* Posts by bonkers

163 posts • joined 13 Dec 2011

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Dotcom's Mega smacks back: Our crypto's not crap

bonkers

Re: dedupe

The way to de-dupe as suggested above is to run a hash of the original, say SHA-1 at 256 bit length and store it "in the clear" . This does allow an identical file to be matched to yours, and copyright owners could make a rainbow table of all their stuff and detect copies, but, it only takes one bit to be different, say in the metadata, and the hash will be greatly different. This same property will cause any attempt at de-dupe to fail also since it needs bit-identical duplicate files.

Perhaps a method a little like Shazam's - taking a "fingerprint" of the file before encryption, so things that sound similar measure similarly. A corresponding process for video might look a the overall structure of the compressed video, its entropy versus time or something - again allowing similar fingerprints to be matched.

Of course, these approaches allow the rights-holders to trawl through the hashes (that would be extracted under court order) and identify stuff that looks a bit like theirs. Proving it is another matter - for that you need to be given a key, so for it to work as a file-sharer service then Mega must never own the keys, you have to ask the folder owner each time. So what if big copyright set up a load of shill accounts?

Intel bets the farm on touch-enabled 'convertible and detachable' Ultrabooks

bonkers
Unhappy

Re: Have you ever tried 'alternative' keyboards?

If i cuold jst get ths fukcng keybrd to tlpe more thean tywo words correctly in a row then thst wold be a grte mp[rvoemnt

Lenovo proclaims PC victory, re-orgs to take on Apple

bonkers
Facepalm

Re: Thinkpad is a revered brand

Thinkpads are revered - but not in any way that a marketing droid could ever understand - they are of robust good quality, they work properly, and they don't make you look like you're aspiring to be some poncy "brand model" - with the right cufflinks, watch, shirt etc.

It seems to have needed the CEO himself to plough through all the marketing bollocks and arrive at this simple conclusion, make good stuff, let a well-informed and un-selfconscious customer base buy it.

PGP, TrueCrypt-encrypted files CRACKED by £300 tool

bonkers
Happy

Re: As Mr ChriZ said

Would that really work? - it is windows that deals with "resurrection" from hibernate, and I don't think it has the option within this low-level code to put up a screen and ask you for the password? Maybe it does.

Clearly the answer is to type the key in every time you return to the computer.

I find yellow sticky-notes are useful aides to remembering these sorts of tediously long numbers.

Sinclair ZX Spectrum FAILS latest radio noise rules SHOCK

bonkers
Thumb Up

"abject" ?

Its a marginal fail, its only 4 or 5dB above the limit, and at a couple of spot frequencies. A few minor modifications would fix it - either an "R" or a ferrite bead in the clock line, or a little work on the grounding scheme. I've seen much worse initial plots than this. Oh, and the emissions above 100MHz should be fine, look a the plot, there is no energy in the higher frequencies, it is just the test equipment noise floor. OK there might be problems with spurii and harmonics of the UHF modulator, once it gets enabled again. Not bad for the time and rather exceptional for our Clive - or Jim Westwood (see Reg's passim) to give him a proper name.

After 50 years, Europe gets one patent to rule them all

bonkers
Mushroom

step #1, one target.

Whether part of a deep conspiracy or simply by the law of unintended consequences, this single system is a big fat target for unification with the USPTO "own stuff that already exists" process. There will come a time soon where almost everything sold will attract an "IP" tax going back to America. They have invented the most powerful and profitable machine ever made: The Lawyer.

Oh, and whilst on the Tolkein theme, a post of mine from July:

The Enemy still lacks one thing to give him strength and knowledge to beat down all resistance, break the last defences, and cover all the lands in a second darkness. He lacks the One Ring... So he is seeking it, seeking it, and all his thought is bent on it

Schmidt: Microsoft will never be as cool as the Gang of Four

bonkers
WTF?

Re: Rage on

But it did say that the gang of four mentioned were cool.

So I thought that could only mean the stuttering guitars and bonkers Trotskyist invective of 1978 Leeds-based band Gang of Four - chief influences of REM and Nirvana.

OK i thought it might be something to do with Chinese political history, OK, but then I hear that its a reference to some dad-dancing poncy overbloated corporate entities.

Cool - In a way that brands simply fucking aren't.

Rage off.

Amazon makes BEELLIONS from British customers, pays pennies in tax

bonkers
Thumb Up

Nice one Guv.

I like that they chose to publish the figures as they are entitled to do. Sends a good message. Too long have government types been scared by these guys. I suspect only public shame will bring their position round - all loophole legislation gets steered round if there is a will to do so. It levels the field for the other, smaller players who pay tax and don't squirrel it away into Bermuda. I don't care if amazon leave the UK market (the "deadweight" argument advanced elsewhere) - the same goods will still be sold, but with a small premium to the taxman that falls pretty fairly on those with the disposable income for these inessential items.

Assault on battery

bonkers
Happy

You shouldn't really use the chargers that only do pairs, well they're OK as long as you use two equally discharged and similar capacity cells, but that can be quite an ask. Oh, and you should take them off charge after the allotted time, the trickle charge can be pretty high - if its more than the "water cycle" in the NiMH can handle then it will erode capacity. the not-quite-best cells (i.e. 2300mAh not 3000mAh) are more robust against overcharge.

its best to spend (shit, my powerex charger is £60 - I thought it was £30) on a decent charger/cycler. - it allows you to nurture the cells and alerts you to dud ones, they will go dud all of a sudden. thanks for the torch tip.

Boffins biff over ‘twisted radio’

bonkers
Happy

Re: Rebecca M & The fundamental things apply

Similarly, minor typo's aside, the post was a good breakdown of the four information-carrying aspects of an EM wave. In particular, the introduction of the uncertainty principle as an explanation for Shannon's theorem was interesting - you know that it has no other basis in any physical law (afaik) - it ties in broadly with entropy, but apart from these two, and possibly the uncertainty principle, there is no physics that links the concept of information with anything else. Information does however seem to be "a conserved quantity" of some sort, and there should ultimately be some new physics coming from it.

Boffins explain research with interpretive dance

bonkers

Frank Zappa

The late great Frank Zappa has first dibs on this concept. It was he who remarked

"talking about music is like dancing about architecture"

I can't help thinking there is a trace of this resignation creeping into the mindset of these physicists and technologists, forever being asked to explain their work but without confusing the lay audience with concepts they don't understand already. Has anyone seen the recent Horizon series? - might as well be a radio show for all the benefit they get from the moving wallpaper. Why not explain it using the full bandwidth, sure everyone will miss most of it, but it gives a real feeling for the subject. How about getting musicians to play, and physicists to describe, using whatever they usually use.

Skype touts FREE* Wi-Fi across the UK

bonkers
Thumb Up

Re: nope, totally lost here...

Never mind the digital economy act and the copyright liabilities it brings, what if your "customers" start downloading kiddieporn, jihadist encrypted files, all that shit - you would be in for quite a lot of difficult questions, never mind having your computers confiscated. At least this method ensures there is repudiation for you and an electronic trail for them.

Oh, and why are the other posters so uptight about "their" bandwidth? - is it not genuinely a free resource - assuming your use does not max it out.

Intel launches ARM battery life Windows 8 Atom chip

bonkers
Thumb Up

security

Glad to see Intel have got over themselves with regard to on-chip security, and the unique ID that this requires.

Similarly glad to see that they've kept the x86 backwards compatibility, unlike ARM, so you can get away with writing code just the once.

Half of Milky Way's mass found in million-Kelvin gas cloud

bonkers
Happy

Re: Cool arcticle

Your're new here aren't you?

Glad you like it. Take some time to thumb through the back-issues, for instance the LHC coverage.

Berkeley Lab proposes 4D clock

bonkers
Boffin

multipole energy loss

because these are ions in a ring they have a multipole moment, like dipole but higher order, lets say 12-pole for 12 atoms. This will radiate electromagnetic energy as the ring rotates, you could pick-up a signal much as the way a gear-tooth magnetic sensor does in your car. You can detect the rotation, hence energy is being lost, and it will slow down to a stop.

Reg readers serve up bacon sarnie amuse-bouche

bonkers
Happy

Re: VBS

Wouldn't that make it, sort of, more difficult to eat?

Anyway, I missed the competition, but here's mine - BLT sushi:

a tortilla /burrito thing, with bacon rashers sliced into strips, shredded lettuce and tomato, mayonnaise, carefully rolled into a spiral, pinned with a couple of cocktails sticks then chilled. Then you slice it into 8mm sushi slices.

Got a BMW? Thicko thieves can EASILY NICK IT with $30 box

bonkers
FAIL

Re: Blame Game

It is in part the fault of the others on the list - in that the OBD standard does not call upon any encryption requirement - it was designed to allow californian cops to read whether your car had declared to you that the emissions limiting equipment was faulty. - so the same readers had to work in perpetuity.

They could have designed it better, even to firewall off just the compulsory protocol commands.

the French have recently proposed anti-competetive legislation to the effect that all french garages shall be able to reprogram ECU's of any sort without having to be registered dealers and essentially under a FRAND type agreement. Though good for competition, its impossible for security - well the concept of a trusted dealer was never a good one, now it is busted we may get tools that require a session into the heart of the OEM in order to decrypt the protocols.

Cable offers to shower UK biz in taxpayer gold to stimulate growth

bonkers
Devil

ploughshares into swords

Its sounds like a good thing to spend some money on engineering, but from the nationalisation days onwards it has always been hopelessly misdirected. It is only the dinosaur industries that can be bothered to fill out the paperwork. How surprised am I that 'our' prime merchants of death, BAE, look to be first in the queue? They want to train more apprentices, then guess what, they'll be wanting orders or all these new puppies will have to be drowned.

I say we should use the money to retrain them to design working, fixed-cost, fixed timescale competitive products for the commercial market - skills they lack in abundance at present.

I maintain that every engineer that crosses onto the dark side costs the country all of the useful things they might otherwise have made. They are a finite resource, let's get them making great new things that don't, intentionally at least, kill people.

Bruce Willis didn't Buy Hard: His girls can't inherit his iTunes

bonkers
Headmaster

Re: Is that the sound....

totally agree, I've got a pile of original stones and beatles, some are even in mono.

should the other parents be having "shit taste" or "shite taste"?

Thanks ever so much Java, for that biz-wide rootkit infection

bonkers
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Re: After Flash and Acrobat, now it is the turn of Java

Firstly, an excellent article, and surely one of the first published accounts of the thing and how to kill it – and a rallying call to common sense, a Reg campaign.

Secondly, how could this happen and can we fix it – I mean do we need to replace the concept of a sandbox? Do we know whether address space randomisation or no-execute bits would have foiled the core exploit? I suspect that even with these hardware protections, exploits will still be found. It is a fundamental problem associated with running arbitrary code.

I like the post above, suggesting secure boot and a keychain, this would stop the rootkit infection, in a very obvious and uncompromisable manner. I think PC’s should come with a wire link to make the boot eeprom a ROM. Well that and the OS needs to be signed and the signature checked by the ROM code, standard stuff from then on. The problem is that Java would then need to be signed, for it to work doing its “day job” - and unless they can then sign all java apps we’re still ruined.

How about only corporate java gets signed and allowed to run – is that possible? Javablock will restrict Java to certain sites only, but its not as good as signed code.

The worry in all of this is that you only found this nasty because it was a shouty one – how many other discreet “sleeper” infections could be out there?

Super-critical Java zero-day exploits TWO bugs

bonkers
Thumb Down

HTF do you kill the auto-updater zombie thing?

in Windows 7 (its a work machine) I have tried the control-panel, java, updates, automatically check for updates - but it ignores you. Revisiting the updates tab shows the automatic updates as enabled, again. OK they don't install, but every time i reconnect the machine, java is there.

doesn't this seriously nix the entire concept of a sandbox? - i know they're supposed to work, but this lot are the first and foremost, and its never worked, and never will.

New rule on blood-soaked metals in mobes is POINTLESS

bonkers
Boffin

Re: No Tantalum

Erm, yes they are, and have been for a while - sparked by the Tantalum shortage of 2000. Ceramic capacitors have slowly crept into Tantalum territory - with high value (10uF and above) low cost parts. They are much better electrically - 20 milli-Ohms of ESR is impossible in a Tant. The other thing is that power supplies are moving into the many MHz of switching speed, and this needs less bulk decoupling. I haven't seen any Tants on new equipment for a few years now. Even Tantalum's abundant daughter, Niobium, finally developed to a point where its as good as Tantalum (in capacitors), doesn't have much market share. Its over, baby, better park all that Tantalum next to the Europium (was used in TV phosphors).

Coming to a cloud near you: dirty laundry

bonkers

why not?

Amusing point regarding loading the wretched thing. However, I would like the option of tinkering with the cycle, why do we accept only a few options on this and dishwasher programmes, when we have so much control and choice over other machines. Whether this is used to save water, or clean better, why not allow user recipes?

For instance a low temperature wash is very green, but you need a blast of heat every few washes (or just for one of the fills) to kill bugs like S. Aureus.

New US rule aims to crack down on Congolese capacitors

bonkers
Boffin

Tantalum

Tantalum capacitors look to be on the way out - I don't see them in new phone designs, and haven't used any in my designs for a few years. They are expensive, have quite a high ESR and can catch fire. High value ceramic capacitors are now commonplace and pretty much ideal components. power supply frequencies are increasing also - this allows smaller values to be used, tiltng the market towards ceramic again.

Work for the military? Don't be evil, says ethicist

bonkers
Thumb Up

Re: Helping those who got in

You were working on commercial quality machines though, not weapons. These are much closer to the mainstream industry as they are made from standard - not mil-spec - parts, which do not need the exhaustive testing. Also, simulators are mostly a software product, so can accommodate changes.

I have nothing against the military personnel, we need them and most are very good - even when contradicting their seniors, like the MoD man who backed the anti land mine campaign saying they were a liability in real conflict - whereas he was expected to say that our good ol' boys (and particularly the sacred arms biz) needed and wanted them. I know simulators and trainers are non-lethal, but they still get sold to some pretty oppressive regimes don't they? I think we agree that this should not happen, defence work should be just that, and our kit should be best. That all said, I think there are much better things that one can do with one's life output - and this was the point, we should help engineers get out if they want to.

bonkers
Unhappy

Re: Helping those who got in

I like the positive suggestion of helping what we recognise as intelligent and considerate engineers out of an unfortunate circumstance. We should also warn against the dangers of “staying in”.

The methods of working, the project timescales, even the raw components of defence work are utterly useless in the rest of the industry. Any fool can deliver half the product at twice the contract price, two years late.

Finally, as an observation, I see many engineers with military backgrounds as though their psychological development just stopped somewhere along the line. Is this a response to the irresolvable contradiction of wanting to be “nice” yet focussing one’s life work on death to others? Is it similar to neutered dogs becoming permanent puppies? Why do so many profess religious beliefs, often through the codewords of church activity, choir singing etc.

If we were in a WWII situation again, and I were making equipment just for us, I would do it. But, we’re not. Weapons is big business and they get sold to the strong to oppress and steal from the weak. Engineers entering this world need to consider not just the grief that they will add to the world burden, but also the positive things that they will not be making, will never make.

MoD to become even more top-heavy as a result of personnel cuts

bonkers
Happy

Shocking

The article is shocking not only for exposing the devious use of "up to" - meaning "loads less than" , but also for it's complete absence of the correct Reg-authorised term: "slug-balancers" .

NASA: WE'VE FOUND Four-toed NON-HUMAN FOOTPRINTS

bonkers
Happy

incorrect use of logic

This is an article all of whose interest and excitement is based on consciously obscuring the critical piece of information that would make it boring. It toys with the readers, leading them up the garden path with the insinuation that it might be on Mars or something. Offering advice to NASA based on this story is, well, about a light-year off-course.

Ready to patent that 'new' invention? Google is here to dash your hopes

bonkers

Re: As soon as you enter your idea into the search engine,

As I understand it, searching "around" the idea is not a feature of this tool: "The Prior Art Finder identifies key phrases

*** from the text of the patent, ***

combines them into a search query, and displays relevant results from [stuff ....]" - the searching around is already a feature of any search engine, you just need to be good at it and find the correct keywords, classification areas - and even then it will not search books, or those journals dedicated to publishing "not quite patent-worthy" inventions.

bonkers
Thumb Up

Re: As soon as you enter your idea into the search engine,

That's what I thought, the text mentions the full patent application being the inputted data, this is complete disclosure. So, it all rests on the T's&C's of the contract with Google. Normally they only want the right to target ads at you, so there might be (well absolutely must be) a strong NDA implied or defined in these terms. Without this its open to abuse and to invalidation through prior disclosure. The service looks similar to the search the UKTPO offers for £250 - but they are implicitly trusted and submission to them is beyond legal challenge. The corresponding challenge (e.g. Apple lawyers say your granted patent is invalid because you "gave" it to Google as part of your prior art search) needs a test case.

That said, the basic idea is good if it allows inventors to drop worthless re-inventions, also saving the patent office the search efforts (which they sell at a loss - what can you really get out of a patent expert for less than £250?).

Build a bonkers hi-fi

bonkers
Happy

Re: Bonkers? oh yes.

Had to have the last word on this "get yourself a Bonkers sound system"

Got one.

Squabbling EU heads force Council to split patent court in 3

bonkers
Megaphone

NOOOO - DON'T DO IT

You will make one big fat target for the fragmented EU system and the American system to be combined. This will cost us (in the EU) untold money and misery, as obvious things will require huge lawyers bills, manufacturers and product developers will not be able to afford the litigation insurance, innovation will stop. America needs its tax on all things - look at the effort they spend on DRM, getting the electronics industry to swallow the costs, the RIAA taking the benefits. Don't make the EU patent system their puppy too.

Intelligence a genetic mistake

bonkers
Boffin

Re: Interesting, but ...

common knowledge..?

Gene modifications can be dated by the number of errors they have accumulated since they arrived. Random errors are introduced at a constant rate, about 30ppb (parts per billion) per generation, and due to the redundancy in gene coding (64 states, 23 amino acids, one start 2 stop sequences iirc) most of these are harmless.

With a population of "tattered" copies (you and me) , you can deduce the original, and the average number of errors. Simple.

http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/News/2009/News/WTX056376.htm

How politicians could end droughts forever But they don't want to

bonkers

Re: Agreed

Audrey, have you tried using the Internet?

http://1greengeneration.elementsintime.com/?p=314

bonkers

Re: Hey Lewis, you missed something

Actually, when you add salt to water, it absorbs energy - wikipedia says 3.88 kJ/mol. Hence the use of ice and salt to get minus 10, 20 degrees.

bonkers
Happy

Hey Lewis, you missed something

Graphene - wonder material - water just gushes though it, leaving the salt behind.

The 7kWh/tonne figure might well be revisable to 700Wh/tonne. At this point do we really care about losses?

bonkers
WTF?

Perhaps someone can read the article for me?

power required is 7kWh/tonne, personal consumption is 167 L/day.

I don't see why flow rate should be anything other than 167 million litres/day, for 1 million people.

I like the Energy dump point though, this is really easy "energy storage" - well actually timed usage, but works nearly as well.

Starck brewing 'fairly, if not very, revolutionary' Apple THING

bonkers
Thumb Up

Re: Oooh...

I like what you did there, Blackadder,

'I regularly visit Steve Jobs' wife,' adds Frenchman

"admits Frenchman" surely?

Female Chinese astronauts must have no scars, straight teeth

bonkers
Alien

Re: It's for the aliens

Are you mad?

If earth gets a better reputation for slinky Taikonauts than, say Gliese131, then we're doomed.

ARM's ultra-low-power fridge-puter chips: Just what the CIA ordered

bonkers
Happy

good luck with that one, ARM..

Much as I respect the Spawn of 6502, I can't see them winning the 8-bit world with a 32-bit machine. For starters, the idea that "the thermostat" takes a position of any sort is bonkers, hierarchy is there for a reason, to consider multiple inputs and to make just one decision. The protocol will be really heavy, where you could get away with almost nothing, like LIN or similar, over RF. For this reason you will need to include over-the-air update, which triples your size and adds hideous vulnerabilities, unless you want to go "signed" - another big headache and no guarantees.

Look at the gross bandwidth of the source - thermostat - about 10 bits (3 sig.fig) every minute. Fridge similar. Light switch 1 bit every hour or so (OK there is a response time also) - what needs bandwidth?

Texas Instruments (with whom I am not associated) have an interesting range of MSP430 super low power 16-bit MCU's coupled with excellent low power radio Tx/Rx..

Submarine cables get simpler, faster

bonkers
Mushroom

Re: EDFA

Am I really pretending to know more than an EDFA service manual? No, I am posting a short summary of a relevant technology. In essence, the EDFA is simply driven by green light and DC, rather than an entire demodulate/decode/error-correct/re-encode/remodulate chain for each of the 256 wavelengths. Sure there is a little more to it than that, the interested reader will know where to look.

Similarly, the noise argument is abbreviated, booby-trapped, even. It is an engineers conundrum - am I claiming an impossible result, a noiseless amplifier?. Yes it is certainly true that laser amplification is noiseless, the stimulated photon is identical in phase and frequency. The resolution of this puzzle offers insight to an enquiring mind, yes the amplification is noiseless, which is never normally the case, but hold on, there is an inescapable spontaneous emission in there also. Aha, seemingly fundamental constraints are observed then. Next week, the parametric amplifier, is it noiseless as claimed?

bonkers
Boffin

EDFA

Erbium doped fibre amplifier

magically turns green LED light, powered by simple auxiliary DC feed in the cable, into noiseless laser amplification of even densely packed IR carrier beams (wavelength division multiplexing), independently of the modulation scheme - upgrade both ends to 200GB/s, whatever, and you're done. .

New steganography technique relies on letter shapes

bonkers
FAIL

Outraged

As many have noted, this cannot correctly be described as steganography, unless the resulting text is readable and "not unusual". Stego must encode TWO messages, the obvious, and the secret. If it produces junk text, its so obviously time to reach for the rubber hoses.

EU runs to WTO again over China's mineral hoarding

bonkers
Boffin

It's called "a position"

So dogged are we in our free-market model, that no-one considered the intrinsic worth of these dull silver-grey metals. It was assumed that the price was fair, and that the mines were not worth buying at the prices they were asking. The truth is that half the uses of these bizarre f-orbital elements are yet to be invented/discovered, or indeed may not be there to be found. China has taken a bit of a punt on half of their stocks, consider just two elements, Europium and Erbium.

Europium is the only stuff in the universe that makes a nice deep red phosphor for TV tubes, so was looking valuable when they bought it. It's worthless now. The CRT is dead.

Erbium did nothing, like the F7 key, till it was discovered that it offers noiseless laser amplification of infra-red optical fibre signals, using only green LED light as its energy source. This is a huge boon for the undersea and land cable business, and it doesn't care how many channels and at what Gb/s speed it all goes at.

So, win some lose some, its called "a position", having a considered opinion that is away from where the market is. Though for us, and the USA, its an uncomfortable bendy-over position.

WTF is... White Space radio networking?

bonkers
Happy

Re: Simple Answer

I like the irrelevant but pejorative association with Yuppies, maybe Pikey-Fi is a term you could introduce? The rest of the post is quite poor. I cannot see users needing to flout the regulations, as there is a legal and adequate means to get the bandwidth desired. The costs of look-up are a free market and will be cheap, and are only required for roaming - where monster aerials would be cumbersome.

I see it as a return of what is "ours" - for our use and for free.

Antimatter asymmetry: new results bring solution closer

bonkers
Boffin

Re: Re: Re: Can someone cleverer than me please explain?

Firstly, there is a big bump in the background radiation at 511keV, the electron-positron annihilation energy, it is not "absent", its just not enormous. Secondly there are flavours of theory that posit antimatter being gravitationally "negative" with respect to matter - i.e.they repel each other but attract themselves. This would cause a large scale clumping together and explain the low annihilation rates, to an extent. Think of two feather boas intertwined but not touching, this structure forms naturally from the simulations.

If all this seems a little outlandish, and I would love to put in relevant links but i'm working, consider the scale of the problem, we can account for 4% of the universe's mass, 23% is dark matter, which we know nothing about, and 74% is dark energy, which we really know nothing about...

Hey Commentard! - or is that Commenter?

bonkers
Happy

Re: Re: Re: "a Reg reader contacted us via our Twitter account to complain"

That's my point - I don't care, nor even understand, which is which.

"Twitbook share auction raises $400million" - sure you can read the article and work out which of the two applies, but would it really matter?

bonkers
Happy

Re: "a Reg reader contacted us via our Twitter account to complain"

Could we respectfully adopt the use of "twitbook" account, when referring to either twitter or facebook?

Boffins make graphene micro-distillery

bonkers
Thumb Up

fresh water

I wonder if it lets Na+ through?

there would be a huge market for potable water, for dry countries and for ships, hikers etc. At present they pump water through polythene, which takes a lot of effort and energy. sounds like it just pours through this wonder-stuff.

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