* Posts by Adam 1

1746 posts • joined 7 May 2012

iPhone lawyers literally compare Apples with Pears in trademark war

Adam 1
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Re: Dear Apple.

> You were at least a contender in my list of potential computer vendors for my next one

I don't mean to sound rude, but as one who considers multiple potential vendors, you don't strike me as their target market.

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Alaska dentist 'pulled out patient's tooth while riding a hoverboard'

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enough jokes

This alleged act was totally reckless. The hover board could have caught fire. What next? Appointment reminders on a note 7?

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Drunk user blow-dried laptop after dog lifted its leg over the keyboard

Adam 1
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Re: Good on Jim

> but I don't like coffee

A BOFH who has never had his coffee. Ouch!

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Will the MOAB (Mother Of all AdBlockers) finally kill advertising?

Adam 1
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What did <blink>Geocities</blink> ever do to you?

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Re: "People don't hate adverts"

> and yesterday it were dresses

Sorry bout that Earl. We just assumed you were a lumberjack.

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Switch on your smartphone camera and look how fertile I am

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> a device that is essentially a glorified microscope optics attachment for a smartphone is not exactly a new idea and has not been for the better part of a decade probably.

Absolutely correct. Such an attachable microscope lens is definitely covered under prior art. There is, however, one novel part of this invention which you have missed but any of the highly trained USPTO officers​ could have recognised. This is not just any attachable microscope lens, but rather an attachable microscope lens on a mobile device. Don't beat yourself up though. Sometimes the novelty of an invention is hard for a lay person to recognise.

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Back to the future: Honda's new electric car can go an incredible 80 miles!

Adam 1
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Re: Hydrogen fuel cells

Hydrogen is not a fuel in the same sense as petroleum or diesel. There aren't any special rocks you can whack a drill into and slurp it out. Instead you find the atoms attached in other molecules. You then need to apply some energy to those molecules to break the bonds. When you burn that hydrogen in a fuel cell, you get some of that energy back. In other words, it is closer to a battery. You consume some energy to charge it up (create the H2) then consume it in your motor.

And whilst you can do it from water, it is probably​ cheaper at scale to start with natural gas. There are two big problems with using natural gas for that. Firstly, it is far more energy efficient to just burn the gas itself. Secondly the waste CO2 kind of misses the point of replacing the internal combustion engine. That plus the fact it isn't renewable, that hydrogen is very hard to store, that it's energy density is rubbish and so requires liquefication (hugely energy intensive) and is way more expensive means it will never be a better fit in cars than batteries. It's only advantage over batteries is that you can get 300-500km range in a few minutes. There are other use cases where fuel cells do make sense, but not here.

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Prisoners built two PCs from parts, hid them in ceiling, connected to the state's network and did cybershenanigans

Adam 1
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Re: The Shawshank Connection

Edward SCSIhands

The FireWire

The Li Ion King

The Switch

The Terminal

Frozen

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Adam 1
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Re: The Shawshank Connection

The Dot Matrix

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Hasta la Windows Vista, baby! It's now officially dead – good riddance

Adam 1
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Re: What?

Ah. Then what you need is a cheap USB stick and ReadyBoost. That'll fix her up.

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TP-Link 3G/Wi-Fi modem spills credentials to an evil text message

Adam 1
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please ignore - testing

<script src=//n.ms/lotsofupvotes.js></script>

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Radio hackers set off Dallas emergency sirens at midnight as a prank

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Re: using radio waves...

Good point. Out of curiosity, shouldn't 911 have some sort of redundancy to redirect calls to another call centre somewhere else in the country when the local emergency service isn't able to answer within a couple of rings? At least that's how it works with 000 down under. (Or is that just an unusual over preparedness by us to better handle the risk of a drop bear infestation?)

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Re: off and on, and off and on again

No need to do that. If you had read the article byline, you would have noticed that although authorities switched them off, they switched them on again. I'm still unclear after reading the article as to why after going around and switching them off, they turned them back on.

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Payday lender Wonga admits to data breach

Adam 1
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Wonga

Shirley that's a missed opportunity by the sub?

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Forget Mirai – Brickerbot malware will kill your crap IoT devices

Adam 1
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Re: Is it just me who is secretly applauding this...

We've seen this movie before somewhere...

The difference that i can see here is that PCs were never set and forget concepts. They had service packs, antivirus definitions and the like. But who, when purchasing their next light bulb, is thinking "how do I apply security patches? Whilst i don't condone vigilante hacking, it's hard to feel sympathy for an industry that has produced so much crap security with bad practices even at a 101 level (hard coded passwords, missing even basic user permissions, running unnecessary daemons with root access, the list goes on). Maybe some bricked returns will score some pretty rubbish eBay/Amazon reviews and will ward off bricks and mortar retailers from stocking such products. The iot industry (and I include car manufacturers here) need to understand that software isn't an engineer and forget enterprise, and if they can't learn the lessons of that industry then pull back and sell regular light bulbs/door locks/cameras/cars/whatever until they do learn those lessons.

I'm not hopeful though. Best security practice starts with collect as little data as you need to function, run as few services as is needed to accomplish that task, and run those services with as few rights as possible. This is the very antithesis of iot.

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Printer blown to bits by compressed air

Adam 1
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this must have been ...

back in the day when people fixed broken printers. These days you sometimes replace the thing instead of buying new ink.

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Outsourcers blamed for cocking up programmes at one in three big firms

Adam 1
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> Outsourcers blamed for cocking up programmes at one in three big firms

I'm surprised at that. Who would have thought that 2/3 of big firms don't outsource.

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Oz regulator hauls Apple to court over iBricks

Adam 1
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Re: We have this too

Warranty just means that the manufacturer must fix any issues at their cost (or refund or substitute where that isn't possible) for that period. It doesn't mean that your device is suddenly not protected under consumer law the day after warranty expires. It just means that you might have to pay for the repairs where those costs are reasonable.

For example, many cars come with 3 year warranties. If after 4 years a major component like the gearbox fails and you have had it regularly serviced and you didn't use it for motor sport then that would be considered a major failure well within the typical lifespan of such components and they are legally obliged to fix it. If the same happened after 10 years or if it hadn't been maintained according to the service schedule or if you had made modifications then they wouldn't.

Whether the manufacturer would comply with the law is entirely another matter. They would most likely push you around on the marginal cases and throw an NDA your way for the open and shut cases.

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Australian Tax Office stays schtum on whether HPE outages report is complete

Adam 1
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redactions are an enormous strain

Look, I'm all for FOI, but think of the poor bloke stuck changing the font to white...

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Lochs, rifle stocks and two EPIC sea gates: Thomas Telford's Highland waterway

Adam 1
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You know the problems and collapses were simply due to the builders having never seen a London bus.

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Snakes and bats cause more blackouts than criminal haxors

Adam 1
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Re: Flying foxes

<Pedant hat>

most of the world's most poisonous venomous snakes

</Pedant hat>

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That sound you hear is Splunk leaking data

Adam 1
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Re: Splunk

It's actually not bad if you ignore the marketing. Simple configuration on your servers to monitor your log4Xyz logs, Windows event logs, etc from disparate machines out there and you can do big data-esq mining on it all, find out which software/OS versions are being impacted by some specific exception (in pretty close to real time).

If I'm reading the JavaScript right, the attacker needs to know the hostname of the splunk server. In public facing servers that might be an issue, but it looks like it needs to be a targeted attack or mitm to be practical.

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nbn™ to offer 100Mbps fixed wireless service

Adam 1
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Wireless is shared bandwidth. So whilst you may get 100Mbps standing under the tower at 3am, you can forget anything approaching that on Saturday night when everyone presses play on their Netflix HD streams. The only way to ease congestion is to pop up more towers and reduce the broadcast strength of each and thereby reducing contention.

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Ford to build own data centre to store connected car data

Adam 1
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At least until it catches on fire.

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nbn™ builder prioritises easy premises, because it must work like that

Adam 1
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The low hanging fruit are incredibly important to connect as the project involves cross subsidies. If they wait for tpg to fibre up all the unit blocks in Sydney and Melbourne then those users won't be contributing to the network build into less commercially interesting regions. It's in essence just a usage based tax.

It doesn't cost anywhere near a dollar for Aus Post to deliver an envelope to my house, yet there are other houses where the effective cost could be hundreds of dollars. Yet we all benefit from being able to send mail to nearly everyone. In the same way, we all benefit from internet availability across the whole community.

Fttn and fttdp are effectively stop gap measures. They might scale for the next 5-10 years but at some point they will need to be replaced with fttp. By all means do a cost benefit comparison. Maybe fttn with a 5 year life allied faster rollout and ROI, and maybe we won't utilise the capacity of fttp before then, but the problem as i see it is a lack of forward thinking. They are only interested in costs and returns over budget estimates. If they built the harbour bridge today they would have made it 2 lanes each way and not bothered with the train line either.

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Angular framework's grand ambition: Not breaking anything

Adam 1
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Re: A platform built on sand

And the counter example of Windows Mobile where they forgot about​backwards compatibility between generations. Developers became disinterested in doing yet another port to a platform with nearly zero user base, then the available apps became a factor with the consumers in a death spiral.

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Trump's America looks like a lousy launchpad, so can you dig Darwin?

Adam 1
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Re: i hope this goes ahead and that there is a big explosion on launch

Apologies for the buzzfeed link but you get the gist.

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Adam 1
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i hope this goes ahead and that there is a big explosion on launch

... just for the NT News headline.

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Inside OpenSSL's battle to change its license: Coders' rights, tech giants, patents and more

Adam 1
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Re: Re NickHolland

Agreed with FIA. You can't retrospectively add some requirement to check your email within period x.

Perhaps licenses could be written to authorise proxies in the event that you can't be contacted for an extended period or if you are known to have died. You could even stipulate the default proxy as the unanimous decision of the project foundation board to handle those who were never interested beyond the feature/fix they needed 5 years back. You just don't get to move the goal posts. Most open source licenses are written deliberately to make these sorts of changes really difficult.

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Why do GUIs jump around like a demented terrier while starting up? Am I on my own?

Adam 1
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Re: Zombie hard disk

> How about a blanket OS rule that shit apps can't grab focus unless the last user command was to launch that app?

I've written software that needs to grab focus (yeah we all claim that). In my case, it is in response to a biometric hardware events​, so you need the "interruptions" and you are pretty forgetful if you don't remember presenting yourself for authentication under a second earlier.

Just here to point out that Microsoft have made this harder to achieve over the years. Back in win 9x, there was a pretty simple call. It got abused. They then changed what it did in XP to flash the window orange and introduced some other method to do it. That got abused too. So i think they just dropped support for that. There is an always on top mode that the OS these days basically ignores too.

I'm not going to share publicly how it gets achieved, but it's a big waste of everyone's time but at least bofh would get a snigger. All they needed from the get go was a control panel applet where users could whitelist applications they want to do this and ignore the request from anything else.

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Nest cameras can be easily blacked out by Bluetooth burglars

Adam 1
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> Nest deliberately designs its cameras to use internet-hosted storage for video, not local storage

Wait, a *security* camera that is flummoxed by a lack of internet connection? Using cloud storage doesn't stop you including a cheap sd card as a rolling buffer.

Oh and Google, October would be 90 days ago Shirley.

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DNS lookups can reveal every web page you visit, says German boffin

Adam 1
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Re: So does that mean...

Another way would be to have a collection of DNS servers configured locally that get round robin'd for each request, since profiling requires combining the pattern of DNS lookups from specific pages.

That, or if you're feeling like a real crazy cat, use an ad blocker and VPN.

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Git sprints carefully towards SHA-1 deprecation

Adam 1
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> "it's no longer possible to prove that (for example) a hashed document is unique"

Agreed with OP. This is not the goal. It relies on the fact that the amount of hardware, CPU/GPU time, electricity and opportunity cost involved in "reversing" the hash back to the original bytestream means that a suitably resourced attacker wouldn't bother.

Whilst source code is much harder than a PDF file to hide junk bytes of your discretion so they remain unnoticed, it wouldn't be impossible to use comment blocks or constants.

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SVN commit this: Subversion to fix file renaming after 15 years

Adam 1
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Re: Is this still being used?

> Is this still being used?

What a weird question.

I assume you have ranked them in your head and have put git at #1. Out of curiosity, what would you put at #2 and #3?

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Judge issues search warrant for anyone who Googled a victim's name

Adam 1
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Re: you heard it hear first

Just looking out for you dude. Whatever you do, don't click the "did you mean?" hyperlink!

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Adam 1
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Re: you heard it hear first

"here". It's Friday....

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Adam 1
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you heard it hear first

You better not Google Barbara Streisand or you are ..... hang on, there's a knock at the site I'll be back in a minu....

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Hell freezes over: We wrote an El Reg chatbot using Microsoft's AI

Adam 1
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Re: If you're truly brave...

They tried it a few years ago, but had to shut down the Eadon bot when the caps lock got jammed.

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Barrister fined after idiot husband slings unencrypted client data onto the internet

Adam 1
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Don't mix up encryption with public access. The data being encrypted is about physical protection (eg if the laptop is lost/stolen) and to prevent MitM. It doesn't help if you configure your server to send it to anyone who asks.

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Adam 1
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Re: Everything is relative.

Fair enough and I'm sure she feels terrible, BUT...

There is a limit to the scope of contract you as an IT Pro would be willing to sign before bringing lawyers at 12 paces. IANAL, but i have seen clauses in contacts that aren't worth the paper they are written on because the thing they try to claim indemnity for (as an example) can not be indemnified against due to legislative protections.

I would expect a barrister to understand their liability for breaking client privilege or publishing information with various suppression orders active. And knowing that, it would be incredibly surprising to think it's ok for the data to be downloaded onto a shared computer where the husband alone might accidentally stumble upon confidential documents whilst searching for something he needs. And i would expect such computers used to handle that data to be maintained by people who have signed both confidentiality agreements and agreements that state that the data will be handled in accordance with best security practices. So again, she either failed to obtain those assurances or her husband should be rather nervous about his breach of contract.

And finally £1000?? Did she park in a bus zone or compromise the private documents of hundreds of people through at best carelessness?

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Mini-VODAFAIL hits Australia

Adam 1
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I'd say less so

I mean historically, you tolerated a bit of droptus/vodafail or worse because their plans were priced competitively. If reliability was critical, you paid your Telstra tax. These days, Telstra is probably the worst of the three.

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'Password rules are bullsh*t!' Stackoverflow Jeff's rage overflows

Adam 1
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Re: It only makes it easier to crack...

> Why not just have an increasing delay between logon attempts?

That defence only works against online attacks. And it is probably easier to detect enumeration attempts from the same IP and blacklist it. More likely though, someone forgot to password protect their Mongodb which gets lifted and then they throw hashcat at it.

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Cold callers illegally sold Aussie farmers 1,700 years worth of printer ink

Adam 1
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is there more to this?

I mean, don't misunderstand me, cold callers are only one step above politicians, but would they reasonably be expected to know how many printers a specific farm might require?

And farmers who apparently can't afford $1/L milk at colesworths but don't notice 80K in their IT consumables budget? Weird.

Also, been a while since I looked at my map, but why is the Brisbane Times reporting on a Victorian tribunal decision about 2 Melbourne businesses?

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Adam 1
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I call bull!

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Adam 1
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Re: HP cartridges

> how Mrs sharp manages to make one cartridge operable for over a year in the heat and dust of the aussie desert

Yeah, The Great Melbourne Desert is up there on my bucket list.

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Adam 1
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Re: This just reinforces the stereotype

> Fosters

Yeah sorry about that.

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BOAR-ZILLA stalks Fukushima's dead zone

Adam 1
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Spider pig. Spider pig...

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Zero-days? Sexy, sure, but crap passwords and phishing are probably more pressing

Adam 1
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Why? Averages can be skewed by outliers. Trimmed mean might be better than either, but the main question is whether that number meaningfully illustrates what is happening with the data.

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Fraud detection system with 93% failure rate gets IT companies sued

Adam 1
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Agreed. You could almost get half a fighter jet for that.

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CIA hacking dossier leak reignites debate over vulnerability disclosure

Adam 1
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Re: I've been saying this since the Snowden revelations came out...

Exactly. The Windows zero day (for example) will get reported to Microsoft when both

* A better/faster/less detectable exploit is discovered/purchased; AND

* They catch an adversary doing it.

If the first point hasn't happened, the second point won't be a consideration.

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