* Posts by 2Fat2Bald

123 posts • joined 4 May 2012

Page:

Neglected Pure Connect speaker app silenced in iOS 11's war on 32-bit

2Fat2Bald

Re: Sale of Goods Act

Not sure about that. Arguably it's limited to it's warranty. You bought it, the warranty expired. It stopped working. But they only said it would work for 12 months, anyway.

I don't buy that argument because it hasn't stopped working (it's fine) which is what warranties are there for, but did they actually agree to provide updates to any future OS? because you do - of course - have the option of using the older OS it was designed for if you want to. That may not be wise or convenient, but you do have it. Unless you've already rejected that option by upgrading to 11. But that's your choice.

1
2

AMD comes out swinging, says: We're the Buster Douglas of the tech industry!

2Fat2Bald

It's kinda interesting...

I've long used AMD stuff. It's fine, honestly. I've used AMD since the days of the first AMD I386DX40 I bought. Back then people said "Get the intel - it's faster". And it was - slightly - but also more expensive.

I think for some people the biggest disincentive to AMD is simply "It's not an Intel" and the perception that it's a cheap knock-off of a "proper" CPU. Like not buying an Android because it's a knock-off of an iPhone and "not a proper smartphone" (different scale, but similar Logic).

I do wonder how much Intel would actually like AMD to go away. I think they probably don't want that as they don't want to be in a monopoly (often bad things happen - like being open-sourced) and really want a dominant market position that isn't *quite* a monopoly.

7
1

Dyson to build electric car that doesn't suck

2Fat2Bald

There is a kinda patchy history with Vacuum companies making electrical cars for eccentric British inventors........................

0
0

iPhone 8: Apple has CPU cycles to burn

2Fat2Bald

So. It can - briefly - sprint to do something very quickly that only a few people will want doing?

I mean - don't get me wrong - it's impressive and all. But is it actually - genuinely - valuable?

8
2

Apple’s facial recognition: Well, it is more secure for the, er, sleeping user

2Fat2Bald

I have no idea how to do this.... but.

How about getting multiple images of a face from different angles, then using that to work out the measurements of the face. Once you have multiple angles that ought to become easier. Scoping social media ought to give you enough images to get a pretty good impression of the face from different angles.

One your have that, you can then make a 3D printed mask of the face and print/paint facial features on to it, also garnered from social media. A few years ago this would have been too pixelated, but now days most phones have pretty decent cameras in them, so high def images are easy.

I doubt it's easy, as I say I have no idea how to do it, but equally I know that with enough maths it ought to be possible.

0
0

Vodafone won't pay employee expenses for cups of coffee

2Fat2Bald

I do wonder to what extent people withdraw their "goodwill" when benefits are cut. it's easy to put the costs on a spreadsheet and show you've saved money, but there are less tangible costs involved.

What they don't see is that salesman visiting the client and turning up cranky because his Octavia greenline is not as a nice as the BMW 320d he used to have. Or the technician who at 4pm says "Well, I'd better hit the road if I want to be home for dinner", rather than billing another 2 hours. They've got no idea the guys who fixed the CRM databases at 11am Thursday would, for the price of Pizza haven't fixed it 8pm Wednesday. One risk is that the company looks "cheap" or, worse "desperate" and gets the smell of death about it - both customers and competitors will get that.

On the one hand, there is no reason for a technical rep to have a company Porsche or for a sales droid to stay in a £2000 a night knightsbridge hotel. On the other, you can't really rely on the goodwill of a many who's forced to bring his own sarnies to a conference, where everyone else pops to the bar afterwards.

5
0

Bank IT fella accused of masterminding multimillion-dollar insider-trading scam

2Fat2Bald

there are plenty of good ways to communicate data securely that don't need an app. Or go low tech and use a burner or public phone......

I wonder why they added that speculation?

2
0

Microsoft ctrl-Zs 'killing' Paint, by which we mean offering naff app through Windows Store

2Fat2Bald

I like Paint.Net - it's a nicely enhanced version of Paint.exe that is nicely judged for clipping and adding notes to photos and the line.

1
0

John McAfee plans to destroy Google. Details? Ummm...

2Fat2Bald

I am not a number...

I am a FREE MAN!

0
0

It's time for a long, hard mass debate over sex robots, experts conclude

2Fat2Bald

It's certainly going to be disruptive, isn't it? When you can get your hands (or whatever other thing...) on the person of your dreams by ordering them. At the moment how many of us actually get someone who, physically, is precisely what we want? Not only that, but how many of us keep that person? - Nobody - because real-world people age and wear and change their minds etc. We all have things that we find particularly attractive in a person. Occasionally we will see someone who hits most of those points and, even if we're in a committed relationship or there is a ridiculous age gap, or they're clearly with someone or whatever we will - even if we do nothing - find our eyes drawn back to them and think to ourselves "if only". With this technology you'll be able to order that person. And keep them. And even modify them to be slightly different because you've discovered something new you like. Hell's there is even the possibility of getting a photo of your crush and getting a replica made. Or of licencing the image of pron stars to be used in the dolls.

My point is - how can a real person who must play the genetic lottery and live in the real world with all the challenges, infirmities and uncertainties that it brings hope to compete with someone made in a factory to exacting specifications that can be changed and refined at any time? How can someone with independent thought, needs and knowledge hope to compete with someone who's one directive is to please you in any way possible?

My guess is that if this technology ever does see light, then it will be in brothels. Or possibly people will have one person who's their "life partner" and a robot for sex. Perhaps the robot will even join them for sex? Making it a four-way, potentially, at least. Is that really that much different from the wife keeping a vibrator in her knicker-drawer?

And this "kids thing" - creepy as f*ck and apt to normalise it. Definitely illegal, and should remain so.

0
0

Nokia's retro revival 3310 goes on sale and disappears immediately

2Fat2Bald

so. a lot of people just want a mobile telephone, not a portable computer?

3
0

‪There's a ransom-free fix for WannaCry‬pt. Oh snap, you've rebooted your XP box

2Fat2Bald

I would imagine that most people - upon finding they're infected - leap for the power button immediately.

0
0

User loses half of a CD-ROM in his boss's PC

2Fat2Bald

A single-speed cd spins at 200-500 RPM (depending on where it's being read)

52x that is 10,400 RPM, at slowest.

120mm across. (or 0.12 meters) x 3.14 (pi) = 380 CM circumference (.38 meters)

.38 X 10,400 = 3952 meters/minute/60=65 Meters a second. X2.5 to give us full speed. 164 M/Sec

164 m/sec = about 360 MPH, outer rim speed. Slightly less than half the speed of sound.

Yep. They're moving.

3
0

BDSM sex rocks Drupal world: Top dev banished for sci-fi hanky-panky

2Fat2Bald

Re: Good code is good code

Good code is Good code, yes. But there is a lot more to it than that. Good ideas, done mediocre will trounce bad ideas, no matter how well done. Most Microsoft projects are not that well coded, but they're

But - outside of some tiny projects and sci-fi films - coders never just sit there on their own with a single computer, writing stuff from memory. There is a massive team involved and they MUST all cooperate.

Having someone on the team who's disrupting it is rarely worth their contributions, and they need to be kicked out of fixed very quickly.

Having said all that. I think this is a pathetic pretext for doing so. Who cares if he likes to play sexual games? - what are you now, the morality police?

1
0

Road accident nuisance callers fined £270,000 for being absolute sh*tbags

2Fat2Bald

Re: Was about to say the same thing

Well, it WAS always that. Up until the speed camera - which takes a photograph of your car, prints a number on it, and claims that's how fast you were going and that you were driving at the time.

As this won't work if you ask the Camera to actually prove anything, it's assumed to be right unless you can prove it isn't.

Really the burden of proof is on the accused here.

1
0

'At least I can walk away with my dignity' – Streetmap founder after Google lawsuit loss

2Fat2Bald

Thinking about it...

I stopped using their services when sat nav became cheap enough for me to buy one - obviating the need to print out a map before jumping in the car. Shortly after that most mobiles gained sat nav as the iPhone and Android became universal.

I'm not sure their decline is due to competition at all. I think it might be due to being a print-out-and-drive service in a navigate-as-you-drive world.

Google DO provide maps, but people use them to look at places remotely to see what they're like and to look for stuff.

Now I think of it, are they really even direct competitors?

2
0

BOFH: Password HELL. For you, mate, not for me

2Fat2Bald

I just say "I don't give out any information to unsolicited callers". Mostly they say "Oh, goodbye". Sometimes they say "But I only wanted..." and I just repeat "I don't give out any information to unsolicited callers".

After a few rounds of this I say "Sorry, but I've got a queue of people with me and it doesn't look at if we can do business. I'm going to have to go".

0
0

RAF pilot sent jet into 4,000ft plummet by playing with camera, court martial hears

2Fat2Bald

Words fail me.

Because it sounds like something I would do.

0
0

IT guy checks to see if PC is virus-free, with virus-ridden USB stick

2Fat2Bald

I've worked in a place (several years back) where they had a strictly enforced security policy. If IT reported someone for doing something against the rules, they got fired. No ifs, buts, maybes or excuses. The rules were sensible things like not using personal email on work computers, no USB devices and so on. When there was a virus infection we had to write a report, apportioning blame where necessary. The company realised that the information was their lifeblood and if some daft git brought their personal computer into the office, plugged it in and it infected the network the loss of time, confidence, and money could be far worse than stuff for which you'd expect to be fired (like torching the building). Everyone watched a video on this on the first day, and signed a piece of paper agreeing to the policy. IT were given some discretion on whether to offer advice or report stuff - depending on how egregious and intentional the transgression was.

You know how often we did this? - virtually never. Because people knew it wasn't worth the risk. Seeing one-or-two colleagues a year (of several thousand) marched out of the building by security made sure people didn't take the mick. If IT came down and said "Look - you can't plug that into your computer" - they listened. Breaking the rules wasn't a "silly computer thing", it was your job. And a friendly warning from IT was sure to be listened to as the next one would be from Security and rather less friendly.

Even quite senior managers respected security protocols and used to come to IT to ask advice and permission before doing things that might impact network security. Sometimes the answer was no, but more often it was "Yes" or "Yes, but you need to do it like this..." or "Oh, we know a much better way of this this - let me show you".

18
0

Apple eats itself as iPhone fatigue spreads

2Fat2Bald

Re: Dunno, Man

With respect, that's not a problem with the format. It's a problem with the implementation. Used to annoy the crap out of me the way so many electronics providers would solder the darn socket to the board. If they just spent 5p more making the thing and screwed it to the casing with flying leads (as the standard was designed to be used) - it would have been fine.

1
0

Soz fanbois, Apple DIDN'T invent the smartphone after all

2Fat2Bald

Apple definitely weren't the first Smartphone - although I think there is a perception that they were amongst a significant proportion of the population. Certainly I had a SonyEricson P800 many years before the iPhone made smartphones popular. People used to be curious about it and think it was cool that it could run games and pick up email and so on.

I think what Apple did do it make the Smartphone mass-market and cool.

0
0

Hapless scouser scours streets for lost Crimble drone

2Fat2Bald

Re: Perhaps "geo-fencing" isn't quite the correct term...

Some of them have an option to limit how far from takeoff point they can go - but obviously this only works when the drone has a GPS lock on takeoff, and retains it in flight.

0
0

China gives America its underwater drone back – with a warning

2Fat2Bald

Because, of course, the US Navy is conducting surveys into ocean currents and salinity. Yes, natural thing for the military to do, is that. Definitely. At this time of shallow budgets and cost-consciousness, naturally they're just putzing around near their biggest foe making sure the sea isn't too salty.

As for trump. Well, it's a phonetic spelling, isn't it? - an easy mistake to make, for sure, but you'd hope he's check this out.

Plus he's far from correct about this kind of thing not happening before. It happens regularly. It's - at most - in the category of the Russians flying strategic bombers into UK airspace for - basically - shits and giggles (as they do constantly).

1
7

Apple ordered to cough up $2m to store workers after denying rest breaks

2Fat2Bald

Something of a pyric victory, perhaps?

They're won on a point of law, but I'm guessing that Apple extracted more than 95 Dollars of worth out of them by these business practices.

2
0

Disney sued in race row: Axed IT workers claim jobs went to H-1B hires

2Fat2Bald

the racism angle is tenuous. The incoming cheaper staff were all from a low cost provider who happened to be in India. so recruited chiefly Indians.

The sad fact is that ditching time served staff in exchange for rookies can save a business so much money that its practically a no-brainer.

2
0

User needed 40-minute lesson in turning it off and turning it on again

2Fat2Bald

Wonko the sane had a point...

2
0

US reactor breaks fusion record – then runs out of cash and shuts down

2Fat2Bald

Re: Quotation from the article: "the high pressures required for burning plasma"

More likely, he's just speaking loosely for the purposes of a non-scientist, popular audience.

In my job I'm forever paraphrasing and simplifying stuff for non-technical staff.

0
0

Tax-swerving IT director disqualified for 8 years

2Fat2Bald

Meh

The unspoken truth with big business not paying tax is that it's reported pretty vaguely by the media. Often they say things like "XXXX paid only £3000 this year in Corporation tax". - which begs the question "Yes - but what other taxes did they pay?". It may be that Corporation Tax isn't the appropriate tax for them to pay, because they're paying the money elsewhere for a variety of reasons.

It could also be that they're not making massive profits. For example, if a business is expanding and ploughing most of it's profit back into to expansion it may actually make very small profits year-on-year, despite the apparent value of the enterprise continuing to increase. Similarly if it's investing money in other businesses, or paying off loans or a variety of other things it may not appear to make much actual cash or may not pay much in particular taxes, choosing or needing to pay it elsewhere instead.

Don't misunderstand me - it's highly likely that a lot of businesses are avoiding paying tax and, possibly, the rules need to be tightened. But the rules are what they are and if people are taking advantage of them to avoid handing over money, that's on the government not the people doing it. UNLESS they're breaking the rules.

Perhaps hard to believe, but I think the media are sensationalising this somewhat.

3
0

Galaxy Note 7 flameout: 2 in 5 Samsung fans say they'll never buy from the Korean giant again

2Fat2Bald

It's probably the consumers fault. "Holding it wrong", or something....

1
1

Google 'screwed over' its non-millennials – now they can all fight back

2Fat2Bald

It just doesn't make sense.

Older employees tend to have more experience. I'm not talking about knowing ancient, irrelevant technologies, I'm talking about knowing people, logical processes, unrelated but reusable concepts and ideas etc etc. I'm not ragging on the younger guys & gals, who tend to have a little more energy and optimism.

But, yeah, there is an impression that people over 40ish are getting more useless by the day, and I think it's very probably a self-fulfilling prophesy.

0
0

VESK coughs up £18k in ransomware attack

2Fat2Bald

Great. So encourage them, why don't you?

Sounds to me like Vesk's backup plan was not all it should be.

0
0

BOFH: There are no wrong answers, just wrong questions. Mmm, really wrong ones

2Fat2Bald

Usually....

The company starts trotting out this stuff when they're in trouble and frantically looking for an answer other than "management incompetence" as to why.

Typically they'll have paid a great deal of money for the survey company's services, despite telling everyone that there is no money for frivolous things like annual increments, staff benefits, modern IT equipment, training etc etc etc.

17
0

Airbag bug forces GM to recall 4.3m vehicles – but eh, how about those self-driving cars, huh?

2Fat2Bald

Compare and Contrast with VW....

VW Passat, arguably, makes more carbon than VW claimed it would (When everyone know the claims were rubbish, anyway). No injuries, illness or real-world harm in evidence at all.

"Outraged" owners, politicians and journalist describe how VW could possibly do such a egregious thing as lying about something that - arguably - barely matters. Massive, massive, disproportionate "compensation" claimed and awarded by federal government, news media dipping on and on about it for months. VW ordered to refund cars in full, despite the mileage, criminal charges filed in federal courts...

GM Cars. Definitely dangerous, lead to at least one confirmed death, probably more, vital safety equipment not working........ drop them an email about it, and move on. If they don't respond, it's their stupid fault for buying a GM product and expecting it to not kill them....

NB: one is European. One is not only American, but also partially owned by the federal government.

1
0

Apple: Crisis? What innovation crisis? BTW, you like our toothbrush?

2Fat2Bald

Well. You'd think so. But, then again, BMW, Mercedes and Audi seem to manage it.

0
0

Bomb-disposal robot violently disposes of Dallas cop-killer gunman

2Fat2Bald

Don't blame they one bit.

The guy had just murdered several of their colleagues and had made it pretty clear he was going to murder more, if given the opportunity. They got him the only way they could. Leave the uniforms and affiliations out of it for a moment. He'd just murdered their friends. As human beings, what do you expect them to do?

Then. I think it seems pretty obvious this was a form of "suicide by cop", going out in a blaze of glory - he wasn't going to come quietly. Any attempt to approach him to carry out an arrest would have led to even more deaths, any attempt to seal the area would have given him the opportunity to turn it into a shoot out, either when he shot at people attempting to seal it, or when he attempted to leave.

I'd have done exactly the same.

0
0

DoJ preps criminal charges for VW over Dieselgate

2Fat2Bald

I wonder at what point VW just give up and leave the US market?

0
0

BOFH: I found a flying Dragonite on a Windows 2003 domain

2Fat2Bald

Re: Erm...

Yeah. I think this publishing was probably scheduled a while back and nobody realised.

Yes. It is a bit insensitive.

9
9

Telling your wife why you were fired is the only punishment

2Fat2Bald

If it's genuinely call-the-police grade filth, then that's what you should do.

If you don't, then you're endorsing the behaviour and reinforcing it, potentially making it more likely this person will actually carry out these acts, rather than merely view them. At best you're normalising it, at worst you're encouraging it. You're also enabling it, of course, by not preventing them from accessing it again. Depending on the nature of the images people (or animals) that did not want to participate in these acts may well be exploited again as you're assisting in sustaining the market for them.

If that does not convince you - remember this. By destroying the evidence of the offence, you partake of it both morally and legally. If the guy gets caught and it ever comes out that you destroyed the evidence you could be charged with the offence under "joint enterprise", or just aiding-and-abetting. Imagine explaining that to your spouse. Your parents. Kids. Future Employers. Imagine going to the police station to sign "the register" (no.... not this one.... the other one..) You could, genuinely, go to prison for it, as a sex offender in a UK prison - you think that's gonna be a laugh?

It's exactly the same as disposing of a gun for a murderer, or driving the getaway car for a bank robber.

0
0
2Fat2Bald

They need to be cautious...

I personally wouldn't delete the images. I'd report it to the Police and allow them to deal with it. Unfortunately - deleting the images is - of course - concealing, altering, destroying or damaging the evidence in what might become a criminal investigation. In other words, how do you fancy having to explain to *your* wife, your kids, any future employers, the PTA and so on that you were fired from your last job for "destroying evidence against a sex offender"?

You might think "Nobody will ever know" - and you're probably right. BUT: - If that guy gets caught down the road and it somehow comes out that you had the images and didn't report it, you could end up in a world of hurts yourself. Maybe just if someone with knowledge of the matter gets downsized and decides to report it out of spite? Maybe if your systems become part of an

investigation into an unrelated matter and these are discovered by accident during that?

That's the entirely practical reason. The other one is that he's the arbiter of other's people's misery, so **** him.

1
1

Windows 10 build 14342: No more friendly Wi-Fi sharing

2Fat2Bald

WiFi Sense

I never liked the idea. Forget the technical arguments - if someone has password-protected their network then they've done it because they want to control access, otherwise it would be open. Who the hell are you - or anyone else, including Microsoft - to decide to pass that on and authorise total strangers (who then authorise others) to access that network? Especially when you consider that there is a lot more transacted over WiFi then just internet access.

Then there is the problem that - if you use it - very often you need to accept a T&C page, and you get nothing at all if you don't.... Which you don't do automatically, so you get disconnected from the 3G network periodically to use WiFi that isn't working....

1
1

Hands up, who prayed for AMD? Well, it worked

2Fat2Bald

I've always liked AMD. I actually use an AMD APU in my gaming rig and it's quiet, cool and plays games fine - Although you do have to wind the detail levels back a way for some of the newer titles. But what the heck do you expect - the whole thing cost me about £300 to build. That's less than a lot of people spend on just a single component. In many cases the difference between "High", or even "medium" and "ultra" preset isn't massive.

The law of diminishing returns in in effect here, and it's easy to end up paying the last 50 percent of the money for the last 5 percent of capability.

8
0

Mitsubishi 'fesses up: We lied in fuel tests to make our cars look great

2Fat2Bald

I do feel slightly sorry for the car manufacturers. There are so, so many variables that affect car fuel efficiency that it is hopeless to ask for a prediction that can be both accurate and precise. You'll have to leave it so wide that it's largely meaningless (eg 20-40 mpg), or you'll be wrong more often than you're right. You don't know how the car will be driven, who'll be driving it, how fast, in what weather, carrying what passengers and luggage, etc etc.

That said - there is no excuse for having a test that allows them to test the car driving in a totally unrealistic way, with equipment removed, vents taped over, engine blueprinted, ludicrous tyre pressures and hybrid batteries precharged. It's just fantasy, and helps noone. Not even the marketing people, as every now knows it's totally rubbish to suggest your 2 tonne 150mph German executive car will average 60mpg.

Personally. I'd like to see them required to fit every car with an *accurate* economy gauge, with some kind of wireless link attached. Everytime you fill a car up it reports it's economy since last filled, chassis type and engine type (eg 2016 Ford Focus Hatch, 125bhp petrol Ecoboost). Drivers can then go to a government website to see what their proposed car will manage in the real world.

0
0

Happy new year, VW: Uncle Sam sues over engine cheatware

2Fat2Bald

I'm not entirely sure how this works out....What if VW just withdraws from the US market entirely? Can the US Government actually recover the money from VW if they have no US presence?

Quite honestly, if VW were to pay the sums being being discussed then it sounds like it would put them out of business. It certainly wouldn't make a continued US presence profitable.

4
1

Robber loses heist case after 'evil twin' defence, gets 60 years

2Fat2Bald

Twins?

I've been told i have an identical twin in (or near) the town in which I was born. I've often wondered if it's just random chance that they resemble me, or if I have a relative I know nothing about?

To be honest. When people go for the insanity defence, i'm never sure if they're actualy insane or just trying it on. To be honest you could medicalise being an arsehole to the point where that becomes a "medical condition", and suddenly isn't your fault any more

0
0

Doctor Who's Under the Lake splits Reg scribes: This Alien homage thing – good or bad?

2Fat2Bald

Re: Viewer "fatigue"?

As a geek I have to say "That would depend if they save to non-volatile storage before rebooting" ;-)

1
0
2Fat2Bald

I liked it. Reminded me of the Dr Who from when I was a kid. Made with modern technology, but the story was right out of the Tom Baker era. I have a feeling that Clara's dress was worn by an early Dr Who companion. But I can't think who.

Looking forward to part two.

1
0

Find shaving a chore? Why not BLAST your BEARD off with a RAYGUN

2Fat2Bald

It'll be okay, until someone tries to make a cheap one for 30 quid. And skimps on everything, and it A) doesn't work B) burns people or C) both. Queue TV programmes breathlessly talking about these "deathtraps" and the razor industry attempting to get the whole thing outlawed after someone plugged their 30 quid knockoff into the wrong charger and it scotched their bathroom carpet.

7
2

VW’s case of NOxious emissions: a tale of SMOKE and MIRRORS?

2Fat2Bald

Do me a Lemon.... Electic Cars?

Electric are - in anything like the short term - a dead issue. Everyone talks as if we could just start buying the darn things and plugging them in. Unfortunately there isn't anything like enough capacity in the power grid for that. Electric cars require a truly spectacular amount of juice to charge them up quickly enough for them to be a practical proposition. We're pretty close to generating capacity and distribution capacity as it is (in fact, we've been reducing it for "environmental" legislative reasons). We can't have every Mondeo man in the country come home at 6pm and plug their car into the mains. The power stations couldn't cope with the demand, and the grid would actually bloody *melt* trying to distribute all that power. In real terms it's about 3 amps (of 240v domestic supply) per BHP you need, so in real terms a 13 amps domestic plug can supply 4 hp (12amps), so if we say a car nominally uses an average of 40bhp throughout it's commute, you can charge it at a tenth of the rate you can drive it. Not entirely impractical, if you have a short commute. However that would mean a every plugging in a totaly new 13 amps at the same time of day... And charging virtually continually until the next morning. HMM. And the fact is a lot of people would get 30 amp superchargers, making the charge less of a problem for them, but the drain on the grid much greater.

SO... before we're all pushed to drive Renault Zoes we'll need a reliable, clean energy sorts (and a metric expletivetonne of cables!). Well, the only real candiate is Nuclear, and I don't think the hippies are going to like that idea one bit.

1
0

Volkswagen used software to CHEAT on AIR POLLUTION tests, alleges US gov

2Fat2Bald

I suspect a lot of this could be political. These imported cars have been making domestic stuff look pretty dated for some time, which has hit sales. This is an opportunity to use the regulatory framework to fine a foreign company a LOT of cash (don't forget, they don't burn the cash the government actually purloin it), and do the competitor's reputation huge damage.

Having given a lot of money to GM to keep them in business a few years ago, i'd imagine the US Government would be very keen to do everything they can to help keep them in business. Plus if someone buys an Audi a portion of that money goes out of the US economy, whereas if they buy a Dodge, Ford or Chevrolet(!) it stays in the USA.

As these cars are being described as "09-15" models, does that mean they've now been discontinued?

I'd be very, very interested to find out if US cars have been subjected to the same scrutiny.

4
0

'Walter Mitty' IT manager admits to buying gun on dark web

2Fat2Bald

I wonder what he wanted it for?

If it was sport he'd get himself a pistal licence and join a club.

Or just get an air pistol (they're legal) for target purposes.

If it was just to wave around to impress people, he may as well have got an airsoft pistol (looks the same).

If he just wanted to fire a pistol, he could join a gun club.

How deeply, deeply embaressing for him. If I lived in the US I would probably get a gun for sport purposes. But the difference is it's legal there.

7
2

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017