* Posts by WatAWorld

1226 posts • joined 24 Feb 2012

IBM could have made almost all the voluntary redundancies it needed

WatAWorld
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This whole topic brings up yesterday's "Could you ethically recommend a female go into IT".

No, I couldn't ethically recommend _anyone go into IT_, unless they live in some country with very low labour costs.

Which of us would recommend a young person go into a field where they are most likely (with a exceptions) to be working for cheap skate abusive employers who treat 'permanent staff' like contractors and lay them off at the first opportunity to shift the work offshore?

In 10 years most of the IT work left here in the first world is going to be administrator work, shifting machines, cabling, swapping boards, and other physical stuff that can't be offshored.

IT was good for me for the first 25 years, now it is rapidly becoming so not worth it. I as badly for the bright young optimistic newbies just getting out of college or university now as I do for those with 10 years experience who are being laid off because their specialty was product we've switched away from.

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WatAWorld
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Re: The good people

"I put my name down several times and was told I was too valuable - not valuable enough for any form of pay rise - but eventually they were left with only a few people like me who kept their hands up and I got my package. Yay."

Yes, it is the best people who aren't afraid to look around, who are versatile enough to adapt to new companies.

I'll add, in my experience many of the 'good people who stay' are generally people who have worked in one environment or with one architecture for so long they are afraid they cannot make a transition. They might have been versatile really good once, but now they are good at what they do and fear the need to learn something new.

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WatAWorld
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Best people often first to accept severance because it is easy for them to find another job &

The best people are often first to accept severance because it is easy for them to find another job and it is glum working in a place where downsizing is a habit. It makes people glum and top performers don't want to work in glum environments.

In IBM's case, you've also got the involuntary relocations -- so super glum, super dismal.

IBM was probably already in a death spiral, and if it wasn't, it is now. Best people leave causing a loss of customers & clients, causing a need to layoff, the further layoff's causing a further loss of customers & clients.

Probably a lot of those who'd offered to resign have already started their job searches, and having started those job searches will be getting job offers now, regardless of what IBM wants.

That is the thing: When your staff start looking around for other employers (because of something management has done or rumors of what management is going to do), once they seriously start looking, many will get good offers, the best will definitely get good offers in the coming several months. And they'll leave regardless of what the employer does to patch things up.

The best advice if you're working at a place that is in a death spiral is to leave now before your outlook on work, attitude towards work, is permanently dragged down.

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Can you ethically suggest a woman pursue a career in tech?

WatAWorld
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Isn't it bigotry and prejudice to see some people in an ethnic group do something,

Isn't it bigotry and prejudice to see some people in an ethnic group do something, or some gangs in an ethnic group, and then to assume (extrapolate) that all members of that ethnic group do that same something?

And isn't that true when somebody does the same thing with manual labourers? With women? With black people? And with programmers?

The only locker room talk I've ever hear or read in IT is here in The Reg by Reg writers. We aren't all like you guys.

Almost none of us here in Canada are like you guys. We're a humourless very cautious and considerate bunch here. Our jokes are about the weather and programming languages. If someone complains about a person, it is the person they're complaining about, not one of that person's groupings.

And if you bully a woman, if it ever happened, and if she ever quit, you'd have all your buddies hating you for chasing away the woman.

It is bigotry to suggest that all IT shops are like Uber. It is pure ignorance to suggest that programmers have anything more in common with rude 12 y/o gamers than do accountants, social workers and liberal arts students.

I'm tired of us in our industry being victimized and generalized over by the media because we're weak, unorganized and don't fight back.

We're a largely soft-spoken introverted group with all the defenses of a bunch of 4 year-olds and we're easy for the eloquent classes to target and bully.

And we'll never ask for an apology.

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WatAWorld
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Re: If Seagates drives didn't fail so frequently they might have been able to hang on

Sorry about the title, my computer changed it as it posted.

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This post has been deleted by a moderator

WatAWorld
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"for the next twenty years, men must be on their best behaviour"

Young me will do what young men are doing: Staying away from university in droves.

Those IT companies had darn well better attract female STEM graduates because STEM's male prospects have given up before they've started.

Affirmative action, whether against Jews in the 1930s, or against white men now, pushes people away, makes them leave. And then you're left having to depend on your Aryans or later day Aryans.

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I don't know what company Mark Pesce works for, but he should quit.

I don't know what company Mark Pesce works for, but he should quit.

What he is talking about, I've worked as an employee and contractor for just over 30 companies.

And NONE of those companies is on the same planet as Mark Pesce. I'm an extroverted guy, I like to get in on scuttlebutt, and I've never heard anything like what he is talking about.

Mark, quit where you are an immigrate back to earth.

Or do some real research before you write your stories.

Are the people harassing the Uber IT person really other IT people? Or are they liberal arts grads twittering from underneath some rock somewhere? Maybe they are what you call in the UK NEETs. Maybe they aren't even male. After all, on the internet nobody knows if you're a dog, or a provocateur.

Anyway, Mark is probably not talking about Canadian IT shops, and if he is he is spouting false news.

Oh wait, it is an Op-Ed piece, it doesn't have to be factual. Right.

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WatAWorld
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If Seagates drives didn't fail so frequently they might have been able to hang on

I'm in Winnipeg, Canada, a city of 800,000. I've worked in IT in Winnipeg and in Toronto.

- When asked, I do not recommend young people go into IT unless they really want to.

- Don't go into it for the money, mostly the money is only okay.

- If they do really want to, I suggest they go in via an accounting, business administration, or engineering degree, not a computer science degree.

- If they want to do games development, I recommend that they do engineering and develop a strong hobby in illustration and painting.

If they are male I give them further cautions:

- In Canada IT doesn't pay so well. Of the top 10 professions you can do with a 4 year degree, IT is at best #10. Some years it is not even in the top 10.

- You should expect to have to leave Winnipeg, and pursue your career in either Toronto or the USA.

- Jobs are no longer automatic anywhere, not even in the big cities.

- Most companies at least partially treat their employees as if they were self-employed, relying at least partially on the programmer to stay up-to-date on his or her own time, although usually reimbursing the tuition fees for courses.

- Expect to be laid-off when the products you know lose popularity.

- Expect to spend many months between jobs while you try to do re-training on your own.

- Expect to remain a bottom rung worker.

- CIOs usually come from sales, sometimes accounting,never programming.

- In Canada there is heavy affirmative action, so advancement opportunities are limited for white and Asian males.

- The companies I've worked for and consulted into, about 2/3 the department will be male, with about 75% of programmers being male, and about 75% of project leaders being female.

- Being Asian (Chinese or East Asian) doesn't help, companies here are generally up to quota in male Asians.

- Being black or aboriginal Canadian or disabled does (I'm disabled) does definitely help, as does being female.

- There are a lot of female CIOs in Canada, and also female CEOs of IT companies, way out of proportion to the number of females in IT. They often worked there way up in IT, but some are from accounting or sales.

- The male CIOs you find are inevitably from outside of IT, usually sales, sometimes accounting.

So in Canada, IT is definitely a worse career for white and Asian males than it is for the disabled, blacks, aboriginal Canadians, and females. It isn't even close.

The day I went back to work disabled was the first time in 30 years anyone talked to me about promotion to project leader.

I'm disabled and spend a couple of days every month in hospital. I've got to say that most nurses are happier than any programmers I've ever met. And in Canada RNs make way more money than programmers.

I kind of regret not going into nursing instead.

Anyway, don't waste your life like I did. Do your research. Go into a real profession not IT.

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Official: America auto-scanned visitors' social media profiles. Also: It didn't work properly

WatAWorld
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At least Trump isn't claiming all programmers are sexist bigots

At least Trump isn't claiming all programmers are sexist bigots without examining each individual, unlike some publications I know.

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UK Home Office warns tech staff not to tweet negative Donald Trump posts

WatAWorld
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It is plain common sense

It is plain common sense not to criticise regulators, clients or customers while indicating your employer.

If you mention your employer, if you mention your professional association, you are dragging them into it.

Much better to have a separate personal account for political comment, preferably using a 'pen name' (pseudonym) that doesn't mention any employer or any professional credentials.

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That CIA exploit list in full: The good, the bad, and the very ugly

WatAWorld
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Your Twitter link in this is dead, so the garbage it contained has probably been withdrawn

"Thirdly, if you've been following US politics and WikiLeaks' mischievous role in the rise of Donald Trump, you may have clocked that Tuesday's dump was engineered to help the President pin the hacking of his political opponents' email server on the CIA. "

1. The CIA is barred by US federal law from spying domestically.

2. Are you guys mind readers? If no, then you must be making it up.

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WatAWorld
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Re: "Nothing to see here, folks, move along..."

"I know the CIA has made a practice of handing complete articles to the media and having them published as if independently written. But I didn't know The Register participated in the program."

I wonder if they'll be resignations over this at The Reg.

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WatAWorld
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The CIA is supposedly prohibited by US federal law from spying within the USA

The CIA is supposedly prohibited by US federal law from spying within the USA.

If it is, that is huge news. Huge huge news.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_Intelligence_Agency

"Unlike the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), which is a domestic security service, the CIA has no law enforcement function and is mainly focused on overseas intelligence gathering, with only limited domestic intelligence collection."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Resources_Division

"The National Resources Division (NR) is the domestic division of the United States Central Intelligence Agency. Its main function is to conduct voluntary debriefings of U.S. citizens who travel overseas for work or to visit relatives, and to recruit foreign students, diplomats and businesspeople to become CIA assets when they return to their countries"

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WatAWorld
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False news?

" was engineered to help the President pin the hacking of his political opponents' email server on the CIA"

The link in there is to a page that no longer exists.

Doubtless false news, so you should recraft your article changing your phrasing from "statement of fact" to "idle speculation".

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Linus Torvalds lashes devs who 'screw all the rules and processes' and send him 'crap'

WatAWorld
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"Are the devs working for Intel being paid or not? Assuming they are that makes them professionals. Intel donates their work to the Linux kernel for free. Does that make them amateurs?"

As covered in one of my other posts in this topic: The amature contributions to Linux and then the professional contribution to Linux.

The amateurs work for free, for experience or as part of class work.

The Intel, AMD, nVidia, etc developers are professionals paid by their employers. So are the developers working for banks, governments, consulting firms, and other companies that donate code to Torvalds.

Those professionals are employed by those other companies, not Linux.

With some exceptions, the objectives of the projects they are working on are not to improve Linux, but rather to get THEIR product to work with Linux, or to change Linux so it will play nice with THEIR internal app, or to eliminate some bug in Linux that affects their company and their clients.

- Their jobs are to fulfill the needs of their employer and their employer's clients.

- Their loyalty is to their employer and their employer's clients.

- They surely don't want to hurt Linux. They probably all want to play nice, because of professionalism and so their companies aren't banned.

- But their loyalties and objectives are not to make sure that Linux runs fine and bug free on obscure stuff at other companies. When their boss assigns them to a new project, regression testing of the old project ends.

So this stuff is created so Linux will work with their equipment or their internal applications, and it is donated to Linux for free. It is written by them so their stuff will work. And they're donating it to Torvalds for free. Even if it has bugs, it is arguably worth the price Torvalds pays for it.

Is Torvalds not even giving them a registered charity donation receipt so they can claim their effort on their income taxes?

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WatAWorld
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Re: "Does the chip vendor publish enough to let someone write a driver?"

" why they should publish their IP for free? Because of course even binary drivers are evil in Stallman "paradise", right? So, who looks stupid? Maybe those who prefer not to have drivers because they're not open code based on open specs?"

I don't think the specs are written in open code, I think they're written in English with graphics.

Are you thinking of example code that you can clone?

Marketability is the jurisdiction of the sales department. That the product is marketable requires usability. The sales department at the device manufacturer should ensure that either drivers are published or the specifications for drivers are published, for all the important operating systems the device will be marketed for.

And sale departments have their limits:

1. They can't override human resources and force employees to work with abusive contacts.

2. They often won't care about salability to tiny markets.

Inability to work with others is a big problem in Linux.

I mean, look at all the problems with Windows and Apple (the Apple problems are hidden from the public, but you're professionals so you know).

All those problems and Linux can't give away its product when the alternatives both cost money and are so bad.

And it isn't only home users who avoid Linux. It is the professionals at banks, governments, electronics manufacturers, engineering companies. They use Linux, but sparingly, only when they have to.

Ask yourself, why do those in the industry with so much varied experience in so many industries not go with Linux all the time? Is everyone else stupid and you're the only smart person? Or are your needs different than theirs? Or do you not understand your needs?

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WatAWorld
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Re: "If you are stupid enough to try and ship code that does not build"

@DS "Who writes Windows drivers?"

Sometimes MS employees, but usually paid employees of the hardware maker.

Why?

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WatAWorld
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Let us get definitions straight here:

If and only if you are normally paid for your work are you a professional.

If you work for free you're an amateur.

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WatAWorld
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Re: Grasshopper ...

"... allow me to impart some of the wisdom of the Ancient Coders: Do not begin to write code without first understanding full extent of the problem."

That is ideally true in the vast majority of cases, especially those with recently written in-house software at companies who've always had high quality staffing and procedures.

Then there are:

- The poor bastards stuck in shops where they're afraid to ask questions because they'll either be called stupid or ostracized as newbies.

- The poor bastards told to fix the current problem because it is urgent and that ramifications can be taken care of laster, and

- The poor bastards stuck in shops where most documentation was destroyed by people worried about their personal 'job security'.

More applicably to operating systems and massive shrink wrapped applications: There now there are systems installed in such a vast variety of companies all around the world, each using it for different purposes, different alphabets, each customizing it in their own way, each with different unforeseen needs, running on a vast variety of imperfect hardware, and then you'll realize that a detailed total understanding of the full extent of the problem is not always possible.

Understanding the full extent of the problem with mega complex massive multi-user software will come with sitting in your ashram chamber and accepting that your knowledge is not detailed that there will never be bug fixes, future releases and future versions.

You try to insist on get a sufficient understanding of the problem that you won't introduce bugs, while accepting that in such complex situations nothing is 100%.

(I think maybe that is how 'security researchers' see the world -- as a bunch of small shops with simple specs and simple human interactions, something that a human being can totally understand with a couple of months effort. That would explain why they think project scheduling, analysis, coding, unit testing, system integration testing, regression testing, beta testing and production roll-out, done over 15 countries with 45 different cultures and delivered to 137 countries in 55 languages should never take more than 90 days.)

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WatAWorld
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Re: Not surprise reaction from Linus

Lack of quality code comes from getting your code second hand, built by people paid to fulfill some paying companies own project, and then trying to send it out to the world.

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WatAWorld
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Re: I for one would welcome --

But I think the word for someone submitting code that does not build is not "narcissist" but "traitor".

That assumes they owe you some loyalty.

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WatAWorld
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Re: "If you are stupid enough to try and ship code that does not build"

Except that MS paid its developers rather than depending on charity donations of time from them.

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WatAWorld
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Charity case Torvalds gets what he he pays for.

If Torvalds were to treat his workers like human beings and pay them like professionals and he'd attract better quality developers.

Instead he's mostly got amateurs working for the glory of being associated with their spiritual leader / demi-god.

Aside for the amateurs, he's got donations from other companies, from people who work for the good of other companies, people who work to fulfill the needs of other companies, who are loyal to those other companies, and who follow the procedures, rules and leaders of those other companies.

Torvalds, you're getting what you pay for.

Be grateful for the charity. (And do you even hand out charitable donation receipts so people and companies can claim their donations to you on their income tax?)

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Google's Project Zero reveals another Microsoft flaw

WatAWorld
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Re: Capable of Learning?

It is shit simple to toss a brick through a competitors window and any idiot with a PhD could do it.

The difficulty is making brick proof glass cheap enough for widespread consumer use, nobody at any company and no academic has done that yet.

It seems LDS is the only one of you lot with practical experience in massive scale systems deployed on a wide variety of hardware under the administration of a massive multi-locationed enterprise.

Rushing out fixes is a sure fire recipe for disaster.

Which is why the ethical thing to do is to register the bug with your nation's CERT and only release zero days when your nation's CERT says enough time has elapsed.

Too many inexperienced arrogant people outside are guessing the complexity with orders of magnitude error.

Especially these security types. If they think they're so smart why haven't they created a better operating system? Come on, the way they talk they should have it done in a fortnight.

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WatAWorld
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Re: Capable of Learning?

Give it a rest??? I beg to differ.

Google's record is abysmal. They're still unable to push security updates out to their Android installations.

Yeah, sure, there are OEMs in between them and their customers, but the same is true for Microsoft. (Only Apple doesn't have that barrier.)

Google is living in a glass house and it it putting its customers in that same glass house.

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WatAWorld
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Is this the same Google that is still unable to update Android?

Dumb question, I know, but is this the same Google that is still unable to update Android?

Maybe instead of publishing "how to hacks" for other people's products and systems they should put some more time and effort into making their own products secure:

1. Figuring out how to make automatic updates work (like Apple did decades ago) and,

2. Getting vendors and re-sellers to agree to let that automatic update process work (like Microsoft did a decade ago).

Or is this some different Google?

Or does Google measure itself by different means than it measures other companies?

I know this other stuff, zero days in other people's products and systems, is important.

However, JOB ONE for Google should be taking care of its own products, its own customers and making stuff attached to its name secure -- rather than sitting up in their in their giant glass house throwing stones.

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How to nuke websites you don't like: Slam Google with millions of bogus DMCA takedowns

WatAWorld
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Re: Isn't that illegal?

It is libel, so a civil matter.

And if it gets a company's search rankings reduced, that is damages.

So it could be solved by tort law and law suits against the IP lawyers spamming out the takedown notices, IF google were to let the victims know they're being targeted and being damaged.

A $25 fee per DMCA takedown request is probably an easier solution.

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WatAWorld
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Re: Hey Google

Downgrading search ranking for an intellectual property law firm?

Intellectual property law firms probably would not care.

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WatAWorld
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Re: Simple Solution

Both billing and throttling probably require a change to the regulations before an ISP or search company could legally do it.

I think billing is a good solution, but probably $1 is not enough. Make it $10 or $25.

The DMCA regulations should be changed to allow a $25 fee for filing a takedown request.

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WatAWorld
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Re: Simple Solution

@Big John

"So the US voters are blocked from directly and immediately forcing their elected representatives to vote a certain way on a specific issue. Fine, let's say they could do so instead."

No that is not what removing the current corrupt system for selecting committee members in congress based on seniority would do.

People run for congress on many issues. You do not elect multiple congress people, one per issue. You vote for one candidate and he or she decides which way to vote on when it comes up.

That is how democracy works in most countries. You vote for the candidate who most goes along with your wishes.

What you're stuck with in the USA is voting for a candidate who doesn't give a damn about you and your wishes because that candidate has years of seniority that guarantee him a seat on a committee from which he can do pork barrelling. Pork barrelling is getting funds unjustly sent back to his district or state, often as kickbacks in exchange for campaign contributions.

What doing away with the corrupt system for selecting committee members in congress would do is give all congress people a chance at getting on a committee.

It would restore democracy and allow voters to vote the best person into office rather than the person with the longest incumbency.

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WatAWorld
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Isn't making false accusations libel ?

And isn't hurting a company's search ranking damages?

Google just needs to publish who is claiming what about whom and let the targets seek damages from the attacking lawyers.

They could also seek their disbarment.

Or the law could be changed so that filing a DMCA takedown notice requires a $25 filing fee.

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'First ever' SHA-1 hash collision calculated. All it took were five clever brains... and 6,610 years of processor time

WatAWorld
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Is this the same Google that has been unable to implement an automatic update for Android?

Dumb question, I know, but is the Google that sponsored this the same Google that has been unable to implement an automatic update for Android?

Maybe instead of publishing "how to hacks" for other people's products and systems they should put some more time and effort into making their own products secure:

1. Figuring out how to make automatic updates work (like Apple did decades ago) and,

2. Getting vendors and re-sellers to agree to let that automatic update process work (like Microsoft did a decade ago).

Or is this some different Google?

I know this other stuff, zero days in other people's products and systems, is important.

But JOB ONE for Google should be taking care of its own products, its own customers and making stuff attached to its name secure -- rather than sitting up their in their giant glass house throwing stones.

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Huge if true: iPhone 8 will feature 3D selfies, rodent defibrillator

WatAWorld
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Rodent defibrillators have a practical use in executive suites

Why buy a human defibrillator when your key headcount consists entirely of rodents?

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FAKE BREWS: America rocked by 'craft beer' scandal allegations

WatAWorld
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Is this going to be another class action suit get rich scheme for US lawyers?

Doubtless another US class action lawsuit where lawyers will seek tens of millions of dollars for themselves, and millions of dollars for those they claim were injured.

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Third time lucky: ICANN beats off .africa ban

WatAWorld
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Re: maybe

That would make it darn easy for the phishers to confuse people.

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WatAWorld
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One can only wonder at the motivation of ICANN staff and council.

One can only wonder at the motivation of ICANN staff and council.

What would motivate them to try and pull this off?

They must have been motivated somehow.

How did ICANN progress so quickly to exceed FIFA in apparent absurdity and subterfuge?

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'Maker' couple asphyxiated, probably by laser cutter fumes

WatAWorld
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no warning of toxic gases then, just aesthetics and housekeeping issues

"dust, debris and smell" no warning of toxic gases then, just aesthetics and housekeeping issues.

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Promising compsci student sold key-logger, infects 16,000 machines, pleads guilty, faces jail

WatAWorld
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Re: Programmer prosecuted for selling key-logger

Why pick on MS when Apple and Google do it too?

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2016/06/apples_differen.html

http://www.networkworld.com/article/2987479/security/your-privacy-and-apple-microsoft-and-google.html

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WatAWorld
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Re: Programmer prosecuted for selling key-logger

That is why "legitimate" sellers pretend to be selling their products for "testing purposes" for us on one's own and one's clients machines.

If you actually admit you're selling the keylogger for illegal intrusion purposes then you're committing a crime.

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WatAWorld
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Re: Another lost opportunity

Despite what it seems reading the news, the US military is not actually looking to upgrade the skills of serious criminals so they can be better serious criminals.

They don't hire known murderers for Seal Team 6, as an example.

They want people who will commit crimes, but only when following official orders.

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Kaspersky fixing serious certificate slip

WatAWorld
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Which is in error, the first or the last line of the story?

The story came out on the 4th and says Kaspersky is going to fix the problem.

But the last line of the story says Kaspersky fixed the problem on December 28th.

Which is it? They can't both be correct.

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The UK's Investigatory Powers Act allows the State to tell lies in court

WatAWorld
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"lies told by people whose sole task is to weave a stories that justify their salaries

"lies told by people whose sole task is to weave a story that will get you sent to prison or fined thousands of pounds"

I prefer, "lies told by people whose sole task is to weave a stories that justify their salaries by sending people to prison".

Justifying salaries and building internal empires, that is what the civil service excels at.

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Netflix and fill – our coffers: Canada mulls taxing vid streaming giant 5% of subs cash

WatAWorld
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Re: Hey look everybody! My VPN started working with US Netflix again!

Grade%, what would you guess Netflix offers in Canada compared to what it offers in the USA?

It has gone up. I'm guessing Netflix Canada now 30% of the number of titles that Netflix USA offers.

Netflix has never even really tried to succeed in Canada.

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WatAWorld
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To be Canadian is to be Shafted by Your Government

These are the same people that got our government to tax CDs, DVDs, USB sticks and computer memory (alone or in a device) to be taxed with the proceeds being sent to them, through the various Canadian guilds and Canadian associations of corporate copyright holders.

Earlier our wonderful government negotiated a free trade agreement, NAFTA, with the USA that didn't require free trade. No, manufacturers and importers are allowed to set special 'country prices' for Canada and it is legal for them to ban inputs from competitive sellers outside of Canada. For home electronics, for example, we generally pay 30% more than Americans. For bathroom products 20% more, and so on.

Sad thing is, our press here is so meager, there is so little competition, newspapers and TV stations don't even bother to do research and reporting. Government is free to curry favour with special interest groups, including special interest corporations by ripping off the middle class to give more money to mega- and multi-millionaires.

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Google's Project Zero tweaking Microsoft, because it did fix a bug

WatAWorld
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Flash Player update came in for MSIE before it came in for Google Chrome

In Canada, at least on my computers, the Flash Player update came in for MSIE before it came in for Google Chrome. The update didn't come a day later, after I sent a complaint email to Google.

However, I've worked in very large companies and usually they can't do anything in less than 2 months.

And MS has it even worse because of the vast number of companies whose products need to be integration tested and potentially modified when MS makes a change.

Witness Kaspersky complaining about how little time MS gave it for integration testing.

It seems a shame that inexperienced non-programmer types with no regard for the organizational complexities of an operating system can reduce reliability for all of us by setting unrealistic deadlines for programming professionals.

If the software maker seems to be ignoring you, formally disclose to your country's CERT. If your country's reports back that it is being ignored and that you should do a full disclosure, then do the full disclosure. Anything less is worse than being an ambulance chasing lawyer. (Ambulance chasing lawyers don't create clients by pushing people under buses.)

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AI is all trendy and fun – but it's still a long way from true intelligence, Facebook boffins admit

WatAWorld
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AI intelligence a long way from being real intelligence

Which means AI intelligence can currently only be used to replace CEOs?

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Donald Trump confirms TPP to be dumped, visa program probed

WatAWorld
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Re: Actual question

The executive branch (under the president) negotiates foreign treaties and the president signs them.

Then to come into effect properly the foreign treaty has to be ratified by the Senate.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_treaties

"Under the treaty clause of the United States Constitution, treaties come into effect upon final ratification by the President of the United States, provided that a two-thirds majority of the United States Senate concurs."

Note that the USA often makes use of "Reservations, understandings, and declarations". on treaties, things that state the USA's interpretation of the treaty. If you go looking you'll often see these clauses say things like, "The United States of American understands this treaty as not in any way restricting its ability to [do what it has always done/do whatever it wants/carry on as before]".

I used UN Treaties for examples, because they can be found easily on the web and they're usually easier for us laypeople to understand than trade treaties.

For example:

http://hrlibrary.umn.edu/usdocs/civilres.html

which makes the USA's signature on this treaty arguably meaningless within the USA

http://www.ohchr.org/en/professionalinterest/pages/ccpr.aspx

Another example:

https://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-9&chapter=4&clang=_en#13

for this treaty:

http://www.ohchr.org/EN/ProfessionalInterest/Pages/CAT.aspx

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WatAWorld
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Re: YES!

100% for certain, if elected Clinton would have done what was good for her herself and her fellow mega millionaire friends on the TPP.

She was the face of stable change and continuing the USA's bipartisan War on the Middle Class.

(The question now is whether:

a. Trump will be no better than Clinton and now join the war on the middle class.

b. Or will be he impeached for whatever. Or

c. Will he join Sanders and Warren to fight almost the entire rest of Washington work to end the War on the Middle Class.

Reading earlier today, perhaps the various FCC appointments he makes and approves may be our first real indication of which path he chooses.

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WatAWorld
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are you saying all American programmers are too stupid to learn?

" the local talent aren't skilled how you need"

It is kind of racist against American programmers to think they are too stupid to learn yet another programming language or methodology on top of the three they already know.

From what I've personally seen a few times, befriend a co-worker on a work permit and you'll find some unfortunate person learning the programming language whose smooth-talking American salesperson lied to the client about them already having 3 years experience in it. And they're working 4 hours daily unpaid overtime to make up for that salesperson's lie.

An employer knows for certain if his own person has the work experience. And sales people from outside agencies can lie very smoothly.

Probably 95% of work visas are for persons with routine skills that could be picked up by a local programmer or analyst in less than 3 months.

The other 5% of work visas are genuinely needed for people working for employers on projects of such short duration with such rare skills they are only needed in the country for 6 months or fewer months, less time that it would take to train someone local to do the job.

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