* Posts by Jtom

256 posts • joined 25 Apr 2012

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Telstra reveals radical restructure plan

Jtom
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There's a lot of copper in the ground, all going back to interconnected central locations. An entrepreneur buying some of it could make a business cheaply interconnecting groups for their own private internets - like hospitals to vendors, insurance companies, and remote databases, all hardwired together with no external connections. I've seen enough evidence that many businesses cannot handle virtual private networks on the public internet without having major security issues, and up untill now, dedicated hardwired connections have been too costly.

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Donald Trump trumped as US Senate votes to reinstate ZTE ban

Jtom
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Bah. Trump threatens to veto the bill if the amendment is not removed (if he doesn’t want the ban), and they will remove it in reconciliation. The senate knew they could pass it for political reasons without it ever going into effect.

As far as your other gripes: we don’t care how you trade or to whom, but you won’t be trading with us if you trade with nations that sponsor terrorism. And if you are putting tariffs on US products coming into your country, you can expect tariffs on your products coming into ours. If you have a problem with that, tough. You don’t have to trade with us.

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Um, excuse me. Do you have clearance to patch that MRI scanner?

Jtom
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Sometimes to go forward you need to go back

A lot of high-tech solutions are being offered here. How about an old-fashion, low-tech solution? For many situations, a nailed-up data line would suffice, or even a dial-up line for equipment not updated often. There were hospitals, insurance companies, and vendors before the internet. They were interconnected with dedicated circuits. The only real difference between doing that and using the internet is cost, but just how much are you saving if you have constant nightmare security concerns using the internet?

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Former FBI boss Comey used private email for official business – DoJ

Jtom
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The Weiner computer emails were not 'substantive' only because the FBI wanted them not to be. There were classified emails among them. Now consider: the computer of a sexual deviant kicked out of public office contained classified emails from a period AFTER he left office. This isn't a cluster f-up of all involved???

With security like that, you might as well give everyone access to begin with. The only ones NOT privy to the secrets of the government were the voters and the country's allies!

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Jtom
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Re: "So Hillary was suppose to know what she was doing was wrong but not James Comey?"

The theory is: Had Hillary been elected, as highly expected, she would have started with a clean slate. The response would be that everybody knew everything before voting her into office. The FBI would have closed the books before her inauguration, never to open them again on her actions.

It simply backfired on them.

The Trump investigation, in the actual words of an investigator, was their 'insurance policy' in the very unlikely event of his election. There was no reason of giving the appearance of maybe being biased against him before the election. So they just held it in case the unthinkable happened, to damage him or remove him from office..

We will never really know what is true. What we know without doubt is that Hillary had many friends, and Trump had only enemies, in the FBI. For a group that is suppose to be apolitical, that is unacceptable.

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The eyes have it: 'DeepFakes' bogus AI-meddled videos outed by unblinking gaze

Jtom
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All of their analysis would be totally defeated by a pair of sunglasses.

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Astroboffins 'sprinkle iron filings' over remnant supernova

Jtom
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Re: Not too shabby indeed

Not too shabby until you realize that there is absolutely no way to verify their analysis. Most of what we 'know' today will be proved either wrong or woefully incomplete in the future. For starters, we have no way of determining if our 'laws of nature' remain constant over either large timescales or distances. If, say, the speed of light in a vacuum is not invariant in the universe, it would upend all cosmological theories.

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That was quick: Seattle rushes to kill tax that would mildly inconvenience Amazon

Jtom
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There is a new wave of homelessness in the US. They are called 'crusties' by many. They are young, able-body youths who see no reason, have no desire, to work. I've worked in charitable 'soup lines' giving out free lunches, and saw many of them. They have cellphones, trendy clothes (both paid for by parents trying to help them sort out their life), and frequently smell of weed. Most could go back home, but would rather hang with friends than to be subjected to being nagged to find a job or live a purposable life.

Yes, they are homeless and jobless by choice, and like it very much, thank you. They can exist in this lifestyle because of the wealth of the nation. In an impoverished country where the policy was no work, no food, they would be working. Pandering to them by giving them still more assistance would only make the situation worse.

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Every bloody gadget in the house is ringing. Thanks, EE

Jtom
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Re: Hang up by numbers app - Marketing company, Survey

That would be good, but I have actually done this: responded to the telemarketer (who had called many times previously), saying, "Hold on while I get my father. He's been wanting to get [whatever the telemarketer was selling - heating duct cleaning, I think]." Then set the phone down. The TV was going in the background, so the caller knew the phone had not been hung up.

I checked the phone two hours later. The call had ended, and he never called again. I wonder how long the telemarketer waited....

Ah, the fun you can have when you're retired.

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ICO smites Bible Society, well fines it £100k...

Jtom
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That's because Jesus saves.

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No lie-in this morning? Thank the Moon's gravitational pull

Jtom
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Re: Climate

The oceans absorb solar radiation, and the sun plus ocean cycles, created by decades of absorbing solar energy, determine the air temps. It is obvious looking at the heat content and volume of the oceans compared to the heat content and volume of the atmosphere, that the oceans drive the temps.

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NASA spots asteroid on crash course with Earth – with just hours to go

Jtom
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Re: Asteroid Ahhhhhhhhh......

Well, I, for one, would like the chance to drink the Bourbon and Scotch I have put aside for a special occasion. Then there's a little lady I know who might want to go out with a bang.

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EmDrive? More like BS drive: Physics-defying space engine flunks out

Jtom
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Great comment on how science was, and should be, done. Unfortunately, it's rather outdated. Today, scientists put their assumptions into computer models that 'prove' that which is desired to be proved. When real data conflict with the models' output, they clearly must be wrong, and are adjusted until they conform properly to the models.

Don't expected significant scientific breakthroughs in several fields for a while.

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Astroboffins, get in here and explain Saturn's odd-shaped balls

Jtom
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Re: That's no moon!

The name given to a body in astronomy is dependent on its location and relationship to other objects. For example, the same object could be a meteor, meteoroid, or meteorite, depending on its location.

Our moon, orbiting the sun without its partner Earth, would be a planet, even if it were once part of Earth. An asteroid captured by a planet would be a moon if it met the size requirement. It is thought that many moons in the solar system are captured asteroids or planetoids.

BTW, the question of our moon's formation is still in debate, although the giant collision (someting colliding with Earth) theory is most widely believed correct.

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Kids and the web latest: 'Won't somebody please think of the children!' US Congresscritters plead

Jtom
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Re: We can protect them from those evil advertisers.

Says the guy from a country that has a city with a murder rate higher than NYC; life destroying acid attacks; gangs on mopeds; huge groups of child paedophiles; a flourishing child sex trade; and police who withhold evidence from innocent men charged with sex crimes.

Both our countries have huge problems because of a systemic breakdown of our cultures, led by those in the educational systems, and supported by globalist, socialist politicians.

And before any of you point to guns and Conservatives as the problem, let me point out one significant observation: guns, and even kids with access to guns, have been around for centuries. Mass murders were virtually unheard of until recently. What has changed?

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Zero arrests, 2 correct matches, no criminals: London cops' facial recog tech slammed

Jtom
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Arguing rates - false poitives, false negatives - is rather moot. Unless you believed that no criminals were scanned out of thousands, then they system is useless, since it found none of them.

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Jtom
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Re: Surely though

No, in this case, 100 were selected, only two matched their database, and they were NOT criminals, which makes the whole process completely worthless.

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FCC sets a record breaking $120m fine for rude robocalls

Jtom
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Here's something to think about. Suppose I wanted to put a bell in your house, and tell you anyone in the world can set it off whenever they wanted, day or night? You would likely tell me to go somewhere very hot. Yet that is exactly what we have done with phones.

If possible, set your phone to ring only for phone numbers you have entered into your contact list (or a subset). Then route every call not on the list straight to voice mail. Take back your privacy. Drive telemarketers out of business.

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Jtom
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Re: First step the fixing robocalls

Why one or the other? Do both. The message should be, pull this shit, and your prison time will be a luxury compared to the poverty that awaits you when you get out. And give the same punishment to those who create and spread computer viruses. Tired of all this BS.

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US Congress finally emits all 3,000 Russian 'troll' Facebook ads. Let's take a look at some

Jtom
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Who these ads would have helped depends a great deal on who the target group of the ad was. If viewed by true BLM followers, they would agree with the ad, and strengthen their resolve to get out the vote for Democrats. If viewed by Conservatives, the same ads would scare them into getting out the vote for Conservatives.

All in all, though, you would have to have lived under a rock for decades not to know quite a bit about both candidates. These ads would have had little impact in this election.

Finally, so what? I would think that Obama saying the UK would be put at the end of the line for trade deals if they voted for Brexit, would be hugely more influential and meddlesome in the affairs of the UK, yet there was no great condemnation of it. Hypocrisy reigns.

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Jtom
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Re: The poor English reminds me of the 419 scam.

And yet your system is giving you the choice between May and Corbyn. Sigh.

It's not the system. It's the people. You can't fix stupid.

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Bombshell discovery: When it comes to passwords, the smarter students have it figured

Jtom
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Naw. I know an idiot who has the best password protection. He creates an eighteen-character (or the longest permitted length) password of random alpha-numeric, upper/lower case, and special characters, does not maintain a copy of it, and doesn't try to memorize it. Then he resets the password everytime he wants to log in.

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NASA boss insists US returning to the Moon after Peanuts to show for past four decades

Jtom
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Re: NASA returning to the Moon? Again?

Yes! Space cats, but more specifically, female space cats. We must have space catettes!

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T-Mobile owner sends in legal heavies to lean on small Brit biz over use of 'trademarked' magenta

Jtom
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Magenta Faced

It seems that T's attornies are claiming the rights to a specific shade of magenta + or - whatever shade suits them. I hope the courts slap them down, leaving them with a specific shade of magenta.

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Yes, people see straight through male displays of bling (they're only after a fling)

Jtom
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Re: Really?

A man after my own heart. I'm about to but my first new car in seventeen years. I have two; the seventeen year old and a twenty-one year old. Time to retire the eldest. If you buy a new car, maintain it, and keep it for decades, it beats any other strategy.

One more thing that used-car buyers aren't getting: the latest technology. That could be significant.

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Equifax reveals full horror of that monstrous cyber-heist of its servers

Jtom
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Yeah, I got the letter, too. Didn't you love the irony of it? We have the option of getting free credit monitoring service from another company. We just have to provide that company with our name, date of birth, address, Social Security number, driver's license number, account numbers, etc.....and pray that having that info in yet ANOTHER database doesn't cause problems in the future.

No thanks.

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Jtom
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Re: And how...

Some of us have absolutely no need for credit. I have the funds to but new cars, condos, even Whoppers from Burger King. What I don't want is getting harrassed from debt collectors trying to collect on debt resulting from ID theft.

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Hacking charge dropped against Nova Scotia teen who slurped public records from the web

Jtom
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Re: It took them a month to reach that conclusion?

There are prosecutors here that would attempt to avoid embarrassment by going through those computers with a fine-toithed comb to find anything that could be used to charge them with a crime, even cyber-bullying for using the term 'snowflake' in an online comment. Show me the person, and I'll find you the crime.

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Jtom
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Re: "no grounds to lay charges"

Rather wish they would say, "we found no evidence of any crime." Which would be far closer to saying he is innocent, rather than there was insufficient evidence that he committed a crime.

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It's World (Terrible) Password (Advice) Day!

Jtom
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Ok, I scanned the comments and didn't see any postings of my main beef with passwords. EVERY BLOODY SITE think it's vital you have one for their site. Really. I don't care if someone accesses my grocery store's site and steals my shopping list or digital coupons. My world would not end if someone posted under my name on a news site (who would? I am a non-controversial old guy and nothing posted online intimidates me). If someone is so hungary they want to steal my loyalty tokens for a free sandwich at a local Subway, God bless them and go in peace.

Even shopping sites. No one is interested in items I've put in my wish list. The ONLY time security is important is on the payment/shipping page. But my credit card comes with sufficient security features provided the shopping site does NOT store that information and make it available without re-entering. Yeah, it makes check-out faster if I don't have to enter the info each time, but then I would have to maintain a password for the site. Not much difference.

How about this: sites give us the option to have a password, and we assume responsibility if we opt out. If we opt out, no personal information will be available on-line. If you want access to that area, THEN you go through a verification process.

My password strength on my financial accounts would be very strong (my brokerage account password is fourteen alpha-numeric characters long, with no sequential group forming a word.). Given the option, I would likely have nominal passwords, like 'me', just to keep out strays, on inconsequential sites, and it would be the same password on many sites.

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Grab your lamp, you've pulled: Brits punt life-saving gravity-powered light

Jtom
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I like the simplicity of the idea, but can't help thinking they are going off-track with solar and batteries. The users don't need added complexity, and they don't have money. What they have is manpower.

Depending on the natural resources available (sand, water, dirt, rocks, wood) and terrain (flat vs hills), I suspect this concept could be ramped up to a much larger scale using manpower. Consider a desert-like condition. Sand could be used as the weight. Instead of manually pulling a large weight to 'wind' the magneto, they could have something as simple as a fire brigade to transport the sand bucket-by-bucket up to a large container. The container, itself, could descend, creating the power (and raised back up after being emptied), or could empty into a verticle conveyor belt of smaller buckets, providing continuous downward drop. Simple machines (fulcrum-lever, Archimedes screw, slopes, wheelbarrows) could be used as appropriate. Anything could be used for the weight, and coordinated manpower could be used to increase the scale. A small output could be generated for extremely long periods, or large outputs for shorter time-frames.

To me, eliminating manpower by adding expenses and technology (batteries, solar panels, etc.) is exactly the wrong trade-off.

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Double double, soil and trouble, fire burn and heat shield bubble: NASA cracks rover, has dirty talk with ESA

Jtom
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At NASA's rate, they should just plan on paying Musk to bring back the sample on one of his regular monthly flights to Mars.

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Boss sent overpaid IT know-nothings home – until an ON switch proved elusive

Jtom
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Re: Way Back...

Not unusual. My living room has two of them. The switched sockets are for table lamps, while they unswitched halves are for clocks, TVs, whatever. They are a pain to work on, though, and you need to make sure power is off to both halves before tinkering with them.

The switches, themselves, come made so you can have separate powering to each socket.

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'Alexa, listen in on my every word and send it all to a shady developer'

Jtom
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Well, first, if this is happening with my Echos, I'll take the bullet for you. If they listen in on me, they will be wasting their time and money, which leaves them less of both to monitor others. I'm a very boring person and am planning nothing illegal.

Secondly, my guess is they would use personal info for customizing advertising. So, just out of curiosity, a couple of times a week I say, "We need to get some septic tank cleaner." So far, I've seen no ads for such a product. We won't be shopping for it, either, since we don't have a septic tank. If I ever do see such an ad, the Echos will be terminated with extreme prejudice.

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America's states try to restart net neutrality – with very mixed results

Jtom
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The states are one step ahead of you. It you look at the bills, they concern what the state will, or will not, subsidize. They can spend their money as they please; SCOTUS can not change that.

States can NOT say 'Thou shalt not..." if SCOTUS rules the Feds control it, but states CAN say, "I shall NOT pay subsidies if thou does...".

That's the same tactic the feds use on the states if they want the states to do something the feds can not demand (e.g., if you want matching Fed funds for state highways, the speed limit can not be over...)

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TSB outage, day 5: What do you mean you can't log in? Our systems are up and running. Up and running, we say!

Jtom
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Re: Sounds like the grammer Nazi's need some comforting....

It's important to distiguish the difference between knowing your shit, and knowing you're shit.

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UK.gov demands urgent answers as TSB IT meltdown continues

Jtom
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Re: I wonder....

Except the money has been wired out of the country, cash withdrawn, and the account closed. Fraud is easy to detect. Getting the money back, isn't.

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Good news: AI could solve the pension crisis – by triggering a nuclear apocalypse by 2040

Jtom
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Re: I'm really not that worried about this

The only ones to really be worried about are those holding the philosophy that if they die in the course of killing an enemy, they have won and will have a glorious afterlife.

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Jtom
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Re: The Elite and Super-Rich are busy planning for it:

I have read that mini bottles of liquor would be the best trading object should the fit hit the shan - government seal for authenticity, inexpensive to hoard, small footprint, highly desired commodity. It also has an infinite shelf-life, but I still constantly rotate my stock to ensure quality!

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Cash-sprinkler Softbank and Alphabet hand over $1.9bn to Manbang

Jtom
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"Someone here order a truck pickup through Manbang? Here I am, just load 'er up. See ya later."

"Wait, he never got the delivery address, and what's this truck pulling in?"

Should be fun. It will happen.

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Oh dear... Netizens think 'private' browsing really means totally private

Jtom
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Re: Avoid Google - use DuckDuckGo

Take a look at Gibiru.com, as well.

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Scratch Earth-killer asteroid off your list of existential threats

Jtom
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Not an ELE, surely, but can we still hope for a couple of rocks big enough to take out London and Washington?

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CEO insisted his email was on server that had been offline for years

Jtom
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Re: That sounds like the story of a madhouse

Same with R&D. Their costs were just losses to a company where I was in R&D. The salesmen were the golden children getting huge bonuses for selling what we created. Eventually, they cut expenses, including R&D, to increase the bottom line. I left for greener pastures. It only took a couple of years before there was no bottom line. No one wanted to buy outdated, obsolete products, and the company folded.

This is why a good CEO is worth big bucks.

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Time to ditch the front door key? Nest's new wireless smart lock is surprisingly convenient

Jtom
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The power seldom goes out here. When the batteries die of a natural death (which all eventually do), I would likely put the chore of changing them on my to-do list, which is very long. Of course, that's the time that the mains will fail.

As stated elsewhere, a lock mainly keeps honest people and stray kids out, but it also encourages bad guys to seek softer targets. We are just competing against each other. "Look, I have an 'alpha' lock. It's less work to rob the guy over there with a cheaper lock."

And this segways into another burr up my backside. We spend all this money on locks and security systems because of criminals, yet the money is never included in the cost-of-crime figures. If they did include them, people would understand the appropriateness of harsh sentencing for those necessitating these expenses.

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You're a govt official. You accidentally slap personal info on the web. Quick, blame a kid!

Jtom
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Re: Unisys screwed up

This case is more like what almost happened to my brother. He was in a store that had a sign that said, "FREE," in big letters next to some inexpensive trinkets. He was just about to pocket one when he noticed the much smaller words at the bottom if the sign, "with the purchase of,"...

He was incensed that he was almost tricked into shoplifting, a serious problem for him, even if they did not prosecute, since he is a judge.

In this case, though, the fine print wasn't even there.

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Jtom
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Re: Unisys screwed up

Don't know what the law says, don't care, but your interpretation if it makes the use of any search engine illegal.

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They're back! 'Feds only' encryption backdoors prepped in US by Dems

Jtom
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Re: Too late

You have pretty much eliminated the guns, yet the murders and assaults contine. So, besides taking away the possibility of the people rising up against a corrupt government, just what have you accomplished?

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Jtom
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Re: Too late

Here's the thing wrt Grandma. Grandma takes a lot of prescription medicine - for thyroid, blood pressure, cholesterol, hrt, etc - and supplements like calcium and iron. She organizes a week's worth at a time in a pill case, so she's not a walking drug store with a dozen bottles.

In most US states (YMMV), not carrying prescriptive drugs in their original bottles with labeling showing what they are, what doctor prescribed them, and the name of the patient getting the prescription, is a felony (thanks to the war on drugs).

No, they have no reason to put granny in prison, but they might want something from YOU. So you have a choice: give them what they want, or granny goes to jail.

Government is nothing but a collection of people, each having their own agenda. Be afraid. Be very afraid. Do not give them any more power than the least needed to maintain society, and never enough power to control it.

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How life started on Earth: Sulfur dioxide builds up, volcanoes blow, job done – boffins

Jtom
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Should the odds of finding other life in the universe be adjusted to reflect the increasingly bizarre set of circumstances that must occur for it to be created? Now, in addition to having the right atoms and molecules coming together, they must do so with the right catalysts and energies, and be absent any chemicals that could undermine the processes. Sounds like a once in a googol, or maybe a googolplex, event.

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Jtom
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Re: EU's metrification?

OTOH, try doing construction work using the metric system. Need a standard, 8-foot, 2 by 4 (two inches by for inches) stud? What would you be asking for in metric units? Metric is great when solving problems on paper. It's tragic when you try to use it on measurements greater than a decimeter and less than a meter. Further, you can divide twelve (as in inches to the foot), by two, three, four, and six, making it easy for many calculations.

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