* Posts by WatAWorld

1333 posts • joined 24 Feb 2012

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Chinese Super Micro 'spy chip' story gets even more strange as everyone doubles down

WatAWorld

Glomar Explorer; Gulf of Tonkin; UFOs and SR71 & F117 test flights; ...

"Faced with such uncertainty, some are reaching for a unifying explanation: that Bloomberg was misled by some in the intelligence community that wish, for their own reasons, to raise the specter of Chinese interference in the global electronics supply chain. Bloomberg could be accurately reporting an intelligence misinformation campaign."

Yes, obviously it is easier for Five Eyes intelligence agencies to thoroughly hack and backdoor stuff totally designed and built within either Five Eyes nations or vassal states. And that is important because you can't infiltrate something by gluing a tiny piece of silicon on it.

Here in Canada we've constantly got the USA trying to tell us to exclude Huawaii from government and private company contracts.

But shouldn't Bloomberg have asked someone at MIT, Stanford, Intel or AMD whether this could function? That a piece of silicon glued to the surface of a circuit board and not connected to conductors could do anything useful?

Bloomberg might well have been duped by the US government, US government's (like probably all national governments) has a long history* of dubbing their press, but an outfit like Bloomberg should have caught it.

* And in the case of the USA, a long officially admitted history. Other countries, especially those on the "other side" don't usually admit things 30 years later.

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WatAWorld

Re: A Matter of Trust

So you're saying it is a matter of belief and religion.

Do we believe in Bloomberger Infallibility? Are we of the Bloomberg faith?

Pretty much the only electrical engineers and physicists who believe the story are going to be doing so in the face of facts they know. So yeah, I totally agree, it would be a religious belief for them.

To most professional programmers, the thermodynamic, electrical and quantum mechanical stuff going on inside a computer is magic that they just accept. (It would be useless details that get in the way of coding.) So out of ignorance, and not realizing the limitations of their expertise, they might sincerely believe Bloomberg.

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WatAWorld

"China has repeatedly demonstrated significant skill in industrial espionage. I don't doubt they have the means to pull this off, "

They've demonstrated zero technical skill in creating electronic devices capable of high speed data manipulation without a power source and without connection.

Obviously any technologically advanced country can produce a tiny IC and place it on a circuit board. But just sitting there not connected to anything accomplishes nothing.

The USA has even greater expertise and more practical experience, but they couldn't make a piece of unconnected silicon sitting on a non-conductive area of a PC board hack a system.

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WatAWorld

Why are ICs always in large packages, how is this dot powered?

It is easy to create an IC smaller than the point of a pencil.

1. Problem #1 is that you need to connect it to power and ground and data buses -- which is why ICs are put into large packages, and why there are circuit board traces leading to them.

2. The dot had neither a windmill nor a solar panel nor a connection to a powerbus, so how is it supposedly powered? Itsy bitsy tiny little nuclear reactor?

And how does it connect to data paths? Psychokinetics?

Simple physics proves that the story has huge errors in its vague technical descriptions and photos.

And with the technical details like power and data connections left out, Bloomberg's story has less than zero credibility.

+++ That said, I do not doubt for a minute that the USA, UK, China, and probably Russia ALL engage in this sort of hardware hacking on a regular basis against key non-governmental targets. +++

(Doubtlessly this sort of spying occurs between governments, but with government targets it is expected. Hopefully no educated person is so arrogant, imperialistic and immoral* that they think their government should be exempted from other governments doing to it what it does to others.

* Accepting others doing to you what you do to others is part of the Lord's Prayer -- the "trespassing part". People living in countries that are truly and sincerely Christian do not claim exceptionalism.

To claim exceptionalism while claiming to be Christian is to lie to yourself and your god.)

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Decoding the Chinese Super Micro super spy-chip super-scandal: What do we know – and who is telling the truth?

WatAWorld

It is a matter of choice

I see this as a a matter of choice.

Your choices are to be spied on in similar ways by the Americans, the Chinese, or by one of the other big players.

Not being spied on at all is not an option.

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Resident evil: Inside a UEFI rootkit used to spy on govts, made by you-know-who (hi, Russia)

WatAWorld

We know you'd never present us one made by the USA or UK, so yeah

"Resident evil: Inside a UEFI rootkit used to spy on govts, made by you-know-who (hi, Russia)"

Or China. But never the USA, UK, Canada, Australia or NZ -- not because they don't exist, but you cannot or would not publish it due to our laws.

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Top Euro court: UK's former snooping regime breached human rights

WatAWorld

Re: So how long until this?

Chekism: where the secret political police strongly control all spheres of society.

If you look at the USA and Russia. If you look at all the ex CIA, KGB and FSB officers working for hedge funds, or in Russia being oligarchs, you can see that those countries already have Chekist regimes.

Why do retired senior US intelligence officials get to keep their top secret security clearances? Why are they entitled to on-going briefing on top secret matters when they're no longer working for the government? It is so they can run business, advice hedge funds, control retirement funds, and control private industry.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chekism

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WatAWorld

Yeah, as expected. And they knew what they were doing when they broke the law.

Yeah, as expected. And they knew what they were doing when they broke the law.

But they're the government so they won't face prosecution.

The laws we pay them to write and enforce aren't good enough for our civil servants to obey. The laws they write and enforce only apply to us.

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Microsoft accidentally let encrypted Windows 10 out into the world

WatAWorld

It is an early test version -- only an idiot would install it and not expect problems

It is an early test version -- only an idiot would install it and not expect problems.

Sheesh, 19H1, skip ahead version.

I know, MS should have "test version" superimposed on the Start Menu and Desktop of every Insider version, they don't. But still, after all this time who would not expect an early test version to have serious problems?

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It's been 5 years already, let's gawp at Microsoft and Nokia's bloodbath

WatAWorld
Trollface

You could equally say that about France, Germany, Algeria and Argentina

"Finland – a nation most Americans couldn't find on a map before the 1990s. Many probably still can't."

;)

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Spies still super upset they can't get at your encrypted comms data

WatAWorld

Re: Brexit, anyone?

From my understanding they're dead against Brexit. It will cost them their connection to EU police and intelligence databases.

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WatAWorld

Paraphrasing

In an official communiqué on the confab, they claim that Russian, Chinese and North Korean inability to access encrypted content risks undermining democratic justice systems, because our the guys working for the Five Eyes can't access it either – and issue a veiled warning to industry.

Yeah, "we" need to be easily spied upon so that we can be safe.

"We" need to be easily hackable so that we can be safe.

"We" being everyone who does not work for a national security agency, and includes our enterprises, our entrepreneurs, our inventers, our lawyers, our politicians, our academics, our physicians, our artists, and our teenage daughters.

The guys at that confab, they're a bunch of chekists.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chekism

Look at the management of US-based hedge funds. They all seem to have ex CIA and ex MI5 on them.

And of course it goes without saying that major businesses in Russia are mostly run by ex KGB, FSB officers (KGB and FSB being the successors to the Cheka). Same in China with their ex MSS officers.

To put it bluntly: How can one be loyal to their country without being loyal to their country's peaceful citizens? Are they not instead being loyal to their agencies and each other?

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Hello 'WOS': Windows on Arm now has a price

WatAWorld

Re: The market for 25 hour battery life is very limited

You're exactly right there.

It is senseless marketing to focus on over-achieving something that need only be totally acceptable.

A race for low weight is pointless after a sufficiently low weight for the target use is achieved.

A race for thinness is pointless after sufficient thinness is achieved (and may even backfire because it means the victim, er uh, customer need to buy an ugly case to keep it in.

And a race for battery life is pointless after a realistic 18 hours is achieved.

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WatAWorld

Re: Wipe Windows...

FYI, running Linux on ARM isn't anything new.

But Linux is an operating system that has difficulty finding acceptance when it is given away free.

Shilling for Linux in Windows discussions has been tried many times over the years and it's done nothing to help its acceptance.

Maybe the Linux guys paid people to run it they could get some traction in the mainstream market place? Just a suggestion.

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WatAWorld

"ubiquitous WIFI" ???

u·biq·ui·tous

yo͞oˈbikwədəs/Submit

adjective

present, appearing, or found everywhere.

Maybe in a few parts of Canada. Toronto and Montreal are mere specks in this great land of ours. And not every coffee shop is part of a chain.

It isn't going to work for you when you're sitting in your car at the side of a road. Or in a client's steel warehouse. It isn't going to work at your cottage. It isn't going to work in a lot of places.

And even when you're in a place where it works, you might be in a place where "high speed" is 100-300 kbps, like North of 60, or in the shadow of a mountain, or any where in Manitoba outside of Winnipeg or Brandon.

Like Chromebooks, these will be useful as "portables" in schools, universities, and offices where they can stay on-premises in an area of known good reliable and fast cell phone or wi-fi coverage.

Which means battery life is immaterial, since they can easily be plugged in.

And weight weight savings below 2 kg won't matter.

Wider use in mainstream Canada will require eliminating the dependence on always being connected. I think that will be readily possible within a 3-4 years.

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WatAWorld

Do I take it that "Always Connected" is marketing speak for "Only Works When Connected"?

Do I take it that "Always Connected" is marketing speak for "Only Works When Connected"?

It would be nice if we all lived in major cities and worked in offices. Must be nice.

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CADs and boffins get some ThinkPad love

WatAWorld

Re: not enough

And that is the reality isn't it. While the marketing types and the journalists focus on thinness, or imaginary clock rates that might be possible, thinking buyers look at a manufacturer's track record with support when deciding what to buy.

Nothing is more important when making an IT purchase than whether the manufacturer will support the customer for the life of the product.

Journalists, I suppose regularly getting new products to report on, and with special support channels provided by marketing departments, don't see the issue -- but it is the main issue for the rest of us.

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WatAWorld

tech journalists should run the CPU to 100% while measuring the CPU temperature

The phrase "Almost Apple-like", I was expecting to read about 2 year-old hardware in a new model. Anyways,

"The P1 is a new addition to the P-series that embeds workstation specs into something an Apple user might recognise: a thin and light portable"

Meaning when tech journalists get their hands on one they should run the CPU to 100% while measuring the case or junction temperature (which ever is available) to ensure that it stays below 85C and that there is no throttling.

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Hackers can cook you alive using 'microwave oven' sat-comms – claim

WatAWorld

Re: I truly hope so

I am one of those who thinks the researchers claims include some exaggerated speculation, particularly on using radar units as microwave ovens. Also he leaves out TCAS. How could he leave out TCAS?

There is TCAS (traffic collision avoidance system) and I truly hope TCAS is secure because pilots are trained to obey any Resolution Alerts (RAs) TCAS issues immediately and almost without exception, including over-ruling ATC instructions.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traffic_collision_avoidance_system#Pilot/aircrew_interaction_during_a_TCAS_event

TCAS was not originally satellite based, but it seems many units use GPS information provided by the aircraft, and that GPS information is of course satellite based.

www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/media/Advisory_Circular/TCAS%20II%20V7.1%20Intro%20booklet.pdf page 21

"With passive surveillance, position data provided by an onboard navigation source is broadcast from the intruder's Mode S transponder. The position data is typically based on GPS and received on own ship by the use of Mode S extended squitter, i.e. 1090 MHz ADS-B, also known as 1090ES. Standards for Hybrid Surveillance have been published in RTCA DO-300."

As I say, TCAS can issue Resolution Alerts (RAs) which are orders to pilots overrule even instructions from the ATC. Pilots are trained to do what TCAS says without question.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traffic_collision_avoidance_system

"TCAS involves communication between all aircraft equipped with an appropriate transponder (provided the transponder is enabled and set up properly). Each TCAS-equipped aircraft interrogates all other aircraft in a determined range about their position (via the 1.03 GHz radio frequency), and all other aircraft reply to other interrogations (via 1.09 GHz). This interrogation-and-response cycle may occur several times per second.[1][2]

"The TCAS system builds a three dimensional map of aircraft in the airspace, incorporating their range (garnered from the interrogation and response round trip time), altitude (as reported by the interrogated aircraft), and bearing (by the directional antenna from the response). Then, by extrapolating current range and altitude difference to anticipated future values, it determines if a potential collision threat exists.

"TCAS and its variants are only able to interact with aircraft that have a correctly operating mode C or mode S transponder. A unique 24-bit identifier is assigned to each aircraft that has a mode S transponder.

"The next step beyond identifying potential collisions is automatically negotiating a mutual avoidance manoeuver (currently, manoeuvers are restricted to changes in altitude and modification of climb/sink rates) between the two (or more) conflicting aircraft. These avoidance manoeuvers are communicated to the flight crew by a cockpit display and by synthesized voice instructions.[1][2]

"A protected volume of airspace surrounds each TCAS equipped aircraft. The size of the protected volume depends on the altitude, speed, and heading of the aircraft involved in the encounter. The illustration below gives an example of a typical TCAS protection volume.

"System components

A TCAS installation consists of the following components:[1][2]

"TCAS computer unit

Performs airspace surveillance, intruder tracking, its own aircraft altitude tracking, threat detection, resolution advisory (RA) manoeuvre determination and selection, and generation of advisories. The TCAS Processor uses pressure altitude, radar altitude, and discrete aircraft status inputs from its own aircraft to control the collision avoidance logic parameters that determine the protection volume around the TCAS aircraft.

"Antennas

The antennas used by TCAS II include a directional antenna that is mounted on the top of the aircraft and either an omnidirectional or a directional antenna mounted on the bottom of the aircraft. Most installations use the optional directional antenna on the bottom of the aircraft. In addition to the two TCAS antennas, two antennas are also required for the Mode S transponder. One antenna is mounted on the top of the aircraft while the other is mounted on the bottom. These antennas enable the Mode S transponder to receive interrogations at 1030 MHz and reply to the received interrogations at 1090 MHz.

'Cockpit presentation

The TCAS interface with the pilots is provided by two displays: the traffic display and the RA display. These two displays can be implemented in a number of ways, including displays that incorporate both displays into a single, physical unit. Regardless of the implementation, the information displayed is identical. The standards for both the traffic display and the RA display are defined in DO-185A.[4]

...

"TCAS works in a coordinated manner, so when an RA is issued to conflicting aircraft, a required action (i.e., Climb. Climb.) has to be immediately performed by one of the aircraft, while the other one receives a similar RA in the opposite direction (i.e., Descend. Descend.).

...

"When an RA is issued, pilots are expected to respond immediately to the RA unless doing so would jeopardize the safe operation of the flight. This means that aircraft will at times have to manoeuver contrary to ATC instructions or disregard ATC instructions. In these cases, the controller is no longer responsible for separation of the aircraft involved in the RA until the conflict is terminated.

"

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WatAWorld

Re: I truly hope so

"Yes, you may safely make that assumption. Satellite comms are not used for flight control, only for communications. You could possibly feed erroneous position information to ground operations (though that does not include ATC), but not to the flight crew or flight systems."

So you're trying to tell us that aircraft do not have autopilots that navigate by GPS position?

Or are you not counting GPS as satellite communications?

I think there are also orders sent to aircraft over the middle of the major oceans where VHS is unreliable.

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It's time for TLS 1.0 and 1.1 to die (die, die)

WatAWorld

Requiring old stuff to meet KEY new requirements is routine in the physical world

Passenger aircraft. Railway tanker cars. Trucks. Cars.

Procor is junking tens of thousands DOT-111 tanker rail cars when the new tanker car standard comes into force in Canada and the USA. These think aren't cheap.

Old buildings must meet current fire codes. And old buildings that are extensively renovated must meet current building codes (building codes being more complete than fire codes).

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WatAWorld

Re: Microsoft

The dates:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.NET_Framework_version_history

Things that were adequate in 2010 are out-of-date and inadequate now.

Is it really that surprising given the rate that hackers and academics find obscure bugs.

If we had to had to wait for ordinary profit-oriented criminal programmers to find the bugs, the products just might perhaps still be secure, against criminals for another year or two. But that would require living in an alternate reality.

(Of course nothing is secure against major state signals intelligence agencies. They can always find ways in. Even TLS 1.4 connections won't be secure, because if outfits like the NSA can't find ways through it, they have many ways around it.)

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WatAWorld

Hum, doesn't this accurately describe how emissions tests place new standards on old cars in the UK?

https://www.classiccarsforsale.co.uk/blog/market-trends/historic-cars-win-exemption-in-ultra-low-emission-zone

Yeah, classic cars get an exemption. But classic cars aren't used for everyday driving. They're used sparingly by collectors and museums.

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WatAWorld

"This is a bit like saying ALL cars must pass current standards and so most over a few years old are then automatically off to the scrappers."

Exactly, which is what we should be copying.

This is the case in Canada too. And California. And probably the rest of the USA.

Classic cars get an exemption -- but then classic cars are driven sparingly by their owners, and not driven commercially.

In the UK a car has to be pre-1980 to get the exemption. In Canada before 1988.

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IBM to GTS: We want you to 'rotate' clients every two years

WatAWorld

Re: Looks like bad management

Ginny isn't going to fire herself for just cause.

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WatAWorld

Re: IBM about 25 years behind Cannot Stand Continuity

@MAH, in Canada IBM charges 3 to 5 times what it pays people. And it charges for every hour worked. And it adjusts those rates for inflation, and if the client has a good year.

I don't think giving a headcount a 5% pay hike would make the account unprofitable.

That said, yeah I agree, if he's content in his/her current job, if they're already fully qualified at it, then he or she should content with only getting inflation increases.

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WatAWorld

Re: @AC

In Canada the traditional solution to this is to assign the headcount to a job they're incapable of doing. Either a job above their skill level, or a job where the required quotas are unachievable.

You reassign the headcount, and then when they fail, you fire them for just cause.

One has to be careful though, because if the re-assignment is too different from the old job the headcount can claim "constructive dismissal". So you can't do this by assigning a "coder" to sales, or a salesperson to accounting. You'd assign a coder to a different type of coding. That way the headcount doesn't have a case.

It is ruthless.

They need to address the issue that older employees who are targets of the RIF can claim discrimination when they can show that there is still demand for their skills.

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WatAWorld

Re: Interesting... color me skeptical.

You're right to be skeptical. This was not announced as a training opportunity for headcounts. And it won't be.

I imagine they'll take your Oracle DBA who has 15 years of RDBMS skills and send him to another Oracle DBA account.

That saves training costs. Saves the new to reduce billing rate. And still achieves the purpose of preventing the client becoming attached to the headcount/resource/person actually providing their service.

And when there are no more Oracle DBA jobs, you sack the headcount and hire a new grad who knows Banana NDBMS.

IBM is a sales and marketing company. Effectively its only real employees are in sales and marketing. They're the wizards that can sell ice to eskimos at $500k a tonne.

The people actually doing work for clients are effectively external contract headcount. You don't want your client becoming attached to external contract headcount.

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WatAWorld

Re: Could be good for the techies

It would be good for the techkies that are not laid off due to not having a client to stick up for them during layoffs. They'd avoid stagnation and keep their skills current -- assuming IBM doesn't just lay them off.

And it would be good for IBM too. Staff more current. Staff better trained. If they were to actually train current staff on new technology.

BUT IBM gave up keeping tech staff up to date 2 decades ago.

Now they layoff the old and hire the new.

So I'll stick with my initial feeling that this is to make layoffs easier for IBM to make.

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WatAWorld

IBM brass got fed up with clients complaining about key people being laid-off

If the client doesn't have a relationship with you, then the client won't interfere next month when we frivilously lay you off.

Exclusive IBM will ask Global Technology Services engineers to "rotate" from "existing assignments" every two years in a working model overhaul that some staff warned could weaken client relations.

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You know that silly fear about Alexa recording everything and leaking it online? It just happened

WatAWorld

Re: 'This was an extremely rare occurrence.' In other words it was not unique.

"Extremely rare" In other words it was not unique.

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WatAWorld

Do you hear Yanny, Laura or Alexa?

Do you hear Yanny, Laura or Alexa?

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LLVM contributor hits breakpoint, quits citing inclusivity intolerance

WatAWorld

Women only make up 2 out of 3 university students in the USA, better fix that now.

It is 2018, not 1960. The people in the USA who are young women entering university and the workforce today have benefited from affirmative action and female centric learning techniques all their lives.

And that shows up in the statistics that show them as being 2 out of every 3 university students (65%).

Geeze, better start an affirmative action program, they're only up to 2/3.

So let's use systemic discrimination to push that 1/3 men out of the only fields they're still comfortable studying. (Systemic discrimination is what we call inadvertent discrimination that results from actions taken for some other purpose. For example, putting your job ads in an ethnic newspaper makes it seem like you're only interested in people from that ethnic group and deters other people applying.)

STEM is only male majority because young women (wisely) do not see it as a good choice.

The study of STEM fields is largely depersonalizing (how often does integral calculus or number theory come up in conversation). And it is hugely thankless.

I'm getting older now. I'm in hospital a lot.

And I'll tell you this: the sort of people who go into engineering, smart and practically minded, if they're women they go into nursing or medicine.

And they love their work more than any engineer or IT person I encountered in my entire career. They get more sincere heartfelt thank-yous in an hour than you'll get in your life.

Plus:

1. Nobody is going to ship their jobs off to the third world.

2. They're employers will pay to train them to keep them up-to-date with technology changes.

3. They're helping real people, rather than helping the rich get richer.

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WatAWorld

Re: Suggestion: Read the messages on the LLVM mailing list

I thought the code of conduct was actually pretty good -- and it would be if it were interpreted literally.

But if adjudicators are going to assume one sex or gender (they're different things) are always telling the truth, if they're going to get fussy about words and language, then no.

But otherwise the actual Code of Conduct reads like something I'd sign on to.

But being affiliated with a group that seeks to advantage a group that already makes up 2 out of 3 university students in the USA -- that makes no sense.

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WatAWorld

Re: White Hysteria?

1) The point of diversity initiatives is not to "punish you for the sins of your ancestors" as one commentard below has said. It really is an attempt to level the playing field, a playing field that white heterosexual men (like me!) barely ever recognise as actually being tilted.

...

2) ...Somebody below complained that they literally "could not be heard" because they were white and middle aged. Well, that doesn't seem very fair, but welcome to the world as perceived by most women, which is even worse if you are any colour of woman other than white.

3) The term Social Justice Warrior really irritates me. It seems some of the people chucking it around really are "snowflakes" to pick up another pejorative term which started out with the alt-right.

Gee, sounds like something straight out of a Goebbels speech about how oppress and ignored Germans were after WWI.

How is discriminating on the basis of skin color going to fix a playing field that was unlevel due to class and social connections?

Women not being heard, but read any newspaper today or listen to any TV station. What is the majority? It is women.

Going back decades, men never talked about being men. Since the end of WWI when regular men got the vote (which was the same year women got the vote in the UK), what men voiced was for the good of their industry or their country, not their sex.

SJWs and you don't like the term. But you sure like terms like alt-right.

I forgive you because you're obviously too young or read too few newspapers:

SJW is the label THEY GAVE THEMSELVES. We capitalized the term because they don't fight for social justice, they fight for identity politics and discrimination.

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WatAWorld

Re: Proposal for Reg Comments

Whites are about 85% plus of the said regions population..

..and queer / other folk are less than 2% of the population. < 1% female. < 2% males. "

...

Last statement made based on a very very large sample encountered while living in San Francisco over the last 30 plus years.

The problem is so many of us are so ethnocentric. What we see is how it is.

But that isn't reality.

Your own all powerful privileged "racial" group only rules 4 out of 27 countries in the Americas.

Reality is that by US dictionary definitions only half of caucasians are white. Their white excludes Asian Indians, North Africans, West Asians, Hispanics, and anyone else who isn't pale pink in winter.

The world is 35% Chinese Asian. 25% Other Asian. 19% white. 19% black.

To us the world is North American and Europe. But Europe is the second smallest continent next to Australia.

Africa is larger than the USA, China, and Europe combined.

Regarding the prominence of non-cis males. For centuries until maybe 1850, the vast majority of male leading members of the European Royal families engaged in gay and straight sex.

It would be truer to say that cis males only began to run things after the industrial revolution. But even that isn't true. It is the children of the wealthy who run things. In limited parts of the world the children of the wealthy just happened to be male, and people assumed they were cis male.

Hence: Cis male comments should be limited to 19% of the column inches. This can be accomplished by using a dynamic font size, ranging from 0.5 pt to 3 pt.

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WatAWorld

There are weeks where I don't come on The Reg because they've published SJW propaganda about others. But their reporting on this story is not biased enough that I'd call it propaganda.

It is good to read that at least one person in our industry is taking on social norms and the establishment to dispute what is today's "scientifically based acceptable form of" racism and sexism.

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WatAWorld

Re: Most discriminated against

In the USA and Canada "unmarried males" have both the lowest average income and lowest average wealth of any of the 4 marital status/sex combinations.

1. Married males

2. Unmarried females

3. Married females

4. Unmarried males

That is grouping together all ages, all educations, all occupations.

If you want to know who is the most discriminated against, I think you'd have to look outside of natural protected groupings.

Back in the 1960s it might have been women who could type. If you were a woman and couldn't type, you'd be hired as a clerk and might learn the business. If you could type you'd be a typist until that occupation became obsolete.

Today it might be the very ugly and those with particular sorts of mental illnesses that prevent them seeking assistance from others.

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WatAWorld

Re: The only valid form of positive discrimination

- Should we discriminate in favour of Kim Jong-un's daughter just because she is female.

- Should we discriminate in favour of a given slave owner's son just because he is black?

- Should we assume that the children of Africa's dictators are all disadvantaged and deserving of privileges to compensate them for the "undeniable advantages' white privilege has given the sons of Virginia's coal miners?

Positive discrimination is only valid when based on individual circumstances, not simply skin color, sex, or gender.

If it were in my power I'd definitely slightly discount the grades of students that had elite schooling, excessive private tutors, and so on.

And I'd definitely give a slight boost to orphans, people suffering chronic disease in childhood, or who'd grown up in war-torn countries.

And not just for schooling, but also for jobs, up to say age 29 -- a slight boost to those individuals who'd been disadvantaged by their parents lack of wealth, and a slight discount to those who'd been excessively advantaged by their parents wealth.

Positive discrimination based on individual circumstances is valid.

Positive discrimination based on skin color or sex is no better than the positive discrimination done in Germany during the 1920s and 30s. "Oh but we have statistics to prove our case." So did they. And their press supported it too.

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This post has been deleted by a moderator

WatAWorld

It would be nice to see some people in the journalism industry stand up for the truth too.

A community that discriminates is not an inclusive community.

Only small-minded ethnocentric people think that all white Americans males were:

1. had one or more parents

2. did not grow up in war torn countries

3. did not suffer from chronic disease

4. did not get physically bullied at school for years

5. never suffered sex abuse from their parents, schools, or priests

Only small-minded ethnocentric people think that all non-white and female people had to endure such hardship.

It is good to see that some people in other industries are standing up for the truth.

It would be nice to see some people in the journalism industry stand up for the truth too.

The UK is not the USA, but look at the list of the UK's richest 10 people. Only 7 of the 10 fall into what is being assumed today by The Establishment (including journalists at recognized publications and modern "human rights advocates") as universally disadvantaged groups.

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IBM turnover shrinks $28bn in 6 years but execs laugh all the way to the bank

WatAWorld

Re: You get the behaviour you reward

Far be it from any Wall Street analyst to advocate for over all lower salaries amongst corporate executives, since their salaries and Wall Street analyst salaries are mis-incentivised to similar levels.

Look at problems the FTC has found with IPOs, bubbles, and misleading company and government audit statements and bond ratings over the years.

[i]No, the quote is from a Wall Street analyst, and they are taking a tilt not at how much directors and officers were paid, but what they were paid for. IBM has become Indian Business Machinations precisely because the incentives have encouraged that, but did nothing to encourage growth.[/i]

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WatAWorld

Re: there really is a crisis in capitalism

I was thinking about that when I read about the TBS scandal/crisis.

The CEO is taking personal charge. The company is totally at risk and the CEO is useless to prevent it or fix it. The company's survival totally relies on people making 5 and 6 figure incomes giving the right advise up the ladder, and doing a good job going down the ladder.

The top of the ladder is no more useful than a flagpole.

Mega overpaid CEOs are more a liability, due to how they misguide the company to maximize their own profits.

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WatAWorld

Re: This makes happy reading - enjoy

LOL

https://www.reuters.com/finance/stocks/insider-trading/IBM?symbol=&name=&pn=3&sortDir=&sortBy=

A quick glance shows their executives have accurately measured IBM's value -- they only buy at a price of $0.00.

(Of course those are stock options. But that is the only time they buy.)

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WatAWorld

Re: Mixed Bag from Customer Perspective

IBM has always had the best sales people. And more and more over the past 2 decades that is what has kept them afloat.

With products and services like theirs, they totally rely on having the best sales people in the industry to persuade customers to go with them as a supplier or a prime contractor.

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WatAWorld

Re: Myopic?

Government of Canada is going through that with its Phoenix Payroll system.

Strange thing is that IBM's sales people are so good that they've persuaded Canadian civil servants that the changing specifications due to inadequate analysis are the government's fault.

It is so cliche, the civil servants apologizing for the mess they got IBM into.

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WatAWorld

Imagine if grunts acted against the interests of the company unless specially incentivesed

Imagine if grunts acted that way, needing special incentives to take action for the good of the company.

A knowledge company is only as valuable as the knowledge and work-ethic of its employees.

Shareholders temporarily own the company (because they can freely buy and sell shares), but in a knowledge company it is employees who are the company.

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WatAWorld

And yet when TBS has problems it calls in IBM

Had IBM previously done any work at TBS?

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Anon biz bloke wins milestone Google Right To Be Forgotten lawsuit

WatAWorld

What is damming to a person's reputation is not that Google says something, but that Google has a link to a respected national newspaper saying something.

Google echos everything on the web, including pub-talk, junk in tabloids, comments, speculation, and blogs. No sensible person makes decisions based on Google's preview of an article, instead they click through to read the source of the news article and judge based on the reliability of that source.

Google is/has been an authoritative search engine -- it has never an authoritative source of facts.

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WatAWorld

The correct ruling, in the sense of natural justice and rehabilitation, would have been for the judge to direct the plaintiffs to go after the newspaper with the incorrect/outdated information.

Google was just an easy target. These guys got a judge to go along with them and given them relief from Google's search results.

Do this a few thousand times and Google will go the way of Hotbot, Alta Vista, Yahoo, and all the other formerly essential seemingly preeminent now obsolete search providers.

Do this enough and we'll be looking up potential business partners and suppliers using other search engines, since Google will no longer be reliable.

If the newspaper article on the web was reporting inaccurate libel, then the newspaper article should be corrected.

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