* Posts by OsamaBinLogin

13 posts • joined 4 Mar 2012

Apple pollutes data about you to protect your privacy. But it might not be enough

OsamaBinLogin

Pay Cash.

It's 2016 and idiots still use '123456' as their password

OsamaBinLogin

Re: We are a part of the problem

yeah, I've started using long passwords. And yes, the typing accuracy is a problem, 30 is about the limit for me. And on the phone, it can be painful.

CloudFlare ditches private SSL keys for better security

OsamaBinLogin

what's wrong with this picture

yeah, i was asking myself, what's wrong with this picture. Secret Keys are meant to be secret. private. On your machine only (or whomever). Anybody or anything else holding them defeats the whole purpose. You've basically outsourced your identity; the secret key now guarantees only that it's from your account on cloudflare. (Or whomever cloudflare outsourced to.)

Android, Chromebooks storm channel as Windows PC sales go flat

OsamaBinLogin

Re: So if we award all desktops to Microsoft then I make it...

You're not talking about a portable computer - you're talking about a desktop. I have a net connection at home, that's easy.

Unfortunately, the entire atmosphere is not yet filled with wifi. On the train to work, nothing. Busses, nyet. In coffeehouses that advertise "Free WiFi", there's only a 70% chance that it actually works. Your typical doctor's waiting room? nada. Enjoying a hike in the woods? niente. Sitting in a restaurant waiting for your pizza to bake? Nunca. Passenger in a car on a looonnnggg trip? Nein. Suddenly, most of my ipad apps are useless (it doesn't have cell). Web pages that auto-refresh soon self-destruct, and I'm left to play sudoku cuz that program doesn't instantly flip out when it can't call home.

Saucy Snapchat addicts EXPOSED: Exploit code to poke holes goes wild

OsamaBinLogin

Re: Load of rubbish

BTDT. You come up with a few good ideas, then you think you're a genius, you're smarter than everybody in the world, and you act that way. But you're not. If you're lucky, you make a few mill before it starts to run down. If you're very lucky, you become Zuck. If not, you crash and burn from your arrogance.

Greenland ice did not melt in baking +8°C era 120k years ago

OsamaBinLogin

Re: Fuel is licked

"Fracking in the U.S. has found enough energy reserves to last a very long time"

Remember that natural gas still gives off CO2 - just half as much as coal. And it takes 40 years for our energy consumption to double. The reason we're going with gas and hydrogen is because it's hard to get away from energy sources from burning. Natural gas is a stopgap, not a solution.

We will look back upon these times fondly, as the good old days, back when hurricanes didn't do much damage.

OsamaBinLogin

just sit there, slack jawed

"Why would we cause the problem and then just sit there, slack jawed"

Because we don't have control over it.

Yes, humans created all the excess CO2, but not intentionally, in order to alter the climate. And in fact we can't stop burning it on a dime and reverse it - we're too hooked on the fossil energy that's causing the problems. And all the solutions we're trying just seem to not work well.

- Hybrid cars give off a little bit less CO2, not half as much.

- Electric cars still get most of their energy from burning carbon.

- Canadian tar sands take so much energy to produce, they generate about the same as coal.

- Carbon sequestration is smoke-and-mirrors; it would take almost as much energy as the CO2 it's storing.

- So many of the solutions tend to need fossil fuels somewhere along the way, or at least their own energy as overhead.

If we stopped carbon burning tomorrow, the temperature would still continue to rise - it's just that the rate of rising would level off.

The hottest year on record (at the time) was 1998. It broke the record of the previous hottest year, 1997. Which broke the previous record from 1995. Lately, it's cooled off so we've only had three years above 1998. But every year since 2001 has been hotter than the 1997 record - every single year. This ain't no interglacial warming; it's happening a lot faster, and it's starting at a warmer time, that's already interglacial.

OsamaBinLogin

suntan lotion

"Plants love heat"... True. And many of the new plants that will crowd in, will compete with whatever plant we were hoping would grow better. This is why biologists talk in terms of ecological niches - like an area of mountain, low enough to support, for instance, Engelmann Spruce, but high enough to eliminate competing trees, which grow one km downhill. You increase the average temperature, and maybe they both start growing higher on the mountain. Or maybe the mountain ends if it's not high enough, and the Englemann Spruce gets squeezed out. Or maybe some of the trees can't stand the thinner air, or the thinner soil, or maybe the wasps that pollenate them can't fly that high. So some plants will thrive, some will fade, and some will go extinct.

So do bugs love heat. Many of the new bugs that show up, will eat the plants or trees, where they didn't before. I remember reading about one kind of beetle; if there's a frost below -2C, the larvae, who have dug into tree bark, die that year, just like how the citrus fruit harvest gets wiped out upon a frost. Temperatures rise, and the beetle can munch trees a few degrees further north.

Our flora and fauna will tend to move away from the equators, and further up the mountainsides. The ones that can't adapt to their new neighbors, and the new soil, and the new humidity, will fade away. The ones that survive will tend to be the more flexible ones, the ones that are harder to kill - weeds, wasps, termites, ants, rats, and pigeons.

So be sure to smear on some bug repellant along with your suntan lotion.

1 MILLION accounts leaked in megahack on banks, websites

OsamaBinLogin
Devil

Re: "affiliated with hacktivists Anonymous"

You see, terrorists and cr/hackers need to trademark their names; that way, if some loudmouth in Iraq declares he's a leader of Al Qaeda, the real Al Qaeda can sue him.

OsamaBinLogin
Holmes

Re: Again, the SQL injection attacks!

Laying off programmers so they can add another wing to their McMansions.

OsamaBinLogin
Mushroom

attacks will continue

israelis: The helicopter attacks will continue until the missle attacks stop.

palestinians: The missle attacks will continue until the helicopter attacks stop.

hacktivists: The bank breakins will continue until the banks stop rounding us up.

Election hacked, drunken robot elected to school board

OsamaBinLogin

Re: Easy fix.

One thing that would help a lot would be to get rid of the ossified Electoral College in the US. This is used only to elect the US president. All other elections use straight popular vote. Nobody would be stupid enough to do such a thing for a governor or senator.

The most dangerous aspect of the EC is the winner-take-all properties of most state's election points. Therefore there's 45 opportunities to have a large block of points thrown by a small box of previously "lost ballots" in one or another state with close results. See also Ohio, Florida.

If it was a straight popular vote, an extra thousand votes cooked up here or there probably could not make a dent in 50M or 100M votes.

OsamaBinLogin

Re: "nobody ever tampered with a paper election."

An audit trail - I don't see why this can't be done with a (partial) computerized voting system. Yes I do know why - the people who set up the election systems fully intend to tamper with the results. Any voting system without some sort of double-checking, you might as well get out the yellow tape, because it's a crime scene. 2+2.

Money is handled through totally computerized systems, from the cashier to the bank to the CEOs paycheck, with audit trails and security that's solid enough to keep corporate losses to a minimum. Yes there are breakins, yes cashiers regularly have discrepancies in their dimes and shillings. But with someone's bottom line in jeopardy, there's plenty of effort put in to making it as secure as possible and keeping the mayhem to small amounts.

Now, the managers at retail locations understand the cash registers and understand all the ways they can be hacked and customers, or cashiers, can cheat. We don't have that at electronic voting sites. obviously. If we have to simplify the system down to make people understand it, so be it, that's why so many are still voting with paper. The security is more obvious with paper. I think a significant part is getting voting machines managed by people who can competently keep people from hacking in by wire or by air or by finger.

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