* Posts by Tannin

328 posts • joined 8 Apr 2012

Page:

Man with 74 convictions refused permission to fling sueball at Google

Tannin

Alternatively, you could learn to read.

After you have done that, and read the article, feel free to get back to us.

10
0

There's a way to dodge Fasthosts' up-to-160% domain renewal hike but you're not gonna like it

Tannin

Re: Price gouging.

Why does .clinic cost$55 quid more?

Because any tool dumb enough to want .clinic instead of something sensible like .co.uk is just about certain to be dumb enough to pay 55 quid extra. Or 155 quid extra for that matter.

10
0

Ah, good ol' Windows update cycles... Wait, before anything else, check your hardware

Tannin

Reads like an unedited and not-very-bright press release.

Oh, my mistake.

Is an unedited and not-very-bright press release.

2
1

AI slurps, learns millions of passwords to work out which ones you may use next

Tannin

Re: Feed this

Second factor questions are an utterly stupid idea. On those brain-dead sites which still use them, I NEVER provide sensible answers. (Not that there are any sensible answers: most of those questions either ask for something that any fool could guess if they know anything about you, or else for something you don't know yourself.)

Much, much better to provide nonsense answers and keep them somewhere secure. E.g., Q: "What is your favourite colour?" A: elephant. Q: "Who was your first girlfriend?" A: Glasgow". Q: "Where were you born?" A: Uncle Arthur. Q: "What is your favourite song?" A: sodium pentaflouride. Or, if you prefer, instead of "Glasgow" as your first girlfriend answer, use "kdKYTEKYE&J$KDTY9".

(Unless, of course, you are from the robo-sex generation and your first girlfriend really was named kdKYTEKYE&J$KDTY9.)

2
0

Scientists produce a map marking water hotspots on the Moon

Tannin

Hot and wet

Why isn't a "watrer hotspot" simply a wet spot?

6
0

'Don't Google Google, Googling Google is wrong', says Google

Tannin

Re: That'll confuse users

"As he doesn't know what a browser is, I can only conclude that he ended up with Chrome when Google were marketing it like spyware"

That would be yesterday then.

Or anytime since ... er .. since whenever it was they started market it like spyware. Ages ago.

1
0
Tannin

Re: Surely....

The worst sort of comment is the dreaded "I have no idea how this works". And yes, one or two of my own beautifully coded little darlings bear this mark of shame. I think it happens late at night after many hours of frustration and trying bad ideas because you have run out of good ones. Then you go to bed and forget about it. Some days or weeks later, you look at the code and .... and you have no idea how it works. You know perfectly well that you should re-write it, but after all it does work, and it took hours to write and ... and .... and .... and ...

# I have no idea how this works

2
0

So thoughtful. Uber says it won't track you after you leave their vehicles

Tannin

Re: A very useful feature beaten down by unthinking liberal do-gooders...

You deserve a down vote, of course, on the other hand, the little gem "given that most Uber riders are drunk twenty-something self-entitled arts students who couldn't find their arse with their elbow on a clear day", you deserve an up vote. Sadly, I don't think the software allows both.

2
0

Australians still buy 100,000 feature phones a quarter

Tannin

Of course, the 100,000 per quarter understates the actual usage of feature phones because (unless I miss my guess) on average people keep a feature phone for much longer than a smart phone. Feature phones don't go out of date (short of major network technology changes), their batteries last years longer (because 50% of a week is still several days and perfecly usable, where 50% of a day is not usable), they don't get pawned, hacked, stolen, infected, crippled by OS and application software updates ... they just work.

So, as a first approximation, regard the 5% sales figure as indicating something like a 15% usage figure.

5
0

At last! Vivaldi lets you kill looping GIFs

Tannin

Still no single tab-close button! Drives me spare.

Other than that, it is good, and getting gooder. I now use it more than most other browsers. Pale Moon has dropped off the radar because of its lack of support for CSS Grid, Firefox has finally stopped messing up the UI with stupid dumb-as-Chrome changes every 10 minutes, and old-school Sea Monkey, appropriately, never changes at all. Still miss Opera though.

1
0

Revealed: The naughty tricks used by web ads to bypass blockers

Tannin

Re: On the other hand...

Re the Brisbane Times, you simply need to globally disable Javascript on brisbanetimes.com.au and affilated sites such as theage.com.au and smh.com.au.

No ads, no garbage, easy as pie.

2
0

Tech giants warp eco standards to greenwash electronics, rake in cash

Tannin

Re: Repair != Green

The choice is not binary, you just have to look harder. You CAN buy good quality third-party batteries for most products, but you have to hunt them down.

And the alternative is not good. Just a day or two ago, a woman here in Victoria was put into hospital by a cheap third-party battery when it exploded. Luckily, neighbours were able to put the fire out before her house burned down.

Moral of the story: don't buy cheap no-name Chinese batteries.

2
0
Tannin

Re: Repair != Green

$10 camera batteries are cheap, nasty and dangerous.

The $140 Nikon-branded ones will last far longer, and won't damage your equipment. Or catch fire.

The actual cost to manufacture the $140 ones is about $60 (that's including all taxes, distribution costs, and a reasonable profit margin for your retailer). Nikon are greedy barstards. (Similar comments apply to most (all?) of the other majors.)

But Nikon don't make those $140 batteries themselves, they buy them in from a reputable third-party manufacturer. So you don't have to pay the $140 Nikon tax, you just have to find a decent third-party vendor (this is the hard part) selling the identical part (no, no, no, not the $10 knock-off, the same part or better from a decent battery maker) and spend the $60 (this is the easy part).

2
1

Oz attorney-general a step closer to SCNA*

Tannin

George Brandis ... in charge of networking. This is hilarious! We are not talking about the same George Brandis who doesn't even know what metadata is, are we? We are? OMG! This is like putting Stevie Wonder in charge of picking the wallpaper. Or ... er ... like putting Donald Trump in charge of running a country. Or like ... oh never mind. I want a drink.

11
0

Photobucket says photo-f**k-it, starts off-site image shakedown

Tannin

Re: $400

Actually. $400 a year doesn't buy you a virtual host, it buys you about 10 of them. Cheap hosting on a shared server provides way more than you were getting on Photobucket, and it costs about one-tenth of the insane price they are asking.

$400 PA on a virtul hosting is quite expensive, but may be worth it depending on how much you care about 24/7 * 365 reliability and a help desk that speaks a language known to most people in your country.

3
0

Blunder down under: self-driving Aussie cars still being thwarted by kangaroos

Tannin

Re: Obvious solution

The real problem with hitting a roo isn't the damage the impact does to your car - though that can be substantial - it's what else you hit afterwards. People take wild evasive action and hit something, such as a tree or another car. The impact of a roo is substantial. It can do a lot of damage, including damage that in some cases makes it difficult or impossible to control the car well enough to bring it to a safe stop.

I regularly drive through a particular section of road arund dusk. This is the worst possible time for roo stikes. I don't worry too much about hitting a roo myself - I slow down to 80k or less and keep a very sharp lookout - I worry about the moron coming the other way at 120 who suddenly sees a roo (or just feels the impact on an unseen one) and unexpectedly arrives on my side of the road, out of control. It hasn't happened yet 'coz I'm here to talk about it, but honestly, some people have got no bloody idea.

0
0

Lordy! Trump admits there are no tapes of his chats with Comey

Tannin

Re: Still don't understand this bullshit

"(**) "Patronise" means talking down to someone."

You'll need to put that in simpler words.

8
0

Samsung releases 49-inch desktop monitor with 32:9 aspect ratio

Tannin

Re: @Dan

Just to add some (useless) extra detail (becuse I'm a useless extra detail kind of guy), CRT measurement is not actually from outside edge to outside edge, it is of the picture tube. The edge of the picture tube is somewhere between the edge of the visible picture and the inside of the outer case. Measuring outside edge to outside edge, you should get roughly one inch (varies with model) more than the claimed measurement by a notional honest manufacturer. With LCD, ther is no picture tube, so you just measure the picture.

(Just in case you are interested, note that it is probably easier to find a working 37 inch CRT monitor than it is to find an honest manufacturer.)

3
0

Foxconn, Amazon, Apple join Toshiba chip plant feeding frenzy

Tannin

Why is it ailing? Because Toshiba blew all the billions it had and as many other billions as it could borrow on expanding its loss-making nuclear powerplant construction business at a time when the industry prospects were lousy and getting worse.

Now they are auctioning off the furniture.

2
1

Boffins find evidence of strange uranium-producing bacteria lurking underground

Tannin

Re: The usual baloney

"Thinking in terms of elements, Protons and Neutrons is 19th Century Science"

And you, Sir, need to read up on when the 19th Century happened.

(Hint: it was long over when Rutherford first discovered the proyon in 1917. And 35 years gone when Chadwick discovered the neutron.)

0
0

'My PC needs to lose weight' says user with FAT filesystem

Tannin

Re: Windows 98

"This comment makes me feel so old. A 10-year old kid using Windows 98 at school. I'd already been in industry for over a decade before Windows 98 became a thing. When I was at school it was all BBC Model Bs"

When I was at school, you had to demonstrate a certain level of proficiency before you were allowed to have upgraded hardware.

Because my handwriting was poor, it was quite a while before I was allowed to upgrade from a fountain pen to a ballpoint.

(True story.)

3
0

Toshiba asset-swap shock: Western Digital is not impressed

Tannin

Re: The question is

By playing in the wrong industry. The astonishingly large losses stem from Toshiba's participation in the nuclear energy industry, which has a cost structure starkly unbelievable to most people, and has been crushed three times over: first by the various nuclear safety scares in recent decades, especially Fukushima: second by constantly escalating construction costs and associated delays; and third by the rapidly dropping cost of competing technologies, first wind, then solar, and now storage. Not to mention very low gas prices in the USA since the fracking revolution.

The result is that there is very little construction activity at present. Making matters worse for Toshiba, they expanded their stake in the industry at the wrong time, buying up competitors when they should have been selling out while their operation was still worth something. Making matters worse still, they paid way over top dollar for a nuclear plant construction company in the States which turned out to be very badly run, to be facing huge contractual difficulties and cost overruns, and to be near enough to bankrupt as makes no difference.

Asleep at the wheel? Too right they were. Asleep and dreaming chemically assisted technicolour dreams. Right royally shafted? Yep. Exactly that. And now they owe a truly massive amount of money, borrowed to buy a worthless, unsaleable asset in a dying industry that loses money hand over fist and will never show a profit, and the only way to pay off the loan is to sell the electronics operations - i.e., stop doing the thing that they are actually good at.

Damn shame. Toshiba's electronic stuff was great.

3
0

Intel gives the world a Core i9 desktop CPU to play with

Tannin

Re: Ahh, I love the smell of competition.

Well, not entirely. AMD have had several brief tilts at superiority, just as you say, but before and after they had one very long period of clear superiority on almost every metric. This was back when clck speeds were moving through (roughly) the 800MHz to 3000MHz range. Intel's Pentium III was reasonably competitive but way too dear; the Pentium IV was hopelessly outclassed for its entire market life, and as for Intel's wrong-headed fetish for the disaster called Rambus, the less said the better.

Intel's then-new Core chips leveled the playing field, and the Athlon replacements were pretty sad efforts. As you were.

6
0

Lexmark patent racket busted by Supremes

Tannin

Re: Rendering the consumer

^ All good points. To be fair to the printer makers, we should also rember that they spend a vast amount on R&D each year (well, Epson and Canon do, I assume that others are similar) and most of that research money doesn't go on printers, it goes on ink. It's not just coloured water.

On a different point, I recently threw away two perfectly functional, reliable, good quality laser printers. Not as fast as modern ones, but plenty fast enough for ordinary office use; built like tanks; and (unlike some really old iron) not so huge and heavy as to be an annoyance. Excellent units, in short. (One was a Kyocera, the other a Fuji-Xerox.) I just couldn't bring myself to buy a replacement cartridge for more than double the price of a whole replacement printer. They are probably landfill somewhere now. What a waste.

The new printer is faster, of course. Other than that it is inferior in most respects. But what else can you sensibly do?

2
1
Tannin

Re: Lexmark loses twice?

Lexmark loses three times, actually. The third one is that this publicity reinforces what every techie worth his salt already knows, which is that when it comes to buying printers you make a list of all the brands, and the second thing you do is pick one off that lisrt.

Er ... did I mention the [i]first[/i] thing you do? Cross off Lexmark, of course. Honesrtly, why would [i]anyone[/i] with a clue buy a Lexmark product? They always used to be carp, but they have really and truly changed now. For the worse.

0
0

What is dead may never die: a new version of OS/2 just arrived

Tannin

Re: To quote a popular song ... 'Let it go !!!'

I installed and/or ran OS/2 on many different machines, so far as I can remember not a single one of them an IBM-branded unit. If you could install it, it just worked. Weeks, months and years of uptime - and that in an era when nothing else except 'nix could manage more than a few days at best. Windows didn't start to approach OS/2 stability until 2000 came along. Consumer-grade Windows never did.

1
1
Tannin

Re: Game on!

Last time I checked - two or three years back maybe - you could still buy a GalCiv bundle of about 5 different versions on-line from Stardock for just a few bucks. Hell, I bought it myself ... installed it .... and never quite got around to playing it.

4
0

No laptop ban on Euro flights to US... yet

Tannin

Re: Pertaining to WTF

"I believe he isn't quite as stupid as he seems - not far off though, but a bit more cunning than you think he is."

Yep. So cunning he managed to bankrupt a casino. That's some serious talent.

2
0
Tannin

Re: Why Israel didn't ban electronic devices on flights to Tel Aviv?

"The US send planeload of their agents to Tel Aviv to watch and learn how the Israelis did it. In the end, they fly back home, write a thick report (another American forte) only for the said report to be thrown into the "too hard" basket."

Sorry. I don't believe it. Since when were the US security people well-trained enough to master complicated technology like pencils?

2
0

nbn™ needs copper to build FTTN: another 15,000 km of it

Tannin

"nowhere near as silly as the Sydney Morning Herald's outrage about the nbn™ coffee spend (about $500k a year for an organisation with 5,000 staff – about 27 cents per person per day).

Yeah right. And how much of that coffee ends up with the actual on-ground workers? Rough guess: none. Most of it will be going to the very small number of people warming chairs in offices. So nothing like 27c per day.

(And if it turns out that the number of chair-warmers (as opposed to workers) isn't small, well that's an even bigger scandal.)

8
0

US court decision will destroy the internet, roar Google, Facebook et al

Tannin

Re: What about abuse of fair use?

Yes. And it gets more complicated than that because "fair use" is the American rule, where other countries have other rules. here in Oz, for example, we have "fair dealing" which is more restrictive than US "fair use" in some respects, less restrictive in otrhers. So there are lots of different "fair-somethingorother" rules, and even where you have the same rules, they are often interpreted in different ways in different places.

It's a mess.

4
0

MP3 'died' and nobody noticed: Key patents expire on golden oldie tech

Tannin

Bahh ... The only way - repeat the only way to get a truly accurate sound for perfect satisfaction is to avoid all electronic pollutions of the aural purity. Simply purchase an instrument of your choice and learn to play it. Most people should be able to achieve a reasonable level of proficiency on almost any instrument in less than 30 years if they practice regularly ... by which time they will be old enough for their ears to have lost full HF sensitivity and thus ruined their ability to appreciate that perfect sound.

2
0

Spend your paper £5 notes NOW: No longer legal tender after today

Tannin

Re: £5 note issued in 1957 had a strong purchasing power

"The average weekly wage was £7.50" - Pretty certain my dad didn't earn anything near that.

That's presumably because the previous poster committed a gross misuse of the term "average". An "average" is a measure of central tendency. There are many types of "average", but in most instances only one or two useful or correct ones. Luckily, there are some very simple rules to help people choose an appropriate measure for any given task. In the case of wages (as with all skewed distributions), the first-choice average is the median. Only a statiastical ignoramus would use the arithmentic mean.

(Rare exception: where one is interested in the total wages of all workers, rather than the typical wage of individual workers, the median is inappropriate and the arithmetic mean is the one to use. But in that case, why not just use the total in the first place?)

In short, your dad probably earned something like £4.50, which was probably around about the average wage at that time.

1
0
Tannin
FAIL

Amazing

I'm amazed that the UK is only now adopting modern, more durable, currency notes. I suppose you'll be moving on to other exiting new technologies soon, such as the electric light bulb, the flush toilet, and the fountain pen.

1
2

Australia scraps temporary visas for skilled workers

Tannin

Re: My Take

Meanwhile, Premier Trumble is still hell-bent on maintaining a massive immigration program.

Like others before him, he talks up 457s and illegals (both very minor contributors to the total number arriving every year) and hope that voters will be too stupid to notice that he is doing nothing whatever to get the overall number under control.

Sadly, this dishonest Howard-era policy has worked at elections many times in the past, and probably will work again.

(Though it might not be enough to save him: 10 disaster Newspolls in a row now, and #11 due any day.)

3
0

Boeing-backed US upstart reckons it'll be building electric airliners

Tannin

Ground-based fuel storage is required

"Simple reality is that "renewable" aviation is going to have to run on synthetic paraffin. And that is going to be VERY expensive."

The problem here is that the aircraft has to carry its own energy (e.g., in the form of liquid fuel). If you could figure a way to leave that weight on the ground and only transport the payload itself (together with things required to control and protect that payload, such as seats, structure and control surfaces), you'd be home free.

Luckily, there is a way. Simply launch aircraft with ground-based electric capapults.

Naturally, you'd need some serious acceleration in the launch tube - 10g? 100g? lots anyway - but this need not be harmful to passengers or freight provided you have a suitable mechanism to cushion the launch impact, such as a very large rubber band.

0
0
Tannin

Re: Just a matter of timing

"An electric plane doesn't need to be as good as a kerosine one. It just needs to find a niche where it is more competitive than anything else."

Good point. All we need to do now is find a place with hardly any gravity.

1
0

Teenagers think Doritos are cooler than Apple

Tannin

Re: Generation Z

There won't be any need for Generations AA, AB, and AC because, let's face reality here - Gen Z will be too busy "communicating" and "updating" on their pocket gadgets to ever learn the skills required to get pregnant, such as meeting people and possibly even talking to them.

(Yes, yes, there are apps for that. But why would Generation Z nother using them when they can achieve a functionally equivalent result with just one hand, leaving the other free for fondling the gadget?)

(Err ... some ambiguity there about which gadget is being fondled. Not that there is anything wrong with thet.)

1
0
Tannin

Re: Who gives a stuff what teenagers think?

Upvote for remembering Setright.

1
0

'Trash-80' escapes the dustbin of history with new TRS-80 emulator

Tannin

Re: My recollection and the Internet says: July 1980

It cost a lot more than 3.5k, and that was second-hand. A mate and I went halves in it. (Why? I have no idea. We were both in our late teens, earning adult wages with overtime, no mortgage, no kids, not gamblers or big drinkers, and it seemed like a good idea at the time.)

But after currency conversion and taxes, yep, $US 3.5k would be about right. But no built-in disc drive. That I guarantee. We dreamed about a disc drive.

0
0
Tannin

Re: My recollection and the Internet says: July 1980

Model II had an expansion port in it's own large box. Model III was all-in-one.

In top-of-the-line form, the Model II allowed a massive 64k of RAM, half of it in that expandion box, which was too big to pick up in one hand. The expansion port wiring and/or connector was horribly unreliable, so the machine would just reset randomly from time to time. When the only way to get a program into the computer was to type it in with two fingers, this was a hardship.

We always had a lot of trouble with cassette storage (possibly, having spent quite a few thousand on the computer and the big 64k expansion, we should have spent a few hundred on a better tape machine!) and never did get one of those very expensive newfangled floppy drive things.

Yes, this was the 1970s. Like Mr Wheat, I am often perfectly well aware of what decade it is. Sometimes I even remember what day it is.

1
1

We're 90 per cent sure the FCC's robocall kill plan won't have the slightest impact

Tannin

Overseas spam calls are easy

Overseas spam calls are easy. Simply require all spam calls originating internationally to unveil, and provde their Facebook and Twitter passwords.

0
0

Australia bins safe harbour, presses ahead with Minister-as-NetAdmin plan

Tannin

Spooky

Once this would have been spooky.

With Brandis in charge ... yes, that same Brandis who crippled an honest Solicitor General in order to stave off public exposure of his own complicity in the $300 million Bell / WA Liberals scam ... yes, the same Brandis who is too stupid to understand what metadata is (even after being repeatedly briefed by his own experts), let alone why it matters .... yes, that Brandis ... it's beyond spooky and out there into horror movie territory.

3
0

'Clearance sale' shows Apple's iPad is over. It's done

Tannin

Re: As I have said a million times

The one thing iPads do still have going for them is that they are one of the very few tablets to have a usefully-shaped screen. Nearly everything else is too shallow to be practical.

Having said that, I looked at the Apple offerings,. liked the screens, looked at the insane prices ... and bought a perfectly functional Android tablet instead (despite the poorer screen). I spent the hundreds of dollars in change, but I could have bought anouther couple of pretty decent tablets with it if I'd a use for more than one.

6
8

In the land of Google, Holocaust denial, death threats – all fine. LGBT? Oh, no, that's sensitive

Tannin

Re: They have a point

"Treat your users with basic respect"

Gosh! What a crazy idea. Next thing some loon will come up with something completely wacko like, just for example, "don't be evil".

Hey, I believe it. Only yesterday I was sitting there swapping medication with my buddies Adolf and Napoleon ... well, he says he's Napoleon but I reckon he's really only Bernadotte, or possibly Mahtma Ghandi pretending ... anyway, we were sitting there making a new hat to keep the starlings out and trying out each-other's medications when Adolf stuck a dose of Napoleon's Penfluridol in his ear and said "Let's treat people like Dr Johnson with basic respect" . Seems perfectly reasonable to me. Wurble worble floop.

5
9

Spammy Google Home spouts audio ads without warning – now throw yours in the trash

Tannin

Re: Personal Advisor

"Do not believe that a box made of plasic set up in your living room cares about YOU. If you do, you must be stupid, very stupid."

Newsflash: most people in this world are stupid, very stupid. Google knows this, which is why it is rich, very rich.

You know this, of course, because you are not so stupid. Neither am I. But we and others like us - including many readers of this thread - are a tiny minority, condemned to drowing in a vast sea of endless stupid.

What can we do about it? Many things. Join a wacko religion. Switch off the computer and grow tomatoes in the back yard. Drink heavily. Close your eyes and wait to die. Post grumbles on the Register. Get rich by investing in a company with a business model heavily based on assuming that most people are stupid.

None of these strategies will actually do any good, of course, but they help the time go by.

1
0

This week's top token gesture: Google Chrome chokes energy-hungry background tabs

Tannin

Of Opera still made browsers, they'd be all over this idea.

Open

Open in new tab

Open in background tab

Open in silent tab

Open in low-CPU tab

User options to set defaults for background tabs, such as (for example) "Open as usual but with moderate CPU priority, after (<reasonable time for page layiut and related tasks>), cut resource use to near-zero until aquires focus". Call that "best of both worlds" tab handling. Naturally, you'd also have a way to open a full-power tab (much the way you can open a private tab in current browsers) for when you want to (for example) stream something.

No bugger invents anything useful anymore.

Damn I miss Opera!

1
0
Tannin

Re: Mobiles suck

Sometimes I wish that I could save up all my upvotes for a day and deliver them to just one post.

" Nothing they type on the bus or toilet is of interest to anyone."

Says it all.

4
2

'Password rules are bullsh*t!' Stackoverflow Jeff's rage overflows

Tannin

Re: I believe...

Well, the obvious answer is that bloggs.com requires a length of 6-10 characters, no dictionary words, no punctuation marks, and at least one number, while jones.com requires 12 or more characters, .mix of upper and lower case, no repeated letters, and at least one non-alpha-numeric character.

But possibly I'm missing the same something here.

1
0
Tannin

Better security questions needed

Never mind the password problem, how about fixing those security questions. The world needs better securtity questions. For example:

What is your favourite recreational drug?

Why were you bullied at school?

What did your granny die of?

What was your most embarrassing disease?

Describe the flavour of your favourite bodily secretion.

Who did you have your first extra-marital affair with?

Not counting masturbation, what was your most memorable sexual experience?

6
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017