* Posts by Adam 1

2135 posts • joined 7 May 2012

SagePay's monster wobble... On the third day of sale week, UK retailers start to weep

Adam 1
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And for the record, this is how a grown up service should apologise.

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Arm Inside: Is Apple ready for the next big switch?

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Apparently the other mob are going for better performance and less waiting around.

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As Google clamps down, 'Droid developer warns 'breaking day' is coming

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Re: So, No Other Google News Today, Then?

> It's like me farting in south wales and somebody detecting a whiff of that fart in scotland levels of sensitive.

Ah, so it was YOU!

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More than half of GitHub is duplicate code, researchers find

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padleft

If I one day hate myself enough to get back into JavaScript, I'd probably want a local copy of any NPM in case some function went missing...

Seriously though, I'd like to know a lot more about their methodology before getting my pants in a twist. I have seen dup checkers complain about nunit test cases being too similar. And yes, you probably could have extracted 2 lines of the arrange into a private method so the three test cases with those lines could share it, but then to describe those two trivial lines of code you would need to spend a month of Sundays trying to come up with a sensible name, and this is somewhat missing the point of refactoring.

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OnePlus 5T is like the little sister you always feared was the favourite

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Re: Fingerprint sensor on the rear

@MrBanana,

I find the old school switches/buttons and knobs far better than the same option through the touch screen. Whilst I *can* change radio stations or audio source via the touch screen, I only do that if safely stopped because a touch screen requires you to divert your eyes from the road and physical buttons do not. When I'm driving, I have a job to do and a responsibility to others to do that job competently. That requires full attention and correct body positioning to take evasive action if the need arises. Using a touch device, no matter how well it is otherwise designed, is incongruent with this responsibility. You (general you, not MrBanana specifically) are not so important that your right to fiddle with devices or check messages usurps someone else's right to safety. If you just must check that beep or send that message, then pull over and then knock yourself out.

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DNS resolver 9.9.9.9 will check requests against IBM threat database

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https://www.ebay.com/new-or-unused/bridges

Resolved: 104.83.251.239

Works perfectly.

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Car tax evasion has soared since paper discs scrapped

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> Abolish road tax and put it on fuel instead.

Not the smartest idea. It is both unsustainable and regressive. It is unsustainable because a significant percentage of vehicles in the next decade will be PHEVs or EVs. We can agree to disagree on the rate of growth of these categories, but price is coming down, choices are increasing, range is increasing and a shed load of money is going into R&D, so it will increase over time. That also drives the regressiveness. It is the wealthy who can afford such cars, so they are the ones getting the tax break. The poorer folk fighting to keep some old rust bucket alive are the ones who get hit with this tax worst (that is true even today) but because of the reduction in tax take, the rate gets increased to retain the total revenue.

We saw something similar here (down under) with our power grid and the growth of home air conditioning. Back 30+ years, it was somewhere near 1 in 4 houses that had it. Today, every new house/unit has it almost without exception. Every renovation adds it. The extra draw on the grid means that* the distribution gets expensive upgrades to cope with the <50 hours a year where all those units are simultaneously on. Furthermore, old, unreliable, and inefficient powerplants at retirement age get billions pumped into them to keep them on life support for another 5 years. It's hard to complain** if you are sitting their in your A/C, being part of the primary cause of the demand side of things that requires. It is quite another (perverse) thing when you are not wealthy enough for A/C yet your pet bill has doubled in the last decade (and then some). The wealthy will respond to this by buying solar panels and battery storage, meaning all that investment capital gets recouped by those who can't afford to go solar/battery. It's a death spiral. So back on point, by all means have a sales tax on inefficient vehicles in the first place, or incentives to buyback old inefficient vehicles, or per Km billing, but don't put it on the fuel itself.

* not the only reason, also some gold plating going on.

** actually, it doesn't seem that hard at all

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Dick move: Navy flyboy flings firmament phallus for flabbergasted folk

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Re: Dammit.

Well maybe it's ok by all you guys, but I, for one, find this a real dick move by the pilot.

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Tesla launches electric truck it guarantees won't break for a million miles

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Re: Sport truck! 0-60 in 5 seconds

> Ever heard of regenerative breaking?

No. I have only seen working ones, but it should still be under warranty.

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Does UK high street banks' crappy crypto actually matter?

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I'm actually with Scott on this. I thought (and still do think) he is wrong on uBlock/reporturi but HSTS is amongst the simplest steps you could implement because legacy browsers will just ignore it. Imagine you're a technical news website with a cloudflare cache frontend; your "changes" are to tick the box on the cloudflare control panel.

Banking websites are often necessary to check while travelling. If you connect to a free cafe/hotel WiFi and visit the http landing page they could easily deliver a fake version and use social engineering tricks to get you to submit over clear text. They might even be generous enough to include a padlock png with some fake browser chrome to make it look half legitimate. If the site used HSTS then they can't redirect it in the first place.

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Inside Internet Archive: 10PB+ of storage in a church... oh, and a little fight to preserve truth

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Re: distributed knowledge?

I'm happy to be downvoted but at least make a point about why my post is wrong or stupid or RTFA or something.

@phuzz, thanks for the link. It's good to see they are at least making the right noises. I think it's a bit generous to call it an "all you do" set of instructions. Most commentards here could do it but it is hardly folding@home or seti@home level accessible. There is a lot of focus on the great backup but potential distributed restore plans don't seem as developed. Bad actors are mentioned in passing but not strategies to figure out which is truth when for example a TLA pretends to be multiple actors and restores a different truth.

This would be an interesting application of blockchains or even with as a cryptocurrency. Imagine mining by proving that you have the hash of hundreds of random files from random places in the archive.

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distributed knowledge?

A few months back we read about a whole bunch of early hp documents that were lost to a natural disasters (fire from memory). It strikes me as quite all eggs in one basket to have such important historical data in one location. How do they backup their data? I know many folk here have a few 10s of GB HDD space. It would be a really interesting project to ask people to donate a few GB storage and a small amount of download/upload bandwidth to truly securing that data. If sharded the right way, you could reasonably have confidence that all information is held in multiple regions, detect where backup nodes are MIA and replicate the at risk data to new nodes.

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DJI bug bounty NDA is 'not signable', say irate infosec researchers

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> That would be in breach of the NDNDAA

And we would share the NDNDAA but that would fall foul of the NDNDNDAAA. Again, I can't share the NDNDNDAAA specifics, but I can confirm that it talks a lot about turtles.

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Drone maker DJI left its private SSL, firmware keys open to world+dog on GitHub FOR YEARS

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Servercredentials.txt? Really!? You are just asking to be hacked. What you should do is to call the file something more obscure like app.config, except further obscure the details by encoding them in XML.

Something like this is all you need.

<configuration>

<connectionStrings>

<add name="ProdDB" connectionString="Server=MyServer; Database=Prod; User Id=sa; password= re@Lly5Af3" providerName="System.Data.SqlClient" />

</connectionStrings

</configuration>

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Windows on ARM: It's nearly here (again)

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Re: About as fast as an Atom

> However the Intel blog posts is essentially threatening the OEMs with a lawsuit if this is enabled

The difference here is that Microsoft definitely want this to happen. They want to compete with tablets and Chromebooks but RT lacks traction and Intel can't hit that day spot on price/speed/power.

Microsoft have a big enough stick to force them to negotiate a license with OEMs to use those instructions.

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Thousand-dollar iPhone X's Face ID wrecked by '$150 3D-printed mask'

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so what you're saying is ...

... that Guy Fawkes should stick to a passcode.

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Shiver me timbers! 67cm Playmobil pirate ship sets sail for Caribbean

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Re: Hopefully it won't sink...

Icy; what you did there.

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Silverlight extinguished while Angular wins fans among developers

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entranced??

> but they've been entranced by Android Studio, the Swift programming language, and Angular, a JavaScript framework.

I'm not sure entranced is the right verb. These things are (almost) unavoidable if you want to deliver to an Android or A☐Thing or if you need a responsive web UI just to make js nearly tolerable. It's kind of like saying that car makers are entranced with creating both LHD and RHD versions of their cars. It'd save them a fair whack of coin if they didn't, but they have to do it to sell in different markets for both regulation and customer preference reasons.

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Adam 1
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Q. How can you tell the difference between an introverted statistician and an extraverted one?

A. The extravert will be the one starting at the other's shoes.

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Judge bins sueball lobbed at Malwarebytes by rival antivirus maker for torpedoing its tool

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Re: Norton != Symantec

Just sayin'

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Adam 1
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> Some users have also reported that it is difficult to remove once installed.

Well if that is going to preclude an application from being considered a security suite, then ....

hang on, Norton just wants me to reboot, brb

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Boffins: We can identify you by your typing, and we're gonna sell the tech to biz, govt – yay!

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Re: Gliding away

I assume that the canine boss is referring to the option in google keyboard by that name. I think that Swype did it first.

Sent from my glide typing keyboard.

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Evil pixels: Researcher demos data-theft over screen-share protocols

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Re: Yes, you can leak data via the screen

Real haxors would send files down one byte at a time by toggling the caps lock, scroll lock and num lock modifiers

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Adam 1
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back in the day

Clipboard transfers are usually enabled even if file redirection is blocked. I remember using a tool once that base64'd the file and chunked it to the client using the clipboard, effectively doing the ctrl+c, ctrl+v for you, then reconstructing it to a file on the client.

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Self-driving bus in crash just 2 hours after entering public service

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Re: German Efficiency

> I guess that rules out "Open Source" for these things... dammit...

Ability to view the source code isn't the same thing as ability to flash a new version to a vehicle that you intend to use on a public space. You could regulate to demand that the source is available. That and:

(1) a mandated critical security bug bounty from the manufacturer; and

(2) full legal immunity for the researcher if responsibly disclosed to the regulator

Today security researchers have to use disassemblers (eg diesel gate) or otherwise MitM some radio transmission (eg Subaru keyfobs). They manage, somehow. (With some of the code I have had to look at, I glaze over with what the author was attempting to achieve, and that is with code.) But it would be better to remove that hurdle.

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Parity calamity! Wallet code bug destroys $280 MEEELLION in Ethereum

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That is not the same scenario because even though you point out (correctly) the lack of savings, you are also implicitly allowing for the fact that the average person continues to receive payment for their labour in that currency.

If Anthony rather asked what would happen if everyone spent what ethereum they got as they got it and accepted more of it every other week as compensation for their labour and/or goods they had to sell, I think we would all agree that it is functioning as any currency should. His picture was about what would happen if everyone tried to totally rid themselves of the currency at the same time. He then went on to imply that this is a reason it should be considered a fake currency. My simple argument is that all currencies fail at that test. A dollar bill or a euro note has almost no intrinsic value. Maybe you could use wads of it to insulate your ceiling or walls, but we don't accept payments in such currencies because of its ability to keep our houses warm.

No, we like to accumulate these because we believe that others will value it in the future and at that time we can get some desired good or service by offering some of this decorated paper or polymer. Part of the reason for that belief is, yes, regulations that seek to limit the rate that new decorated paper/polymer gets created. This means that it is less valuable for me to hoard decorative paper/polymer as its buying power decreases over time. This drives people with surplus decorative paper/polymer to invest it in enterprises that pay a dividend.

There are of course risks associated with crypto currencies. You can lose your whole portfolio to a hacker, software bug or hardware failure. It is vulnerable to regulators who may restrict it in certain markets (leading to a combination of fewer buyers and a glut of sellers cashing out). But it isn't vulnerable to the Robert Mugabe style hyperinflation either. Nor can it be manipulated by governments to suit their trade agendas. I'm not saying you should throw your lot on this or that crypto currency. It isn't a binary proposition (er, pun not intended).

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> if everyone decided to sell their bitcoins or etherea, what would they be worth then?

If everyone decided to sell their USD or Euros, what would they be worth then?

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Adam 1
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Re: And that's why cryptocurrency is not and won't become a replacement for money

> Imagine this happening in a real bank with real money

You are absolutely correct. There is no way that a bank would stuff up big time and effectively vapourise some eye watering sum of money. And if they did, they'd hardly go cap in hand to Mr add Mrs Tax-Payer for a bailout I guess.

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Pixel-style display woes on your shiny new X? Perfectly normal, says Apple

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Re: 'image persistence' or 'burn-in'

> ...a foot operated button on the floor to dip the head lights.

> I actually thought that was a brilliant idea, and I'd love to see it "reinvented"...

Sadly we are going the other direction. My car goes all nanny state on you if your high beams are on and it thinks some street light in the distance could be another car.

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Seldom used 'i' mangled by baffling autocorrect bug in Apple's iOS 11

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Re: The most shocking part of this story

Absolutely correct. We have made amends and are keen to move on. Please find enclosed 2 tickets for The RegA☐ster to attend WWDC.

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Adam 1
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NA☐ce.

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Birds are pecking apart Australia's national broadband network

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Re: Alternative tasking for them?

So what you are saying is that we should teach them how to hold a golf club instead?

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Adam 1
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Re: Why have unprotected cables there at all

> Being a dumb cheapskate costs money.

To be fair, they expect the network to be obsolete as soon as it's rolled out. Why add all those expensive plastic containers?

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Biggest Tor overhaul in a decade adds layers of security improvements

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Re: The future...

Why do you say that? Shirley a publicly verifiable record of all transactions is the goal of the TOR project. Perfect for blockchains.

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Hardware has never been better, but it isn't a licence for code bloat

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a couple of observations

Firstly, jumping to 64 bit, doubles your pointer sizes. Every array now takes up double the amount of memory as its 32 bit cousin. Every instruction now needs an extra 4 bytes to describe the memory address it applies to and so on.

Secondly, time is a finite resource in a development team. Optimisation takes time to both profile, figure out whether it is CPU/disk/memory bound and try alternatives. That is time that cannot be spent on other shiny shiny features and digging out other bugs. So the feature of having it work faster or having it work on older hardware gets weighed up. This is true in both open and closed source worlds.

Thirdly, optimisation changes with hardware evolution. 25 years ago you were probably trying to optimise to some maths coprocessor. Today, you are probably trying to parallelize loads and get GPUs or cloud load balancers to improve throughput.

Fourthly, developers fix what they see and experience. That's the reason why software can suck on low resolution laptops; the team writing it has a 4K dual monitor setup on their i7s with at least 8 cores and somewhere north of 16GB RAM and an SSD. They simply haven't had to tolerate it in a 5 year old netbook so the spend half a day making that feature quicker never gets prioritised.

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Adam 1
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Re: code bloat is not necessarily slow

A simple example of this is inlining. For example

foreach thing in myThings

{

this.ValidateThing(thing);

this.ProcessThing(thing);

}

Without inlining, every iteration of the loop need to jump to and back from each of the methods. If the valuation is pretty simple (say check something != null) then the time the CPU spends jumping in and out of those methods is going to be relatively significant. Inlining copies the method implementation so no jumps are required within that loop. You could do that manually but your code will be unmaintainable. The cost of the inlining operation by the compiler or jit is that your application will be bigger. And that is just one example.

We could consider the trade-off between binary size and boxing/unboxing operations. For example

List<Animal> pets = new List<Animal>();

pets.Add(new Dog {Name="Fido"});

Console.WriteLine(pets[0].Name);

If I didn't use generics then I would have just a List and the last line would be a much less performant

Console.WriteLine(((Animal)pets[0]).Name);

Plus all the other fun bugs that come from accidentally casting something to something it is not. But again, this costs file size because I need a separate definition for List<Animal> vs List<Commentards> Vs ....

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Hackers abusing digital certs smuggle malware past security scanners

Adam 1
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Re: Great news

Sounds very goto fail

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Google reveals rapid Bluetooth gadget connection tech

Adam 1
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We note your solution and await a corresponding problem.

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Slashing regulations literally more important than saving American lives to Donald Trump

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Re: All vehicles within 4 years?

Disclaimer: I have no idea how these regulations are written.

I don't see a technical reason why the first phase cannot be broadcast only. If other nearby AI or semi AI vehicles know some basic information about my speed, acceleration, direction then they can take that into account in their own emergency manoeuvre planning. My bigger concern would be digital tracking by some Slurpy Inc (although they can do that with a camera and number plate recognition right now)

> That means if eg. an Audi driver turns in front of - it signals your car to brake to let them in ?

You must be mistaken. I've never seen an Audi with signals. Maybe you have confused it with their adhoc parking space indicator lamps that designate a piece of road not otherwise required by the Audi driver and blink to indicate that it has been designated as a parking space.

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Official: Perl the most hated programming language, say devs

Adam 1
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Malbodge hello world

(=<`#9]~6ZY32Vx/4Rs+0No-&Jk)"Fh}|Bcy?`=*z]Kw%oG4UUS0/@-ejc(:'8dc

Some people are evil

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Adam 1
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Re: Perl's issues are not Perl as such

> As far as pet hate subjects, Delphi IMHO is clearly the absolute leader.

That's interesting. I was kind of curious about why it was getting hate. To me, it was more a sadness about what might have been if better decisions were made by Borland, sorry I mean Inprise, sorry I mean Borland (again), sorry I mean Codegear, sorry I mean Embarcadero, sorry I mean Idera. The same sort of feeling one might have towards an upcoming sporting potential who through a series of bad life choices finds their careers over before they have reached their full potential. The stuff that annoyed me was rarely the language syntax. I actually much prefer the constructor chaining syntax in Delphi Vs C# (we won't talk about anonymous method or nullible value types or the clunky way that interfaces work). Maybe I just have a soft spot for the earlier versions which were light years ahead of their contemporaries.

For the record, pet peeve is JavaScript. If only it wasn't the lingua franca of the web. The fact we need typescript to make it tolerable speaks volumes.

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Vlad the blockader: Russia's anti-VPN law comes into effect

Adam 1
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not quite

I can more imagine the West's governments saying "that's a neat idea".

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Car insurers recoil in horror from paying auto autos' speeding fines

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Re: Try a sensible design?

> Do you know an insurer who would insure a human driver for speeding fines ?

I think this is why I'm having such trouble following the line of reasoning. Insurers have never covered you for breaking the law. If you are driving an unregistered vehicle and have an accident, your insurer won't pay out. Same if you are driving at an unsafe speed for the conditions or under the influence of a substance (prescribed or otherwise). They are not about to start now.

They will insure you against fire, theft, damage caused by another party etc. At most, they may accept to charge back to Ford/Toyota/BMW/whoever. The manufacturers themselves may have public liability insurance specifically to handle Takata scale recalls but carrying the can for this isn't something that retail insurance would want a bar of.

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Fine, OK, no backdoors, says Deputy AG. Just keep PLAINTEXT copies of everyone's messages

Adam 1
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Re: what part of end to end doesn't he understand

Dammit, my evil plans to change the word mall to shops in all signage has been foiled. And I would have gotten away with it if not for you pesky kids.

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Re: OFFS

Wow. I hadn't realised just how far Google translate had come. Impressive.

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Re: what part of end to end doesn't he understand

--- BEGIN DECRYPTION ---

Please find attached the latest results of my coin toss hobby. 0=Head, 1=Tails

00101111011100001101111100010000........

--- END DECRYPTION ---

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Re: Ransomware

At least with this approach, the law abiding ransomware authors will no longer cause problem.

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Vietnam bans Bitcoin as payment for anything

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Re: Please enlighten me.

I'm totally with you. The sooner they stamp out paper* money and coins, the quicker we'll solve their use in crime. Pretty sure that's what you meant by anonymous fund transfers.

*or polymer

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A picture tells a 1,000 words. Here's about 750 on Facebook using pics to school AI translators

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Re: Computer translation is terrible

> Facebook translate is so good it translates "good morning" into "attack them"

You know perhaps we've been focusing on the wrong thing with the whole conflict. Maybe we should double check their translations?

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Adam 1
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and yet we wonder why these systems eventually go postal on us.

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