* Posts by Kernel

402 posts • joined 13 Nov 2011

Page:

Man prosecuted for posting a picture of his hobby on Facebook

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Police Scotland = Morons with time on their hands

"Yes I have a grudge to bear after the NZ pigs tried to screw over a younger family member. Does it show?"

Many, many years ago, long before computers were small enough to be put on a desk, I was involved in a trial in NZ as an expert witness - on that occasion , while waiting to be called into court, the plod appearing for the prosecution suggested that my colleague and I might like to make a few minor changes to our (hand written) shift log records, as such changes would make their case just that much better.

The request was refused and I have had a deep distrust of NZ plod ever since.

Strangely enough, after that episode we didn't actually get called to testify.

4
0

Deloitte to wind up Plutus Payroll, promises contact with contractors 'within 20 biz days'

Kernel
Bronze badge

The elephant in the room

The large grey animal in the room is, of course, that in most countries the priority order for being paid out will be:

i) Inland revenue, or whatever they call it in Australia

ii) Employees who are owed wages, etc.

iii) The aforesaid contractors, who, along with miscellaneous suppliers and landlords, probably rank as unsecured creditors.

I hope it works out for everyone, but my very limited experience of being paid out by liquidators is not encouraging - and it wasn't even a lot of money (to them, but it was for me at the time).

1
0

Super Cali goes ballistic, small-cell law is bogus. School IT outsourcing is also... quite atrocious

Kernel
Bronze badge

"the city council, in all their glorious wisdom, caps the number of meeting rooms a building's owner may choose to put inside it."

So, not being a resident of California, or even the US, I'm going to extent an invitation to any and all officials of that particular city to provide me with a rational explanation of why they even care about how many meeting rooms there are.

2
0

Oz military megahack: When crappy defence contractor cybersecurity 'isn't uncommon', surely alarm bells ring?

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Relax ..

"It should be remembered that Australia and South Korea sent troops to Vietnam to support the US."

As did New Zealand - and both ourselves and the Australians (and probably the South Koreans as well) had to dodge bullets not only from the Vietcong, whom at least were expected to be firing at our troops, but from our US allies as well on occasion - presumably as a result of general incompetence and crappy map reading skills..

0
0

Dear America, best not share that password with your pals. Lots of love, the US Supremes

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: What happens if...

"The is the Nine Seniles do not grasp there is a difference between unauthorized access and data theft and sharing Netflix passwords"

Actually, in this specific case of sharing passwords to services with friends and family I would argue that the "Nine Seniles" have in fact got the correct grasp - when a service such as Netflix puts in its T&Cs that you are not allowed to share your access with other people they, as owners of the service, are being pretty specific about the fact that you don't have any right or authority to delegate your access to anyone else - anyone who then uses your access password or codes is very definitely illegally accessing the system. I suspect Netflix (and similar services) will have a very definite opinion on whether or not sharing passwords is akin to data theft.

I haven't studied FB's T&Cs, but I wouldn't be surprised if they have a similar restriction, if nothing else to try and build their user numbers. As for a personal email account, well, people have ended up in the poo for just this before today - if the person who's account it is doesn't authorize you to access it then doing so is, at the very least, an indication that you're a bit of an arsehole and from there it's not too much further to being a stalker and/or divorced.

I just don't see what's complicated about this - either you have been granted legitimate access by a person with the authority to do so, or you haven't - one is legal, the other isn't. If the person giving you the access information is not authorized to delegate their access, then potentially you're both in trouble.

36
1
Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: What happens if...

It seems pretty simple to me.

If you are authorized to access a given system the owner (or their authorized agent for such purposes) of it will have provided you with a userid and password of your own to facilitate that access, if they haven't, or won't, then guessing someone else's account details or persuading them to give them to you is the same as any other form of hacking in - it's illegal because you have not been granted authorized access and you quite rightly run the risk of being done for it. Where I work corporate policy is also very clear that you'll also be invited to seek exciting opportunities outside the company.

Using a spouse's or friend's account details to access their computer should also be fairly straight forward - if they own the computer/system, have given you their account info and told you you can access the system using those details then they've authorized you to log in using those details - if they didn't want you to do that they should have created a separate account for you or told you you can't have access. If you then log in using their account without them authorizing you to do so, then once again you're on the dodgy side of the law (not to mention the relationship). I have a separate account on my wife's personal laptop and I also know her login and password - but I still check with her every time if I need to log in as her to look at a problem - just because I know more about computers than she does doesn't reduce her right to whatever level of privacy she desires.

Even giving a family member the details to your bank cards is covered - the T&Cs for these (and any of the numerous company ID/access cards or tokens I've ever held) invariably make it clear that the card or token remains the property of the issuer - in other words, you as the user are not the owner and therefor do not have the authority to delegate use of that item.

Simples, really.

51
2

MH370 final report: Aussies still don’t know where it crashed or why

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: If you found the plane it wouldn't bring the people back.

"But I still think it is a disgrace that the airline and governments concerned will not continue to fund the search for the wreckage, to allay all doubt."

You do realise that airlines and governments don't have access to a magic money tree, don't you?

The searching that has been done has been paid for by us working stiffs through taxes and, to a lesser extent (I suspect most of the search costs have been borne by the unfortunate Australian taxpayer) those who purchase tickets from Malaysia Airlines.

While it would be nice to see the matter resolved one way or another, I am, as a taxpayer, grateful to $deity that this didn't happen in New Zealand's extensive search area.

5
0

Thomas the Tank Engine lobotomised by fat (remote) controller

Kernel
Bronze badge

"I know in the US some trains are already controlled by remote in the yards."

'Shunting robots' have been in use in New Zealand for some years now.

3
0

HPE coughed up source code for Pentagon's IT defenses to ... Russia

Kernel
Bronze badge

So, not like the NSA then.

"but always told vendors about any discovered bugs first."

If this is true then it puts them somewhat ahead of the TLAs of the freedom loving Western nations, doesn't it?

16
0

BYOD might be a hipster honeypot but it's rarely worth the extra hassle

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Never saw the Attraction

" you want me to have a work mobile then you can give me one and I will turn it off when I'm not at work."

Exactly this!

I have a mobile and laptop for work (both provided by my employer) and a laptop and phone for personal use (provided by me, obviously) .

The weeks that I am not on call the work phone gets turned off as I leave the building and stays that way until I start work the next morning. My employer doesn't know my personal mobile number in general terms - my line manager can go into the HR systems and pull my personal phone numbers, but that has never been done yet and they'd need to have a very good reason for doing so, eg., I'm a support engineer with a major vendor of carrier level telecommunications infrastructure, so a significant failure of a product I support, which was having a national level impact on the country's communications, would qualify - in other words, extremely rare and unlikely.

0
0

Musk: Come ride my Big F**king Rocket to Mars

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Economy price flight = NONSENSE

"Musk is full of crap:"

Ah, that'll be why he's a multi-zillionaire making videos about space flight and you're writing comments on el Reg, then.

17
0

It's a real FAQ to ex-EDS staffers: You'll do what with our pensions, DXC?

Kernel
Bronze badge

"You spend your life from age 20 getting to a figure, slowly raising and raising from minimum-wage (or better) to the highest you're ever likely to earn. Then you retire at 65. That's 45 years of salary earned. And at that point you expect that probably-maximum salary to continue for free until you're... what... 90?"

Yes - although in my case the payments from the pension started when I turned 50, the payment is adjusted for inflation every year and the taxpayer backs the fund, although the fund managers are fairly good in their investment choices.

Oh, and in addition, 13 years later I'm still in the same job as I was when I turned 50 and still earning the salary from that as well, part of which has been put into a second pension scheme - when I do finally retire I'm looking forward to enjoying the benefits of three separate pensions, even though there were times when I was younger when I could have really used the extra money in the bank..

0
0

Smartphone SatNavs to get centimetre-perfect GNSS receivers in 2018

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Not quite

To quote from the somewhat light-weight website you included the URL of:

"there are four unknowns in the pseudo-range equations: the three components of the receiver’s position, and the offset in the receiver’s clock. To determine its location it then must solve the four equations for the four unknowns."

and

"If the receiver “knows” one of the three position components, then measurements from only three satellites are required to solve for the other two components and the receiver clock offset (3 equations and 3 unknowns). If, for example, the altitude is known perfectly, this is equivalent to tracking a satellite directly above (or below) the user, and having a perfect pseudo-range measurement to it. Since a real fourth satellite will never provide a perfect pseudo-range, the three-satellite solution will be better than the four-satellite solution (assuming similar geometry quality, i.e., PDOP). If on the other hand the assumed altitude is in error, then the two sides of the equations will be equal only if a compensating error is added to the horizontal position components and clock offset. "

or. to put it another way, the receiver can only calculate an accurate position from three satellites if it accurately knows its position or its clock offset already - and if it already knows (ie., has been told) its position accurately, then why bother at all?

0
0
Kernel
Bronze badge

Not quite

"The BCM47755 achieves its extra accuracy by locking on to three satellites using the L1-band transmission (the GPS broadcast of satellite location, time, and signature)."

Actually, any GPS receiver needs a minimum of four satellites to lock on to, otherwise it has no way of determining how inaccurate its internal clock is and making appropriate corrections.

Four satellites allows the calculation of three potential positions - since you're obviously not actually in three places at once, adjusting the clock to minimize the difference between the three calculated positions provides the feedback loop to ensure the cheap internal clock chip is running as close as possible to the rate of the very expensive (and comparatively large) Cesium clocks in the satellites.

0
0

Boffins sling around entangled photons at telco wavelengths

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: So what is it good for?

" So just short range entanglement in real comms terms"

You do realise that 1550nm is the long-haul wavelength range used by telcos, don't you - so we're looking at distances in the order of 1000s of kms without having to decode or otherwise interfere with the photon. This sort of range is currently available off-the-shelf with existing DWDM systems, so no great break through required there.

Hence the push to get it working at 1550nm - there's no commercial advantage to using this technology within a data centre or even across campus, but trans-Pacific or trans-Atlantic is a different story altogether. I doubt that the cryogenic requirement would be too much of an issue either - it used to be a requirement for the low noise amplifiers in satellite antennas, but it didn't stop that technology being widely deployed.

If there's a significant economic advantage to this technology for long-haul carriers (and I suspect there is, capacity-wise) it will be developed into a stable and reliable commercial product surprisingly quickly.

1
0

Driverless cars will make more traffic, say transport boffins

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Asking people if they're willing to share

"Or they'll leave their half eaten McDonalds breakfast under the seat and it'll still be pretty ripe just as edible after a few days years."

FTFY.

1
0

Linus Torvalds' lifestyle tips for hackers: Be like me, work in a bathrobe, no showers before noon

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Last time I tried to work in a bathrobe...

"pour it and nuke it for 30 seconds or so to get the temperature back up."

I don't know what you're making there, but it sure as hell doesn't qualify as coffee!

2
0

Totally uncool California bureaucrats shoot down drone weed delivery

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Safety?

So why don't the same rules apply to alcohol or tobacco?

2
0
Kernel
Bronze badge

Safety?

"Much of the reasoning behind the rules appears to be safety-related."

My thinking might be wrong here, but it seems to me that one of the big advantages of legalizing pot is that it becomes just another product, like alcohol or tobacco, and with readily availability I would expect the price and risk to supply chain participants to drop to similar levels, thus eliminating most of the motive for criminal involvement.

10
0

Please, pleeeease let me ban Kaspersky Lab from US govt PCs – senator

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Makes some sense

"There's no evidence that the NSA has ever used Windows Update to distribute malware, "

Windows 10?

There's no shortage of evidence that the NSA has encouraged the distribution of malware by hiding information about vulnerabilities they've found.

2
2
Kernel
Bronze badge

I wonder ........

what it's like to live in a country which is constantly in a state of fear?

41
2

Yahoo! must! face! the! music! over! data! breaches! judge! rules!

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Now for the Vultures

"Time to pick the bones clean... I hope Verizon put some cash aside in a high yield account "

Verizon is probably not be liable for any damages awarded - they weren't the owner of Yahoo! when the breach happened and I suspect any damages would lie with the original Yahoo! legal entity.

This may, of course, not have much in the way of assets anymore, so the plaintiffs may well end up with nothing.

0
0

Police deny Notting Hill Carnival face recog tech led to wrongful arrest

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Nothing wrong with being "wrongfully" arrested

"or have their image and biometrics (illegally?) stored in a leaky police cloud server until the sun explodes,"

Of course that won't happen - after all, their record on not storing data related to people that haven't committed a crime is squeaky clean, isn't it?

I encourage you to persist in reading to the final sentence of the article,

"Hundreds of thousands of mugshots, mostly of innocent people not convicted of any criminal offence, are used to feed the Met's face-matching database. "

7
0

Judge: You can't call someone a c*nt, but a C∀NT is a cunning stunt

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: As we know..

""unwanted Brits" AKA the lucky ones"

Some years ago I read a book called "The Second Fleet", which was about the women that made up a large portion of the second shipment of convicts.

They wouldn't have thought so at the time, but looking back at where many of these women came from (think backstreet prostitution and gin by the bucket full in some of England's finest cities) and it's hard to disagree that in retrospect it was the best thing that ever happened to them and their descendants.

Worth hunting down and reading, if you're interested in the history of early European settlement in Four Ecks.

5
0

Terry Pratchett's unfinished works flattened by steamroller

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: I'm touched by the weirdness of this request...

"I wouldn't start with Unseen Academicals or Raising Steam, two of the last Discworld series as I'm not sure they are as good as the others. Felt like he was losing his bite, particularly in Raising Steam *ducks and runs for cover*"

Personally I'd add "Strata" to that (happily, very) short list - vaguely Disc World related and an attempt to explain how Disc World came into being, but it doesn't really fit with the rest of the series.

1
0

How the CIA, Comcast can snoop on your sleep patterns, sex toy usage

Kernel
Bronze badge

"We could easily see a router manufacturer figuring out a way to disguise identify such traffic and use a new privacy setting as a unique selling point sell the information in a timely manner."

FTFY.

Just wait for the message to pop-up on your tablet or PC - "We see your sex toy is slowing down - would you like to order new batteries for it now?"

34
0

Vodafone won't pay employee expenses for cups of coffee

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Per Diem

"That's why most companies are using per diem rates from the tax code without trying to be clever about it."

Ah, this will explain why my Finnish employer has specified our per diem rates here in NZ in Euros rather than $NZ.

1
0

Paris nightclub red-faced after booze-for-boobs offer exposed

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Not unusual

I'm not sure if it;s still there, but a few years ago there was a bar in Taupo, NZ, that had a wall decorated with framed bras that various female customers (I assume) had donated.

3
0

Calm down, internet. Elon's Musk-see SpaceX spacesuit is a bit generic

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Double vacuum

'If the astronauts used pure Oxygen it might only need testing to 1 bar for "double vacuum" '

That would actually be "triple vacuum" I think.

I seem to recall from the early Apollo days (pre-fire) that when using pure O2 the pressure required to get the same amount of oxygen into our blood stream as we get from air is only about 4psi, ie., the partial pressure of O2 in air at standard temperature and pressure is about 4 psi.

We are designed to operate on a mixture of about 80% inert gas and just under 20% oxygen - goldfish excepted - so if you filled a suit with pure O2 to 1 bar (about 15psi) then that would be a little over three times as much oxygen as called for in the spec and probably well on the way to causing seizures and/or death.

1
0

Sonos will deny updates to those who snub rewritten privacy terms

Kernel
Bronze badge

Farewell Sonos

Never owned a Sonos system, guess I never will now.

91
3

Where there's smoke there's a Galaxy Note: Refurbished Model 4 batteries recalled

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Well done Samsung!

"Another winner!"

You didn't actually read the article, did you?

If you had you'd know that it's not the batteries that Samsung installed (or most likely were installed on their behalf by a Chinese manufacturer), but replacement batteries installed in the USA by a 3rd party.

0
0

President Trump to his council of industry CEO buddies: You're fired!

Kernel
Bronze badge

"Funny old world. I was in the market for a new laptop, with Dell's XPS13 at number one in my list. I went elsewhere. And now I'm glad I made the right choice. "

And now, to complete the job, you need to email the highest up person in Dell that you can find and tell them why you made that decision and how you feel about their company's continued support for racists - people who refuse to buy from Dell over this issue need to also tell them that they are spending their money with Dell's competitors.

8
1

On the interactive web conference, nobody will hear you are a dog

Kernel
Bronze badge

"Or, you could just teach people to, y'know, MUTE their lines when they're not speaking."

Oh yes, please!

And for an encore, can we teach them to dial in before the meeting starts, rather than a t some random time in the first 15 minutes - followed by requests to repeat what's been discussed so far, because "I wasn't here and don't know what was talked about."

1
0

South London: Rats! The rodents have killed the internet

Kernel
Bronze badge

"Wow... it's almost like they didn't have redundant fibre down there too, and that nobody was monitoring or noticed that their fibre strands were dropping off one-by-one...."

It was possibly the cable from the exchange to the roadside cabinets - I woulndn't expect them to be redundant, especially if it is an x-PON type system where there is only passive optical splitter/combiners in the cabinets.

I can also tell you from personal experience that the time between one bitten fibre and 8 or 9 can be very short - like a matter of seconds - it all depends on exactly how that particular rat goes about the job. If it eats around the sheath first and then follows up with a chomp at the kevlar strength member in the centre of the cable then it's going to take out more than one at a time.

The other aspect to consider is that if, as I mention above, there is only passive components at the far end of the cable, there is nothing capable of reporting a signal loss. As for loss of the back channel signal back at the exchange - is the cable cut, or have the customer's modems just shut down due to a power cut?

0
0
Kernel
Bronze badge

"Hmm, I thought it was standard practice to run armoured for all outdoor runs. The price difference has never been much for the runs we do."

Maybe for campus type work, where the runs are relatively short - but for telco use, where the distances can be 1000s of km, the price of armored cable would be prohibitive, so it's only used where necessary.

You can actually buy fibre cable with rodent repellent sheathing, but that adds to the cost per metre as well, so it's typically only used where there is an identified rodent problem.

0
0

Watch this nanochip reprogram cells to fix damaged body tissue

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Technobabble?

" lets hope they next can create a chip that creates water into beer"

I can do you beer into water, if that's of any help?

8
0

You had ONE job: Italian firefighters suspected of starting blazes for cash

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Not the first

Yep, it's been known to happen in New Zealand as well. Apparently it's not as rare as we'd all like to think it is.

1
0

HMS Queen Liz will arrive in Portsmouth soon, says MoD

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: wrongo

I believe in NZ the order of precedence is:

airforce

army

navy.

0
0

London Mayor slams YouTube over failure to remove 'shocking' violent gang vids

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: All they have to do...

" a group of yoiks goosestepping and cry "Sieg Heil" in the car park."

But just doing this is not actually racist, is it?

Be very careful to differentiate between expressing a political opinion and racism, they're not the same thing.

4
2

Don't make Aug 21 a blind date: Beware crap solar eclipse specs

Kernel
Bronze badge

"If you are a moron that keeps looking directly into the sun despite it hurts because of magic glasses or something, you get what you deserve."

So you've never worked with infrared lasers then.

0
0

Dirty carbon nanotubes offer telcos chance at secure quantum comms

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: What happens when you amplify this photon

Fair enough, that explanation works for me. Thanks.

0
0
Kernel
Bronze badge

What happens when you amplify this photon

An optical amplifier does its magic by emitting a second, identical, photon when an incoming photon hits an atom of the doping material which has an electron at a higher than normal energy level, without destroying the original photon - these two then go on to cause other photons to be similarly emitted, thus ensuring that the egress signal is at a higher level than the ingress.

I might be missing something here, but it seems to me that once the single photon has been through an amplifier there will now be considerably more than one of them, giving Eve plenty of opportunity to listen in without Bob noticing anything wrong.

On the other hand, the little I've read about soliton transmission systems suggests that perhaps a single photon traveling alone may have a range of thousands of km without amplification, so maybe this is the answer.

0
0

Sorry, psycho bosses, it's not OK to keylog your employees

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: What if...

"Germany is fantastic for personal privacy protection in the workplace. You're not allowed to film employee areas except for areas where money is being handled and the staff have to be informed beforehand about that sort of thing. "

Yep, in the company I work for, which has a worldwide presence, you're not allowed to record on-line meetings unless every attendee gives consent first - just in case there is someone from Germany attending.

3
1

'Real' people want govts to spy on them, argues UK Home Secretary

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Ask her this

" use a GSM jammer to blanket the signal so no device within a 3 mile radius to me works, then thats my legal perogative and I am allowed to do that"

No, you most certainly are not - I can't think if a single country where this would be even remotely legal, it's even dodgy for the authorities to jam cell phones in prisons in many countries.

Your other ideas, yes, fill your boots as they affect no-one but yourself, but it's a brave person who would be caught jamming cellular (or any other radio) signals within a 3 mile radius.

18
0

GPS III satellites and ground station projects get even later as costs gently spiral

Kernel
Bronze badge

"GPSIII - mmm, does that mean your device gives you three possible locations for where you might be at any given time ? (just asking)"

Strange you should mention that, as that's pretty much how the receivers correct their clock rate.

With four satellites in view they can calculate three possible positions, each position based on data from three satellites - since you can obviously only be in one place at a time, adjusting the clock rate to minimize the difference between the three calculated positions ensures the clock is running at the correct rate. This allows the receivers to provide accurate positioning with a cheap and simple clock chip, as opposed to needing an atomic clock.

Presumably the more satellites a receiver is tracking the more accurate this clock rate correction process is and hence the more accurate the final position calculated..

0
0

USA to screen tablets,
e-readers and handheld games before they fly

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Pre-registration?

"Does america acutally recognise the IRA as a terrorist organisation though?"

I have a vague memory of being taught at school many years ago that the IRA was primarily a political organization that grew out of Sein Fein, not a terrorist group - the Provisional Wing of the IRA (Provos) on the other hand was an entirely different bag of ferrets.

0
0

'Coke dealer' called us after his stash was stolen – cops

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Florida Man

"Hmm... This change from rise to drop wouldn't happen to roughly coincide with a world war and mass use of leaded fuels would it? "

Some years ago I watched a documentary about excavations at some ancient site in the UK - it may have been at Stonehenge.

Anyhoo, they discovered the skeletons of a woman and two or three young children which were duly dated to confirm they were contemporary with the structure they were found beside. Once that had been done, and isotope analysis was carried on the teeth out to find out where they had been born and lived and to try and benchmark how much lead modern children take in from leaded petrol and other evil things in modern society.

Unfortunately this came to naught, as the children's teeth contained as much lead (within the accuracy limitations of the instruments used) as a modern child's did at the time the documentary was made.

So now we know - when places like Stonehenge were built technology was primitive, so all the trucks, cranes and earth movers they used to build it had petrol engines rather than diesels, which obviously hadn't been invented yet..

2
0

Reborn Nokia phones biz loses its head

Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Hard to believe

"Nokia did well, . It's interesting Motorola are still around,"

Motorola Mobility, the spin off who make the handsets, were bought by Google in 2011, then sold on to Lenovo back in 2014, so while they're still around it's only for certain values of "still around". Pretty much the same as 'Alcatel' and 'Nokia' cellphones really - made by companies that have acquired the rights to manufacture handsets with someone else's name on it, but are not part of the original brand owner.

After the split in 2011 the rest of Motorola became Motorola Solutions - except for their cellular infrastructure business which had been bought by Nokia Siemens back in 2010.

"Where as Nokia could not keep the number one spot forever without some form of burnout?"

According to Nokia's 2016 accounts, they had net sales of 23.6 billion Euro in 2016 - is this some new definition of burning out? If so, where do I apply?

3
0
Kernel
Bronze badge

Re: Where are Ericsson?

"Making infrastructure, and quite successfully I'm led to believe."

As is Nokia - who, like Ericsson, don't make phones now days and haven't for some years.

7
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017