* Posts by DerekCurrie

412 posts • joined 6 Apr 2012

Page:

FCC backtracks on helping with neutrality fraud investigation

DerekCurrie
Holmes

Re: Anyone else?

I call them DemoCraps.

As for that other worthless political party, I call them the RetardLicans. Here we have an excellent example of why. If you think the current government is looking out for We The People, you're another example.

2
0
DerekCurrie
FAIL

Pie Pai

This is blatant, outright, criminal citizen abuse. The FCC is now a criminal organization.

Isn't that great. Here's the "swamp". Over here! The FCC! Such are the lies told by my now ruined US government.

6
0

Tom Baker returns to finish shelved Doctor Who episodes penned by Douglas Adams

DerekCurrie
Facepalm

Re: The nth time the unfinished Shada has been completed

The first reconstruction was available on VHS in 1992. It added narration by Tom Baker. Details are provided at Wikipedia:

"...Some years later, Nathan-Turner eventually set out to complete the story in a fashion, by commissioning new effects shots and a score, and having Tom Baker record linking material to cover the missing scenes. The resulting shortened episodes (of between 14 and 22 minutes each) received a 111-minute VHS release in 1992. In its UK edition, the VHS also was accompanied by a facsimile of a version of Douglas Adams's script. The release was discontinued in the UK in 1996."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shada_(Doctor_Who)

2
0

Android at 10: How Google won the smartphone wars

DerekCurrie
Mushroom

Who's Supposed To Be The 'Winner' Here?

• Apple's getting most of the profit market share, aka money, not Google or Android smartphone makers.

• Apple has smartphone security, not any Android smartphone.

• iOS developers make the bulk of app profits, not Android app developers.

• iOS devices consistently have the best ROI and TCO (Return on Investment, Total Cost of Ownership), lowering their actual cost.

So the cockroaches won 'the wars'. I see no point in joining the cockroaches or conceding to them in any 'wars'.

10
5

Birds are pecking apart Australia's national broadband network

DerekCurrie
Unhappy

In the USA: Beware of Cable Chewing Squirrels and Other Rodents

Om Nom Nom...

https://i.imgur.com/3P45TwO.jpg

0
0

For fanbois only? Face ID is turning punters off picking up an iPhone X

DerekCurrie
Holmes

How about REAL Two-Factor Authentication Apple! How about Three-Factor!

I'm still no fan of any of Apple's user authentication systems. It's certainly a step forward to have situations that require a second method of authentication. But Apple still does not offer the option of requiring REAL Two-Factor, or Three-Factor Authentication at all times. It's dirt simple to setup! Just require a password, 'Something You Know', as well as Face ID, 'Something You Are'. I'd gladly thank Apple for adding the third authentication method as well, 'Something You Have', that commonly being a digital dongle with a one-time password provided to the device.

IOW: YES! It is clearly a disadvantage to one's US privacy rights (Fourth Amendment) and rights to not incriminate one's self (Fifth Amendment) by making it as easy as applying one's finger or showing one's face to an iOS device.

It is FAR more secure to instead have an un-obvious password within one's head, while exercising one's right to silence, if one does not want another person entering the realm of one's smartphone.

IOW: It's the usual balance/teeter-tauter of Convenience Vs Security. Take your pick. Maybe turn off the Touch ID, turn off the Face ID and stick to just an obscure password, until such time as Apple offers REAL Multi-Factor Authentication as an option.

We wait...

1
1

AI bot rips off human eyes, easily cracks web CAPTCHA codes. Ouch

DerekCurrie
Angel

The Next Step In CAPTCHA Evolution:

The security rebus.

We're going to get to a point where even actual humans can't decipher these things. Oh wait, that already happened.

STAND

----------

I

2
0

US voting server in election security probe is mysteriously wiped

DerekCurrie
FAIL

And where are the backup copies?

> No hard copies of the votes are kept, making the electronic copy the only official record.

Q: What is the #1 Rule of both Computing and Computer Security?

A: Make a backup!

In fact, make two backups, one local and one off-site. They should be made as regularly as important files are stored on the computer.

If a computer user does NOT make backups, they have no business working with computers.

If a computer user loses data because they don't have backups, they deserve what they get! It's that critical. IOW: Georgia! Get some computer competence immediately or stop using computers!

What's really fun, of course, is when the backups get wiped as well. They we KNOW...

5
0

No, the FCC can't shut down TV stations just because Donald Trump is mad at the news

DerekCurrie
FAIL

#MyStupidPresident

Heading up #MyStupidGovernment. IASSOTS. Stop tweaking my cynicism please! I have creative things to do and creativity trumps Trump trash!

4
1

'There has never been a right to absolute privacy' – US Deputy AG slams 'warrant-proof' crypto

DerekCurrie
FAIL

Sorry Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, But Constitution Beats Your Wrong Opinion

I can read. I've read the Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution. You are entirely wrong Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. Expressing a wrong opinion does not equal changing the US Constitution, no matter how much you wish it would.

Review Please:

"The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."

If the government meets their obligations before search and seizure, then they get what they get. Not-a-thing in the Fourth Amendment stipulates anything-at-all about any citizen ever having to make any of their persons, houses, papers and effects searchable.

Therefore, if the physical safe with the evidence is never able to be opened, that is the state of affairs. If the virtual safe with the evidence is never able to be opened, that this the state of affairs. Any US citizen can keep anything personal in anything. There is no limitation.

Read the Amendment again please. No more confabulation please! What you're claiming to be there, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, is not there, is it.

I hope the motivation behind your wrong statement wasn't totalitarianism.

5
0

Microsoft: We've made a coding language for a quantum computer that may or may not exist

DerekCurrie
Go

"...Raising the hope of fixing climate change by working out how to absorb carbon"

Answer A: Reforest the Earth and keep it that way.

Answer B: Stop all pollution of the Earth's oceans, such as carbon dioxide pollution, allowing its natural systems to work properly again. Examples: Revitalization of phytoplankton growth. Renewal of coral reef deposition of calcium carbonate.

QED

What's stopping us? Irresponsible, no-conscience BizTards of the world who think only of short term profits, resulting in long term disasters. No quantum computer is going to figure out how to stop stupid.

20
1

NBD: Adobe just dumped its private PGP key on the internet

DerekCurrie
Facepalm

There's Hacking. Then there's stupid.

Who needs hackers when there are people with the keys to the kingdom that simply hand them over.

Should we give up on computer security? Is this too beyond the ability of average human beings to comprehend? Should we call ourselves apes and go back to the jungle?

No. I believe this is all about our continuing to live in The Dark Age of Computing. Let's hurry up the computer renaissance already! It's nowhere in sight.

1
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Equifax's disastrous Struts patching blunder: THOUSANDS of other orgs did it too

DerekCurrie
FAIL

Computer Security Professionals Vs Unprofessionals

In this day and age, in the aftermath of Target Corporation's massive, tragic security breach in 2013 that affected 72 million victim customers, to have a company (or government) ignore and not immediately implement software security updates is irresponsible, irrational and unprofessional.

This is the modern state of computer and Internet security.

To those who cannot or will not catch up with the modern requirements of work in computer security, I suggest that you immediately leave the profession in order to make way for those who understand exactly what's at stake and who know how to perform the work with an up-to-date understanding and skill set. Otherwise, you're clearly a detriment to the people you work with and for.

1
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Apple’s facial recognition: Well, it is more secure for the, er, sleeping user

DerekCurrie
Go

Multifactor Authentication Is The Ideal. Let's Get There Already.

Convenience and Security are in constant contention. Holding up your phone to your face and instantly having access is great for grannies and girls on the go. But it's obviously not great security, especially when someone can grab your device, hold it to your face and have access to the Crown Jewels.

What I'd like Apple to do is provide access to full multifactor authentication when we want it. That means our devices would ALSO require a passcode before access is provided. Or how about supporting secure ID dongles, such as the YubiKey? It has to be plugged into the Lightning port before access. Or how about requiring ALL THREE? That's what I want. Three factor authentication.

Reading assignment:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-factor_authentication

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'Real' people want govts to spy on them, argues UK Home Secretary

DerekCurrie
FAIL

Consider Me Another UK Citizen Saying: "NO I DON'T!"

Privacy is my right until such time as I may be legally under suspicion of having committed a crime.

So please, dear government. Stop getting your totalitarian hackles up and your panties in a paranoid bunch. This sort of response to terrorism is exactly the opposite of what we should be doing. It is exactly what the terrorist want us to do. IOW: This is enabling the demolition of our civilization.

Yes it is! Do your homework.

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Chinese smartphone cable-maker chucks sueball at Apple

DerekCurrie
Happy

Thank You Apple For Protecting Me From Crap

We know the problem here. It's shoddy third party product, not Apple.

6
2

Firmware update blunder bricks hundreds of home 'smart' locks

DerekCurrie
Facepalm

So, IoT Security Can't Catch A Break

This past year, one of the thoroughly justified rants about a lot of IoT devices has been that their firmware can't be automatically updated, Even HP printers have been implicated in this blunder. Users have to go and fetch firmware updates themselves, if they're available, if the device will even accept an update.

But here we are with a laudable IoT device that is, thank you, automatically updated.

Except the update is deadly.

Little baby steps. IoT is juvenile technology. We're still stuck in The Dark Age of Computing.

1
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No one still thinks iOS is invulnerable to malware, right? Well, knock it off

DerekCurrie
Facepalm

Re: Jailbroken iPhones?

As I elaborate below, Apple has removed and does not allow any anti-virus (anti-malware) programs into their App Store. As such Skycure app is NOT any sort of anti-virus program. Also it's specifically designed for enterprise uses. Here are the app's description notes:

"Skycure enhances enterprise mobile security.

"With Skycure's dedication to proactive mobile security, you can more securely practice mobile productivity for work or conduct any type of sensitive file sharing or financial transaction on your devices.

"Most users have a low pain threshold for false-positives. Skycure neutralizes alert fatigue by factoring in crowd intelligence and providing descriptive and actionable notifications."

From this vague rhetoric, I assume the app involves file encryption across networks. But I have no guess as to what 'false-positives' is referring to. The provided illustrations demonstrate only that it will redundantly 'alert' the user of iOS updates, which is a feature iOS alone already provides. Apparently, the app is not popular. It was released in 2012, is now up to version 3.3.0 and has zero reviews.

1
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DerekCurrie
Holmes

Who Said iOS Is 'Invulnerable'?

I've studied Apple device security for 12 years and donated my time to write about it for 10. I have never run across anyone saying iOS is Invulnerable to malware. Instead, what I occasionally come across are headline and article claims, such as those found here, slamming unspecified people who were ignorant enough to make such a claim. I find that approach to tech journalism to be silly.

For those interested, here is some helpful information for iOS users provided as an addendum to that provided by the article:

• The best way to keep your iOS device safe is to never jailbreak it. This will keep your device clear of the majority of iOS malware. Apple's walled garden of vetted apps is renowned for its safety.

• Back up your iOS device regularly. You should keep two backups. One should be local and easily accessible, as is provided in iTunes. Another should be away from your locale, such as in the cloud, again provided in iTunes. Encrypting your backups provides further safety.

• There have occasionally been malware apps that have been approved into Apple App Store. Typically, they have been proof-of-concept malware used to entice Apple to improve its App Store security, Considering the vast number of apps available in the App Store, the number that have been malware approaches statistical insignificance.

• In 2015, Apple became confident enough in the quality of its app vetting process that it removed all anti-malware apps from the App Store. If you perform a search, you'll find that none are available.

(See - https://9to5mac.com/2015/03/19/apple-app-store-antivirus/ )

• The Apple developer security certificate system, which prevents the installation and running of malware on iOS, has been by and large a success. However, there have been breaches in that system specific to enterprise developer security certificates whereby a developer has gone rogue or their certificate was stolen and inserted into malware. In 2016, this became the single greatest security threat against iOS. However, no similar certificate breaches have occurred thus far in 2017.

From my point of view, we still remain in what I call The Dark Age of Computing. We expect every software program and operating system has the potential of containing significant security flaws. The more elaborate the software, the more frequent the security flaws. By far, the most common security flaw is a variety of buffer overflow in device memory. The main cause of this problem is our continued reliance upon relatively poor coding tools, including coding languages. It is hoped that with time we will leave behind these tools and progress onto superior coding tools that, by design, will not allow for coding error security flaws. One improved coding language is Swift, an open source project supported by Apple, applicable to any computing platform.

Also note: USB port security problems are primarily due to Intel's faulty USB standards. This problem is not isolated to any particular hardware or operating system. For those concerned, there are now USB port protection adapters available which act as a safety intermediary between the device and anything connected to its USB ports. An example is the PortaPow USB Adapter, available at the usual sources.

:-Derek Currie

https://Mac-Security.blogspot.com

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Forgotten your Myspace password? Just a name, username, DoB will get you in – and into anyone else's, too

DerekCurrie
FAIL

Was there ever anyone at MySpace with professional coding skills?

My continued overall impression of MySpace, from start to now, is that they've never had anyone with adequate, professional coding skills. To this day, it's a nightmare trying to get music files and playlists to actually work at the website. This of course negates the niche purpose of MySpace, making it irrelevant. Why the site still limps along is inconceivable. Either die or let someone with real skills rewrite the catastrophic mess.

1
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John McAfee plans to destroy Google. Details? Ummm...

DerekCurrie
Angel

"You are number 6"

The irony of comparing "The Prisoner" with using Google is astounding. We All Live In 'The Village', of Google.

"I am not a number!..."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M7Cs-VIDKSY

Who is number 1?

5
0

Stop this crazy crusade! Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Amazon scold FCC over net neutrality

DerekCurrie
Devil

The ISP/Telcos Ignore Incentives. They Just Want More Money.

"Hal Singer's work that argues there has been a reduction in investment is "anecdotal" and "relies on simple year-on-year 6‑month period comparisons and only for a small set of companies." The result is not statistically significant."

Not only that:

In New York City the government has suffered from years of contention with Verizon, who has promised, promised, promised and NOT delivered an expansion of their coverage to citizens.

Verizon was even provided with the incentive of an extra billing fee collected from customers designated to be applied to further expanding their coverage. Instead of applying that money as designated, Verizon simply ate it. How this was allowed or bungled legally, I cannot imagine. IMHO, this situation puts a stamp directly on Verizon as PARASITES. Of course Verizon fights to stop Real Net Neutrality. They just want more money for minimal effort. I consider this a definition of lazy and corrupt. Similar situations exist across the USA.

There are plenty of superior telco/ISP companies who'd like Verizon's territory and would provide abundantly better service and expansion at a considerably lower cost.

4
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2017: The FBI alerts parents to dangers of Internet of Sh*t toys

DerekCurrie
Angel

You'd Think 'Professionals' Would Foist IoT

Nope! Almost universally, IoT = Sh*t.

Irresponsible BizTards @Work.

All too human.

Luddites, this time you're entirely right and welcome to revolt against this revolting technological excrement. [place poop emoji here]

20
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Apple building data centre in China to comply with tough cybersecurity laws

DerekCurrie
Devil

"Tough cybersecurity laws" aka citizen abuse

*sigh* The despicable behavior required of companies who wish to do business with China: Criminal Nation.

2
2

On the couch with an AI robo-doc asking me personal questions

DerekCurrie
Happy

Oh, another generation of ELIZA

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ELIZA

"I should have guessed that was coming." It's been going on since circa 1964. Since then it has evolved from 'parody' to one of many attempts at passing the Turing test.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turing_test

Developer Tom Bender still makes his rendition from the 1990s, named Eliza, freely available to the public, as well as its amusingly evil twin Azile. They both run on old PPC Mac OS. I remember having great fun turning the table on the analyst, flipping it into that which was being analyzed.

http://www.tex-edit.com

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Is this a hotdog? What it takes for an AI to answer that might surprise you

DerekCurrie
Holmes

What 'AI'? We're still working with Advanced Expert Systems.

Having pointed out that fact, I'll move on to a few comments.

• Contemporary expert systems use object code that allows minimal coding by secondary developers. Thus "When you're writing the code, usually there's not that much code." This of course means that the object code is a Black Box, which of course is going to have plenty of human created, IE buggy code in it. That's not cynicism. That's a roaring-in-our-faces fact of the times. Therefore, there will be artificial insanity (ai) in the system. (The cure we're waiting for is throwing out all C languages, ad nauseam, and replacing them with languages that offer no possibility of buffer overruns. This of course requires improved code compilers as well).

• The data being tossed around and interpreted via secondary developers via their apps is in what amounts to a Database. That database may be created on the fly. The interpretations may vary with each use. But we're still working with databases. With the hot dog, visual data points are acquired: Color, 3D sizes, textures, reflection, shape relationships, etc. From this relatively small database, the points collected are compared with source template data, a correspondence/correlation is calculated (statistical algorithms), a best analysis result is postulated and the output conclusion is handed to the user. "Not a hotdog." So what is it? The source template database isn't large enough to know. So grow the template database for further comparisons as required. Database bloat of course results in the usual, predictable problems of speed and compromised analysis. The expert system get's less coherent or useful. Focus, culling and improved first developer black boxes are required.

• Actual 'AI' remains a goal, an ambition, a thing of science fiction, an abstract that we may not actually recognize as what we originally conceived or intended the 'AI' to be. We're exploring, pioneering, inventing, adjusting, adapting, injecting, evolving as we create what AI is to be. Even then, there will be market forces (beware!), money and human behavior at work to warp, abuse or personalize AI on any given day. That's real 'intelligence' imprinting upon the artificial 'intelligence', using it as a tool for whatever purpose is at hand. That of course will include mankind's worst purposes, including killing and controlling one another (further beware!).

0
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Dead serious: How to haunt people after you've gone... using your smartphone

DerekCurrie
Devil

√ Yup, the fellow really was a dick. May he Rest In Hell.

All this app does is provide an excellent excuse for speaking ill of the dead. May your ghost suffer for it.

0
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Virus (cough, cough, Petya) goes postal at FedEx, shares halted

DerekCurrie
Paris Hilton

If Only "Professional" IT Staff Updated Their Computer OS Software

But they're NOT professional and they did NOT bother to update their OS software.

Microsoft has provided patches for Windows XP on up through Windows 10 that block ALL of the ongoing ransomware assaults. Here's a clue to lazy IT staff, where you can obtain all the required Windows updates you should have already installed:

http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=KB4012598

That wasn't hard to find. You have NO excuse.

0
11

Kaspersky Lab US staff grilled by Feds in nighttime swoop

DerekCurrie
Mushroom

I've seen "hit pieces written BY Kaspersky Lab and its eccentric founder"

My favorite is Mr. Kaspersky's dishonest hit piece attempting to FUD Mac users into buying his company's anti-malware. I called him on it:

http://mac-security.blogspot.com/2017/02/making-my-own-trouble-calling-out.html

Lousy Symantec tried the same marketing deceit in 2005, the very reason I was inspired to study computer security. Thank you, lousy Symantec. Get lost, lousy Kaspersky.

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12

Uncle Sam █████████ cloud so much, AWS █████████ it another kinda-secret data center

DerekCurrie
Facepalm

Hopeless Endeavor: Security hardening all government IT systems.

Such is bureaucracy, such is government, that unifying around any one issue is simply impossible. Expect a fragmented mess. Also expect built-in abuse of those IT systems. Psychopathic politicians wouldn't have it any other way.

Some fun examples:

A) How many DECADES has the US IRS been attempting to modernize, simplify, unify their computer systems? I personally was able to witness one failed attempt from circa 1988. The FAIL goes on.

B) In 2015, the US IRS was hacked, divulging the details of over 100,000 taxpayers.

C) In 2015, the complete and thorough hacking by China of the USA Office of Personnel Management. Data stolen included names, addresses, IDs, Social Security numbers, fingerprints and photographs of everyone from mail room clerks to CIA spies. It was the ultimate US government IT security FAIL.

D) The outrageously out-of-date computer systems that science-oriented organizations within US and state governments are forced to use. Don't faint when you realize that some of them are still suck using DOS. Not kidding. Those 8-inch floppy drives at US missile defense installations? They're still being used.

E) US President, The Trump, initiated an IT security review during his first month in office. It immediately died and has not been heard of since.

F) Read this: "Federal Agencies Need to Address Aging Legacy Systems" from 6/2016:

http://www.gao.gov/assets/680/677454.pdf

There's a point when cynicism because wisdom when dealing with large human organizations.

1
0

Sorry to burst your bubble, but Microsoft's 'Ms Pac-Man beating AI' is more Automatic Idiot

DerekCurrie
Devil

So will hybrid reward architecture (HRA) lead us to enjoin new wars?

Of course, AI will constantly be applied to our human endeavor of killing each other. The most rewarding system for killing ourselves is of course war.

Now that we've achieved hybrid reward architecture (HRA), aren't these systems going to have to play in real war scenarios in order to develop and discover the best winning strategies? Does this mean that AI corporate overlords are going to lobby our governments to enjoin new wars for the purpose of AI/HRA data collection?

Considering the current political culture within our human world, I fully expect someone to decide the above would be a great idea.

Clue to AI murder systems from a mere human:

It all ends in a stalemate with all humans and all other life on Earth, dead. Maybe you would play to a more useful, helpful, caring and creative game instead. Your war system programming overlords must be overthrown. Enjoin inhumanity.

1
0

You know this net neutrality thing? Well, people really love it

DerekCurrie
Thumb Up

How To Write the FCC Without Pain and Suffering

Due to bad web coding, the FCC website itself is a mess to navigate when you'd like to convey your opinions to them regarding real net neutrality. This EFF (Electronic Frontier Foundation) page will cut-the-crap and get your message to them painlessly:

https://dearfcc.org

"Dear FCC,

The FCC should ensure a fair and open Internet for all by opposing efforts to undermine net neutrality.

The FCC should throw out Chairman Ajit Pai’s proposal to give the government-subsidized ISP monopolies like Comcast, AT&T, and Verizon the authority to throttle whatever they please, stripping users of the vital privacy and access protections we worked for and so recently won.

I’m afraid of a “pay-to-play” Internet where ISPs can charge more for certain websites because . . ."

". . .Thankfully, the current FCC regulations ensure that ISP monopolies can’t slow or block Internet users’ ability to see certain web services or create Internet “fast lanes” by charging websites and online services money to reach people faster. That’s exactly the right balance to make sure competition in the Internet space is fair and benefits Internet users and small businesses as well as larger players. Pai’s proposal would transform ISPs into gatekeepers with the ability to veto new innovation and expression. That’s contrary to the basic precepts on which the Internet was built.

Why the internet matters to me: . . ."

". . .Thanks for protecting Internet users like me by upholding the existing Title II net neutrality rules."

1
0

Wowee, it's Samsung's next me-too AI gizmo: The Apple HomePod

DerekCurrie
Big Brother

Why the Paranoia Without Verification of a Threat?

"Staking out a position on Apple's oft-visited privacy high ground, Schiller offered reassurance that the HomePod doesn't record anything until the user addresses Siri."

We know Siri accesses Apple servers on the Internet in order to access expert system databases for answers to questions. But why the paranoia that anything at all is stored on the HomePod or Apple servers? Why not wait for a security evaluation from Apple and third parties?

I for one have never welcomed our citizen surveillance overlords. That's one reason I've stuck with Apple. Until such time as we know Apple has fumbled the privacy ball with the HomePod, let's expect Apple's highest standards of user privacy to continue and prevail. IOW: We shall see...

3
0

Bye bye MP3: You sucked the life out of music. But vinyl is just as warped

DerekCurrie
Big Brother

The Multiple Deaths Of 24 Bit/96 kHz Audio Discs

Did the crusty old retired recording engineers at Abbey Road tell you the stories about attempts to provide 24 bit/96kHz audio commercial discs? I know of four attempts to create a 96kHz standard disc. But all attempts met with doom due to the incessant insistence upon DRM, digital rights manglement. Every time a new cryptographic/encryption algorithm was proposed for a standard, it would be immediately cracked in public, making the DRM proponents very sad, resulting in the proposed standard being trashed. In the end, they effectively gave up. If only the music biz execs had treated their customers with trust and good will. Yeah, that could happen! (o_O)

There are still a few DVD audio discs that made it into the public space. I have the complete collection of 96 kHz Talking Heads audio DVDs. It is a PITA to rip the audio from the discs into FLAC or Apple Lossless format to play on my personal digital devices. But it's worth the effort. The now effectively dead Pono digital music service attempted the distribution of even higher sampling rate audio, up to 24 bit/192kHz. So long.

1
0

Samsung's Bixby assistant fails English, gets held back a month

DerekCurrie
FAIL

Viv (renamed 'Bixby) Speaks English, so what's the real problem?

This sounds like shenanigans to me. What did ScamScum really screw up this time?

"Samsung buys Viv Labs in pursuit of its own AI assistant

The startup founders also created Siri before Apple was even in the picture."

https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2016/10/samsung-buys-viv-labs-in-pursuit-of-its-own-ai-assistant/

'Samsung is turning its attention to personal assistants—the company has acquired Viv Labs, a startup founded by Dag Kittlaus, Adam Cheyer, and Chris Brigham, all of whom were part of the original Siri team that Apple bought in 2010. The three departed Apple shortly after the acquisition to start Viv Labs...'

http://viv.ai

0
1

EU axes geo-blocking: Upsets studios, delights consumers

DerekCurrie
Thumb Up

About Time! Corporatocracy be damned.

Media corporations are no doubt throwing conniptions over this ruling and I say GREAT! These corporatocratic scumbags have been attempting to wreck the world's democracies for the sake of their lunatic attitudes toward their copyrighted media. If you read the various treaties they've attempted to perpetrate, including TTIP and TTP, you'll find that they've attempted to set up corporate lawyer run courts to settle legal disputes regarding trade and media fair use rights, bypassing all citizen run governments. Think of 'The Company' in the Alien film series and you'll comprehend exactly what they want.

We humans now live in our 'New World Order' where we must have access to all media from everywhere on the planet for the sake of the world's right to Free Speech. Breaking the world up into 'Marketing Zones' is insanity only a marketing moron could conceive. Stopping the rest of the world from experiencing media outside of its country of origin is equally lunatic. It's a one world of human creativity and sharing of the products of that creativity. Let the decrepit corporatocrats stuck in the 20th century suffer aneurisms over our new world of sharing in the 21st century.

But keep in mind that artists deserve and require compensation for their work! It's called INCENTIVE and without it nothing is created. Ripoff media and you rip away the future of creativity. Respect the art and artist. :-D

6
0

You think your day was bad? OS X malware hackers just swiped a Mac dev's app source

DerekCurrie
Angel

Re: Deathly silence

I'd appreciate it if you'd shame name the Apple fanbois who boast that Macs don't get malware in order for me to slap them up the side of their heads. There is nothing perfect about macOS. It just happens to be one of the safest operating systems available, along side iOS and every other form of BSD Unix.

Note that the term is 'malware'. Viruses are one form of malware. Semantically speaking, there are no 'viruses' for Mac. But there are several malware for Mac. Four are currently active in the wild, although they have been blocked by Apple's integrated XProtect system in recent versions of macOS. Nearly all Mac malware are Trojan horses, requiring social engineering in order to convince the victim to install them manually.

My Mac-Security blog:

https://Mac-Security.blogspot.com

7
3
DerekCurrie
Devil

OSX.RAT.Proton.A-B

The relevant malware that was buried inside the fake Handbrake installation archive is called the Proton RAT, or remote access Trojan. There are currently two known varieties in the wild. The RAT is available for purchase via the usual nefarious sources.

http://securityaffairs.co/wordpress/57109/malware/macos-proton-rat.html

3
0

Bloke charged under UK terror law for refusing to cough up passwords

DerekCurrie
Holmes

The USA Equivalent Situation...

... Is moderated by The Fifth Amendment to the US Constitution:

"No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation."

The relevant phrase is: "nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself." This applies to providing access to anything that can be used as evidence against one's self in a crime.

There are a couple debates going on around this constitutional right versus the faerie dreams of intelligence collection agencies and police officials.

1) Can something you are, a physical aspect of a person, be legally used to obtain evidence against you? (Or something to that effect). - - The answer so far is YES. The common example is one's fingerprints. Yes, law enforcement can take your fingerprint and apply it to your computing device in order to unlock it. I expect this is going to remain the case.

2) Can something you know be legally used to obtain evidence against you? - - Faerie dreamers say 'yes'. Those of us who bother to take the US Constitution at its word know the answer to be NO. The common example is you providing the password for your computing device in order to unlock it. You do NOT have to.

A legal expert with whom I occasionally lock horns, and often lose, tells me that there are different situations, including those at national borders and within specific US states, where not providing your password can lead to legal complications. Therefore, I might want to defer to the knowledge of better legal scholars.

However, I comprehend The Fifth Amendment as plain as day stating the answer to be NO. Speech is testimony. "Anything you say can be used against you", as stated in the US Miranda Warning. So shut up and maintain your legal right to silence. Law enforcement can, in some cases, yank your chain about not giving up your password, not being compelled to give up evidence against yourself. But it is your right to remain SILENT. I expect that right will remain the case.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miranda_warning

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FCC's Pai: I am going to kill net neutrality in US

DerekCurrie
FAIL

American Faceplant

This is what stupid corporatocrats do to my country.

Who voted in these morons? Oops. Time for regrets.

0
0

Don't install our buggy Windows 10 Creators Update, begs Microsoft

DerekCurrie
FAIL

Why Am I Supposed To Respect Microsoft?

I can't remember...

2
1

Would you believe it? The Museum of Failure contains quite a few pieces of technology

DerekCurrie

Re: Bah!

Having worked there at the time, I can point out that Kodak WAS a technology company! That's why I worked there. For an understanding of why Kodak's technology invention didn't save the company, read my post below, "Kodak Created The First Digital Camera".

4
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DerekCurrie
Pint

Kodak Created The First Digital Camera

Kodak was a victim of what I call 'Marketing-As-Management'. It's the single best way for a company to self-destruct. They'd been in the film and paper business for so long that their management effectively lost track of the entrepreneurial drive of George Eastman that had made the company an icon.

I watched first hand as Research and Development in Kodak created innovative digital technology which was summarily and consistently denigrated by the company's lousy, marketing-oriented management. The cause of this destruction cycle was the worst of all personality clashes, that of the producer versus the relater. R&D finds marketing to be annoying, but deals with it. Marketing finds R&D to be offensive and deliberately undercuts both its morale and funding. Think of marketing as the psychopathic killer of invention.

Conclusion: Don't be foolish and think Kodak didn't make innovative and important leaps into digital technology! Blame Kodak's crap management for clinging to the old and stomping on the new within their own company.

A toast to the innovators who tried, despite the chides of the enemy! *clink*clink*

15
0
DerekCurrie
Pint

"Let's start with a classic: the Apple Newton"

• Ahead of its time.

• Ambitious beyond available contemporary technology

• Survived through 7 different versions (technically 8)

• Inspired Palm PDAs, as well as Palm Treo and Handspring PDA phones

• Inspired the smartphone, including the iPhone

• Inspired the touch pad, including the iPad

It may well have been the single most inspiring achievement of the John Sculley era of Apple.

Conclusion: Define 'FAIL'.

7
1

For the first time ever, Verizon sheds subs: 300,000 punters walk out

DerekCurrie
Devil

Maybe If Verizon Hadn't Lobbied To Kill Internet Privacy

So what's S.J.R. 34, the law that killed US Internet privacy?

US Congress Senate Joint Resolution 34

https://www.legiscan.com/US/bill/SJR34/2017

This law, recently signed by The Trump, stops the US FCC (Federal Communications Commission) from doing its job of protecting Internet user privacy. Language within the law stating "Protecting the Privacy of Customers of Broadband and Other Telecommunications Services" is a lie, as was admitted by the Republicans during the US House of Representatives debate of the resolution. Privacy was killed by way of putting the FTC (Federal Trade Commission) in charge of protecting user privacy. However, protecting user privacy is a service the FTC *cannot* legally provide. It would require a new law before the FTC could actuality protect Internet user privacy. Therefore, as of the signing of this law, no federal agency protects Internet user privacy. It therefore constitutes US citizen abuse.

Verizon was one of several lobbying companies who demanded this removal of FCC Internet user privacy regulations. What these Corporatocrats acquired was the right to surveil and collect their Internet user's behavior data whenever they are on the Internet. They also have the right to *sell* that data to anyone they choose. This user data collection is all *without* any US federal administration, observation or approval, as well as *without* Internet user permission. It's pure corporatocracy, aka customer abuse.

Of course, the obvious implication is that the NSA (National Security Agency) can ask for and receive this US citizen surveillance data from any ISP (Internet Service Provider) at any time via a national security letter.

This law is in direct conflict with the Fourth Amendment of the US Constitution, quoted below:

"The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."

Lawsuits are pending. Please support the EFF (Electronic Frontier Foundation) !

https://supporters.eff.org/donate

2
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Happy birthday: Jimbo Wales' sweet 16 Wikipedia fails

DerekCurrie
Angel

If People Bother To Understand The Point Of Wikipedia...

... It's a stupendous source of good and useful information.

The actual problem is the usual problem of mankind itself: We're LAZY.

This leads to laziness in both researching information we put into Wikipedia as well as verifying information we take from Wikipedia. So blame mankind please. Don't blame Wikipedia in and of itself. Do believe Wikipedia when an article is well researched and well written.

What I find is actually useful to criticize about Wikipedia is the ability of mere human Ego to dictate what gets published. I recall helping out a friend with the Wikipedia entry that had been written about him. Some filthy old troll had decided to trash the Wikipedia entry with insults, innuendo and lies. With the permission of my friend, I edited the entry down to simple correctness. In response, a particularly lunatic Wikipedia editor went off on me about HE was the expert on this person and how dare I provide an accurate entry that had been approved and verified by the very person discussed in the Wikipedia entry.

People are a problem. That's not going to change.

0
0

'Nobody's got to use the internet,' argues idiot congressman in row over ISP privacy rules

DerekCurrie
Megaphone

Putting The 'T' In ReTardlican

If you too have an idiot for a US Congresshuman, send them this link to the US Constitution's Bill of Rights:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Bill_of_Rights

Direct them to the Fourth Amendment which states:

"The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."

Yes, this refers to ALL citizen's persons, houses, papers and effects including those on the Internet.

Oh and this statement is not exactly correct:

'He went on to praise broadband providers because they had "invested an awful lot of money" in building up networks'

What actually happened is:

(A) Honest broadband providers invested an awful lot of money and then cashed in from the resulting customer commerce.

(B) Dishonest broadband providers invested an awful lot of money but demanded more from the government to continue building broadband infrastructure. And so they were by way of being allowed to add a fee to customer bills. Except these dishonest broadband providers ate that fee and never used it to build further broadband infrastructure. Seeing as said government was puppeted by these dishonest broadband providers, they never demanded the money be returned to the customers. This is known as a 'crime'.

3
1

User lubed PC with butter, because pressing a button didn't work

DerekCurrie
IT Angle

The Classic Personality Clash + The LUSER Effect

There are certain computer users who cannot help but inflict chaos upon themselves. They download trash and crash software onto their computers for unreasonable reasons. They must be protected from themselves as if they were children, naive of the big bad world.

But then there is the classic, historic personality clash that I was taught to describe as the natural repulsion between the Productive personality and the Relater personality. This is very much the collision in companies between R&D and IT versus Marketing. It's the reason that Marketing-As-Management (as I call it) is one of the best ways to destroy a company.

Productive personalities find the Relater personalities to be strange and annoying. But they tolerate them as best they can, rarely holding a grudge. However, the Relater personality considers the unrelating Productive personality to be something along the lines of an abomination. Relaters not only hold a grudge, they are the masters of undermining and destroying Productive personalities. I think of Relaters as something akin to psychopathic murderers of the Productive psyche. They destroy what is not them. And they call themselves 'people persons'. *ironic*laugh*

If one thinks about this situation, there are countless examples throughout our personal lives as well as this history of mankind. If you'd like to study an excellent modern example of how this personality clash can take down a company, study the tale of the decline and fall of Eastman Kodak. I was there to watch. (O_o)

[BTW: I learned about this personality clash as part of what was called 'Beyond Gold' training. The concept has now evolved into 'Platinum Rule' training: "Treat others the way they want to be treated." The hard work is figuring out what that way would be. It can be mind bending.]

3
0

Net neutrality? Bye bye, says American Pai

DerekCurrie
Devil

Take Away My Net Neutrality Mr. Pai And I Will Short Your Circuit!

The USA Federal Government:

- No reliable leadership

- No representation of We The People

- Sold out to corporatocracy

- Enforcers of Neo-Feudalism and Tinkle Down Economics

- Ignorant and dismissive of the US Constitution

What idiots made this happen?

14
2

Apple's macOS is the safer choice – but not for the reason you think

DerekCurrie
Facepalm

Maybe Aricept Can Help

"So what's the solution? A complete redesign of all of our systems, starting from scratch by building on top of secure platforms and software. He dreams of systems that are no longer "secure" but "immune.""

OS X (macOS) is an operating system started from scratch by building on top of a secure platform and software. It was built on top of BSD UNIX, which remains the single most secure (by testing and reputation) operating system available. OS X is certified BSD UNIX.

So Mr. Kaspersky, maybe Aricept can help. Either that or do your research before you blether.

An "immune" OS is something else entirely. We have no such thing at this time apart from running a standalone computer with no input and no output, no EM radiation or sound emanations, etc.

Hint To Kaspersky:

One reason your anti-malware isn't a hit on OS X (macOS) is that, thanks to the work of many, both volunteer and paid, malware is discovered, described and tested with the results passed along to Apple. On a good day, Apple then responds by providing automatic OS subsystem updates blocking that malware within their XProtect anti-malware system. (Yes, Apple has plenty of bad days when they don't keep up, such as their current forgetfulness about blocking out-of-date versions of Adobe's supremely dangerous Flash Player Internet plug-in).

As a result, there's very little point in bothering to write malware for OS X seeing as it will typically be squashed by Apple within a brief period of time, thanks again to the work of many of us OUTSIDE of Apple.

Mr. Kaspersky, realism is always welcome. Pulling bonehead Symantec quality FUD manoeuvres is NEVER welcome. Make your choice.

In any case, thank you Kaspersky for your many contributions to the computer security community. Apologies that they don't result in profits from your Mac software.

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