and mostly only usable for running OpenBSD inside itself.

1
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Yet another reason to

'People simply don't run Xen at home for instance'

Most people might not, that doesn't mean all. I do, so do others. KVM has the advantage that it's easier to install as part of a distro, its vfio infrastructure is excellent, and it supports more architectures. On the downside it's less well integrated than Xen, effectively Linux only, and pretty much necessitates external libvirt based management.

KVM feels very Linux : a set of sometimes bleeding edge components that sort of hang together, where some bits work better than others. It's also used by some large companies including, err.. IBM - remember that KVM supports S370.

Personally the criticism I've seen of Xen has come from its longevity and complexity, borne in its unique paravirtualisation origins. There's other disadvantages : complexity of pci passthrough, different levels of functionality on the various dom0 platforms (not really Xen's problem), a variety of management interfaces that are upgraded more quickly than they should be (xm was deprecated and removed in favour of xl before the more obscure parts of xm were entirely replicated in xl), and (on Linux dom0) a set of kernel options to create a successful dom0, that can easily get missed (base it on an existing working config and it's trivial).

Little of the above applies, of course, if XenServer is downloaded. It's turnkey, freely available, and comes with management tools, not dissimilar to ESXi.

2
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Please stop this ill informed and click bait 'journalism'

Look what you didn't quote from the mailing list post, that I've only just read :

'every advisory has the risk that it will be picked up and blown out of proportion by the media'

It's looking very much like Thereg is deliberately targeting Xen, possibly because the team create nicely formatted advisories and spend the time to explain issues.

There are no recent articles complaining about KVM, despite the fact it also has security issues, and I remember few reports of VMWare problems.

Xen is not perfect by any means, but put this in perspective, please. I've read the post now, and the discussion is not entirely unreasonable and is a starting point, not a policy. Try marc.info, it's easier to read : http://marc.info/?t=148353353000001&r=1&w=2

There is NO link to security statements on linux-kvm.org. There is on xenproject.org.

6
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Nice link, pity you didn't read it

Now try looking at the KVM entries that are also in that list, or using KVM as a keyword.

2
0

Sexbots could ‘over-exert’ their human lovers, academic warns

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Dolls

Now (assuming you're a man who likes women) ask how the 'average woman' would respond. Given that I've been told to my face by more than one woman that if I'd visited a prostitute I'd be thought less of, you'll excuse me if I believe what I'm told by people I trust.

(I don't personally use prostitutes, but don't have a problem with people I do. However, I think it's arguable that the statement of 'use a prostitute' often doesn't mean 'I won't have a problem with it', it means ' The reason you can't find someone you like to sleep with is difficult, so I'm going to take the easy way out to make you go away')

0
0

Solaris 11.next plan brings continuous delivery of OS upgrades

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Version numbers by another name, what a load of rubbish.

Much obliged, it would have helped if the article actually pointed that out..

0
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Version numbers by another name, what a load of rubbish.

'I'd quite like a copy of DataMuncherPro v7.2 for Solaris, I'm running version 11.next'

'Certainly sir, here you go'

..time passes..

'It's not working, it says it has a dependency on libfloogle.so.6'

'Ah, which update of 11.next are you running?'

'I'm running 11.next - that's all that's required'

'Ah yes, but it doesn't work with the June 2017 release of 11.next, as Floogle functionality wasn't added until December 2017. If, however, you're running February 2018 preview you'll need DataMuncherPro v7.2a because the new socket pledge access protector breaks our session establishment'

'I was told this works with 11.next with no qualification, and I can't upgrade to 11.next December 2017, because at the same time as adding Floogle functionality, they removed remote hierarchical tape support over ssh'

'I'm sorry sir, you'll need to take that up with Oracle'

'.....'

9
0

Two words, Mozilla: SPEED! NOW! Quit fiddling and get serious

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: You await some decision?

Paul135 :

Short version : you're an uninformed idiot.

Long version : Go on, provide a reasoned argument why a same sex marriage threatens opposite sex marriage. Include notes on why opposite sex marriages aren't allowed for couples who can't have children, or don't want children. Also include the screening details to ensure that only couples who have sufficient income, a stable family life, and have been on training courses are allowed to have marry and have children.

For bonus points, use statistics from countries where same sex civil partnerships or marriages are legal to demonstrate how marriage rates have plunged after same sex partnerships were made legal (protip : the data are freely available in the UK, and they don't support your statement)

Obviously you have extensive experience in marriage, and what marriage is has never changed in the last millennium. I wouldn't mind finding someone at some stage. Can you let me know what the dowry should be - I'm thinking 53 cows and a goat called Gary would be sufficient, but a friend tells me that llamas are necessary to secure their hand. Also, is it better to ally myself with the clan chief who has 15,000 warriors but already two married daughters, or the one with 10,000 warriors but only one single daughter? How many daughters and sons are necessary to cook and clean my hut, and protect my smallholding when I grow old?

11
2
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

At least multiprocess is here

I hadn't realised, however, as under FreeBSD the entire browser hangs on a regular basis usually due to shitty javascript, and I've no extensions installed. Will check it tonight.

Under Windows I was still on Firefox 35, as it hadn't told me an update was available. It then proceeded to download *four* subsequent updates before finally updating to the latest version..

Chrome is probably better, but at least under Android it has questionable behaviour such as launching Play Store links without your permission. This can't be disabled..

0
0

Munich may dump Linux for Windows

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: The thing about Linux Desktop

So far as UEFI goes on the BSDs, and also GPT, the answer is that the main BSDs (Free, Open, Net) can all handle UEFI and GPT. They didn't for some time because it was not a priority (UEFI almost always also supports legacy boot), and the 2TB disk limit associated with MBR could be worked around as all the BSDs (on x86 architectures) can modify the disklabel to override the MBR (don't know the state on non x86 platforms, macppc ports tend to use funky HFS schemes, but can also use disklabel, and AUX iirc. Other platforms have their own quirks).

I generally love the way the BSDs are put together, but there's a lot of engineering required in some areas to bring them up to the level of functionality available in Windows, and to a lesser extent Linux. FreeBSD's virtualisation capabilities are not as good as Linux. NetBSD is a hodgepodge of functionality working to a greater or lesser degree. OpenBSD is limited with modern X server drivers, has no firewire, bluetooth, and has deliberately removed Linux compatibility (no-one was using it), and can't run Wine (technically I think the reason for this, page zero mapping, can probably now be worked around either with DOSBox, or disabling 16 bit compatibility)

1
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: The thing about Linux Desktop

Jon, I'm not sure if you're using sloppy terminology, but whilst yes, applications are updated separately from the OS on BSD, one of the major BSD/Linux differences is that BSD features an integrated kernel and userland, and Linux does not. There's then ports/packages on top of the base userland, but for FreeBSD it seems pretty necessary to do an update on a regular basis when installing new apps as even on STABLE components can get out of sync. Course, if you're mainly running apache this is likely to be less on an issue.

systemd has nothing to do with this architecture, and is a very Linux specific solution. If it existed under FreeBSD it would be maintained as part of base.

In the nicest possible way, if you don't have money to buy Office, the companies that would create a decent e-mail based collaboration system don't care about you. This isn't going to happen for free, it needs a large population of users to sign up for it. At the home user end this will not happen, because they'll use Google apps instead.

FreeBSD hasn't hit the mobile market because there's no room for it. For better or worse Android went with Linux, and everyone else except iOS have failed to make any dent on the market - the technical underpinnings are irrelevant too, as Android really was awful when released, and it's hardly perfect now.

Also, the FreeBSD team lack the resource. FreeBSD support on laptops is barely adequate, forget mobiles. It took until FreeBSD 11 before my ten year old laptop stopped shutting down due to heat, something that doesn't occur on any version of Windows, probably didn't happen under Linux, and didn't happen under the other BSDs either. The FreeBSD mailing lists freely admit laptop support is sub par.

2
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: @ Korev

>Linux, per se is not functional at those things because Linux is an Operating System (or, more strictly, an

>OS Kernel) and those things are tasks carried out by applications software.

Yes, you really are splitting hairs, and this infighting helps no-one. Neither does arguing on what an 'e-mail client' is. No one cares, they just want things to work.

For the main part, Linux is distinctly different both from Windows, and other Unixes (i.e. BSD). Even within Linux there's increasingly homogeneity between distributions, it's only outliers such as Slackware and Gentoo that retain some distinctions.

It's always about the software, both for operating systems, and consoles. If the functionality isn't there, it doesn't matter how technically able the underlying OS is. I'd also argue that Windows is not poorly engineered, but there may be disagreement on their priorities in terms of backwards compatibility, changing driver models, long term support, DRM/licensing, interface, and customisability.

However, this is all unlikely to change. I know first hand from being an ex OS/2 user that people will not pay more for software with fewer high quality features, which is the reality of software being developed by independent firms. It's also true that interfaces win over technical prowess; I remember the joys of the Describe word processor - multithreaded, stunning printing, amazingly fast. It also lacked a word counter, and the interface was an utter pain. Despite exclusively using OS/2 at the time I wrote over 15,000 words in : AmiPro for Windows 3.1, running under WinOS/2 (AmiPro OS/2 was a broken mess, Word Pro OS/2 was pretty decent but arrived too late).

Linux is lucky enough that some very large firms have dedicated a lot of time and money to improve browsers, media performance, and driver support. However, there are gaps, particularly where the userbase doesn't accept the need to pay, and pay a fair bit of money, for apps such as a workflow and collaboration client that uses an e-mail transport.

2
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: @ Korev

>That is NOT email (except for email contacts, of course). The fact that MS decided to lump it in with their

>own email client still does not make it email.

You really are being very picky. Call it a workflow client that uses e-mail as a transport, then, as that's more accurately what it is.

It's pretty straightforward : is Linux as functional at mail, calendaring, forms, rules, and tasks as a Windows/outlook/Exchange combination? If not, it doesn't matter if the calendars are delivered by e-mail or flying monkeys.

22
8

GRAPHENE: £120m down, UK.gov finds it's still a long way from commercial potential

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Shouldn't they be throwing more money at this thing?

*currently* half assing it? Their whole plan is quite obviously to continue to half ass it, throwing money at specific industries post Brexit in the forlorn hope to shore up a failing UK with the bits that can actually make money.

2
7

Linus Torvalds decides world doesn't need a new Linux today

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: I think I know why Linux never worked for me.

You can look for yourself :

https://lkml.org/lkml/2017/2/12/142

It's almost entirely bug fixes, but there are a couple of new driver fixes in there that seem to me to be unreasonable to include in an RC. I agree : where the heck is the change freeze?

I'd say 'oh wait, it's Linux' with some justification, but I'm currently being driven mad with lacklustre/hanging web browser performance in FreeBSD (Core 2 Duo 2GHz laptop). I'd much rather run OpenBSD, but the only options for general purpose emulation under it are Qemu and Bochs, Virtualbox is a much better option for running Windows 7 in a VM. Wine is rather sucky under FreeBSD running on a GM965 graphics adapter, and doesn't run at all under OpenBSD..

0
0

SQL Server on Linux? HELL YES! Linux on Windows 10? Meh

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: why not just run Ubuntu and put Windows in the virtual machine?

>The main lappy makers are on a bung to ensure that Linux DOES NOT run them.

>:-( I'd love to run Mint on my T100Chi, but no chance.

Do take off that tinfoil hat.

The majority of manufacturers don't care if you're running anything other than the recent versions of Windows. It simply is not tested sufficiently/at all elsewhere.

There's a post on OpenBSD tech today saying that, they need to pretend to be Darwin to get suspend working correctly on Apple hardware. Linux has had to do the same thing.

ACPI/etc tables are tested only against a restricted set of configurations. In the event that NewMungeyOS is passed in as an identification string, don't expect to receive anything reasonable back.

1
0

Android Wear: The bloatware that turned into gloatware

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: To every one who is slagging smart watches off as utterly useless...

It's a pain to work out how far you've actually run, and what the ascent is, especially when you decide to take a different route on the spur of the moment.

Get back home, load up a decent (not google maps) mapping program, plot where you think you went, fiddle with the waypoints as the route shifts a bit.

That won't tell you of your speed on different parts of the route, and if your speed is increasing on certain types of terrain if the route is run regularly.

0
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Too expensive for anyone other than commited runners

A fitness smartwatch is a great idea, but the form factor will always be less stylish due to the necessity to be shock resistant and waterproof.

The LG Sport might do ok, it has a GPS and a barometric altimeter which puts it at the high end of running watches. *If* the software is decent and the price isn't higher than a few hundred quid, it might succeed in the UK.

However, I question if it's going to be more integrated than offerings by Garmin and Suunto. If they end up competing, the fitness watch manufacturers will probably just drop the price and make it uneconomic for LG to continue.

0
0

Android's February fix-fest flings 58 patches

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Blackberry patch landed a couple of days ago, fixes most of the issues listed.

http://support.blackberry.com/kb/articleDetail?articleNumber=000039027&language=None

0
0

Tails Linux farewells 32-bit processors with imminent version 3.0

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: 32-bit compatibility, vs "64-bit only"

Nope. Yes, 64 bit code is larger and uses more memory, but (on Intel) 64 bit mode provides access to many extra registers so code runs appreciably faster, and handling large amounts of data is faster too.

The problem with 32 bit is not specifically the 4GB limit for a process

1) The limit isn't 4GB. It's usually 2-3GB because of the way the process space is organised.

2) 4GB is a hard limit (unless PAE is used, and that causes driver issues). 2GB of web browser, plus a large spreadsheet, a database, and the OS and suddenly 4GB is breached. Out of memory, game over.

Memory is dirt cheap, it does not make sense to be miserly.

Also, this is universal. The accommodation of even lightweight Unixes (i.e. NetBSD/OpenBSD) for old systems is decreasing, due to a lack of user base, the need for more drivers/modern support, and compiler support holding back an entire ecosystem to the least capable item (this is one reason why OpenBSD dropped some of the older systems). They're still pretty lightweight, but the days of running a Unix system in 4MB are largely gone..

0
0

BOFH: Password HELL. For you, mate, not for me

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Awesome

However,

'"Here? No, we implemented it and a bunch of other security measures but then we got told to turn them all off because it's hard for people to remember their password when it changes every six months. So there's no complexity and a two-year lifetime. The only time one of the execs on the top floor changes their password outside of this process is when they start up extramarital relationship in the building and don't want their PA to find out."'

I thought BOFH was supposed to be satire, not real life?

10
0

Father of Pac-Man dies at 91

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

beeeeowww blip blip

Still an awesome game, with many decent successors - Pacman Vs, Pacman Championship Edition, Pacman racing.. Thanks for all the gaming times.

0
0

Wine 2.0 lands: It's not Soylent for booze but more Windows apps on Linux and Mac OS

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: Mostly just games

'without hacking it to remove the assumption that a 24 bit colour graphic driver could actually support 32 bit colour'

24 bit? I remember elderly Windows systems running 15 bit graphics (although to be fair, I think even some genuine Windows apps running on real Windows didn't like that either)

0
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Re: All is Strange in MS Land

'Its all free and no activation issues to circumnavigate'

Apart from the Windows 2000 license, which you legally own, yes?

VirtualBox is ok, but if you're using 3D graphics it may have worse performance/stability than running the app under Wine (depending on the host platform hardware).

0
0

Furby Rickroll demo: What fresh hell is this?

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

Mass rickrolling, but with a five minute delay

Glorious, and oh so tempting.

I'm guessing it's not possible to play the Imperial March and get the Furbies walking in step..

5
0

One BEEELLION dollars: Apple sues Qualcomm, one of its chip designers

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Bronze badge

So torn

..on the one hand it's clear that Qualcomm aren't exactly the nice guys.

On the other hand, Apple shows contempt for its customer base, and has a loooong history of trying to squash companies by legal means, so excuse me if I don't shed a tear.

2
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017