* Posts by Jtom

163 posts • joined 25 Apr 2012

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US Congress mulls first 'hack back' revenge law. And yup, you can guess what it'll let people do

Jtom

Ok. Sorry to disappoint, this is not snarky, insulting, or full of bravado, but a real question. I am curious why those with massive data files (cough, cough, Equifax), don't have 'red dye-packs' buried in their data files. They would be buried routines that would trigger some event if they were moved from one network/operating system/whatever to another. No one would legitimately be asking for the transfer of these specific 'files' because no one would know they were there. They would only be accessed in a bulk transfer.

The triggered event could be something benign - like sending a traceable email to the data-owner, or more severe, like encrypting everything in the files (and only the data-owner has the key).

If this gives anyone any ideas for a product, I relinquish all rights. I'm tired of the creeps causing these problems.

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'There has never been a right to absolute privacy' – US Deputy AG slams 'warrant-proof' crypto

Jtom

Moot topic. If the government banned perfect encryption, someone would put the code, method, and logic on the web for free. It would be tested by many, rated, reviewed, and distributed before the first search warrant was issued to stop it. If something is possible, it will be done and put on the Internet.

Besides, people have always had the ability to develop their own, private language (and some have done so) or code, understandable to no one else. If you want to send undecipherable information, you can do so. It just takes a little creativity.

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Q: How do you test future driverless car tech? A: Slurp a ton of real-world driving data

Jtom

Reading a lot of comments, and I could add quite a few scenarios of my own, driving often takes an analysis of the overall situation to make the right decision. That's going to be tough to program. There is a truck stopped in the road. Do I stop behind it, or go around? See the writing on the truck and lowered tailgate? It's a landscaper stopped to get equipment out; go around. There's a vehicle stopping, going forward a hundred feet, then stopping again; USPS is painted on the vehicle. A mail delivery truck, go around. There is another truck stopped. A school bus is stopped on the other side of the street letting children off. Stop until the bus pulls away, it's the law. There are dozens of situations like this, and you will encounter them on most every trip you make in suburbia where I am.

Good luck developing autonomous vehicles for anything but tightly controlled areas.

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Sniffing substations will solve 'leccy car charging woes, reckons upstart

Jtom

The existing grid cannot support widespread use of EVs. There are no plans to upgrade the grid, so the assumption must be that those in power have no intention of the masses using EVs. Yet they have announced an ultimate ban on ICEs. Connect the dots, people. The intent is to get the masses out of cars and onto mass transit, without the politically untenable position of saying the average person is banned from owning a car. All they need do is require separate metering, then charge more than people can afford.

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US Senate stamps the gas pedal on law to flood America's streets with self-driving cars

Jtom

There are too many drivers in non-autonomous vehicles, today, not paying attention to the road, lost in their electronics, eating, or make-up regimen. I am not looking forward to the day when they think they can completely ignore driving. They'll be taking naps, drinking, having sex, ...

I suspect partially-autonomous cars will be declared illegal in some places one day.

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Developers' timezone fail woke half of New Zealand

Jtom

Re: This kind of crap is why I turned off all alerts in my phone

It's amazing how many people suffer from Trump derangement syndrome. There is no topic that does not remind them of him, somehow.

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ISIS and Jack Daniel's: One of these things is not like the other

Jtom

Re: Be afraid...

If there is a redneck involved, it would be the one flying the flag. Jack Daniel's is produced in Tennessee, proud red-neck country. BTW, the term red-neck comes from the sunburn southern farmers would get tending their crops, a derogatory term created by cily-slickers who have no clue how to survive without them.

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FCC big cheese given Congressional roasting in reconfirmation bid

Jtom

Pai's predecessor injected Democratic politics into the FCC actions in a huge fashion. Pai's effort to undo those politics, though, is criticized as political. Standard hypocrisy from those no longer having political power.

As far as the obamaphone: yes the program was started long before obama, to help those in rural area poorly served obtain telecommunications (and originally, electricity). The program wasn't set up to serve the poor, but to bring costs down to reasonable levels in areas where demand was insufficient to make service profitable at affordable rates. But like several other programs, it was corrupted by the Obama administration to be another welfare program for the poor. As a result, many inner city dwellers, where prices were competitive and service abundantly available, were allowed to obtain multiple cellphones for little or nothing. That is what is referred to as obamaphones. But don't let reality get in the way of fake outrage.

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Guntree v Gumtree: Nominet orders gun ads site must lose domain

Jtom

I wanted to join in with the making of a bad pun, but fear I would only be making an ash of myself.

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Nadella says senior management pay now linked to improving gender diversity

Jtom

Don't talk to me about racial and gender diversity to match the general population until it is applied to the NBA and NFL. If meritocracy is not the right way to run competitive IT businesses, then why is it right for competitive sports businesses?

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UK data watchdog swots automated marketing call pest with £260k fine

Jtom

Oh, come on. Just make the phone carriers jointly liable for the fine for turning a blind eye to the misuse of their network. If the commissioner's office fielded hundreds of complaints, then you know the service provider got thousands, and ignored them all. And the fine needs to be several times larger than any revenue the service provider received.

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Blame Canada? $5.7m IBM IT deal balloons to $185m thanks to 'an open bag of money'

Jtom

By contracts in "Atlanta," it's safe you mean the blue cesspool city government, not the state government located there.

I was wondering when Atlanta would enter into its next round of IT contracts. The city's almost finished with its Y2k projects.

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Ducks ding dongs in face of stiff competition

Jtom

Re: Temporary penises

They don't bother flying. They simpy pole vault.

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Quebec takes mature approach to 'grilled cheese' ban

Jtom

The article plus the comments managed to turn cheese puns into a cottage industry.

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IT fraudster facing four years' bird time for $10k blackmail

Jtom

Re: Not funny

And doing hard labour.

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What's that, Equifax? Most people expect to be notified of a breach within hours?

Jtom

To go a step further, one usually gets a degree in the subject that most interests them, and that especially applies when the field does not pay well, like music. If she is that enthused with music, then how likely is it that she takes much interest in a field like data security? There really isn't much cerebral overlap, is there?

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Jtom

Well, I can work around this breach. I've reached the point where I no longer need credit. What worries me is the thought of a data breach involving my insurance company. Over the years, my wife and I have acquired enough valuables (jewelry, gold, silver, coins, antiiques, etc.) to justify a big rider policy for coverage beyond standard homeowners' insurance. To get the rider, I had to itemize each asset and provide the address of where it is kept. That data now resides with the insurance provider. I have to believe that thieves would love to know who owned what, and where it was kept. I think there are a lot of us 'accidently affluent' retirees living in modest neighborhoods but holding substantial wealth, and we would be easy targets.

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BoJo, don't misuse stats then blurt disclaimers when you get rumbled

Jtom

There's an old book titled, "How to Lie with Statistics," that is well worth the read. The basic rule is, don't believe anything you may infer from them. I have a second rule, never believe ANY numbers generated by a journalist (this after reading that crime had dropped 120% from the previous year. What? Were thieves returning items stolen from previous years?). Third rule, don't draw any conclusions from any percentages given without showing the actual raw numbers (story said, people diagnosed with 'x' jump 50% in one week. At that rate of growth, entire population at risk in just months. (Actual numbers went from two diagnosed cases to three, but wasn't reported.))

Then there was an actual ad that said something like, "65% of smokers say "A" cigaretts are as good or better than "B" cigarettes. Perfectly true, but the numbers were: A better than = 15%; A as good as B = 50%; A worse than B = 45%.

Look, most oeople are uncomfortable with numbers and oercentages, and you know if you are. If you are one, don't conclude anything by someone else's version of what they mean.

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Ofcom to crack down on telcos' handling of nuisance callers

Jtom

Just need to correctly apply carrots and sticks. Any telco not stopping spoofed caller IDs and cold calling are fined £500 per call (paid to the offended party) after they have been notified of the problem. Also, allow a telco to accuse any company engaged in spoofing/cold calling with violating the T&Cs of their service contract, and charge them a £25000 penalty, PLUS any fines the telco was hit with.

In other words, let the telcos be rewarded for stopping the practice, and fined if they don't. No taxpayer dollars involved.

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Bloke fesses up: I forged judge's signature to strip stuff from Google search

Jtom

Of course that is a real sapphire. Look at this certification of natural gemstone I have for it, signed by a noted gemologist.

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Users shop cold-calling telco to ICO: 'She said she was from Openreach'

Jtom

If enough people could survive without their phones for a couple of hours, we could dent this problem for a while.

I kept getting calls from a collection agency demanding to speak to someone I never met (same last name, unfortunately). I kept telling them I didn't know the person, never met her, this was not her number, and they would never reach her by calling it). Finally, when I answered yet another call, I simply said, "Hold on, I'll see if I can find her," set the phone down, and went back to my chores. The TV was on, so it was clear I had not hung up. A couple of hours later, I hung up the phone. They never called back.

I tried that again with a cold caller who kept calling me for a home service. They seemed to think if they called often enough, I would change my mind. How dense is that? After being left holding the phone for a while waiting for 'the head of the household,' they gave up too.

So, in response to a cold call, say something like, "Hold on, I'll get Mohammed. He'll be very interested in your offer." Put the phone down and forget about it for a while. Not only are you sending them a message, you are wasting their time, tying up their phone line, and keeping them from cold-calling others.

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Crackas With Attitude troll gets five years in prison for harassment

Jtom

Re: American justice in action

If you think deterrence does not work in a relatively free country, then you have never been to Singapore. Deterrence most certainly works except for those who do not care if they are imprisoned.

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Jtom

Re: Straight Inta Jail

It's also a derogatory word for whites in the South. Supposedly, what slaves called overseers who cracked whips on them to keep them in line and working. Of course, some groups now apply the term universally to all whites (just as some groups of whites call all members of the other group, spear-chuckers).

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Jtom

Re: So being a dumbshit ...

Appeal is highly unlikely. He was originally charged with multiple felonies and agreed to a plea deal admitting guilty to this one with the understanding that he could be give a five-year sentence, in exchange for not being charged with other felonies.

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Boffins fear we might be running out of ideas

Jtom

Crop yields have fallen 5% per year? They lost all credibility with that statement, alone.

https://ourworldindata.org/yields-and-land-use-in-agriculture/

The soaring INCREASES in crop yields may be slowing down a little, depending on the crop, but yields are breaking records almost yearly. A five percent decrease would be headlines throughout the world, and put strong inflationary pressure on food prices.

One of the positive attributes of additional atmospheric CO2 is the effect on plants. When levels were in the 280 ppm range, wheat and other C3 crops would actually stop growing in the afternoon of high-growing days in the UK (large fields of wheat 'gulping' down CO2 would cause CO2 levels to fall below that necessary for photosynthesis). Now growth continues. Further, since CO2 is easier for plants to get, plants can reduce the size of their stoma openings, reducing transpiration which reduces water requirements. The Earth hasn't been as green as it is for many, many centuries.

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How alien civilizations deal with climate is a measure of how smart they are. Just sayin'...

Jtom

Re: What is meant by 'advanced civilisation'

I think the lesson that should have been learned by now is that politicians represent the most unsuitable group to hold elected positions, and no one should vote for any politician, ever. The worst non-politician on a ballot is less harmful to a country than the best politician.

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Smart meters: 'Dog's breakfast' that'll only save you 'a tenner' – report

Jtom

Re: Really, that Much?

Remote switch off IS allowed most everywhere I"ve seen smart meters. Don't pay your bill, they remotely switch off your power.

It's just symantics and regulations, something like this:

Reg #444: pricing may be based on real-time aggregate usage sufficient to match demand with supply levels to avoid black-outs.

Reg #555, when a subscriber's useage exceeds £x, suppliers can require REAL-TIME BILLING, i.e., immediate withdrawal if bank fund as the power is used.

Reg #666, should the subscriber not have the funds to pay for his real-time power consunption, the supplier may remotely terminate the delivery of power.

Reg #999, consumer protection act: the consumer shall have the power to temporarily suspend the delivery of power if the cost exceeds a threshold set in advance by that consumer.(we listen to and protect the consumer from evil powercos).

Symantics: "you have complete control over how much power you use and how much you pay," means, "we have contrived a way to ration your power and cut it off completely when we wish."

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Jtom

Re: Really, that Much?

Bingo. The UK is headed down the rabbit hole of needing to ration, then deny, power. First the push for unreliable electrical generation - i.e., wind and solar. Those making energy policy all over the world are mucking things up. Do you really trust the intellect of those who decided to burn woodchips imported from the US to power generating plants in the UK that are sitting on top of huge coal deposits?

Then there is the forced-conversion to electric vehicles, when there are NO plans to build the generating capacity, distribution lines, or recharging points neecessary IF average people are still to have vehicles.

Finally, there is this deployment of smart meters, which do not benefit the consumer who are paying for them.

Connecting the dots, I would say the intent is to push up electric prices so high, that only the elitist can afford to pay for the energy that the average bloke uses today. If you make power expensive enough (enforced by the smart meter), you can de facto ration power, so the average person consumes less. Then you don't need more power generation, more transmission lines, or charging stations. You can own a vehicle - you just can't afford to keep it charged. This strategy provides the same result as an outright ban on cars, but without the political fallout. There would be so much finger-pointing - it's the evil energy companies, it's your local electric company, the battery companies have failed us, we did it for the good of our children, the last PM put us in this postion, ...that no one would get the full wrath of the people. Meanwhile, elitist are driving on roads not congested by us mere mortals. Plenty of parking. No new road projects necessary.

And people become much easier to control. What happens to your ability to survive in today's world if power is cut off? How many have the supplies required to stay warm in the winter? Obtain their own food and cook it? And what would happen to communications - good luck organizing a coordinated protest.

We are being herded into a brave new world, and they have us believing we are doing what's best for our children. We may be actually selling them into slavery. Do not trust all the changes being forced on us. If the initial objective is not deliberately for ill intentions, these changes could easily be misused by others in the future.

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Hubble Space Telescope spies possibility of liquid water in TRAPPIST-1

Jtom

Re: @Pascal

Considering the amount of silicon on Earth, if silicon-based life were possible, we should find some on earth. Pick an environment, other that a vacuum, and you can find it on Earth. That we haven't, indicates to me that nature just can't provide that path.

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Some positive news: LG, Hitachi, NEC charged $65m in li-ion battery price fixing shocker

Jtom

Re: In an industry where value is based on research put in...

Yes, you seem to be missing quite a few points here. Free markets, patent protection, and supply-demand pricing, for a start. If R&D was required, you protect your discoveries and processes through patents, forcing you competition to spend on R&D for different solutions. The most cost-effective solution has the edge in price competition. Free markets lets people charge what they need to to generate an appropriate profit. If the guy with the least expenses raises their prices too high, they lose market share to others, or entices them to develop a competing product.

As supplies dwindle, demand will result in higher prices until the demand falls to meet the supply available. Hurricane Harvey has stopped 20% of the gasoline refining in th U.S.. The gasoline price i paid before the storm was $2.19/gallon (taxes are far lower here than in the UK). Today, a gallon would cost me $2.59, and will go higher if other refineries don't increase production soon.

There is NO justification for price collusion. Each producer should establish his costs, look how he compares with others, what the price the market will bear (supply vs demand, again), and determine his own price should he choose to compete.

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Jtom

Re: 65 Meeelions...

Yes, usually the payout is quite small. Worse, is when you get a discount coupon for your next purchase of the product (which they raise the price of to offset the loss from the coupon). That's like throwing Br'ar Rabbit into the briar patch for punishment.

OTOH, I have received settlements in the £100s to over £2000 on other class action lawsuits (I save virtually ALL my receipts and subscribe to a class action site). Maybe this one will be equally rewarding. Besides battery-powered electronics, I have a slew of cordless tools. (Hmm, I need to find out what a UPS uses).

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Judge: You can't call someone a c*nt, but a C∀NT is a cunning stunt

Jtom

According to Wiki, et al, the word was Anglo-Saxon (though it had origins in other languages, as many words do), and was no more offensive than the word 'vagina', today. When the Normans invaded England, they used language as one more form of oppression of the common people whom they had conquered. The word "vulgar' derives from the Latin word for 'common'. It was - is uncouth to use vulgarisms, i.e., words of the common people.

Most ALL of the forbidden words (if you remember George Carlin's routine), were Anglo-Saxon common words. They didn't urinate (Norman); they took a p1ss (A-S). They didn't defecate; they took a sh1t. Other Anglo Saxon words are still considered impolite or less sensitive than more proper Narman variants. Which sounds better, "His wife is dead," or, "His wife is deceased?" You can guess which one is derived from the Anglo Saxon language versus Norman.

After all these centuries, the oppression of Anglo Saxon continues. I think it is past time to end it.

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Nasty firmware update butchers Samsung smart TVs so bad, they have to be repaired

Jtom

Re: Bricked TVs

YMMV, but I have a Samsung, two Vizios, and one Sony TV, and they all automatically update. I've seen no option for turning off auto-updating. You can avoid it, obviously, by killing its access to the internet, but then you just ha a 'dumb' TV.

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Seriously, friends. You suck at driving. Get a computer behind the wheel to save your life

Jtom

If the lane departure alarm doesn't compete well with the music, then I think the solution is to reduce the volume of your music. Hearing is one of the senses that helps improve the safety of driving. Hearing horns, emergency vehicles, and police cars - as well as your lane departure alarm - should not be compromised by the volume of your entertainment.

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Kill animals and destroy property before hurting humans, Germany tells future self-driving cars

Jtom

This whole issue is a shiny bauble to distract you from the true intent of the 'ruling class'. First they establish a date when all internal combustion engines will be banned. EVs are to be the future. But there are no plans to roll out charging stations, or to upgrade the electric grid to provide the power necessary to charge all our vehicles. Why not? Because neither will be needed. They will raise the price of power (tiered based on usage) such that you simple can't afford to heat your home AND charge a car. Now, onlt the very affluent can afford vehicles. They can install their own charging systems, and the grid could handle the small increase of electrical requirements.

I suspect they are already salivating over the money they can save not doing new road construction, less road repair, less traffic police needed, fewer accidents, etc., and as a bonus, they will never be stuck in traffic again. You? You will be on bicycles, buses, trains, subways, or walking.

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Jtom

I won't underestimate the possobility that one day we will have autonomous cars, if civilization lasts that long. I have underestimated what technology can do too many times before.

What I dread is the transition period during which people are suppose to still be at the wheel to handle odd situations. Are you kidding me? We already have a problem with inattentive drivers who are suppose to be in complete and sole control of their vehicles. Allow some autonomy, and no one will be paying any attention at all.

I have manual transmission cars (Honda Prelude andj S2000, both fine cars). It is a pain in the bcakside in the normal stop-and-go traffic we have here, but with one hand on the wheel, one on the stick, one foot on the clutch, and the other working the gas and brakes, you have no option but to be ONLY driving. No cellphone, internet, ebook, whatever. Sometimes I think we would do better if we reduced the automation in cars. Ban automatic transmission (yes, I know, that would never happen, but I think the roads might actually be safer).

I would rather they keep autonomous cars off the road until they are 100% autonomous.

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DreamHost smashed in DDoS attack: Who's to blame? Take a guess...

Jtom

While everyone is looking at the dullards who make-up the alt-right, what is being missed is the very dangerous antifa group. The alt-right, neo-nazi-skinhead-whatevers, are loose, basically unorganized, financially-impoverished groups who like to make noise to get attention. Occasionally, a lone-wolf loon will engage in violence. I don't think there has ever been evidence of organized violence by them.

The antifa's and other such leftist groups, otoh, seem to have a well-funded, inner core that plans violent activities. They instagate violence with any rightwing group who tries to meet, whether it's the alt-right meeting to praise the US Confederacy, or simply conservatives wanting to hear the President speak. Much of their violence is skantly reported by the MSM. It is they who destroy monuments, cars, and businesses. What is also not well-reported is that ads are being placed on on-line services seeking to PAY people to join their protest in cities just prior to such activities. They are paying thugs to be thugs.

The antifa is the biggest fascist group in the US, and it is seeking to silence all who would oppose them. This is the group that needs watching, and somehow de-funded.

When you consider this, it makes perfect sense why these DDoS are being done by the left. They have the organization and money to pay people to engage in that activity, if not the skills, themselves. The alt-right are driving around, flying a bit of colored-cloth.

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FYI: Web ad fraud looks really bad. Like, really, really bad. Bigly bad

Jtom

I suffer a problem from ads I have not seen in these comments. Us older, set-in-our-ways, folks don't buy a new phone or slab everytime a new release comes on the market. If the one we have still works, we still use it. The iPad I am now on is several years old. It does everything I want it to do (which isn't much). I downlad upgrades wherever I am notified of one. It is rock-solid when I am on professional sites like banking and brokerage services. It's rock-solid on this site. But some sites are totally useless. They lock up, freeze, and frequently crash, causing the page to reload. Some crash Safari, itself. I suspect this must stem from bad coding in ads, or someone using routines in ads incompatible with older devices.

Weather dot com is horrid. The weather radar page is impossible to use. And it's maddening to see a special weather alert that you can't read because of constant page reloads (accuweather dot com is better, but very slow). And I've given up on the local newspaper and local tv station. Because of problems with their sites, I would never consider paying for premium service from either.

These ads aren't just costing their sponsors money. They are driving traffic away from some sites entirely.

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Jtom

Re: Advertising is often overhyped...

"A new product needs to attract attention." That reminds of the dawn of the Internet. AT&T had come out with their version of a specific telecommunications platform (Service Control Point). They called it the "Advantage". It was impossible to do a search on their site to find the product (this was before Excite or other general web search engines). Any possible term you could come up with (AT&T, Advantage, service, control, point, platform, telecommunications, etc) were in the descriptions of all their telecom products, advertising, news release, etc. Always use a unique name for a product!

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Apple bag-search class action sueball moves to Cali supreme court

Jtom

I'm sure you could make an issue of it, but don't forget the employer has the ultimate trump card: Notice - effective 9-1-2017 no personnel can bring in personal items into the building. Bags and parcels are hereby prohibited unless it is job related or company property. Those items must be cleared at security to enter.

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Jtom

Re: When will this bosses realise it works both ways?

Same with me. My official hours were from 8am to 4:30pm, with an hour for lunch; a 7 1/2 hour workday. We weren't a customer-facing group, but dealt internally with our construction department that started work at 7:30am. For years I got to work at 7, took an hour lunch, and left a little after 4pm (I was escaping both morning and evening traffic jams); a workday in excess of 8 hours. An upper-level brain came in and said everyone must be at work from 8 to 4:30. So I did exactly that. Very quickly construction was complaining that they were losing a half-hour each day because they couldn't get answers from us before 8am. The brain only lasted a few months. His replacement just said, if you do the job done, on time and within the budget, I don't care how you do it. He's been there for years.

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Judge yanks plug out of AT&T's latest attack on Google Fiber

Jtom

I'm all for competition. The more the merrier - and cheaper.

Legally, though, I would think the answer would depend on who owns the poles. Very seldom are they owned by municipalities. They are usually owned by the phone or electric company serving the area. In some areas, service providers do inventories of shared poles versus who owns them. If one company owns more poles than the other, they either get rental compensation, or the other owner buys enough from then to even out the number. Cablecos usually just pay a blanket rental fee to the pole-owning utilities.

If AT&T owns the poles and wanted to maximize Google's problems, they would bury their cables and drops, and force Google to either buy the poles or they would removed. Small towns, specifically, have very few contractors for placing poles or burying cables, and they serve the existing utilities. A little pressure on them by AT&T would make it hard for Google to do any of their own installation.

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US cops point at cell towers and say: Give us every phone number that's touched that mast

Jtom

Re: If you are a bad-un all you need to do is:

If you can go without the phone on, why take it at all? Leave your phone behind, with it turned on. Let it be 'proof' that you never left that area. Why didn't you answer your calls, assuming you recieved any? You were simply engaged in other activities (showering, on the toilet, showering, sleeping, etc.).

If you need a phone during the commission of a crime, burner phones are cheap.

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UK govt steams ahead with £5m facial recog system amid furore over innocents' mugshots

Jtom

Re: Soon, citizen, soon

Or a license to exhale carbon dioxide. Can't exceed a prescribed amount. If anyone objects, well, they must hate children. Think of the future of children who will be forced to live in a world that's 0.05 degrees hotter!

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I say, BING DONG! Microsoft's search engine literally cocks up on front page for hours

Jtom

Well, it's not a big enough dick to be Corbyn.

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Web-enabled vibrator class action put to bed

Jtom

Re: That's the best headline you could come up with?

Defendent firms up private parts for customers.

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10 minutes of silence storms iTunes charts thanks to awful Apple UI

Jtom

If the ker-cheng is big enough, then this opus will be replaced by an identical work named a a a a a a a an even better song, that will sell for $ 0.50.

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Months after breach at the 'UnBank' Ffrees, customers complain: No one told us

Jtom

Re: "you shouldn't worry about the government more than you worry about criminals"

I'm not worried about 'the government' as much as the people IN the government. For example (using US laws, ymmv): you rub some low-level bureaucrat, maybe your neighbor, the wrong way. He does an unauthorized search of your Amazon purchases and sees you bought a weekly pillcase (where you can distribute a week's worth of meds, by day, for covenience, especially traveling). Then he looks at the list of prescribed drugs you take, and see that it's quite a few (not unusual). This indicates the pillcase was not for over the counter meds, but prescriptive ones. He makes a sinle call anonymously and reports you as illegally transporting prescriptive drugs. Not carrying such medication in their original bottles with the proper labeling is a felony in most states (the law was passed as a way to combat the improper sale of prescriptive drugs).

Quite a few people unwittingly commit felonies such as this. The aren't enforced by 'the government' because they are not after you. Individuals in the government, though, may have different agendas..

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Batteries that don't burn at the drop of a Galaxy Note 7? We're listening

Jtom

Re: The inventor of Li-ion batteries already has the replacement ready

I suspect they have already considered this problem, and have solved it. First, like the UK, you establish a date when all internal combustion cars are banned. Get them all off the road and only allow EVs. Next, raise the price of an electric 're-fuel' to about £500 per complete charge. Of course only the top 1% would even consider that. So 99% of the people are using mass transport, sans cars, while the 1% drive in personal vehicles on roads that are now free of traffic. The existing electrical grid could handle that.

As you scream and curse at your carless life, just remember, you are doing it for the children. Their future will be 0.001 degree cooler, on average.

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Snopes lawsuit latest: Judge orders disputed cash can flow to fact-checking site

Jtom

Re: Snopes is a Damaged Brand....

Sorry, but my experience with Snopes and controversial issues showed it to be a hard, left-leaning site. Too many time I've seen things listed as, 'false' when a trivial bit was wrong, while other issues rated 'mostly true' when one of the significant factors was untrue.

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