* Posts by Allonymous Coward

232 posts • joined 17 Feb 2012

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Apple unleashes FoundationDB as an open source project

Allonymous Coward
Pint

Re: Can someone explain in simple terms what this is and why I'd want to use it?

Thanks. Have an upvote and TGIF pint icon for a genuinely useful and enlightening answer.

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Allonymous Coward
Windows

Can someone explain in simple terms what this is and why I'd want to use it?

I get that it's a "distributed ACID-compliant NoSQL datastore". But aren't there a million of those already?

For someone who doesn't keep up with the latest web-scale trends, what makes this great compared to, say, Mongo or Couch?

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You're a govt official. You accidentally slap personal info on the web. Quick, blame a kid!

Allonymous Coward
Boffin

Re: Unisys screwed up

just making an html^H^H^H^HHTTP request

FTFY.

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Linus Torvalds schedules Linux Kernel 5.0, then maybe delays 'meaningless' release

Allonymous Coward
Windows

I can't believe no-one's mentioned TeX versioning yet

Where the version number asymptotically approaches π

Icon because get off my lawn, etc.

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Allonymous Coward
Flame

Re: why use version numbers at all?

go for YYYYMMDD-style date stamps

I used to work with a guy who liked that numbering scheme.

He was one of the biggest assholes I've ever had the dubious pleasure of working with, for many reasons unrelated to his release numbering preferences.

Ever since then, I've had an irrational dislike of date-based release naming.

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2018's Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon laptop is a lovely lappie

Allonymous Coward

a configuration in search of a useful scenario if ever there was one

I know someone who likes this particular ThinkPad feature. They do a lot of work up ladders and apparently a screen that folds flat makes this easier. No, I don't know why - easier to hold in one hand maybe.

I don't think I'd spunk more than £2K on a laptop I was going to take up a ladder though.

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*Thunk* No worries, the UPS should spin up. Oh cool, it's in bypass mode

Allonymous Coward

it shouldn't take months to sort out a new circuit board

Hold on, didn't you say this was public sector?

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F-35B Block 4 software upgrades will cost Britain £345m

Allonymous Coward

Re: HOW many developers are they employing?

It's government. 54,000 person-years is just the project meetings and procurement paperwork.

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No, Stephen Hawking's last paper didn't prove the existence of a multiverse

Allonymous Coward
Alien

Re: Awesome

We're always blabbing about how unfathomably huge our universe is, but huge is such a subjective word, as our universe is only big from our perspective.

Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space.

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18.04 beta is as good a time as any to see which Ubuntu flavour tickles your Budgie, MATE

Allonymous Coward
Trollface

Maybe...

2018 will be The Year Of The Linux Desktop!

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Allonymous Coward
Childcatcher

beginning to look a little dated

I guess appearance over functionality matters to some people. I remember someone once telling me they didn't want to purchase a corporate web app because the blue used in its UI was "dull".

Personally, I think that if your office suite looks a bit dated, who cares as long as it works and works well? Where does fashion come into it?

One reason I like Linux is that prettifying-for-the-sake-of-it doesn't happen too often. Some of Canonical's "design" missteps aside. If you want software that doesn't "look dated" and is targeted at the "general home or small business user" perhaps Linux shouldn't be your first choice.

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Allonymous Coward
Facepalm

Re: Watch out for Netplan!

I like the idea of Netplan. But I have to admit to tearing my hair out on a 17.10 (where it was introduced, IIRC) machine when I couldn't work out why my network config wasn't being applied.

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Allonymous Coward
Linux

"But we're still in bug country, so run in a VM"

That's overstating the risk a bit, IMO. I've been running the daily build for a few weeks as my main workstation (it has one or two very important package improvements over 16.04) and it hasn't caused my PC to melt or the magic smoke to escape or anything yet. In fact it's been impressively reliable for a not-yet-released product.

Bugs there will be, but aren't there always? I've been pretty happy with it so far. It won't touch our servers until at least the first point release though.

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It's Pi day: Care to stuff a brand new Raspberry one in your wallet?

Allonymous Coward
Devil

Re: Dates

voiding all warranties and support contracts

Oracle will still find some way to come after you...

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IBM thinks Notes and Domino can rise again

Allonymous Coward

I always thought Notes was alright

Given the right problem. Except at email, it was horrible for that. But at $PREVIOUS_JOB 15-odd years ago we built a document management system on it which is still more effective than anything I've seen since (admittedly I now work for UK.GOV so it's entirely possible our problems implementing a sane document management system are - ahem - not technical). And our sales force had all kinds of little product databases and whatnot they could go all road-warrior with and sync up later.

I mostly worked with it as a user rather than administrating or developing, though. Perhaps I missed out on the fun bits.

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The Gemini pocket PC is shipping and we've got one. This is what it's like

Allonymous Coward

Replaceable battery

I missed that titbit the first time around. Bravo, Planet.

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Allonymous Coward

Re: Far from complete

Maybe... personally (i.e. sample size = 1) I suspect people want a keyboard for keyboardy applications like ssh and email and don't care too much which OS underpins it.

That said, you can already get a Bluetooth keyboard for Android devices that are probably already better at being Android devices when compared to the current Gemini iteration. But a truly open & vendor-supported software stack is something that's missing in the marketplace just now. So I can understand the desire for Linux from a freedom/diversity/tinkering/differentiation perspective.

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Allonymous Coward

Where Gemini's value really lies

I think Orlowski missed a trick here. I can see quite a lot of potential value for people who really need a keyboard because their workflow doesn't support or require much else. Thinking of sysadmins and the like. It's not all about Evernote and MS Word.

Admittedly a niche market, but this seems like a niche product.

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Careful with the 'virtual hugs' says new FreeBSD Code of Conduct

Allonymous Coward

Re: Offensive

Steady now. That sort of behaviour makes me uncomfortable.

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Oracle open-sources DTrace under the GPL

Allonymous Coward
Joke

The OpenSolaris that we know today

It's not dead, it's just pining for the fjords.

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Six things I learned from using the iPad Pro for Real Work™

Allonymous Coward

"This much is true of the Surface too"

No it isn't. I'm no Microsoft apologist, and have a love/hate relationship with my work-supplied Surface Pro. But on the Surface you can in fact adjust the screen angle with the keyboard attached.

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Just can't catch a break, can ya, Capita? Shares tumble 40% amid yet another profit warning

Allonymous Coward

Re: Dividends vs Pensions?

A few years ago I was intrigued to learn that the Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan Board is one of the world's largest institutional investors.

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Allonymous Coward

Couldn't happen to a nicer company

I've said it before, but it seemed worth repeating.

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IT 'heroes' saved Maersk from NotPetya with ten-day reinstallation bliz

Allonymous Coward
Thumb Up

I'd like to have a C-level exec like this guy

Ours could learn a thing or two about recognition of huge efforts pulling business-critical systems out of the fire.

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Wait, what? The Linux Kernel Mailing List archives lived on ONE PC? One BROKEN PC?

Allonymous Coward
Terminator

Re: Reminds me of the old BBS days....

Reminds me of the old running-websites-in-the-NHS days. Not in a good way.

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We translated Intel's crap attempt to spin its way out of CPU security bug PR nightmare

Allonymous Coward

Re: "Isn't making it go mainstream before this date kind of a bad thing?"

@diodesign thanks for taking the time to give some more background. I was wondering if it'd turn out to be vendors not treating the news/enquiries with enough respect (in hindsight).

<Papa loads his shotgun, sighs, shakes head, and takes the PR department behind the woodshed>

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Allonymous Coward
Alert

Re: Late to the party

Isn't making it go mainstream before this date kind of a bad thing?

Depends how you define "bad", and for whom, I guess. Their articles this week are seven-figures in terms of page views and they get to write snarky articles about Chipzilla, so I'd say it's working out pretty well over at Reg World HQ. Triples all round.

I enjoy watching Intel get stiffed for insecure design and PR waffle as much as the next person. I also respect The Register for holding the industry to account, and not just on this issue. But it'd be interesting to be told why they decided to publish early. Not that I expect we will be.

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Linux Mint 18.3: A breath of fresh air? Well, it's a step into the unGNOME

Allonymous Coward

Re: Timeshift

"Hardly a problem", just run these 30 simple commands in a console during installation

On Ubuntu >=16.04 at least, the command you need is just:

sudo apt install zfsutils-linux

We have lots of boxes with ZFS data pools, and it works really well. We have some boxes with a root ZFS pool and that sometimes requires a manual import step at boot. IMO ZFS boot is a little too bleeding-edge; ext4 on mdadm still works more reliably.

Perhaps without the licensing dogma these sorts of things would get fixed faster, or best practice would be clearer. That'd be nice. As it is though, I've already found ZFS on Linux to be useful, stable, and generally easier to work with than expected.

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Allonymous Coward

Re: Timeshift

Does the Linux implementation of OpenZFS not have snapshots?

Yes it does. We use it in production on Ubuntu 16.04 systems.

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Open-source civil war: Olive branch offered in trademark spat... with live grenade attached

Allonymous Coward

Re: So Sad

the OFSS and the SOFS communities

Splitters!

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Games-mart Steam halts Bitcoin payments

Allonymous Coward

Re: $20 per transaction fee

I've had this discussion over the last couple of months with various people who've spoken to me about "investing" in BTC. To me at least, there's literally no value associated with the currency because none of the places that I want to buy things accept it. Maybe if I wanted some private VPN service or whatever, but I don't.

It's just numbers, admittedly numbers that are getting bigger quite quickly. Paper value. Reminds me a lot of the dotcom boom, and I wonder if some of the people being sucked in this time around are too young to really remember that.

Despite all that I did consider buying some just to offload it a week later to the next fool. But I can't be bothered. Think I'll stick with investing in goods, services and assets that are actually tangible.

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WW2 Enigma machine to be seized from shamed pharma bro Shkreli

Allonymous Coward
Pirate

Re: The sole copy of Once Upon a Time in Shaolin

The Pirate Bay is that way --->

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Munich council: To hell with Linux, we're going full Windows in 2020

Allonymous Coward

Re: Needs government lead

Quite often it doesn't work even with a government lead. For example: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/open-document-formats-selected-to-meet-user-needs

Why this happens is complex. Personally, I think not enough attention is paid to the fact that the people with the nous & clout to make sensible technology decisions, are also the people who don't hang around too long in the Civil Service or local government.

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Better filters won't cure this: YouTube's kids nightmare

Allonymous Coward
Thumb Up

This gets my Comment of The Week vote. It's only Wednesday, but nothing's going to top it for sheer bang-onitude.

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Submarine builder admits dismembering journalist's body

Allonymous Coward
IT Angle

I propose a new El Reg unit of measurement

The "Madsen" (Md). This is a measurement of the degree of change for an entity (be that an alibi, a software system, whatever) when moving from one state to another.

Examples:

A story that gets reversed in a subsequent retelling to law enforcement: change of 1 Md.

A minor update to a config file: change of 1 μMd.

Deploying "enterprise" software: change of 0.5KMd

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Canucks have beef with Soylent as to whether or not it's a real meal deal

Allonymous Coward
Terminator

Re: Mystifying...

I've just picked up a fault in the backup unit. It is going to go 100 percent failure within 72 hours.

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Equifax: About those 400,000 UK records we lost? It's now 15.2M. Yes, M for MEELLLION

Allonymous Coward

Re: What are your thoughts on...

The problem with GOV.UK Verify

...is that it's GOV.UK Verify.

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Allonymous Coward

My mother's maiden name is $q002Z&x3409

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Allonymous Coward

Re: Post

That probably was a legitimate email, if they're anything like as useless as our HR department.

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Fending off cyber attacks as important as combatting terrorism, says new GCHQ chief

Allonymous Coward
Headmaster

"Cyber" is an adjective

For that matter, so is "digital". A distinction that seems to be getting blurred with every piece of tech-related news burbled out of the public sector these days.

If cyber is a tier-one threat, what's tier-two? Tall? Fast? Supercilious?

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Lenovo spits out retro ThinkPads for iconic laptop's 25th birthday

Allonymous Coward

Still running my T500 here

I bought it second hand seven or eight years ago. Since then it's had two new SSDs (first a speed upgrade, second for capacity), more RAM, and three new power supplies when the cables give up. Surprisingly still the same battery though - I don't use it on batteries a lot.

Running Ubuntu MATE. Fan sounds a bit like a chainsaw these days but other than that the darn thing just won't die. And much as I'd like to I can't really justify buying a new one until it does.

Side note: I particularly like the T5xx-series as a compromise between full-size machines and portables. Nice big screens and keyboards. My work-supplied T440 is nowhere near as nice, though that may also be because the T440 is the worst ThinkPad ever made.

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Home Sec Amber Rudd: Yeah, I don't understand encryption. So what?

Allonymous Coward

Re: Fashionanle Ignorance

I vaguely remember from my PRINCE2 certification (shows you how much I use it) that one of the supposed strengths of the framework was that it was portable across all types of different projects. Whether that was canning soup or building an online service.

So it wouldn't surprise me if people brought up in the public sector management tradition do think they can manage stuff they don't understand. Or apply the same rules to two totally different projects.

And you know what, they're right in some ways. On a large enough project, management isn't going to know everything. One key to success is realising what you don't know, listening to and empowering (sorry) the people who do know, to do the right thing. Another key to success is building mutual respect with the technical experts so they give you good advice and information.

Based on what's in the media, Amber Rudd appears to be pretty bad at both these things.

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Allonymous Coward
Thumb Up

Re: I'm going to keep sneering, Amber

That careered a bit off topic, but wow. Have an upvote for Rant Of The Day.

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Allonymous Coward

Re: "patronising" techies that "sneered" at politicians

It should be dreadful for politicians, used to think about themselves as "know-it-all, know-it-better" types, to find themselves naked to the truth they don't know enough, and the little they believed to know is wrong, in a world that became and is quickly becoming complex in ways all their knowledge is useless to understand, especially since very few politicians have scientific backgrounds.

^-- this

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Allonymous Coward
Black Helicopters

From the BBC article

"I am not suggesting you give us the code," the home secretary shot back, telling him: " I understand the principle of end-to-end encryption - it can't be unwrapped. That's what has been developed.

"What I am saying is the companies who are developing that should work with us."

It's not very clear what she means here. Work with them how? By decrypting messages? In which case, isn't that just giving the Home Office "the code"? (spoiler: yes it is, assuming she doesn't mean source code; and she probably doesn't mean source code, being Amber Rudd and all).

The whole thing smells like a ranty soundbite. Designed, presumably, to appeal to the Tory faithful at the annual conference. And to get Rudd a few column inches about being tough on terrorism while conveniently skipping over all the detail of how that might work. Perhaps it will also take the spotlight off her recent contempt of court travails.

Amber Rudd and the liberal-arts-educated political and Civil Service elite would do well to pay more attention and respect to technical experts generally. Rather than treading on toes every time she opens her mouth.

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Microsoft may have its groove back but it's binned 'Groove'

Allonymous Coward
Windows

Huh

And here was me thinking Groove was that thing they bought from Ray Ozzie back in the day and tried to shoehorn into all their collaboration products (actually Wikipedia suggests it's still in use on the backend of OneDrive). I'd never even heard of this music service.

If it'd been ten years earlier, they probably would've called it Music.NET.

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How's that 'turnaround' year going, Capita? ...Sheesh, sorry I asked

Allonymous Coward
Mushroom

Couldn't happen to a nicer company

See title

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Brit ministers jet off on a trade mission to tout our digital exports...

Allonymous Coward
Linux

Selling snow to the Inuit

The Finns have a terrible track record for technological achievement*. So they'll no doubt roll out the red carpet for some highly qualified Westminster policy wonks who can tell them all about how to deliver stuff on time and under budget.

* For avoidance of doubt: may not be true. See icon for example.

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Linux 4.14 'getting very core new functionality' says Linus Torvalds

Allonymous Coward
Linux

Re: Will 2017 be the year of Linux on the desktop?

Quite. Mine was 2005-ish. I've no interest in evangelising or converting anyone else. It (mostly) works pretty well for what I do. Others' mileage may vary and that's fine. Life's too short to argue about operating systems.

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