* Posts by LeeE

522 posts • joined 12 Apr 2012

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Jodie Who-ttaker? The Doctor is in

LeeE
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Re: Sorry, but ...

"There are only two Doctors of note ... Jon Pertwee and Tom Baker. All others pale into insignificance."

I don't think that there is or ever can be a 'best' Doctor.

Believe it or not, Doctor Who was a very serious programme when it first started and William Hartnell was the perfect first Doctor, irritable, intolerant and impatient. You didn't like him but you respected and feared him.

Tom Baker's Doctor, on the other hand, was relaxed, affable, whimsical and very likeable. Humour, something not really present with the earlier Doctors, began to feature.

In hindsight, Jon Pertwee's Doctor, along with Patrick Troughton's, turned out to be somewhat transitional characters.

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Open-source world resurrects Oracle-free Solaris project OmniOS

LeeE
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Re: Great news

It's interesting that Tobias Oetiker's involved in this; I think it adds credibility to the project. I haven't used MRTG but RRDTool & Smokeping, which I believe are derived from MRTG, are two of my favourite tools.

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New work: Algorithms to give self-driving cars 'impulsive' human 'ethics'

LeeE
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Re: Save the women and children first!

@Steve Knox: "I believe you misunderstand my point."

Fair enough, but I still can't agree with "...you are the only one with the capability to do so. Hence you have a burden of responsibility to do one or the other..."

The problem I have with this is the implied obligation to act: the "burden of responsibility to do one thing or the other". I'll admit straight away that my objection is more philosophical than practical but if you accept the proposition that you are obliged to act then this raises two further issues: firstly, an obligation means you have no choice, and secondly, to whom (or what) are you obliged?

It seems to me that if you are obliged to act then you're putting the need to act ahead of which act you perform: in the context of the Trolley Problem it means that it doesn't matter which action you take because the subject has changed from which action you perform to simply whether you act or not.

The second issue, of to whom or what are you obliged, is a bit of a trick question. Unless you are owned, as in slavery, then any obligation you may feel you are under can only be granted by yourself, whether it be to an individual person or to a concept, like Humanity.

The upshot is that, unless you're a slave, there can be no external obligation upon you, only the obligations you grant to others. Consequently, if there can be no external obligations imposed upon you then you can not be burdened with any responsibility to act, other than by yourself.

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LeeE
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Re: Save the women and children first!

@AC: "That is not correct. To quote the relevant instance I am most familiar with¹ (my emphasis):"

Note that I said "might be interpreted" and not will be/is interpreted.

But the legislation you quote only considers one party being at risk and in the trolley problem there are two parties. As framed, this law leaves the way open for lawyers to prosecute you which ever way you act because acting to help one party means that you haven't acted to help the other party.

Of course this is nonsensical, but nonsense doesn't deter lawyers.

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LeeE
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Re: Save the women and children first!

@Steve Knox: "because doing nothing when you have the capability to do something is a choice in and of itself"

I believe that this is incorrect for two reasons. Firstly, having a choice does not equate to being in a position to make a choice, especially when that choice has to be made immediately and without time for analysis. Secondly, you seem to assume that everyone can make decisions easily and instantly when in reality many people find it difficult to make any decisions, let alone stressful ones; you can't simply claim that an inability to decide is a decision in itself.

Perhaps you personally find it easy to make decisions - that's fair enough for you, but if you start projecting your decisiveness, or indeed any of your personal qualities, upon everyone else you're going to end up criticising everyone else for not being you.

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LeeE
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Re: Save the women and children first!

The problem with the 'Trolley Problem', as usually described and as used in this article, is that only one of the two important factors is considered: the dilemma of choosing whether just one person dies or whether several people die.

The other important factor is responsibility: if you remove yourself from the scenario then the route will not be switched and multiple people will die but as you are not present then you can bear no responsibility for any outcome. If you then add yourself back in to the scenario but do nothing then the outcome is the same: the same group of people will die, just as they would when you were not present.

However, if you add yourself back in to the scenario but this time switch the route then one person, who would not have died, but for your action, will now die.

Your two options, therefore, are not symmetric; if you switch the route then you become responsible for the death of the one person because they have died as a direct consequence of your actions but conversely, if you do nothing then you can't be held responsible for the deaths of the several people because their fate would be the same as if you were not present and unable to influence the outcome.

Some countries have/are considering 'Samaritan' laws and these might be interpreted, in the 'Trolley Problem', as obliging you to switch the route and kill the one person but I don't know how they would then deal with your direct responsibility for killing the one person. And even if the Samaritan law could grant you immunity from criminal prosecution, could it also grant you immunity from civil prosecution?

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Britain's warhead-watcher to simulate Trident nukes with Atos supercomputer

LeeE
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Re: "Give it time and I'm sure there will be some advanced boffinery on ARM."

"Given that bomb codes tend to coded in FORTRAN I'd guess in principle porting them to ARM would not be impossible."

Far from it; the gcc suite is available on ARM. I think porting between different versions/standards of FORTRAN would be a bigger issue.

In any case, you wouldn't be running the heavy lifting on ARM; all the heavy stuff would be run on the arrays of GPU-type accelerators that the ARMs manage.

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LeeE
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Re: Hmm

"...the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (to which the UK is signed up), which bans emission of nuclear yield (radioactive debris)..."

Umm... the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty bans all nuclear explosions, for all purposes, in all environments (the 'comprehensive' bit).

If the treaty was just about the release of emissions then we'd still be seeing underground testing.

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One-third of Brit IT projects on track to fail

LeeE
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Re: 257%

@JimC - No, I wouldn't have expected that. Whilst I would agree that if there's just one unforeseen problem with a project then there might be a good chance of salvaging it but as soon as you have more than one problem things can become much more difficult.

Even with just two problems it's possible that the solution to one of the problems is incompatible with the solution to the other. And even then, you may not even be able to start addressing the second problem without having first solved the first.

Overall, it suggests to me that typically two or three major problems will be overlooked in 40% of projects during design, planning and management. I find this worrying and far worse than I would have expected.

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LeeE
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257%

When you sum the percentages associated with each reason for project failure you end up with 257%. What this seems to suggest is not just that each of those projects failed but that they did so for multiple reasons - with an average of 2.57 reasons for each project in the sample set.

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Australian govt promises to push Five Eyes nations to break encryption

LeeE
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Re: Imminent danger.

Controlling governments indeed - they're supposed to be our representatives, our servants, not our masters. The intended purpose of these backdoors isn't to tackle terrorism by the few but to forestall rebellion by the masses.

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Want to learn machine learning in 15 minutes? Start here...

LeeE
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"...though the data cleaning and selection is going to be a pain as if you teach it wrong then it's always going to be wrong."

Good point - perhaps a suitable job for an AI?

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Debian 9 feels like home with security upgrades and a flaming vulpine warming your toes

LeeE
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MariaDB in Debian 8

"I thought Debian had ditched MySQL for MariaDB long ago?"

The article is a bit misleading in this respect; Debian doesn't have a default RDBMS nor choose which RDBMS is used by which package; both MariaDB and MySQL were in the Debian 8 repos, and that's not going to change in Debian 9; both will remain available.

What has actually happened is that many packages have been switched from using MySQL, as their RDBMS back-end, to MariaDB by their upstream maintainers since the release of Debian 8. However, because Debian stable only releases updates for bug-fixes and security issues (because stability precludes feature changes*) none of those changes will have made it in to Debian 8.

The new stable release means that those feature changes can now be included, so now many packages that used to use MySQL will now use MariaDB.

* Any new feature changes behaviour, either by changing existing behaviour or by adding new behaviour; any change in behaviour can not be regarded as stable.

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You wait ages for a sun, then two come along at once: All stars have twins, say astroboffins

LeeE
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Re: Binary/Twin Star?

@james 68: there are a couple of problems with your idea of stellar gravity weakening due to mass-loss. The first problem is that as you increase the orbital distance between the two stars, due to the reduction of gravity due, in turn, to stellar mass-loss, you also decrease their orbital velocity. Thus as Sol and its partner drew further apart due to stellar mass-loss they would be moving more and more slowly; they would never reach "the point where they would no longer be bound, sending them off rather quickly in opposite directions" - they would just drift apart more and more slowly.

The second problem is that if Sol's gravity weakened to the extent that its partner was able to drift away then all of Sol's planets etc. would also have drifted away.

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LeeE
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Binary/Twin Star?

The problems I have with this theory/article are in the use of the words 'binary' & 'twin'.

A binary system is one in which two stars are gravitationally bound and orbit each other about their common barycenter. There isn't an astronomical definition of a 'twin' star.

If Sol formed in a binary system, where it was gravitationally bound with another star, then something very energetic indeed must have happened to the other star to expel it from the pairing: it wouldn't have just drifted off, as almost implied in the article; it would still be gravitationally bound to Sol.

That Sol formed in relatively close proximity to other stars is pretty certain; molecular clouds are big - even the little ones contain around 100 solar masses, in which several stars would have probably formed.

As for 'twin' - well, we've no way of knowing how similar to Sol other stars in our particular nursery were, but it's almost certain that Sol had several 'siblings'.

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French firm notches up 50km unmanned drone inspection flight

LeeE
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Re: BVLOS?

'Surely "visual line of sight" is redundant, yes?'

In the context of controlling drones, the key part here is visual, which means that you can see the drone with your eyes. However, whilst you may have control Line-of-Sight to a drone, via its RC link, or in this case via 3G, you may not be able to see it with your eyes because it might be foggy, raining or snowing, or simply because it's night and too dark.

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Two hot Jupiters around two similar stars orbiting at similar distances look similar, right? WRONG

LeeE
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Not really surprising

I can't really see any anomaly here.

The two systems concerned, WASP-67 & HAT-P-38, are in entirely different areas of the sky and will have developed from different progenitor molecular clouds/nova remnants. WASP-67 is a type K0V star whereas HAT-P-38 is a type G. WASP-67b is 0.420 Jupiter masses and is 1.4 Jupiter radii in size, HAT-P-38b is 0.267 Jupiter masses and 0.825 Jupiter radii in size.

It seems to me that the only similarities between them are their orbits: WASP-67b has a Semi-major axis of 0.0517 AU, with an orbital eccentricity of 0.00 and HAT-P-38b has a Semi-major axis of 0.0523 AU, with with an orbital eccentricity of 0.0670.

(All data from the Open Exoplanet Catalogue - http://www.openexoplanetcatalogue.com)

I'm not surprised that the two planets have different characteristics.

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ESA astronaut decelerates from 28,800kph to zero in first bumpy landing

LeeE
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Re: Can someone explain...

"Perspective is a function of the point of view"

Yes, you're absolutely correct; the angle of view of a lens doesn't change perspective.

In retrospect, perhaps I should have said that telephoto lenses de-emphasise perspective instead of 'reduce or flatten' it, which may be interpreted as changing perspective.

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LeeE
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Re: Can someone explain...

First of all, telephoto lenses reduce or 'flatten' perspective whereas wide-angles lenses emphasise it.

Because the distance between the helicopter and the parachute is relatively small, but the distance between both of them and the camera is relatively large, from the camera's point of view both the parachute and the helicopter are more or less at the same distance.

The helicopter in the background is an Mi-8, the fuselage of which is 18.17 m long, and with an area of 1000 m2, when you subtract about 1/3 of the diameter of the parachute to allow for its curvature, you get an approximate effective width for the canopy of ~24 m. If you actually freeze the video and measure the width of the canopy and the length of the Mi-8 you'll find that the Mi-8 is smaller by about the right amount.

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First-day-on-the-job dev: I accidentally nuked production database, was instantly fired

LeeE
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Re: So....restore from backup

"The issue is with the docs."

Absolutely, and was the responsibility of the CTO to ensure, if not personally, that they should not have included or used real DB details in an example. This was a cockup waiting to happen.

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Russian data scientist unable to claim £12,000 prize in Brit competition

LeeE
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clause 2.3b of the competition rules

Just to make things clear, this isn't about eligibility to enter and compete in the competition; it's just about eligibility to be awarded a prize.

Eligibility to enter and compete is covered by Section 2 of the 'Official Rules' which is headed "Eligibility to take part in Data Challenges" and the only restrictions to entry are:

2.1 Data Challenges are open to individuals aged 18 and over. Entries made by or on behalf of corporate entities will not be accepted.

2.2 Officers, directors, employees and their immediate families of the Sponsoring Agencies, BAE Systems, Capgemini UK PLC, Roke Manor Research Limited and their respective group companies, contractors and agents may not participate in Data Challenges.

However, clauses 2.3 & 2.4 of the competition rules do not refer to eligibility to enter and compete but just address exclusions of payment:

2.3 No payment shall be made (whether directly or via a third party/country) to:

2.4 If UK Government is not (or its authorised representative is not) reasonably satisfied as to the potential recipient's identity, no payment shall be made to that person.

And it is sub-clause 2.3b that refers to "a score of 37 or less according to Transparency International's Corruption Perceptions Index 2014"

I find it a bit puzzling to allow someone to enter but then specifically exclude them from being awarded a prize, should they win.

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Amazon granted patent to put parachutes inside shipping labels

LeeE
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Re: Ooooh, It Makes Me Wonder...

Well, if it gets tangled in overhead lines, as mentioned earlier in the thread, then she might want to reconsider buying a stairway to heaven and start looking at cherry pickers instead.

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Spacecraft spots possible signs of frozen water on the Moon

LeeE
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Re: GOD!

Up-voted just for making me laugh, which I assume was the intent.

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LeeE
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Re: We're whalers on the moon

Giant steps are what you take...

(Ok, not exactly the Wailers Whalers)

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LeeE
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Re: Water, water everywhere...

@imanidiot: Although, during the Hadean eon, the Earth would have been too hot for water in liquid form, on the surface and in the atmosphere, the water vapour wouldn't have had the energy to escape Earth's gravity and be lost to space; it would have stayed in the atmosphere until it cooled enough to precipitate out and fall as acid rain. Also, at that time, a lot of the water would have still been in molecular form and trapped in rock, beneath the surface, or bound in a variety of other chemical compounds.

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LeeE
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Water, water everywhere...

"Some scientists believe water on Earth might have been brought by icy asteroids or comets."

I can't quite see the need for Earth's water to have been brought here by icy asteroids and comets. The entire Solar System, including both the Earth and all those icy asteroids and comets, was all made from the same cloud of stuff, so if water was present to make the icy asteroids and comets it would also have been present to be incorporated in the Earth as it formed.

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LIGO physicists eyeball a new gravitational wave

LeeE
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Re: Two solar masses (in energy) escaped

@Black Betty

"Same principle as a space probe getting a gravity assist by swinging around one planet on the way to another"

When a probe gets a gravity assist from a larger body it 'steals' energy from the velocity component of the larger body's momentum, not from its mass component, which remains unchanged.

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Microsoft founder Paul Allen reveals world's biggest-ever plane

LeeE
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Re: "can launch from different runways"

My first thought on seeing it outside its hanger, where you've some sense of scale, was that there won't be very many "different runways" from which this could operate at all, let alone safely, because its landing gear tracking is too wide. Whilst it may just fit on a typical runway, there won't be much 'wiggle' room between the main gears and the edges of said runway. This issue will be exacerbated by the off-center piloting position - one can imagine a conversation between the flight crew in each of the two cockpits as they try to line up with the runway for landing:

Starboard Pilot: "Come to port a bit, come to port a bit"

Port Pilot: "No!, come to starboard a bit, come to starboard a bit"

In addition to the risks resulting from the closeness of the main gear to the edges of the runway, the camber of the runway is also likely to cause problems with such a wide-tracked landing gear, not just because each of the main gear sets will be running along the side of a gradient but also because dirt and other crud will tend to end up along the edges of the runway, due to both the passage of other conventional aircraft using the runway and rainfall, which will 'wash' wind-blown dirt and grit off the crown of the camber down towards the edges. It will be a bit like driving along the hard-shoulder at full motorway speed - not good.

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The revolution will not be televised: How Lucas modernised audio in film

LeeE
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Re: Beg your pardon?

"I think modern cinema owes more to George Lucas and other such technical boundary pushers such as James Cameron..."

Depends what you mean by 'modern' - to me, Lucas & Cameron are modern, and both have said that they were inspired by, and aspire to, the standards set by Kubrick.

'Modern' cinema really started in the mid-sixties, with directors like Lindsey Anderson, Michelangelo Antonioni and, of course, Kubrick.

Can't say I noticed any problems with the sound in 2001 either.

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AI-powered dynamic pricing turns its gaze to the fuel pumps

LeeE
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Re: Also this is NOT ripping people off

"This is not a matter of stealing more money from your customer. It's about making margin on people who don't care, and giving away margin to people who do care"

This suggests that everyone chooses to commute at the same time, ignoring the fact that they are obliged to do so; whether they care, or not, doesn't come in to it.

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GPU-flingers' bash: Forget the Matrix, Neo needs his tensors

LeeE
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DGX Station

..so at last, a system that probably can run Crysis then?

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Particle boffins calculate new constraints for probability of finding dark matter

LeeE
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Re: Dark Matter - pah!

"... I've had a feeling for quite a long time that "dark matter" and "dark energy" are just contructs made up to fill in missing gaps in current models."

You are correct, and the boffins would agree with you.

What has happened is that the boffins have observed a couple of things (anomalous galactic orbital rotation rates and accelerating expansion) for which they have no explanation within established physics.

The anomalous galactic rotation rates could be explained by additional mass, for which there is no evidence, and the accelerating expansion could be explained by additional energy, for which there is also no evidence. Because we can find no evidence for either the additional mass or the additional energy i.e. we can't see either, we call them 'Dark'.

Thus, Dark Matter and Dark Energy are more a description of two problems, representing two gaps in our knowledge, rather than being answers to those two problems and filling those two gaps.

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America's drone owner database grounded: FAA rules blown out of sky

LeeE
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Re: For the curious

I'm curious about the 55 lb weight limit for 'model' aircraft - how are 'Large' models classed, such as those featured on this website:

https://www.largemodelassociation.com

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Blighty's buying another 17 F-35s, confirms the American government

LeeE
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Re: Flying Duck

"A MiG-15 would have reasonable chances against an F-35. Especially in a dogfight."

The F-35 won't be doing any dogfighting at all, because it wouldn't stand a chance against any 'proper' fighters it's likely to encounter when it eventually enters service; it'll be strictly BVR* then turn around and run away which, essentially, is what radar stealth is all about.

In fact, the fighter 'F' designation is highly questionable and an attack 'A' designation would be more appropriate.

* Beyond Visual Range

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The rise of AI marks an end to CPU dominated computing

LeeE
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Re: They've certainly sold a lot of chips.

Nvidia are ARM licensees - I can see some potential in ARM+Nvidia GPU lash-ups to compete with x86/AMD64 in these HPC workloads.

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LeeE
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Re: Bloody Nvidia

"You can't just download drivers, you have to have an account with them..."

Doesn't seem to be the case for Linux users - I don't have an account with Nvidia and have no problems downloading drivers.

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Just so we're all clear on this: Russia hacked the French elections, US Republicans and Dems

LeeE
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Re: There were 3 in the server and the little one said...roll over

I think that 'sheeple' is appropriate here - most folk immediately focus on the details of what the various countries secret services are alleged to have done, in this case, what the Russians are alleged to have done. Instead, what people should be focussing on is who is saying the 'what' and, most importantly of all, why are they saying it.

In this case then, what is important is: why are the West's security services are telling us this stuff and what do they hope to achieve by doing so?

What is clear is that when the public can do nothing about what they are told, the only point in telling them is to make them believe something that they would not have thought otherwise.

In summary, when government tells you something about someone else the target they're shooting at is not that someone else - the target is you; the someone else is just the bullet.

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Mastercard launches card that replaces PIN with fingerprint sensor

LeeE
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Re: Really?

Also: "...since we leave our fingerprints everywhere they should not be considered secret..."

But those fingerprints won't be scanned and sent straight to GCHQ/NSA/ETC.

And fwiw, I think that, apart from my own possessions, I only leave my fingerprints on doors and beer glasses, which is hardly 'everywhere'.

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Trump's lips sealed on surveillance, complains EU privacy chief

LeeE
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Re: "they have extremely professional people still in the administration"...

That usage of the word 'still'...

Very subtle - I like it.

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Can you make a warzone delivery drone? UK.gov wants to give you cash

LeeE
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Re: My exact thought

"There is no way in hell you can even sketch out the designs for anything even remotely innovative with that amount of money."

Not only that... From the article:

"...autonomously predict resupply demands from frontline troops..."

How can a drone predict resupply demands without also being able to predict the duration and outcome of the battle?

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PACK YOUR BAGS! Boffins spot Earth-size planet most likeliest yet to harbor alien life

LeeE
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Re: Even if we could get there, somehow

"...but I'll take a guess that the planet is a little bigger and a little lighter than the given values..."

Yeah, those numbers don't seem plausible: 1.4 x size & 7 x mass means something more dense than an iron core, even if the core is relatively larger than Earth's. The problem is that you can fusion elements, from hydrogen upwards and still gain energy, until you reach iron but at that point further fusion, to produce heavier elements, costs energy and this only occurs at the end of a very large star's life and in relatively small amounts.

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Qualcommotion: Sueball return alleges Apple 'pay-to-play' deal

LeeE
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Re: @LeeE: @DougS

"It is like how MIcrosoft had the PC companies cowed about their anticompetitive contracts back in the 90s. They couldn't afford to piss them off and risk retaliation. Some were reluctant to speak on the record even during the FTC case."

Ah yes, I remember that, and seem to recall similar goings-on with Intel withholding subsidies to PC builders who also wanted to offer systems with CPUs from other suppliers.

Still doesn't make it right though.

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LeeE
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Re: @LeeE: @DougS

I wasn't thinking in terms of Apple's liability for violation of FRAND, just that I think that Apple must have known that they were agreeing to a deal in which FRAND was being violated because Qualcomm couldn't have priced on percentage without knowing the cost of the phones/tablets in which their products were being used, which in turn, they could only have got from Apple. Apple also would have looked at the prices being charged and realised that they were being charged on a percentage but did the deal anyway instead of reporting it.

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LeeE
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Re: What I don't understand... @BAG

'I've not read the contract, but I'm guessing "...withholding payments due..." would violate it.'

That accounts for only one of the three complaints in Apple's lawsuit.

The other two complaints are about charging royalties for unused IP and overcharging for IP that was used, to both of which Apple knowingly agreed.

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LeeE
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Re: @LeeE: @DougS

"What Apple is complaining about is that Qualcomm was charging for the patent licensing portion of the chip as a percentage of the phone's price. That is specifically not allowed for patents covered under FRAND, and has been held to be so in multiple courts in multiple countries all around the world."

If Qualcomm were charging on a percentage of the phone's price then Apple could not have been ignorant of that fact and so must have knowingly colluded in a deal that was in contravention of FRAND.

If this is really the basis of Apple's complaint then why have they waited until now to make their complaint when they could have legitimately done so before the deal was agreed?

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LeeE
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Re: What I don't understand...

I don't see mention of a breach of contract in the article. The main thrust seems to be that Apple agreed to purchase stuff from Qualcomm and then after the event decided that it wasn't happy with the price to which it had agreed.

Unless there was something in the sales contract limiting the profit that Qualcomm made from the deal, and it tuned out that Qualcomm exceeded that limit, then I can't quite see what Apple's complaining about; it knew what it was paying for and how much it would cost.

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LeeE
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Re: er Bribery?

It was the bribery aspect that first caught my attention, but is bribery actually illegal in business-to-business deals?

Whilst bribery is generally regarded as unethical, ethicality in business has only ever really been a PR factor because few people would willingly buy from a company who were blatantly unethical.

The effect of bribery within a deal is going to alter the the apparent costs/payments, so I it could lead to inaccurate financial reporting and subsequent taxation liabilities but that case would be between the government and the companies.

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LeeE
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What I don't understand...

...are the actual points of (civil/contract?) law that are being contested here.

Neither of the parties seem to be claiming that they were mislead or deceived; it seems to me that both sides had the competence and resources to perform due diligence and knew exactly to what they were both agreeing, warts and all, so where's the case?

Although it seems that both sides knowingly employed practices that were arguably unethical, are any of those practices actually illegal in business law?

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Embrace our cloud, damn you: Microsoft dangles 40% discount on Azure instances

LeeE
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Ads on TV?

I was a little surprised to see TV adverts for the MS Cloud and had to wonder who they were targeting. My first thought was that the ads were targeted at the management level that could authorise the purchase of such services but then realised that's going to be a tiny percentage of the people who have to view the adverts, so there's got to be more behind them.

Now though, I'm wondering if the real purpose behind these ads is actually subversion of internal IT departments.

With current business practices seemingly based upon the principle of take-the-piss & exploit every possibility, paranoia seems to be a reasonable point of view.

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Boeing-backed US upstart reckons it'll be building electric airliners

LeeE
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Re: Just a matter of timing

"Something *like* this is almost inevitable, since toy drones prove that existing batteries have the necessary power-to-weight ratio..."

This won't work, for the same reason that we don't get giant insects - as you increase all the dimensions the corresponding cross sections are squared but the corresponding volumes, and therefore mass, are cubed.

For example, a 1 x 1 cube has a face-area of 1 and a volume/mass of 1 whereas a 2 x 2 cube has a face-area of 4 but a volume/mass of 8.

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