* Posts by imanidiot

1553 posts • joined 19 Mar 2012

Canadian sniper makes kill shot at distance of 3.5 KILOMETRES

imanidiot
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.50 cal near misses ripping limbs off is total bullshit and an urban legend. It's been tested plenty of times and it's complete hogwash. Think of it this way, if a bullet were creating such a powerful shockwave, where is that energy coming from? Wouldn't the bullet slow down incredibly fast? A bullet is designed to have as little shockwave as possible, as any shockwave dissipates energy that is subsequently not delivered to the target.

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Let's go live to the 3rd circle of Hell – and see what Comcast and Charter are screwing up

imanidiot
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It's sad

Comcast WILL get away with this as long as they have taken basic precautions and made sure nothing was put in writing. I have no doubt this would actually happen.

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Latest Windows 10 Insider build pulls the trigger on crappy SMB1

imanidiot
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Coat

Re: "Home and Professional editions strips out the SMB1 server software exploited by the NSA."

*Cough* Isn't that exploitable vuln Windows 10 in it's entirety? *Cough*

--> The one with the Windows 7 install thumbdrives -->

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Tesla death smash probe: Neither driver nor autopilot saw the truck

imanidiot
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Re: Right, $50 of bars will stop a 4000lb car going 74mph.

@Schultz,

The wiki article you link to is for REAR impact guards (Sometimes called Mansfield bars in the US, after an actress and her family got killed by impacting under a trailer and getting decapitated). Already mandatory in (most of) the USA. (For instance)

Side Underrun protection isn't mandatory everywhere. It is in the UK for instance but I know of no such regulations in the USA. But then again I don't live there and I don't work in the transportation sector.

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'OK, everyone. Stop typing, this software is DONE,' said no one ever

imanidiot
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Re: If you're into tool porn...

Damn you AC. That looks like some good stuff. (I like their selection of Engineering lathes and mills. Seems to be the standard "straight from China in a crate" design but the fit and finish looks a lot better. The price doesn't but that would be justified if the quality meets the looks.

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Intel: Joule's burned, Edison switched off, and Galileo – Galileo is no more

imanidiot
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Cost not the problem

I suspect most serious users (the pro embedded systems designers) realised well enough what advantage these platforms offered to justify the added costs. Availability in lower quantities for prototyping was a tad hit and miss however which already threw a spanner in the works. Getting documentation for ANYTHING on these IoT devices if you didn't have a signed contract for x million units was apparently a nightmare. I've heard stories of people developing for the platform not allowed access to particular bits of data crucial to their implementation of Intel stuff simply because they didn't have the correct contract/nda/friends in high places to allow them access to that bit of Intels document library. Even if they KNEW the data existed.

Intel expected to just dump these boards on the market and get orders for 10 million units in year 1. Which is not how the embedded systems market works. Lots of single unit prototyping or maybe double digit unit runs happening there. Especially for specialist high power devices like these Intel devices.

(Not to mention the rediculous edge connector that meant you needed a breakout to do anything with the boards)

One this is for sure. By dropping the Joule only a few MONTHs after it's introduction without so much as a warning they'll NEVER get into the embedded market ever again. They've killed any goodwill they might have remaining.

IoT= Intel offered Trash in this case.

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BOFH: Halon is not a rad new vape flavour

imanidiot
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Re: Vape Nation-

@John Brown

That's probably because the final purpose is not far off. I suspect the Halon gets bought cheap ("how else are you going to get rid of it? You'd have to pay a company to remove it from the premises. Instead we pay you!") and then sold for an arm, 2 legs and a large part from the remaining limb to a client needing Halon on an existing system they don't want/can't replace. Probably good business.

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When we said don't link to the article, Google, we meant DON'T LINK TO THE ARTICLE!

imanidiot
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Re: Not so easy...

@Myvekk, you are clearly a minion of Goldstein, sent to make ungood. Eurasia is our Ally against Eastasia and always has been!

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imanidiot
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Yeas, because clearly someone posting false facts about you is in the least bit interested in helping you. Or is even possible to be found. Or is even still alive.

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Disney mulls Mickey Mouse magic material to thwart pirates' 3D scans

imanidiot
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yeah, right, that'll work

because using a can of spraypaint or other methods to produce a matt coating onto an object isn't technology a counterfitter could use...

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Toshiba memory unit drama alert: SK Hynix chips into Japanese consortium bid

imanidiot
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Eh...

In the end, most likely nothing will change for us down at the bottom of the foodchain. For now it just looks like a lot of speculation.

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Voyager 1 passes another milestone: It's now 138AU from home

imanidiot
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Re: Not sure what they used...

From Nasa's Voyager mission FAQ found here:

"Question: What kind of computers are used on the Voyager spacecraft?

Answer: There are three different computer types on the Voyager spacecraft and there are two of each kind. Total number of words among the six computers is about 32K.

Computer Command System (CCS) - 18-bit word, interrupt type processors (2) with 4096 words each of plated wire, non-volatile memory.

Flight Data System (FDS) - 16-bit word machine (2) with modular memories and 8198 words each

Attitude and Articulation Control System (AACS) - 18-bit word machines (2) with 4096 words each.

According to my calulations, that's a total of about 68KB, or small potatoes compared to today's microprocessors. We probably could perform all functions with one of today's boards and still have room for solid state data storage and much more fault detection software. We would still need a second unit for redundancy. Today's microprocessors are also much faster than the chips used on Voyager and a comparative system would use less electrical power. On the other hand, software might be more complicated as opposed to that used in an interrupt type system, but it would be much more capable and more flexible.

Let's look closer at the CCS. The CCS has two main functions: to carry out instructions from the ground to operate the spacecraft, and to be alert for a problem or malfunction and respond to it. Two identical 4096- word memories contain both fixed routines (about 2800 words) and a variable section (about 1290 words) for changing science sequences. The CCS issues commands to the AACS for movement of the scan platform or spacecraft maneuvers; to the FDS for changes in instrument configurations or telemetry rates and to numerous other subsystems within the spacecraft for specific actions. Fault-protection algorithms are also stored in the CCS, occupying roughly 10 percent of the CCS memory.

The main functions of the FDS are to collect data from, and controls the operations of, the scientific instruments; and to format engineering and science data for on-board storage and/or real-time transmission. The FDS also keeps the spacecraft "time" and provides frequency references to the instruments and other spacecraft subsystems.

The Voyager spacecraft computers are interrupt driven computer, similar to processors used in general purpose computers with a few special instructions for increased efficiency. The programming is a form of assembly language.

There is no clock chip, as such, in the spacecraft. The "clock" is really a counter, based on one of several electronically generated frequencies. These frequencies, based on a reference, generated by a very stable oscillator, are converted and fed to different locations in the spacecraft as synchronization signals, timers, counters, etc. The "clock" signal is part of the information telemetered to the ground and it is with ground software that we convert to day of year, time of day Greenwich Mean Time.

Voyager was built in-house at JPL; the computers were manufactured by General Electric to JPL specifications.

Question: How fast are the Voyager computers?

Answer:Not very fast compared to today’s standards. The master clock runs at 4 MHz but the CPU’s clock runs at only 250 KHz. A typical instruction takes 80 microseconds, that is about 8,000 instructions per second. To put this in perspective, a 2013 top-of-the-line smartphone runs at 1.5 GHz with four or more processors yielding over 14 billion instructions per second.

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Lockheed, USAF hold breath as F-35 pilots report hypoxia

imanidiot
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Re: Awesome...

@ShelLuser

No, not really. The Eurofighter is an even poorer choice than the F35 for the use"case of the Netherlands. Just ask the Brits how the update program is going to get the Typhoon even moderately capable of doing ground attacks (hint, BAE systems is involved). It has a poor load carrying capacity, poor range and per unit costs after figuring in added costs for integration of our weapons and electronics systems is not actually all that much cheaper than the F35. Added to that it's known to be a bit of a pig in terms of maintenance costs too.

The Saab Grippen has similar issues, added to the fact we'd be buying a version that doesn't even currently exist. Not even finished on the drawing board.

But the biggest thing is that for what the Netherlands does with it's aircraft (ground support, reconnaisance and air intercepts within Dutch airspace for the majority part) the F16 does just fine, and would do for the considerable future. We could probably have bought close to the over 200 F-16's we originally had. We have the parts, the training and the infrastructure to deal with that airfraem. But no, we wanted the latest shiny. And we get only 35 of those new F35s! (at most)

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imanidiot
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Re: O2 many issues

Either system has it's drawbacks. I think the F35 design allowed for a more stealthy design with better IR signature than the harrier concept. Limited cooling is however still a problem. The F35 is apparently more than capable of melting the deck underneath the tail if kept in a low hover too long

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imanidiot
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I'm surprised...

I find it surprising pilots are still willing to fly these things after all the problems found with this airframe time and time again (A lot of them potentially deadly). I'm not surprised they found another problem. I doubt that'll stop any time soon.

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Hyperloop One teases idea of 50-minute London-Edinburgh ride

imanidiot
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Re: Demonstration

Well more or less yes. I have however had more luck making friends or atleast aquintances out of for instance Frysians (Not exactly the most amicable bunch), Amsterdammers, Rotterdammers, Tukkers and Groningers than I have had with Limburgers. (Though I will add is seems the south Limburg region around Maastricht seems to be somewhat more accepting than the northern regions)

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imanidiot
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Re: Demonstration

@AC,

I have tasted vlaai, I don't do carnival (neither the drinking nor the culture) and I'd rather speak any other language than the speach impediment that is Limburgs. Additionally I also speak german well enough to be understood. I also already live well outside the Randstad because I can't stand the rush and tumble of the region. What I however also can't stand is the pigheaded, closed culture of the Limburgers. In any other region in the Netherlands it's possible to atleast be somewhat accepted into the social structure of the village/club/region. Not so in Limburg. If you're not born there and speak absolutely flawlessy in a incomprehensible limburgish accent you'll never be a part of anything.

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imanidiot
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Re: Demonstration

@Ledswinger

The problem in the Netherlands is exactly this concentration of the population. If the entire country is within 1 hr travel range then working in Rotterdam while living in Groningen becomes an option (or living in Limburg, but who would actually want to do that...) for instance. Much is the population density within the "randstad" region as we call it is a result of the simple fact that a large proportion of the non agricultural jobs are located there. And thus most of the non-agricultural workers live nearby.

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imanidiot
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Trollface

But after brexit...

What would be the benefit of fast travel if you get stuck at the bordercrossing into Scotland and the EU economic zone from what remains of the United Kingdom?

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Alphabet offloads bot businesses Boston Dynamics and SCHAFT

imanidiot
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In other words

Ad revenue is falling and Alphabet needs different sources of income fast to pad the numbers and not look like the ship has sprung a leak.

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The harsh reality of Apple's augmented reality toolset ARKit: It's an incredible battery hog

imanidiot
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Look closely at the map large map at the entrance to the store. ALL shortcuts are actually on there, just not all marked. The shortest route is sometimes through the displays instead of along the path. I can get anywhere in my local Ikea from any other point in a few minutes (And it's one of the largest ones in the Netherlands). And yes, I've been there way too often...

BTW, it's also a good idea to bring along one of the smaller maps just to keep yourself grounded. Ikea stores are purposefully designed to desorient you so that you feel there is no other option than following the path laid out by the store.

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'Fat boy' flies: ISRO's heavy rocket fails to blow up

imanidiot
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Re: And the UK gives "aid" to this country.

@Raj,

I'm not saying they are a rival or peer. I'm saying the india-pakistan relations are a (nuclear) threat to the stability in the region. Current diplomatic relations with China are FAR less strained than they are with Pakistan from my understanding. I'll grant you firing an ICBM or IRBM towards Pakistan would be "a bit" overkill.

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imanidiot
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Re: And the UK gives "aid" to this country.

You clearly don't understand how government finances work so lets keep this simple.

Poor people without a job don't pay taxes. Poor people without a job are also unlikely to have the means of letting their childres go to a school, meaning their children wil also be poor and without a job.

Running a (relatively cheap) space program means you can get some better educated people a good job, so they can pay taxes and send their children to school, so the children will later pay taxes as well. You can then use the more reliable source of income from taxes to help the poor.

On top of that the space program is a billboard for the nation: "Hey, look at us, look what we can do. Send some of those manufacturing contracts our way maybe?" (Since being able to build a reliable rocket means you have a high degree of control/mastery of things like supply chain management, metalurgy, engineering, precision fabrication and assembly, transport, quality assurance, etc, etc). Guess what those extra contracts do? More people (including lower wage/education) with jobs, more people paying taxes, more people sending their children to school. Thus less poverty in the future.

Poverty isn't a prolem you solve by simply throwing money at it. And just because they spend 1 billion on a space program (a tad under a dollar per person) doesn't mean they don't spend anything on poverty relief/reduction. In fact they spend well over 100 billion a year on those measures. Stopping the space program would add less than 1% to that budget. Not exactly shocking.

Keep in mind also that the space program is more of an offshoot of the ballistic missile program intended to threaten and/or keep control of Pakistan. That's still a powder keg waiting to kill us all in nuclear fire. (Both sides hate each other, both sides have nukes, and there haven't been any positive moves in the conflict from either side for some time now)

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imanidiot
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Congrats to ISRO.

Now if only they could hire a media production company from this millenium. That video feels very 90s in looks.

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Class clowns literally classless: Harvard axes meme-flinging morons

imanidiot
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No there aren't

"I appreciate humor, but there are so many topics that just should not be joked about,"

There exist no such topics. ANYTHING and EVERYTHING should be joked about. But there is a time a place and a context for each. Something like this Harvard group is not the place or context for this sort of thing.

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After reusing a rocket, SpaceX tries reusing Dragon capsule for ISS resupply

imanidiot
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Re: Clean underwear?

@AC, they do live streams from the ISS. (probably) Nbody wants to see scientists junk flapping in 0G.

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imanidiot
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Re: Clean underwear?

They probably could, but the weight and power requirements of putting such a machine up there so far make it more efficient to just send up clean suits up every now and then and dump the dirties overboard to burn up in the atmosphere on the next Progress launch.

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imanidiot
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Re: Is there ever not a delay?

There have been plenty of launches right on schedule, but a launch getting delayed can happen due to such a massive array of things that it's highly likely for it to happen atleast once to any given launch. In fact, it's sometimes a miracle we get anything up there in the first place.

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imanidiot
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Re: I can see where this is going

And the windows vibrating from the massive subwoofers installed in the parcel shelf blasting out some form of music that seems to consist entirely of bass thumps.

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Microsoft founder Paul Allen reveals world's biggest-ever plane

imanidiot
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That would be the Antonov An-225.

Maybe you got it confused with it's smaller sibling the An-124 "Ruslan"?

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imanidiot
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Re: Reason dual fuselage

I'm very skeptical of more An-225's actually getting produced. IF they are they'll more likely be used simply for heavy/oversized cargo transport. The 225's design isn't really suitable for air-launching stuff.

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imanidiot
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Re: Interesting

This is most likely simply about weight. A full tailplane joining the two tailbooms would be quite hefty. The only task of the tailplane is to provide a certain amount of force to keep the plane balanced and an added amount of variable force to provide pitch control. If that can be done by 2 smaller tailplanes you have less weight far aft of the CG that then needs to be compensated ahead of the CG with even more weight to keep the CG within limits.

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Spacecraft spots possible signs of frozen water on the Moon

imanidiot
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Re: Water, water everywhere...

I think the theory is that earth for a while was too hot (what with all the lava lakes and such) to retain it's water and therefor it must have been (re)introduced after this time.

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German court says 'Nein' on Facebook profile access request

imanidiot
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Re: You say that now

All of you are missing the point. It's not the DAUGHTERS privacy being protected. It is the privacy of all of those that messaged her, expecting her to be the only one to receive the messages, whose privacy is being protected!

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Pentagon trumpets successful mock-ICBM interception test

imanidiot
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The problem with ICMB interception isn't really target aquisition or tracking. It's pure and simple speed. A typical short range missile might be moving at mach 2 or 3 at best. An ICBM re-entry vehicle is moving at a balmy mach 14 or faster depending on trajectory. A timing error of 1 millisecond at mach 3 is about 1 m of position error. At Mach 14 that's closer to 5m. The difference between getting within blast radius and a mis. And every second you spend trying to get a good targeting solution means the target has moved nearly 5 km closer!

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imanidiot
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Re: let's test something against the next NORK launch

Lets not poke the snoozing bear shall we.

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India sets June 5 as the day it will join the heavy-lift rocket club

imanidiot
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Flame

Not really heavy is it?

Comparable to Soyuz, which isn't really a heavy lifter either. Nor is the Falcon 9 imho at 22 tons to LEO. So more of a medium lift vehicle. Anything over 50 tons to LEO would be a heavy lifter in my view. --> Hopefully only out of the right end -->

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Google can't spare 113 seconds of revenue to compile data on its gender pay gap

imanidiot
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Re: (.) (.)

I'd not be entirely sure it's bullshit. Recent research in the Netherlands has shown that the supposed pay gap in here is nearly non existent in general when compensating for experience, age, hours worked, etc and in certain demographics (mostly young higher educated) women ARE actually getting paid more.

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Sergey Brin building humanitarian blimp for lifesaving leisure

imanidiot
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And another load of people with more money than sense...

Whenever these types of projects show up it's always led by people with too much money (sometimes not their own) using a lot of handwaving to explain away any inconvenient area of problems that need to be solved as "trivial" or "well use technology XYZ to solve that" without any concern for practical applications of the technology or actual difficulty.

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Australian Taxation Office won't penalise Plutus contractors

imanidiot
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Wait a minute....

A government tax agency is actually being helpful? Must be a very cold day in hell.

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NASA duo plan Tuesday ISS spacewalk to replace the mux that sux

imanidiot
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Just another day in the office?

Have they fixed the second cooling and power umbilical yet? Last spacewalk one of them was leaking, causing the spacewalk to be cut short.

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Beaten passenger, check. Dead giant rabbit, check. Now United loses cockpit door codes

imanidiot
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Thumb Up

Re: What if the pilot and copilot both have the fish???

@ Norman Nescio

I'll bow to your clearly better informed knowledge. I'm not a commercial pilot, I just pretend to know stuff on the internet :)

Also, great nickname.

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imanidiot
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Re: What if the pilot and copilot both have the fish???

The button in the cockpit is a time based lockout. If nobody buzzes the person in when a code is entered the person is let into the cockpit after x seconds. If someone presses the lockout button the keypad (and thus the door) is locked out for some time (I believe a minute or something) so pilots have to keep pressing the button to keep the door closed. If no-one presses the button the cockpit door can be opened. (Yes, they've put atleast SOME thought into this)

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Uber is a taxi company, not internet, European Court of Justice advised

imanidiot
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Re: But

Cake or death?

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America 'will ban carry-on laptops on flights from UK, Europe to US'

imanidiot
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They can demand to "scan" that SD card at the border crossing or deny entry if you refuse (or if you do but they don't like you)

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Drugs, vodka, Volvo: The Scandinavian answer to Britain's future new border

imanidiot
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Probably won't work

These camera's are usually triggered by induction loops in the road surface or some other system to measure a vehicle passing to trigger the camera at the correct time. Just flipping a flip book probably won't trigger the camera

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IBM freezes contractor hires to keep full-time workers fully occupied

imanidiot
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Re: Death Spiral

You're confusing a spin/assymetric stall with a death spiral. A death spiral is a full "flown and in control" state but results from disorientation from being in clouds for instance. If you don't know you are banking you might notice your altitude dropping so you pull on the stick a bit more. Thus you go into a turn. As the plan banks more and more you get into a state where pulling no longer raises the nose but only decreases the turning radius. That is death spiral.

In a proper spin BOTH wings are stalled. Correction would be elevator neutral, full opposite rudder till the spin stops, Rudder neutral, power, pull out of the dive. Some aircraft have a different order of doing things (like applying power before applying opposite rudder or only after pulling the nose up and establishing a glide or adding opposite aileron. Consult your aircraft operations manual!)

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imanidiot
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Re: Yawn

You don't PULL out of a death spiral. That is the very definition of one. The way to get out is to roll to level, then pull the nose up to lose speed. What IBM is doing now IS pulling the stick, hard. Increasing the G forces until they black out and/or smash into the ground.

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European Patent Office dragged to human rights court – by its own staff

imanidiot
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And the circus continues...

I just don't get how this Batistelli is still in charge. Even if he did nothing wrong and his staff is just out to get him, his position has become unsustainable. Announcing now that he won't be attempting to renew his position in 2018 would already be a step in the right direction.

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CERN ready to test an EVEN BIGGER gun

imanidiot
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Re: Lineac 3?

Probably some standalone interim design that got left on the drawing room floor somewhere when the decision was made to build the LHC at CERN.

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