* Posts by Tannin

255 posts • joined 8 Apr 2012

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Mozilla wants infosec activism to be the next green movement

Tannin
Mushroom

Back to the future

The main problem is that we don't design systems to be secure in the first place. Every code wonk in the known universe wants to add features and Do Cool Stuff. Security is an afterthought. This notion that any random website is allowed by default to run unknown code on your computer is stone motherless stupid. And the ability sites have to hand-off code to other sites, ones you have never even heard of, is beyond stupid.

OK, so that amounts effectively to throwing away Javascript and starting again with a better idea.

Good!

(Yes, yes, it's Javascript is not the only problem child. There are various other completely unnecessary scripting honeypots, such as Flash and active PDF documents, various Microsoft proprietary horrors, and so on. A pox on all of them. And if that means going back to 1995 and starting again, only trying to do it right this time, well, hand me the plutonium and switch on the flux capacitor.)

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Unbreakable Locky ransomware is on the march again

Tannin

morons and synpathy

If she's lost 10 years worth of photos, it follows that she has gone 9 years plus without a backup.

That's somewhere out there in the unexplored territory where you go beyond stupid, turn right, and keep going until the wheels fall off. Nine years!

Of course, as all of us here have no doubt seen for ourselves, Beyond Stupid is commonplace, and some remarkably intelligent people do it. Even people who are generally pretty careful about things can surprise you with a complete failure to backup.

So is this unique to computers, perhaps because people don't understand them or are subconsciously hostile to them?

Not really. It seems to apply to other seldom-needed but vital tasks too, especially ones that are a little unpleasant, or boring, or cost a small amount of money for no tangible immediate return, or not very easy to understand.

People go for decades without bothering to make a will; somehow manage to avoid the dentist until they have really serious pain, don't quite get around to paying the house insurance .... probably every profession can cite the dumb things people do (or more to the point don't do) which wind up hurting them badly.

But I still reckon that complete ffailure to backup is more common and more difficult to excuse than any of them.

I've spent my working life being polite and sympathetic to people who've just discovered that not having backups is a very bad idea. Sometimes I've been able to get their data back, sometimes not. Rule Clint applies. ("Do I feel lucky?") Win or lose though, I've always, always been sensitive to their feelings and handled them more-or-less the way an undertaker handles a bereaved family member. Underneath all that, of course, there is what I really think. Yes, yes, I do understand how easy it is to not backup, I really do. And I know, I really do know, the horrible sick feeling you get when you realise that you've really screwed something important up through your own carelessness. But you know what I really think, don't you. It's the same thing we techies all think when we see this happen: well what did you expect, you fu*king moron?

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Bank robber reveals identity – by using his debit card during crime

Tannin

Re: I call fake

Good point. But he's 57. He grew up in an era when most people - yes, even poor people towards the lower end of the IQ scale with not too much formal education - could add up well enough to make change without computer aid, and were more-or-less literate. Different story if he was, say, 35.

Alternatively, one might suppose that a literatre journalist or sub-editor corrected his spelling - but only if one happened to believe that there are literatre journalists and sub-editors remaining in the wild.

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Google nukes ad-blocker AdNauseam, sweeps remains out of Chrome Web Store

Tannin

Re: No free ride

Cheers Tim99, that answers my question nicely.

It wouldn't have occurred to me to use .vbs for a task like this (or indeed for anything else much) but I can see the advantages in your context. Me, I'm only just used to these newfangled batch file things, since they replaced the normal .sub SUBMIT file. :)

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Tannin

Re: No free ride

Thanks for that script.I'm sure it will be useful. Forgive my ignorance here, but what is the point of using vbs for it when a perfectly ordinary batch file is faster and easier?

(Possibly I am showing my age.)

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Tannin

Re: Maybe they should've thought the whole video ad thing over

Well done on your EE Smith reference - not too many people remember the Doc these days. But - though one should hesitate to mention her in the same paragraph as EE Smith - a rather earlier and utterly compelling insight into advertising is Dorothey E Sayers' Murder Must Advertise. But, of course, she had inside knowledge of the industry.

(What would she have made of Google/DoubleClick? One hates to think.)

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Folders return to Windows 10's Start Thing

Tannin

Re: With the exception of the Master Race...

There are good reasons to use Windows, reasons inbvolving programs which are absolutely positively superior to anything available on 'nix. Office and Outlook are not, repeat not, repeat not amongst them.

1
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Don't pay up to decrypt – cure found for CryptXXX ransomware, again

Tannin

Follow the money.

This scumware only exists because authorities (a) allow quasi-currencies like Bitcoin, and (b) make no attempt to make the quasi-currencies comply with the standard rules that apply to all traditional currencies.

Seriously, what actual use is Bitcoin? What goods and services could not be delivered without it? What would we lose (other than a lot of crime) by simply getting rid of it? (You wouldn't ban it, you'd just legislate to make it difficult or impractical to exchange it for items of genuine value such as currency.)

Follow the money. Always follow the money.

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Don't panic, friends, but the Chinese navy just nicked one of America's underwater drones

Tannin

Re: Truly, the post-truth age.

Just so. A cleansing dose of nuclear winter would rebalance the climate, and with any luck, all the bombs would be nice and far away in the unpopulated Northern Hemiphere.

(Unpopulated by anyone important anyway.)

(In case of confusion, "important" in this context means me, my mum, and the chap who runs the pizza shop.)

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Tannin

Re: Something doesn't add up about that scenario

Nonsense. The Chinese don't own the ocean., It is not, repeat not, territorial water. The "frisbee", in this case, was being thrown in a public park, and the Chinese military simply stole it. There is no excuse in internation law for this behaviour. None.

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China is building a full scale replica of the Titanic to repeatedly crash into iceberg

Tannin

But where is Uncle Clive?

Clive Palmer, that is. Or has he sunk without trace now?

1
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Bluetooth 5.0 emerges, ready to chew on the internet of things

Tannin

Bluetooth 29

Can't wait for Bluetooth 29. As you know, Bluetooth 29 is expected to be the first one which actually works nearly all the time in most (possibly even all!) permutations and combinations and doesn't suffer from lag, cut out unexpectedly, demand enough CPU cycles to heat a small room, or contribute to the incidence of computer rage and clinical depression in computer technicians and other humans. (OK, near-humans.)

Industry experts expect Bluetooth 29 to be announced to coincide with the dawn of the 22nd Century and be available in shops soon after that. If anyone still uses Bluetooth then. If they still have computers then. If they still have shops them.

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Telstra launches Australian homes onto the Internet of S**t

Tannin

This will end in tears

What a disaster waiting to happen. This is not going to be pretty.

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Adobe Australia drops SaaS tax dodge

Tannin

Re: Laughing all the way to the Bank

It's not the few cents worth of "international fee" that bothers me so much as the damn administrative overhead at my end. Yes, it's only one more transaction to buggerise about with when you reconcile your statements, but it's one extra every damn month. With four or five subscriptions (one to Adobe for Photoslug, various others for other things) all of a sudden you have around 100 extra transactions to record, classify, make typos entering, forget to enter, double-count, any other trivial mistake you can make at the end of a long day when you really don't feel like reconciling bank statements, and you only bought four or five products.

Some of these subscription products you can arrange to pay once a year in a lump sum, others you can't, and others you probably could but you quail at the thought of ringing/emailing customer service and just don't bother. It all takes time. I'd actually pay a little extra if I could have one single transaction once a year to cover the whole thing, just for the convenience.

(And yes, I could use one of those services which auto-read bank statements into an accounting package, but that's a whole different can of worms I'm not going to open.)

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Microsoft goes back to the drawing board – literally, with 28" tablet and hockey puck knob

Tannin

Re: I want to join

Lots of Windows users here, you know, and most of us (or at least the more intelligent ones) are pretty good at spotting the howling errors Windows is notorious for.

So who don''t we all switch to 'nix? Lots of reasons. Many of us depend on a must-have application which isn't practical on anything bar Windows or (in possibly Mac in some cases); others need to keep their Windows skillls current for professional reasons; others again are restricted by company policies, and so on.And there are things Windows does better; some of us like that.

Yes, there are a few Linux fanatics that post here, and yes they can be a bit tiresome now and then, but the vast majoritty are sensible, knowledgable, and friendly.

In fact, most of the Windows criticisms here (and elsewhere) come from Windows users. Windows users know Windows far better than non-users after all, and it's not as if there is any shortage of Windows mistakes to grumble about - especially these days since Microsoft has (a) finally worked out how to make the mission-critical function work properly most of the time, and (b) totally lost the plot when it comes to understanding users and treating usability as if it matterred.

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Tannin

Gibberish. Try posting in a known language, such as English.

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WD flashes first SanDisk drives: Blue and Green

Tannin

Maybe WD's drive cloning software will actually work on these nerw models now.

(It refuses to work on Sandisk-branded drives, even though the box proudly says "A Western Digital company". This was annoying enough to make certain that I'll return to Samsung SSDs next time.Damn shame you can't get Samsung spinning rust anymore. They weren't quick but their reliability was fantastic, and nobody buys rust for speed anyway.)

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18 seconds that blacked out South Australia

Tannin

Re: Working wind turbines won't help...

This is not the case, Pompous Git.

The Snowtown wind farms in the north of the state started reducing output (shutting down individual turbines, one by one) because of the extreme wind force well before the blackout and had already restarted by the time the towers blew over. Snowtown started reducing output at 3:50pm. Wind speed there peaked at 3:58pm. Shortly after 4, Snowtown was back in business and ramping up towards full power.

The outage did not began until 4:18.

When wind farms shut down, they do so on an individul, tower by tower basis. An entire wind farm doesn't suddenly shut off in an instant, still less two completely different ones a long way apart.

The outage itself was, given the tornadoes that took the towers down, pretty much inevitable.

The real mystery is (a) why it took so long to get restarted, and (b) why much of the state's gas generation capacity was left idle right through the main part of the outage. (SA has enough gas generation, remember, to power the whole state without any help from South Australian wind, Victorian coal, Tasmanian hydro, or solar. The reason gas generation doesn't operate all the time, of course, is that it costs more than wind, solar, coal or hydro. They switch gas plants off when they don't expect to want the power.

The questions we need to be asking are (a) why, given the known extreme weather on the way, was there no extra capacity on standby? And (b) why was it that two different large South Australian gas generators, both supposedly black-start-capable, were unable to restart in a timely manner and get the lights back on?

(As a matter of background, it is normal for most power stations to require power to enable start-up. They need to do things like run cooling pumps and control electronics before they can start generating. It is also normal for a power network to have two or three designated "black start" generators, any one of which can provide its own start-up power and thus be the first one back online, this enabling the other (non-black-start capable) stations to start up in their turn. The designated South Australian black start stations failed, and the outage went on for many hours as a result.)

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Tannin

Re: What redundancy?

An absurd inability to plan proper redundant systems seems to be an area of genuiine Aussie expertise.

You remind me of the notorious 20-day gas supply failure for the entire state of Victoria in 1998, which was all caused by the failure of a single oil.pump, which led to a fire at the Number 1 gas plant.

No problem there, right? The system planners had intelligently built three independent gas plants, any one of which could (at a pinch) supply the whole state. They had also decided that it would be cheaper and easier to build all three independent gas plants side-by-side on the same block of land.

Result: when #1 Plant blew up, it took out #2 Plant and #3 Plant as well, and the entire state ground to a halt for three weeks. No heating, no hot water, no cooking, and in many cases no job to go to even if you could cook breakfast and get clean enough for it.

(And yep, I can't possibly lock myself out of the house. I have two spare keys. 100% safe. Look - there they are - right here on my keyring.)

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NBN is essential, says Essential poll, but not Turnbull's NBN

Tannin

Yes. More to the point, the question is misleading about the difference between the two schemes. It says the all-fibre scheme:

* Would have taken longer (correct)

* Been faster (technically correct but rather misleading insofar as the hybrid scheme is amply fast for most users and will remain so for quite a few years. In practical reality, speed is and will be almost identical for 95%+ of users until the copper components need replacement in around 10 years, give or take.)

* Cost more. (False. The hybrid scheme is only slightluy cheaper up front, and that only because it leaves most of the work undone, or skimps on it by using outdated technology. But the overall cost of the hybrid scheme is far higher as most of it will have to be done again in a decade or so. The TOTAL cost of the hybrid scheme will be in the order of 50% to 100% more than the fibre scheme.)

* Last much longer. (Obviously true but the question mysteriously failed to mention it!)

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User couldn't open documents or turn on PC, still asked for reference as IT expert

Tannin

Re: The computer Tao

Yep. I have that gift. Computers like me. Back when I used to have a bigger place with hot and cold running staff, the lads in the workshop used to troubleshoot intermittent hardware problems they could not duplicate by sending me outside to stand on the footpath with a cuppa because they swore black and blue that the bloody things wouldn't go wrong if I was in the building. True story! I never used to mind that, except when it was cold and raining.

But my little gift only works with computers. Don't ask me about bloody lawnmowers. :(

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Tannin

Re: Plugs....

Just so. But that straight-through / null modem / gender changer mess had serious consequences. Equipped with a gender bender, any slightly intelligent user who didn't know better could figure out all by himself that all he needed to do to get the parallel cable to fit into the serial port correctly was connect the gender changer. Worked first time every time. (Assuming that by "worked" we mean "let the smoke out", of course.)

And then there were those DB-9 monitor connectors (back before 15-pin VGA became universal). They were fine, nothing else would fit in them .... until modern 9-pin serial ports started replacing the old DB-25 style and instead of blowing up $25 serial ports by plugging them into $200 parallel printers, we could blow up $500 monotors by plugging them into serial ports.(Or was it the ports that blew up. Can't remember now.)

Anyway, I used to teach people that the only thing you needed to know about using gender changers is don't.

Which brings me to the ridiculous visual similarity of HDMI ports on laptops and USB ones. Right next to each other too, and every damn thing is (a) out of sight under the stupid curve in the laptop case edge, and (b) black on black. Haven't managed to blow anything up that way yet, but there is always hope.

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US govt pleads: What's it gonna take to get you people using IPv6?

Tannin

If you really are going to do it again, that's fine. Just one thing: you have to do it right. You have no excuses.

IPv6: networking's answer to Windows Vista and XHTML. Older than both, as it happens. Sadly, while Vista and XHTML have both failed and been long forgotten, IPv6 has failed and yet we seem to be stuck with it forever.

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The law is an ass: Mooning banned at arse end of the world

Tannin

Browneye

Australiand don't "moon". Ever. Australians "flash a browneye".

Only Americans moon. (Possiily citizens of other places too; I wouldn't know about that.) Australians flash a browneye. Get it right.

(Yes, yes, the Act quaintly bowderises the normal term and substitutes a foreign term, presumably in the hope that eaisily-shocked Victiorians won't know what it means if it's written in the American dialect instead of the native tongue. This reminds me of the Victorian (era not state) practice of expressing any passage which was even slightly racy in Latin. So ... er ... what is the Latin for "flashing a browneye?" For some reason tmy classical education seemed to omit that useful term.)

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Victoria Police warn of malware-laden USB sticks in letterboxes

Tannin

Re: The urge to execute arbitrary code is growing stronger...

Just so. Compare with the 1980s direct equivalent of a USB stick, the floppy disc. With a floppy, the interface between drive and system was simple, and being so simple, was dead easy to secure and trust.

In this instance, you simply typed "format a:" before attempting to read the drive. 100% success rate.

If you wanted to write-protect a disc, there was a physical switch. Flip that switch and no electronic tricks could get around it. (Hacking the mechanics of the disc drive would work, but that is a physical attack.)

Simple is good.

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US Marine Corps to fly F-35s from HMS Queen Lizzie as UK won't have enough jets

Tannin

Re: it's Pearl Harbor

"You want a crackerjack WWII naval film, watch Tora! Tora! Tora!. Midway wasn't half bad, either."

Or just watch one of them. It's the same footage.

(Yes, really. Making the second one - from memory it was Midway - they saved some money by re-using footage from the earlier one, and not just outtakes. Apparently there are good slabs of film just grafted straight in, presumably because they thought no-one would notice.)

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You're guilty but broke, judge tells Wash.io – the 'Uber of laundry'

Tannin

"it deluded itself into believing that excited press coverage was as good as profit margin"

Gosh! Now where have I seen that done before? Don't tell me, jet me guess.

Err .. was it 8921 other brainless startups?

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Australia's mobile black spot program was a partisan money hole

Tannin

Balls to the partisan notion

There is no evidence presented here that the program was in any way partisan. While there are, of course, isolated urban blackspots, the vast majority of area without coverage is, of course, in rural districts. Off the top of my head I can't think of any genuine rural electorate which not a rusted-on conservative stronghold.Is there even one rural seat held by Labor or the Greens? I don't think so. Given that, you would expect something like 90 or 95% of the funding to go to government-held seats, which is exactly what happened. On this evidence, there is nothing to see here, move along please.

* Note 1: I'm not saying it wasn't partisan. Indeed, if it was fair it might just have qualified as the first and only program this notoriously unfair, mean-spirited, revenge-obsessed and very partisan government has ever run. (Well, possibly the second such. Doubtless there is at least one other. Somewhere. I can't actually think of one, but I admit the possibility.) I'm simply making the point that no evidence has been presented here to show that the black spot program was in any way partisan.

Note 2: We should, however, consider the various rural independents. From memory, during the period under consideration there were two: Bob Katter in Queensand and Cathi McGowan in Victoria. You would expect that their electorates would be, on technical grounds, just as deserving of network expansion as the various surrounding (mostly) National-held electorates. Did those two get their fair share? Or were they punished for not voting Coalition? (As, in fact, outed Liberal Sophie Mirabella claimed had happened with health spending in Benalla because she wasn't there to fill the pork barrel. Not that you'd want to take anything Mirabela says as truth, of course.)

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Paper mountain, hidden Brexit: How'd you say immigration control would work?

Tannin

Re: Simple is best

This is your plan to rejuvenate the tourism industry then.

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Microsoft can't tell North from South on Bing Maps

Tannin

"Actually, Australia is moving at about 7cm a year, which is about double the rate of fingernail growth."

Actually, he said fingernails. Plural. So, taking the conservatibe view that the plural indicates two rather than some larger number, 7cm a year woud be about right.

(Just stand there for a year with your arms outstretched and your fingers pointing in opposite directions.)

(Try not to scratch.)

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Google AdSense abused to distribute Android spyware

Tannin

Well, that's the problem with Android, isn't it. No hosts file, at least not in the sense of something that you, the owner of the device, is able to control. It's seriously bad design. (Deliberately so, one presumes.)

(Disclosure: no axe to grind here, I understand that Apple kit is as bad or worse in this regard.)

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Turnbull's Transformers intend to test single sign-on to Gov.au on the offshore, public cloud

Tannin

Sense of proportion here please

Steady on there chaps. What's actually wrong with storing things in some murky overseas system beyond the reach of Australian law that most voters have never heard of anyway? After all, Mal happily trusts all those millions to a repository somewhere in the Cayman Islands so he should know. What could possibly go wrong?

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Adblock Plus blocks Facebook's ad-blocker buster: It's a block party!

Tannin

"Bucky 2 - "You have to have morals to claim the moral high ground".

^ What is there left to say after this? Nailed the whole issue in one short sentence.

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Mozilla 404s '404 Not Found' pages: Firefox fills in blanks with archive.org copies

Tannin

People aren't stupid

People aren't stupid, you know. They read the article, and the article is at pains to say that Firefox will redirect 404s to the archive. It does not, repeat does not, bother to make it clear that (according to various grumpy comments above which I have no reason to disbelieve) this isn't a redirect at all but a glorified error page that offers to serve the archive page instead. (A very different - and much more sensible - thing.)

Subject to who you are and how plausible your message is, people tend to believe things you tell them. When you are a writer for the Register, we tend to think you probably know your stuff and take it at face value. (Stand aside one loopy science malreporter, of course.) When what you write seems plausible (e.g., when you suggest that Mozilla management have come up with an ill-considered "improvement" of dubious value - just to pick an example completely at random), people tend to believe it.

In short, don't bloody criticise people for posting perfectly sensible responses to the (you would have thought) trustworthy news they read. Instead, criticise the highly misleading, headline-chasing article they are responding to.

Thankyou, Mr Grumpy and your friends, for pointing out that Mozilla haven't been as stupid (this time) as the article makes them out to be. (Assuming you have your facts right, of course, which I am happy to do.) No thanks for the manner in which you did so.

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Australia gets one-quarter of a minister for national infosec

Tannin

Oengus - "If I remember rightly ANZAC was 25 April 1915. What does our prime minister need assistance with for something that was over a year ago?"

What do you mean more than a year ago? This is a government stuck in the 1950s after all. There is plenty of time before the 21st Century starts.

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Windows 10 a failure by Microsoft's own metric – it won't hit one billion devices by mid-2018

Tannin

Re: The penguin struggles to reach 4% market share with a free product

I don't think it's just marketing that keeps 'nix off the desktop and Wiindows on it.I think people ignore a whole list of showstopper can't-run-X-on-'nix issues. That list of showstoppers includes things like Photoshop and Lightroom, popular accounting packages, and so on. It used to include a zillion games and the Microsoft Office package, but the games situation has improved a lot, and Microsoft's Office is gradually becoming a bit irrelevant because the alternatives are often just as good if not better. Nevertheless, until we have key applications like Photoshop on Linux, Windows is fairly safe.

Does Microsoft know this? Is there any concerted push by MS to ensure (for example) that Adobe doesn't port its applications to Nix?

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Tannin

Re: The sad thing is that Windows 10 is great and (etc)

It is quite absurd to walk around pretending that Win 10 is faster than 8.x. 8.x had a factory user inferface even worse than 10's, of course, but Classic Shell fixes that and it installs in less time than it takes Cortana (or whatever it is that they call that crud on the start bar) to start up and do anything.

But to be fair, taken as a whole, 10 is better.

Better than Vista, anyway.

Well, mostly.

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Tannin

increasing customer delight

The fact that this turkey can talk about "increasing customer delight with Windows" says it all, really. Sure, it's not uncommon for a sales droid to be a litte out of touch with reality, but anyone who says that about the way people interact with Windows is, frankly, hopelessly confused.

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Ad blockers responsible for rise in upfront TV ad sales, claims report

Tannin

Re: Subliminal ads

"Who remembers when subliminal ads were banned?"

Don't remember it at all. Escaped my consciousness. Must have been a subliminal ban.

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Philando Castile death-by-cop vid mysteriously vanishes from Facebook

Tannin

How many Americans have been killed by terrorists this year?

Roj Blake asked "How many Americans have been killed by terrorists this year? Less than 50 is my guess."

That depends on what you mean by "terrorists". If you mean armed gangs who perform mindless acts of random murder with no discernable purpose other than to kill some people and make the other ones scared and traumatised (which seems like a pretty fair working definition of terrorism to me), then the answer is 506 and counting.

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400 million Foxit users need to catch up with patched-up reader

Tannin

PDFExchange for me. Small, fast, flexible, no junkware. Probably misses out on 1017 "must have" features I have never heard of and don't want.

I junked Foxit years ago. For a one-time small, good PDF reader, Foxit has done a wonderful job of turning itself into a great, bloated pile of (unpleasant substance).

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Liberal Party of Australia: why are you paying so much for ancient software?

Tannin

Gosh darn it

Gosh darn it, why doesn't anybody recognise the outstanding value of this package? It has five key advantages:

Fully supported

Reliable

Affordable

Useful to the client base

Developed for purpose

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'Leave EU means...' WHAT?! Britons ask Google after results declared

Tannin

Re: Seriously...

"Actually, half the country has a below-MEDIAN IQ. #math"

Actually, IQ has a symmetrical normal distribution with a mean of 100 and a standard deviaton of 15. Always. In every population. because that's how it is defined. As with all such distributions, the median is equal to the mean. (And to the mode, for that matter.)

# psychology

PS: learn how to spell "maths".

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Shareholders rubber-stamp Ingram Micro $6bn sale to Chinese firm

Tannin

They will certainly be better at running the Giant Wholesale Schmozzlemeisters than whoever the current mob is. Well, they couldn't really be a lot worse.

Ingram Micro: for when you want a verdor that does wholesaling nearly as well as Adobe does security.

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Google is the EU Remain campaign's secret weapon

Tannin

Nevere mind the length, feel the width

@Nick Kew "Google can see if you return to its results page and try another link after 30 secs" and uses this to help adjust its rankings - sites people hand around longer on get upranked..

Now that raises an interesting point. (Slightly off-topic, but this is The Register after all.) Let's assume that Google is quite good at measuring the length of your visits that way (which shouldn't be too difficult). Well, it should work well for people who habitually use only a single browser window and seldom make use of tabs.

But what about those among us who habitually open most things in new tabs? There are quite a few of us (particularly amongst more technically inclined communites, such as this one) who will typically search on a phrase and then open as many links in background tabs as seems sensible before flipping over to read them or (if they don't have what you want) discard them.

Google has no way to tell how long we spend on those pages.

Well, it has lots and lots of ways, starting with their damn analytics webspam. I suppose the question is (a) how extensive and smart is their linking of these different information sources? and (b) should I go out and buy a tin foil hat before asking (a)?

1
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Surface Book nightmare: Microsoft won't fix 'Sleep of Death' bug

Tannin

Re: Sue them

Any consumer protection law covers this.

(If you have something called "consumer protection law" in your jurisdiction and it doesn't even cover a basic "goods faulty, refund or replacement required" situation like this one, then it isn't a consumer protection law at all.)

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Tannin

Back to the future indeed! This is exactly how sleep mode worked on Windows 95 and 98.

Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose.

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Telstra's confession to DNS-messin' explains broadband borkage

Tannin

Why were Telstra modems and routers resetting themselves at all? Surely this is not something that a real router (as opposed to those strange, firmware-hacked things Telstra uses) should be doing without a human's say-so?

Edit: I've been experiencing very strange intermittent DNS problems this last week or two on my (brand new) Telstra NBN connection. Possibly this is connected. (Not a new connection as such, it's just been switched to Telstra from Internode. When it actually works, by the way, it's a lot faster. iiNet's backhaul arrangements have never recovered from their ill-advised free Netfix blunder. Slow as toffee every evening peak. Telstra is vastly faster. But it has DNS problems. Should I muck about looking for a workaround? Or just assume that they will figure it out eventually and do nothing? Doing nothing is always tempting.)

1
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Is uBeam the new Theranos?

Tannin

Re: Look at the non-functional requirements: efficiency and safety

Oh dear. It "shows power transfer" measured in volts. Nuff said.

I am, by the way, 87 kilograms tall.

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Kill Flash now? Chrome may be about to do just that

Tannin
Flame

Off-topic (almost)

One nice thing about having Flash content is that you can tell your browser not to run it. This avoids all those shouty, distracting things. Once in a while, when you actually do want to see something animated, you can click to run.

Is there a simple, practical way to turn off HTML5 animation or make it click to run the way you do with Flash?

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