* Posts by BinkyTheMagicPaperclip

793 posts • joined 11 May 2012

Page:

Apple to dump Intel CPUs from Macs for Arm – yup, the rumor that just won't die is back

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Rosetta-a-like is absolutely necessary

You're assuming Xcode is being used to develop all applications, rather than a cross platform build system - which would be far more sensible. Processor specific optimisations are also used in a number of cases, and it's always possible there is other code that assumes PC architecture (support chipsets on ARM are usually different).

At least ARM can run in little endian mode.

3
0

UK.gov to press ahead with online smut checks (but expects £10m in legals in year 1)

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Rebrand and extend the site offerings

I'm sure that one of the adult performers moved on to selling their own range of kitchen equipment, or cooking, but googling for it is tending to produce misleading results..

Simply ramp up the number of recipes to 67% of the site, problem solved. No-one will believe you that you're reading it 'for the recipes' but at least it won't be blocked.

1
0

Leaked memo: No internet until you clean your bathroom, Ecuador told Julian Assange

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

I feel terribly sorry for them

Trapped with all the attention of the world on you, unable to leave or visit outside properly, with irritating room mates.

Mittens needs to be freed!

It should be the other way around. If Assange can't care for the cat, the cat should stay in the embassy, and Assange should leave.

1
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Please, someone set up a GoFundMe

You really, really don't want to use a catgenie. Go and read the Amazon reviews if you want to laugh and feel more than a little sick.

A self cleaning cat litter tray does not exist, unfortunately. It's just not possible to reasonably cope with the vast range of cat crap.

If I thought they'd actually work, I'd buy one like a shot, but with a cat that has digestive problems, the only way to handle a litter tray is manually.

0
0

Softcat warns of Brexit cloud forming over UK tech, vows: If prices rise, we'll pass them on...

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: F*ck business

I'd be amazed if a lot of Brexit opinion was driven by considering the minimisation of tax, and if it is they're ill informed.

It's pretty certain that the Tories will try and turn the UK into a tax haven, and elements of the party are eager to start winnowing human rights (such as reasonable working hours and conditions).

There's already no enforcement of the huge number of LLPs in the UK, and the 'commitment' to investigate offshore firms ownership has already been downgraded to a consultation (go read Private Eye). We already know the UK government will screw over bits of the UK to gain business from the Americans or the Chinese.

The EU are starting to crack down on tax, and there are stronger rules coming in. One persistent but probably untrue conspiracy theory is that senior Brexiteers forced Brexit so not to see their income hit. For maintaining tax revenue, staying in the EU is the best option.

6
0

Party like it's 1989... SVGA code bug haunts VMware's house, lets guests flee to host OS

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: A standard dating back to 1987?

You're talking about the Hauppauge WinTV Celebrity full length ISA card, aren't you? I still have one - got it second hand as new it was hideously expensive. Gorgeous thing, scaling direct into the overlay without blitting to the screen (as per the later cards).

Little bit useless now analogue TV no longer exists, although it could be used to record/view composite sources etc.

2
0

RIP Paul Allen: Microsoft cofounder billionaire dies at 65 after facing third bout with cancer

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: @El Reg

That's why you need to carefully construct share agreements, so that they act properly as their aim of both rewarding employees and keeping them in the company as you point out with the widow example.

If you bought a present for someone, and it later became immensely valuable, you don't get to ask for it back. It's the same with share schemes granting part ownership of the company without any attached terms. It's basic common sense to cover the case of someone leaving. If you haven't covered that, then you live with it, which includes making them offers, but doesn't consist of shafting them.

In other words, if you made a bad decision you may have to live with it, rather than being a dick.

0
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Nit picking

It's still a lot of money, and if you have lots of money you are not obliged to spend every waking moment working out how to give it away.

If I ever win the lottery big, I'd be happy with a million or two. With a hundred million you'd have to plan how to spend and give it away, and I'm not sure I'd want the hassle.

0
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Well, that's a nicer eulogy than the Steve Jobs rant

You might have a point if it was just a one off with Steve, but he was an arsehole over, and over again, and he didn't really improve much with age.

3
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: @El Reg

Still sounds pretty evil to me, notwithstanding the fact Allen wouldn't have been short of a few bob.

You have 4 staff, you lose one - offer them some of your *own shares* rather than pinching someone else's. After all, you're betting the employee will be a great revenue earner.

1
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Say what you will

Not as much as you'd expect. Large institutions already have that choice and generally choose not to go down that path; when they do implement large projects the outcome is usually a cost and time overrun.

People also by and large spend money on something that exists, or is guaranteed to exist, in a fairly short time frame. I suspect the funding of open source alternatives over buying an available product is several orders of magnitude smaller. Plus, of course, it's only really useful when all your applications are available, not just one.

3
0

Shortages, price rises, recession: Tech industry preps for hard Brexit

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Oh what a lot of whinging eurobootlickers we have here

Go on, tell us how GB is going to become great again.

Invading other countries has fallen out of favour, and didn't work in 1956..

Maybe you're thinking manufacturing - such as steel, that was undercut by Chinese steel, and EU steel import tariffs were vetoed. Who was the dastardly country that voted against the tariffs? That would be the UK..

6
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Tech industry preps for hard Brexit?

Walter, you do realise that selling products from another country is more involved than 'give us some money' ?

Yes, companies will still want to sell to the UK - *if* it's profitable to do so, and their market elsewhere isn't saturated. The changes in certification, duty, and import procedure will have an impact on the cost and delivery times.

As the Tories are currently resisting maintaining the status quo with EU single market standards, this pretty much guarantees that at the absolute minimum prices will increase, because over time there will be divergence in UK and EU law.

4
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Ha Ha

I'd say you're a lucky sod, and I wish that my Irish ancestry was a couple of generations closer so I could get a passport, however it really depends on what sort of deal the UK government do to get Brexit in.

If they get it really wrong, Ireland could be a particularly nasty place to live (which also affects the UK, as terrorists can get on planes and ships, for the hard of thinking over here).

As it is, I suspect that regardless of the Brexit outcome, the neutering of political independence of Northern Ireland will be accelerated, and the bigots in chief will finally have to accept same sex marriage, abortions, and ideally Not Being A Dick (sadly not a crime). You'll have some 'interesting' years ahead, just hopefully only shouting matches and political wrangling rather than a return to the Troubles.

0
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: And all we can do...

I don't think you understand what democracy is. It has taken decades to get through various changes in law such as votes for women, the end of slavery, and other equal rights of many different flavours (most recently extending civil partnerships to everyone).

For every law that his made there will always be the opposite side(s) lobbying for a change (see : ban on hunting). If the differing opinions to the current law do not form a substantial percentage of the electorate, the law persists and little coverage is made. If the percentages in support of each position are much closer, or there are highly placed/funded people (hunting) there's more coverage, and the likelihood of a challenge to the law.

Brexit was a very close vote, so the challenges will continue until the percentages in opinion swing substantially.

If Brexit does not happen there will be continued pressure to change our relationship with the EU (this is not limited to the UK as we can see in other EU countries, including the big two).

If Brexit does happen in my opinion the fallout will be severe enough that within a limited number of years there will be a UK re-entry to the EU in some form.

I personally doubt we will leave the EU at the end of March, largely due to the Irish issue. The Irish issue that was thoroughly covered in the media (including the BBC), and yet many Brexiters conveniently forgot or claimed it wasn't sufficiently covered..

6
0

300,000 BT pensioners await Court of Appeal pension scheme ruling

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Barrister BS

That was only 18 years ago! I know that I'm now middle aged, but even so..

I hope BT don't manage to win, people have worked for their pension : give it to them.

I'd like to retire at age 55, it won't be on a large pension though.

11
2

Hey you know what the smart-home world really needs right now? Yup, Google screaming in

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Not a chance

The only devices that will get into my home will be those without any cloud functionality, and that support open source software. I do have a FireTV, but it's only switched on when I want to watch programmes.

I also don't want to speak to my devices, buttons work just fine.

4
0

Convenient switch hides an inconvenient truth

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

The fact it's 19th century doesn't really change things. I'm in a late 20th century building and the sockets aren't designed to support heaters. Socket damage has been caused by people trying to plug in high current devices.

Granted, it didn't take down the entire ring though...

5
0

Apple forgot to lock Intel Management Engine in laptops, so get patching

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Keep an eye on Raptor Computing Systems

https://twitter.com/raptorcompsys

New motherboard revealed at the OpenPOWER summit today (probably about half an hour ago). POWER9 based, no management engine.. Probably sub ATX, looks like it has SATA, and a couple of expansion slots.

(OS selection will be a bit limited (Linux and.. Linux (FreeBSD, others in progress)), code is not always optimised for POWER, compatibility list is short).

Sorely tempted by this, but can't justify the full Talos II motherboard, and the Lite is a bit limited.. If this can support 4-8 cores with a reasonable amount of memory, SATA (or SAS), and at least two expansion slots I might go for it. It'd be good to have a modern non Intel system.

12
0

VR going mainstream? Yeah, next year, says Facebook, for the third year in a row

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: I went all in and it's the most expensive desk dust protector in my office

I'm sorry for your vertigo, but in my opinion Google Earth is the best thing on the Rift! It works seated, and with the 3D models it looks great - ok, it's not the same as reality by a long way, but it's still decent. Some of the streetview pictures work really well too (others don't..).

If you don't like Google Earth, I definitely wouldn't recommend trying the BBC's Spacewalk app!

1
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Environment is the key

I have a Rift, but I've not used it that much. The problem is it takes up too damned much room. The example Rift setup is always a large room, with the base stations on top of a reasonably sized desk with one monitor, keyboard, and not much else.

My (small) study has five monitors, twelve computers, and a load of peripherals. You can just about use a Rift in it, but strictly seated with no movement apps are the only option and they are in short supply. Google Earth remains fantastic, however.

I have got extension cables to use it in another room, but re-setting it up is a faff, and means I don't bother as much as I'd like to. The alternative is buying another computer for a different room, and that's realistically the thick end of another 600-700 quid..

1
0

Microsoft liberates ancient MS-DOS source from the museum and sticks it in GitHub

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: To some MSDOS was an major leap forward.

You've got a selective memory, the 8088/6 and DOS weren't ideal but made a lot of sense at the time. The 8088 was cheaper, enabled the use of an existing design, and mostly interfaced to 8 bit peripherals.

When the IBM PC came out, that DOS would win was not a given. It had the option of DOS initially, but also CP/M-86, and UCSD p-system. There was a huge amount of CP/M software available, and that no doubt informed the extremely CP/M like initial design of DOS, that it slowly diverged from.

It's true that most 286s ran DOS, but it wasn't for a lack of Intel trying. The 286 was explicitly designed as a server chip (in some ways the Pentium Pro of its time). If it was aimed at running DOS they would have included more real mode functionality and easier ways to switch between protected and real mode.

The real problem was memory usage, whether on the 286 or 386 onwards. OS/2, Unix, and Windows NT all used a considerable amount of memory for the time. They all had spotty driver support, and native applications were in short supply.

3
0

Brexit campaigner AggregateIQ challenges UK's first GDPR notice

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Definitely not politically motivated

No, definitely not. Not choosing an easy target few people care about, rather than companies blatantly breaking GDPR such as Facebook, numerous media outlets, and dating sites.

0
3

Spent your week box-ticking? It can't be as bad as the folk at this firm

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Cheaper option

Maybe, maybe not. Bear in mind that the supplier isn't likely to provide details on how the database works, given they've already quoted a large amount for doing it the proper way.

If the customer changes the system in an unsupported way, there's the potential both to create support issues, and also to affect future development. Depending on how unsympathetic the support structure is, it's not unreasonable to demand a restore from backup, rather than a data fix.

At the very least it's probably more than a simple update, because you DO want to write an audit, don't you?

That applies to anyone using the system, not just customers. We had an instance of a different product/support group running a query against our product without our knowledge. This worked for a while until the customer data was changed slightly, and an invalid assumption the other group had made in their query resulted in things grinding to a halt..

1
0

Windows Server 2019 Essentials incoming – but cheapo product's days are numbered

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Print server?

Also note that initial Jetdirect offerings as 'recently' as the Laserjet 4000 series (late 90s/early 00s) weren't particularly fast. An ECP parallel port offers speeds as fast as 2.5MB/s, faster than a number of Jetdirect cards. I have a 4000 series Laserjet at home, and it is connected using a parallel port.

Modern systems can use USB to parallel ports very inexpensively. Mono laser printers of old can be quite fast, high resolution, and very cheap to run.

1
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Print server?

The print server is serving the printer clients, it doesn't have to be directly connected.

Printers absolutely used to be connected to the server, initially directly via serial/parallel, and later on via Jetdirect and similar. Print queues offer a number of sophisticated features that typically aren't included in the bare bones offerings in many lower end printers.

8
0

BlackBerry KEY2 LE: Cheaper QWERTY, but not for what's inside

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: BT keyboard anyone

Laptops are considerably less portable than a mobile phone...

0
0

BlackBerry, Sony, Honor and LG flash their new phones for all to see

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Key2 LE : No gesture support, no sale

It's mostly a matter of perspective. Some Blackberry purchasers will see an authenticated trust chain and the inability to root the device as an advantage, I'm not so fussed.

The Priv is a lovely device, but dropping patch support after a couple of years does not engender good will. True, this is in part due to driver support from third party OEMs, but they need to do better.

DTEK is basically useless.

However the hub is pretty decent.

1
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Key2 LE : No gesture support, no sale

Yeah.. I know that I may have to accept that at some stage, if all the keyboard phone options are exhausted, I'll be forced to use a touchscreen.

I want to use various Android apps, so I have little choice in the matter, even though I'm not a fan of the infrastructure.

Recently I played some of Inkle's Sorcery! (fantastic game, go play it), side loaded on to a mobile. That worked fine until I finished it, 'can't save to cloud'. Apparently the server has changed, so the earlier version can't save. Update the earlier version? You can't - as it hasn't been installed via Play Store despite the fact I have a license. Install the later version? You can't as it conflicts with the side loaded version. So, unload the side loaded game, install the game again from Play Store, play through it all again, and save it.

FFS. This is the cloudy future, and that's from a half decent developer that generally cares about its customers.I'm getting really sick of the increasing tendency of platforms to enforce only one true way of doing things, flexibility is the reason I did not go iOS.

2
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Key2 LE : No gesture support, no sale

One of the best things about the other Android Blackberry phones is that they combine the best features of a physical keyboard (tactile feedback, known location of keys, etc) with the best of a virtual keyboard (prediction, ability to navigate with cursors, deletion of words (usually because the prediction has inserted a word when you don't want it to)).

It's still a step up from an entirely virtual keyboard, but I can't say I'm impressed, especially given the other disadvantages of Blackberry.

I'm waiting on the Moto Mod keyboard coming out. Motos aren't perfect but they can be rooted, and it's a landscape keyboard - so much better than portrait.If that doesn't pan out, I'll reluctantly go for a KeyTWO, but I'm not keen on a phone with a defined lifespan, as it can't be rooted and I'm beholden to the manufacturer for updates. Given that Blackberry dropped the Priv after two years like a hot potato, I'm not inclined to give them more money.

2
1

We're all sick of Fortnite, but the flaw found in its downloader is the latest way to attack Android

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Epic fail... (Galaxy S6)

As I noted above some of the Samsung phones were abandoned, but were later reinstated (for now), you can check this if you wish.

The real point is that there are a number of phones that have security support dropped after two years, and that Google themselves only specifically tout three years security updates as a feature for Enterprise certified phones.

This is somehow deemed as being 'good' - it isn't, it's below what would be expected as baseline performance for a mass market OS on a PC. Given that mobiles are frequently used to access sensitive information (confirming credit card purchases, banking/ebay/paypal/other site apps), as soon as security support is dropped they really should be treated as useful as a brick.

ALL phones should have security patches provided for a lifetime comparable with a PC based OS. In a sane world, all the mobile phone apps should also continue to be patched, and not forced to update to a new, bloated version that makes a handset unusable. This does go against the current mobile development ethos of 'continuous improvement' (continually broken), but that's because the current model is flawed.

Old phone of five years age should still be able to Facebook/whatever app with a new phone, with some common features, both with no security issues and acceptable performance.

If you look at Vista, one of the less loved versions of Windows, it was 'fully supported' for five years, and security patched for nine. For the last couple of years of its life cycle, just like Windows 7 now, whilst technically 'supported', various vendors were less than keen to update products to support it. Nevertheless that's a damn sight better than Android.

If people continue to accept this, the situation is likely to worsen, and this model is slowly reaching the PC. Don't roll over, or you'll find your PC is soon even less your own than you realised. Not that I'm a fan of Stallman, but he was basically right, as is Theo de Raadt (OpenBSD). If you don't control your own hardware and software, someone else controls it for you.

3
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Epic fail... (Galaxy S6)

Oh, that's nice, you've cherry picked some examples without noting it doesn't apply to other phones.

Go and check out the patch level for the Blackberry Priv, it's ok, I'll wait.. Alternatively go and check that the S6 Edge was initially withdrawn from security patch support, but Samsung later backtracked.

Check out this from Google themselves :

https://www.android.com/intl/en_uk/enterprise/recommended/

The guaranteed three years of updates only applies for specified 'Enterprise' devices.

If you bought a computer for a few hundred quid, you'd expect to receive patches for much longer than three years, and to be able to update the OS. For some reason (the contract nature of phones) the general populace are brainwashed into thinking this is acceptable when it's a pocket computer that connects over a mobile network.

3
1

Intel Management Engine JTAG flaw proof-of-concept published

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: No, it's easy to exploit.

No, it isn't. All the motherboards I've seen with USB debugging support have a USB port soldered vertically to the motherboard (it's a port, not a header). If you want to do USB debugging you need to open up the case.

I have in the past exposed a USB debug port to the case USB ports, as I was short of USB ports from the motherboard headers, but I needed to solder it myself as it didn't seem like the cables were otherwise available.

4
0

A third of London boroughs 'fess to running unsupported server software

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

I'm not sure if suggesting OpenBSD is sarcasm m0rt, but if it isn't you clearly haven't used it much.

I am an OpenBSD fan and use it frequently on the desktop as well as infrastructure, but the support policy is *one year* - current and previous release, new version approximately every six months. There are no LTS versions.

It's true that OpenBSD is secure, and that there have only been two remote holes in the default install, but the default install is mostly limited to OpenBSD specific infrastructure software (firewall, email, very basic web server, routing, dns). If there is no local execution of programs or third party software then yes, upgrading is less essential, but many people need additional functionality.

If there is a need to go beyond the default install ports/packages are not audited to the same extent as the base install, there is no binary compatibility, and the ports tree is a moving target, so a couple of releases on it's possible it will not build against an unsupported release.

Furthermore, OpenBSD's policy is pretty much 'security before all else' - firewire, bluetooth, and the Linux compatibility layer were dropped completely because they weren't being adequately maintained and security couldn't be guaranteed. Currently hyperthreading is disabled by default under OpenBSD due to the speculative execution information leakage issues, which is certainly an effective mitigation but (on Linux) leads to around a 30% performance degradation in some scenarios.

If a council can't upgrade beyond a Windows Server version released in 2000, I'm not sure BSD is really the best idea..

2
0

Rejoice! Thousands more kids flock to computing A-level

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Most of the people taking A levels will be teenagers, so it's awfully strange that a high proportion of the pictures of results being received are of teenagers that are a) female and b) pretty, the few exceptions being the students that get A* in everything.

0
1

EU wants one phone plug to rule them all. But we've got a better idea.

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Just add wireless charging

Micro USB is awful, I continually need to buy new cables as the old ones fail, and the connector becomes less usable over time.

Just put wireless charging on everything. If not wireless it needs to be a locking connector designed for thousands of insertions (yes, I realise this will lead to some people ripping the guts out of their phone)

3
22

Three more data-leaking security holes found in Intel chips as designers swap security for speed

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Middle ground

Nice thought Ken, but you're effectively suggesting that all the VM hosted software is bug free. Without protections, find an exploit in the software in one VM, access all the others.. There's no way that will pass security compliance.

5
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Looking at the wrong holes

@Mark110

I'm picking on Windows because, mostly, it doesn't use an app store for its major applications (For games Steam has a lot of the market, but you should all be using GOG.com instead where possible..).

Plenty of Ubuntu software can be downloaded from third party sites, but most Unix these days uses a repository for installing software - at least the free stuff.

I'm also picking on Windows because in a hypothetical app store only model the user has less choice. With Unix you can always choose to use a third party FTP site. In a locked down Windows world software will cost more and be less diverse.

4
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Intel only told the favoured few, again

Windows, Linux, OS X had patches ready in advance. OpenBSD was left out in the cold, again (although due to the work they've already done, most of those vulnerabilities have no effect)

10
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Middle ground

A cloud provider does not need to ensure that the virtual instances are up to date.They should strongly recommend it, for the individual customer's sake, but the priority is ensuring the host OS/hypervisor is fully patched so that there is no information leakage or DoS between VMs.

If an individual VM is not patched and some code involving speculative execution enables a third party access to data in that VM they are not authorised to see that's unfortunate, but really no different from any other OS or software vulnerability.

4
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Looking at the wrong holes

'Random third party code' ?

You do realise this is almost Windows' entire software ecosystem, and a large proportion of non Windows apps?

Unless you really do want all software to be signed, vetted, subjected to (possibly arbitrary standards), plus a 30% margin, then dumped in Windows Store?

Obviously some sense is needed, you might not take a code snippet posted by 1337Haxx0r37 on a forum literally, but there's an awful lot of trust elsewhere that software is as it claims. Rarely is this a problem.

14
1

Making money mining Coinhive? Yeah, you and nine other people

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Cryptocurrencies are pyramid schemes

News at 11..

4
1

Linux 4.18 arrives fashionably late while Zorin OS shines up its Windows

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: PlayOnLinux

Strictly speaking that's true, but PlayOnLinux (and Crossover) allow for different versions of Wine to be used per program, automatically configured.

Obviously this is possible with Wine as-is, but most people are probably going to run one version of Wine without fiddling with prefixes.

3
0

Phased out: IT architect plugs hole in clean-freak admin's wiring design

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Wiring limits

Oh, sure, the Internet is currently 11-12Mb/s or so until I shortly get around to a fibre upgrade. I don't know if it's the negotiation, or re-transmits (there weren't any errors reported), but it was much more effective to replace a couple of quid of network cable with a new one rather than bother with fixing negotiation speeds. Also, if I want to copy on the local network I want to do so at 1Gb.

Anyway, the switch has now been moved so the issue won't re-occur. Next up is replacing my ancient firewall hardware with something a little more embedded..

1
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Wiring limits

I once went to a new machine room, if I remember correctly in the Republic of Ireland. It was smart, shiny, with incredibly neat wiring - a thousand miles away from cable horrors.

Unfortunately the comms system we maintained wasn't working - modems were communicating with the server, but no calls were being answered. The wires from the modems were tied very neatly, and almost at 180 degrees round parts of the rack, where they had presumably broken inside. Cue a test of every individual modem, replacement of RJ11 wires, and a request not to be quite so fastidious. This was made worse by the fact that US Robotics don't have a standard RJ11 wiring, they use different connections for different models..

I may have also managed the same at home, where one of the computers on a 28 port switch was rather slow web browsing. Eventually had a look at the switch stats and found it's negotiating at 100Mb instead of 1000Mb, cable has probably been bent a bit too much in the limited desk space, project tonight to move it on to a new shelf on the wall..

7
0

The off-brand 'military-grade' x86 processors, in the library, with the root-granting 'backdoor'

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Could be really useful in specific circumstances

If you wanted to reverse engineer software that, for whatever reason, doesn't work in a virtualised (or v86) environment, doesn't have a kernel debugger, but you still have the ability to execute userland code, this could be ideal.

1
0

You want to know which is the best smartphone this season? Tbh, it's tricky to tell 'em apart

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Updates? Removable battery? Rootable?

I know this isn't trendy due to the fact most people are on a contract and throw away their phones every two years, but in a sane world (one where people treated a laptop in their pocket exactly the same as a mobile phone) there would be riots if it was supported for less than five years.

As it is the best that's possible with Android at the moment is three years for Android Enterprise phones (of which the latest Blackberry KeyTwo is one).

Start punishing suppliers, and chipset creators. Say a new fancy graphics chipset comes out, and they want to extol its virtues :

'so, how open are the specifications?' 'We supply a binary blob certified to work with Android Oreo'

*sucks teeth, immediately lowers score out of ten by four points*

'How long will you be supporting this chipset for?' 'Well, as we said we'll be supporting Oreo throughout its lifetime and then will make a decision on further releases'

'Sorry, our review policy is a blanket support arrangement of a minimum five years including all Android versions released in that time. Come back when you've tried harder'

Phones are now mostly a stable market with very little differentiation. Service should be the key factor here, and the whole infrastructure (Google, chipset manufacturers, headset manufacturers) being geared to force people to change phone on a regular basis is borderline criminal.

6
0

Sysadmin trained his offshore replacements, sat back, watched ex-employer's world burn

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: Logic bombs are unprofessional

I think Lee, your primary mistaken assumption is likely to be that there is anyone doing a proper licence audit at all..

I've never used personal software as an essential part of any business process, but free/personal/decidedly non ideal products have been used in the past, usually because the company refuse to pay for a proper infrastructure or bureaucracy is so much of a pain it saps at your will to live.

I'm happy to say that my current employer is making considerable improvements in those areas, most things are as they should be, and the addition of new systems in no longer an exercise in pain.

55
0

Oldest swinger in town, Slackware, notches up a quarter of a century

BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Re: No GUI Installer

It's nothing compared to OpenBSD, which has one of the most stripped down installers.

Graphical installers can be useful, particularly when organising a complex disk setup, but frankly that is a minority pursuit.

Some distributions could probably save a fair bit of effort by staying text only instead of poorly implementing a graphical interface, especially when I think it was Ubuntu failed to support 15 bit colour quite some time ago, meaning the installer wouldn't work in one of the most popular virtualisation products..

3
0
BinkyTheMagicPaperclip
Silver badge

Great distro, apart from dependencies

I started Linux with Slackware, although much more time was spent with OS/2, and BSD Unix. It, or to be more accurate Salix aka Slackware with dependencies and a few extra bits, is my primary Linux OS at home.

It's generally straightforward, and not difficult to wrangle, instead of systemd/network manager buggering around with the machine and networking.

initrd is a bit of a pain, though. It's possible to create one, which is essential for Xen, and also useful when running an SAS controller. Really need to work through the steps in getting my main Linux system to boot after transplanting the SSD from an SATA connection to SAS, it gets a few seconds into boot before the SAS driver initialises, the root partition appears at a different location, and the system falls over.. I've built an initrd, but it isn't working, and I'm currently too stubborn just to do a reinstall.

1
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018