* Posts by imanidiot

1513 posts • joined 19 Mar 2012

NASA duo plan Tuesday ISS spacewalk to replace the mux that sux

imanidiot
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Just another day in the office?

Have they fixed the second cooling and power umbilical yet? Last spacewalk one of them was leaking, causing the spacewalk to be cut short.

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Beaten passenger, check. Dead giant rabbit, check. Now United loses cockpit door codes

imanidiot
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Re: What if the pilot and copilot both have the fish???

@ Norman Nescio

I'll bow to your clearly better informed knowledge. I'm not a commercial pilot, I just pretend to know stuff on the internet :)

Also, great nickname.

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imanidiot
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Re: What if the pilot and copilot both have the fish???

The button in the cockpit is a time based lockout. If nobody buzzes the person in when a code is entered the person is let into the cockpit after x seconds. If someone presses the lockout button the keypad (and thus the door) is locked out for some time (I believe a minute or something) so pilots have to keep pressing the button to keep the door closed. If no-one presses the button the cockpit door can be opened. (Yes, they've put atleast SOME thought into this)

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Uber is a taxi company, not internet, European Court of Justice advised

imanidiot
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Re: But

Cake or death?

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America 'will ban carry-on laptops on flights from UK, Europe to US'

imanidiot
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They can demand to "scan" that SD card at the border crossing or deny entry if you refuse (or if you do but they don't like you)

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Drugs, vodka, Volvo: The Scandinavian answer to Britain's future new border

imanidiot
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Probably won't work

These camera's are usually triggered by induction loops in the road surface or some other system to measure a vehicle passing to trigger the camera at the correct time. Just flipping a flip book probably won't trigger the camera

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IBM freezes contractor hires to keep full-time workers fully occupied

imanidiot
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Re: Death Spiral

You're confusing a spin/assymetric stall with a death spiral. A death spiral is a full "flown and in control" state but results from disorientation from being in clouds for instance. If you don't know you are banking you might notice your altitude dropping so you pull on the stick a bit more. Thus you go into a turn. As the plan banks more and more you get into a state where pulling no longer raises the nose but only decreases the turning radius. That is death spiral.

In a proper spin BOTH wings are stalled. Correction would be elevator neutral, full opposite rudder till the spin stops, Rudder neutral, power, pull out of the dive. Some aircraft have a different order of doing things (like applying power before applying opposite rudder or only after pulling the nose up and establishing a glide or adding opposite aileron. Consult your aircraft operations manual!)

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imanidiot
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Re: Yawn

You don't PULL out of a death spiral. That is the very definition of one. The way to get out is to roll to level, then pull the nose up to lose speed. What IBM is doing now IS pulling the stick, hard. Increasing the G forces until they black out and/or smash into the ground.

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European Patent Office dragged to human rights court – by its own staff

imanidiot
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And the circus continues...

I just don't get how this Batistelli is still in charge. Even if he did nothing wrong and his staff is just out to get him, his position has become unsustainable. Announcing now that he won't be attempting to renew his position in 2018 would already be a step in the right direction.

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CERN ready to test an EVEN BIGGER gun

imanidiot
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Re: Lineac 3?

Probably some standalone interim design that got left on the drawing room floor somewhere when the decision was made to build the LHC at CERN.

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Comet 67P's oxygen could be a breath of fresh air

imanidiot
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Re: Sceptical ...

Read again. The hydrogen combines with other materials and is bound to solid materials on the surface. Leaving the O2 in a gaseous state free to float away.

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Curiosity Rover's drill is ill. But chill: we can dig Martian sand instead of rocking hard

imanidiot
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Re: Ingenuity at work

@Mike Richards, Take a look at JPLs Mars yard where it conducts tests with Curiosity's twin Maggie. (https://www.reddit.com/r/space/comments/51m2b4/meet_maggie_the_earthbased_copy_of_the_curiosity/?st=j2bu8dtu&sh=81b405b4)

That looks suspiciously like a shed to me. I don't know about the tea but I know that smoking is not allowed there (air quality issues around the test article and all that).

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China's first large passenger jet makes maiden flight

imanidiot
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Those backlogs are artificial

Both boeing and airbus could more than likely invest enough to build a production line capable of delivering those aircraft in a more timely manner. They won't because they know they can create artificial scarseness and keep their company reliably working for longer if they they don't.

In any case I probably wouldn't fly on one of these. Because I know how chinese culture works and I know how the aviation safety culture SHOULD work. And the 2 are near polar opposites.

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Tesla: Revenues up, losses deepen, in start to 'exciting' 2017

imanidiot
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Probably not actually making a loss (much)

Probably just dumping anything and everything they can find on investments, new factories, aquisitions, penthouses for the management, etc. on the company to keep it from making a profit and having to pay taxes.

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Zeiss, ASML hit back at Nikon in chip-printing patent row

imanidiot
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Re: That last part.

@paulf, Not really, just open the ASML yearly statement over 2016 (available publicly afaik) and they state pretty much precisely how much each of their units (ARF, IRF, IRF Immersion and EUV) have made.Since Nikons claim falls over exactly one of those units (IRF immersion) it's easy to do the math.

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imanidiot
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Re: filing suit in three countries (the Netherlands, Germany, and Japan)

@Charles 9

Yes, you would be correct. The EPO was started in 1977 apparently. (ASML wasn't around until 1984) So it's not that

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imanidiot
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Re: filing suit in three countries (the Netherlands, Germany, and Japan)

If I remember correctly some of the earliest patents were filed through the dutch patent office before the EU patent bureau even existed. Possibly they thus have to file in the Netherlands for some of those?

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imanidiot
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Re: That last part.

@AC, there ARE other (though very small) players in the litho market. Companies like Nikon and ASML get to be the billion dollar companies they are because semicon manufacturers actually buy their product. Keeping those companies happy is the only reason ASML or Nikon have any succes in the market. And as someone involved somewhat in that process, let me tell you they are very demanding clients! (No wonder if an hour of tool downtime costs in the order of 500k or more!). Screw up enough and one of those other small players might suddenly find itself getting a boatload of cash dumped on it to get building.

And litho companies have no qualms about booting a supplier from their fabs.

(I have heard a possibly apocrifal story of a PVD equipment supplier who got told their tools had been removed from the fab after the last breakdown that morning and if they wanted to salvage them they could come pick them up. Ohh, and they were already outside the building in the parking lot. And they might like to hurry as the forecast was for heavy showers that afternoon).

A threat about not buying certain equipment or delaying orders can have VERY heavy repercussions on the operation of a company. You can bet your shiny metal behind that both Nikon and ASML will not do anything to anger their supplier much.

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imanidiot
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That last part.

For all the turmoil and chaos that is the semicon business companies like Global Foundries, TSMC, Intel, etc do NOT like uncertainty about the continued operation and supply of their most critical manufacturing tools. Nikon and ASML are the 2 main players for the most critical step in the whole process. They'll be getting a slap on the back of the head from suppliers soon enough telling them to play nice and share their toys.

Neither party has solid ground to stand on and risks drowning in the patent quicksand if they don't get to stand on each others IP.

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What is your favourite cider?

imanidiot
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Pint

Re: With a name like "Cox" ...

Ahhh yes, good old bureaucracy. Where would we be without it?

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imanidiot
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Re: With a name like "Cox" ...

Not allowed off the premises as the product or not even inside the stomach of a human being :)

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Nikon snaps at Dutch, German rivals: You stole our chip etch lens tech!

imanidiot
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Re: Re. EUV

The biggest draw of using EUV over multi-patterning (we're up to quad-patterning with the 9 nm node already) is that EUV can achieve these nodes at single pass exposures. Line edge roughness is actually comparable (Due to electrons being knocked loose by the EUV from what I understand, which is a problem getting solved by new resist types), but single pass allows for smaller feature to feature distances, meaning more efficient chips even at the same CD.

I'm not all that in depth knowledge about the exact process specs. I'm just involved in building parts for them and then keeping those parts operational.

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imanidiot
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@named coward, there IS no other method. Immersion litho is the workable way we currently have to process wafers below the 30 nanometer node (which is already old tech in litho terms).

The real reason Nikon isn't too keen on letting ASML continue in the market is probably because it's getting squeezed out of the litho market by ASML. Which is most likely because ASML delivers a better product (though I might be biased) for a comparable price. If they can put enough margin on the ASML price due to patent royalties they might get a better market margin.

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imanidiot
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Since 2012 more fabs have moved to multipatterning and incremental improvements to the litho and processing equipment have been made. No major process steps have been made. EUV tech is on the brink of being ready. Given past PR statements from ASML and the status of the tech as far as I know I suspect ASML will start shipping production ready systems very soon.

EUV tech is MINDBOGGLINGLY complicated and the amount of new technology and knowledge that had to be created took a LOT more time than anticipated. It's getting close. Really close.

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'I feel violated': Engineer who pointed out traffic signals flaw fined for 'unlicensed engineering'

imanidiot
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Re: Bureaucracy

What is the diffrrence between a civil engineer and a mechanical engineer?

A mechanical engineer builds weapons. A civil engineer builds targets.

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Ewe, get a womb! Docs grow baby lambs in shrink-wrap plastic bags

imanidiot
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Re: And it's only taken 52 years.

More likely to do with "statistics". Like the great helmet controversy of WW1 where the introduction of the battle bowler lead to an INCREASE in head injuries. (Because instead of soldier being killed by clods of earth raining down on them in an artillery strike they merely received non fatal head wounds).

In this case improved in-utero diagnostics, increased knowledge about care for premature infants and better ways of keeping a child alive means doctors are sooner going to decide to allow the child to be born early, where they would have let is stay in the womb before. Thus an increase in premature babies. (Instead of a whole lot of near full term stillborn babies that might have survived by being delivered premature nowadays)

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imanidiot
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Looks unpleasant.

First off, my hats off to the researchers, this could save infant lives and prevent lots of complications.

To me it just looks disturbing as hell though. Certainly not really all that suitable for stressed out parents worried sick about their infant.

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Drone maker DJI quietly made large chunks of Iraq, Syria no-fly zones

imanidiot
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So they just roll their own

A NAZE32 or similar flightcontroller (Now often comes with built in RC receiver), couple off speed controllers, battery, motors and props can be had from a multitude of chinese sellers for about 50 to 60 dollars total. The frame doesn't have to be anything more complicated than a bit of plywood and 4 sticks. A decent camera gimbal and camera setup with video transmitter will probably set you back 50 to 150 dollars or so if you NEED video. Buy in bulk and you can probably build a whole load of them at 60 bucks a pop. Lot cheaper than buying a load of DJI's and and whole lot less traceable too.

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Reg reader offered £999,998 train ticket from Cambridge to Horley

imanidiot
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Joke

But...

Isn't that the normal price for a rail ticket in the UK?

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Drunk user blow-dried laptop after dog lifted its leg over the keyboard

imanidiot
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Re: Good on Jim Re dog

That'd be my question too. A normally housetrained dog isn't suddenly going to take a piss on the boss's laptop

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(You can't) buy one now! The flying car makes its perennial return

imanidiot
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Re: Bah!

Uhhmmm, they've done way more than show pretty renders already:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRRnXq41UV4

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Opportunity rover gets bored of spot it's explored since 2014

imanidiot
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No it wasn't

It WAS always expected to last more than 3 months. 3 Months was just it's primary mission time, things it "had" to get done before the winter and the possibility of losing the rover due to lack of power from dust on the solar panels. Plans to survive the winter had already been made before the rover arrived on the planet though. But 13 years is certainly something no-one would have believed a decade ago. And I'm sure we can forgive the lil' chap his memory problems. I'm sure we all get those senior moments once we age.

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PACK YOUR BAGS! Boffins spot Earth-size planet most likeliest yet to harbor alien life

imanidiot
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Trollface

Re: "most likeliest"...?

Knowing El Regs style that was put there just to annoy us and get comments like yours! Congratulations, you took the bait.

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Zuckerberg: Escape from the real world into my goofy make-believe science-fiction fantasy

imanidiot
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"Our next focus is building community."

Not exactly. It's about controlling and tracking and shaping "community" in Facebooks favour. Because forming actual community involves actually looking people in the face.

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New satellites could cause catastrophic space junk collisions

imanidiot
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Re: SIgh,,,,

@Hoola

Nuclear Waste?

Actually not all that much of a problem if people would only just get over their paranoia over what constitutes nuclear waste and reworking of used fuel bundles (yes, you get plutonium, no you can't just build a bomb out of used fuel plutonium as it'll take a LOT of processing to remove neutron poisons and then you are left with the wrong plutonium isotope.

Acid Rain?

Not actually as big a problem as it was first made out to be and pretty much succesfully solved by tighter regulation on emissions from factories and power plants.

CFCs?

Again, tighter regulations (and bans) on use of CFCs has largely solved this issue and the latest evidence indicates the Ozone layer in the atmosphere has been recovering.

CO2?

Jup there's a problem. Not easy to solve either

Electronic Waste?

Shouldn't be a problem and isn't a problem in a lot of countries.

Yes, we face a lot of problems as humanity. No, solving them won't be easy. It's not just the rich nations taking the hit for this. Every nation on this planet benefits from access to space.

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'Nobody's got to use the internet,' argues idiot congressman in row over ISP privacy rules

imanidiot
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This is not age or inexperience talking

What you hear is the lobbyists of the big telco's talking. It's very obvious this guy has only listened to the guys buying his lunch and dinner.

>> Some of those might have been involved -->

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NASA agent faces heat for 'degrading' moon rock sting during which grandmother wet herself

imanidiot
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slow clap

Well done NASA goon. Exemplary action...

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Microsoft raises pistol, pulls the trigger on Windows 7, 8 updates for new Intel, AMD chips

imanidiot
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Windows

That doesn't seem right...

it looks like a convenient way of forcing people onto the newest build of its operating system.spyware and ad-slinging platform

FTFY

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Boeing 737 turns 50

imanidiot
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Re: Clever design

Theoretically deep stall IS possible with a "standard" horizontal stabilizer but simple geometry means that it can only be unrecoverable if the stabilizer is above a certain height, a normal and/or cruciform tail is normally below this height.

What happens in a deep stall is that the horizontal stabilizer moves through the dirty stall turbulance of the main wing and thus the elevator is no longer effective to control the altitude and the nose is no longer pushed down. Thus if the centre of aerodynamic force and the centre of gravity align the plane does not recover from the stall.

The why of how this happens can be a long story but the gist of it is that any wing stalls at 15 degrees angle of attack. Maybe a few degrees more or less depending on flightlevel and flaps config. One can then draw out the wake zone of the stalled main wing and the position of the stabilizer relative to the main wing and determine when the stabilizer is within the wake zone. With a normal tail when you draw this wake zone in a stalled situation the tail is below the wake zone in all but the most extreme stall angles and the pilot and aerodynamic forces have plenty of time to correct the situation. In a T-tail design the tail is higher up and thus closer to this wake zone. Thus control authority is lost for much lower stall angles. And additional problem is that in a T tail the tail has to be above the wake zone for the aircraft to regain normal flight and thus has to transition back from high angle to lower angles, while a traditional design does not have this problem.

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imanidiot
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Re: But what about...

The problem with keeping XH558 flying is that by now she had many more hours on her than any other Vulcan had ever made. Any aircraft in service has problems, graded from minor expected easily fixed problems down to disastrous but completely unknown problems. The Design Authority basically has to make an assesment as to how many unknown potentially catastrophic problems exist in the airframe and mitigate any known or known potential problems. Due to XH558s lifespan and flight time the amount of unknowns starts climbing as there is no "comparable lifetime" airframes to make an assesment against and cross check measurements against one another. The B-52 can be kept in the air because there is a large pool of them to cross-check and reference. Same with other "old workhorse" planes like the A-10 or the DC-3. Keeping a unique, single example, complex plane like the Vulcan flying just started to take too much time and become too much liability for the design authorities. Added to that the skills needed to keep this sort of design flying started to die out within the companies as people retire or die. Modern aircraft are built differently and follow different rules and regulations requiring different skills and knowledge. It's tragic but thats the way it is.

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imanidiot
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Longer. And more seats

Even the short haul 737s used to have plenty of first class seats. Nowadays the seatcount is usually reported in an "all economy" config for a short haul plane. And most airliners operate their planes in that config too.

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Machine vs. machine battle has begun to de-fraud the internet of lies

imanidiot
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There is enough evidence to show chemical weapons WERE used. There is debate as to whether it was of a type and grade available to Assads regime. I'd find it just as believable it was the US or Russian forces under a false flag operation. I've also not seen any indication as to how the weapons were supposedly delivered. Air attack? Artillery? Large vats opened upwind?

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imanidiot
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Re: New Turing test needed

I'd be all for a license to use the Internet, with just a basic requirement to show that you actually know how to think and breathe at the same time. Anonymity is however much more important than people seem to realize. I would NEVER advocate for any sort of internet where anonymity isn't available.

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LiveJournal trial a storm in a safe harbour

imanidiot
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This will be interesting

Mostly in how the court is going to interprit the actions of "volunteer" moderators and their affiliation/work for the website. It could have heavy repercussions for how ad-supported sites run their bussiness and how much liberty/power they grant their moderators. I can foresee many forums banning their moderators from posting any content under a moderator account just in case anyway.

In any case, posting "questionably obtained" materials as a moderator is a stupid thing to do anyway.

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Goodbye, cruel world! NASA's Cassini preps for kamikaze Saturn dive

imanidiot
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Trollface

Re: Saturn's atmosphere is cold

/care...

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imanidiot
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Re: Saturn's atmosphere is cold

Earths atmosphere is roughly between 200 and 250 K in the upper mesosphere. That's only a 100 degrees K difference. Yet returning vessels easily experience thousands of degrees of shock heating. A hundred Kelvin isn't going to change that much at all.

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Startup remotely 'bricks' grumpy bloke's IoT car garage door – then hits reverse gear

imanidiot
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I'm just waiting

I'm just waiting for a blackhat or pentester to penetrate their servers and open every garadget door in the world simulatinously. Or makes them do a dance.

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Boeing details 'Deep Space Gateway' for Mars mission staging

imanidiot
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Nice idea

Too bad it won't be going anywhere. Because once Trump gets ousted (I highly doubt he'll make it to a full term without either getting impeached or killing is all in nuclear fire) NASA budgets and budgets get porkbarreled again, and the SLS will get scrapped for the next inane, rehashed, stupid idea that gets the US nowhere fast. Meanwhile India and China are catching up and SpaceX and possibly Blue Origin are making the entire US space program look like idiots.

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Verizon utters solemn Oath: Yahoo! will remain Yahoo!

imanidiot
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Facepalm

How?

How does any board ever approve of such a shit name?

And more importantly how the flux is Yahoo! still a thing? It's a brand that deserves to be taken out behind the shed and shot. Repeatedly. At close range. With a large bore shotgun. Using deer slugs. After receiving a damn good beating with a baseball bat.

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Spotted: Bizarre SpaceX rocket-snatching machine that looks like it belongs on Robot Wars

imanidiot
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Re: Let's look at what's there...

@BobC:

Given the limited space on the deck and the spread of landing points seen in the landings so far I doubt they'd have enough confidence to land more than one core on the same deck. Nor would I suspect they'd want to due to vibration/noise damage to the core already on the deck when a next one comes down. Do not underestimate just how much damage acoustics from a rocket engine can do. It's one of the main problems to solve in silo launched ICBMs for instance. Without mitigation they would shake themselves to bits before leaving the silo.

As mentioned before SpaceX has noticed the first stage has a tendency to "walk" across the deck in rough seas between the landing and the welding crew getting there to weld it to the deck. The stage doesn't stay where it lands, so one could end up taking a topple after a successful landing. Next to that there is also the problem that the stage is never really centred on the deck after the landing and there is no provisions on the barge to move it to the centre (or to the edge of the deck to hoist it onto a support ship to clear the barge). Thus it makes perfect sense to design something that can move the core to the centre of the ship and hold it there until the support crew can swoop in to weld it to the deck or transfer the core to a support vessel. My guess is transfer to a support vessel is actually the long term plan, so that the barge can stay out at sea while the much faster moving support vessel shuttles the first stages back to port)

For falcon heavy the centre core will either not be recovered or if it is it will land MUCH further out than the booster cores. By the time the centre core stage separates it'll be moving at probably about 1.5 km/s, so it takes some serious burning to get it back to a barge the booster cores can reach. (But as said before, the booster cores are planned to return to the LZ pads at the spacecentre) More likely they'll have a barge much further out, so the centre core can use the atmosphere do some of the breaking and stay on a mostly ballistic trajectory.

Then again, I'm not a rocket scientist. I just play one on Kerbin.

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