* Posts by Phil O'Sophical

2931 posts • joined 28 Oct 2011

Chevy Bolt electric car came alive, reversed into my workbench, says stunned bloke

Phil O'Sophical
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How can an electrical device function without a neutral?

Three-phase.

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My hole is a private thing – see for yourself

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: Un-clouding

Or SNOW:

Still

Not

Outsourcing

Work (or Windows, if you must)

?

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Euro space agency's Galileo satellites stricken by mystery clock failures

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: "halt launches until the problem has been traced and cured"

Ignoring that ESA never had a shuttle in the first place, could the Shuttle ever reach geo-stationary orbit?

No, but neither do GPS satellites.

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Why Theresa May’s hard Brexit might be softer than you think

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: 2 years?

Most mature referendum-holding countries apply a double majority for decisions of major consequence.

You mean the way that not a single one applied such a condition for joining the EU in the first place? Funny how people want to change the rules when the game isn't going their way.

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Solaris 12 disappears from Oracle's roadmap

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: Srtaws in the wind

everything is going to hyperdense x86_64

I hope you've got good cooling.

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Japan's terrifying techno-toilets will be made foreigner friendly, vow makers

Phil O'Sophical
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rather than the anemic 100V used in Japan.

Depends on which island you're on.

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French spies warn politicians of hack risk as election draws near

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: Hacking French politics ? Not worth it.

Third, personal misdemeanours of a sexual or financial nature seem to be of no real concern to the French voters.

If they're bad enough, they do. Ask Dominique Strauss-Kahn.

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Phil O'Sophical
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People lie to pollsters

I doubt that MLP will get through though, it's far more likley to be Valls, Macron or Fillon.

If there's a second round I agree with you, she stands no chance against Fillon, and little against the other two likely opponents.

It's a potentially big "if", though. French voters have a tendency to use the first round as a protest vote, to send a message, before lining up behind more moderate candidates in the final head-to-head runoff. That bit them in 1995, and could do so again. Le Pen is the only mainstream candidate who is vocally anti-EU (especially anti-euro) and anti-immigration, and it wouldn't surprise me to see her get a big first-round vote from across the country on those issues. People forget that if she should happen to pass the 50% in that first round, there won't be a second round, she'll be elected. With the FN sitting at a consistent 25-26% now, and given people's tendencies to lie about voting for them in polls, passing that 50% in April isn't impossible.

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Phil O'Sophical
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I'm not sure that high levels of trust in the media are necessarily a good thing. In the UK people have very little trust in the press, especially the tabloid press, and even traditionally trustworthy sources like the BBC are now seen as pushing a political agenda (maybe they are, maybe not, but there's a belief that they are). The result is that people are sceptical of what they read.

In France the very paternalistic society means that people trust the state and the media somewhat blindly. If it's in Libération or Le Figaro it's trusted much more than something published in the Guardian or Daily Telegraph in the UK would be, for example.

What that means, though, is that there's less precautionary scepticism in the society. If one of those papers does start pushing a specific agenda it is much more likely to be swallowed without questioning it, at least for a time.

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Japan tries to launch satellite on rocket the size of a telegraph pole

Phil O'Sophical
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But whose going to be the first to launch an actual telegraph pole into space?

The Scots try manual launches from Braemar every so often, but they never seem to get very far.

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BT installs phone 'spam filter', says it'll strain out mass cold-callers

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: BT need to sort out CLI

If BT are doing this properly they won't be relying on the (possibly-spoofed) CLID, they should be able to see the real number in many cases. Won't help for VOIP calls, but it's a start.

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Promising compsci student sold key-logger, infects 16,000 machines, pleads guilty, faces jail

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: Ignorant Brit here

3.0 is pretty normal as regular smart people are good at something and suck at something else.

So really it's as useless as a TripAdvisor star rating, then.

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Mr Angry pays taxman with five wheelbarrows worth of loose change

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: He'd be shit out of luck in the UK

banks are not obliged to process written instructions

Thanks for the clarification.

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Phil O'Sophical
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one wheelbarrow shall be known as 1Whb

Pronounces "whub" I suppose? So we can measure Google profits in megawhubs, and government debt in petawhubs.

I suppose by that reckoning my lunch cost me 10 milliwhubs. hmmm.

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Phil O'Sophical
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Re: He'd be shit out of luck in the UK

As I understand it, there is no obligation to actually accept them.

I think that banks are legally required to accept written instructions from their customers, the whole reason cheques were invented was to avoid the hassle of having illegible requests written on the back of a napkin, piece of bog roll, or whatever else came to hand. Even so, if you write it down & sign it I think (but IANAL) the bank has to process it.

Makes me wonder what will happen if their plans to put an end to cheques ever happen, since they

ll still be bound by the legal requirement to accept written instructions.

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Smart fingerprint padlock startup to $320k backers: Sorry for the radio silence

Phil O'Sophical
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Wait & see...

If they're that inept at designing something so that it can be manufactured, I wonder what their security design and test process is like...

Will this be another "biometrics" device that can be unlocked with a fingerprint taken off a button using some adhesive tape?

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EU policy makers consider FRAND licensing of machine-generated data

Phil O'Sophical
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fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory?

What's wrong with "keep your grubby hands off my data altogether" ?

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Crumbs. Exceedingly good cakes, meat dressing price hike in wake of the Brexit

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: My toothpaste

It's all right, after Brexit it'll be back to 3oz

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Stop us if you've heard this one before: Seamen spread over California

Phil O'Sophical
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Black Helicopters

Recycling?

a battery life of around 20 minutes and a top speed of 60mph, and are designed to be dropped and then discarded

So will we have lots of kids in war zones out collecting these and recharging them, then selling them on ebay? If they use primary cells (better power-to-weight anyway) for drop'n'discard use it might even be as simple as popping a few new AA cells in.

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Phil O'Sophical
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Re: Swarms of weaponized suicide drones

all you need to do is transmit some loud rock music over FM

Aha, the true reason for ending FM broadcasting now comes to light...

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FBI let alleged pedo walk free rather than explain how they snared him

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: School Teacher

UK is one of the only two countries in the world without a written constitution

That's Internet myth. The UK does have a written constitution, it just isn't all written down on one sheet of paper headed "Ye Olde Conftitution". It's made up of centuries of written Acts of Parliament.

The US constitution and the Bill of Rights is heavily based on the English Bill of Rights from 1689, which is still part of UK constitutional law.

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Phil O'Sophical
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Headmaster

The correct abbreviation is paedo, not pedo.

Well, if you're being pedantic, it's pædo.

Anyway, where does that leave us walkers with the pedometer on our belt?

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Could YOU survive a zombie apocalypse? Uni eggheads say you'd last just 100 days

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: UK - Zombies Win. USA - Zombies LOSE

So in the UK, where guns and knives are forbidden, zombies will triumph.

No, we're too creative for that. I bet I could knock up a flamethrower just with what I have in my garage. Not to mention the axes, pitchfork, etc.

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Forget aircraft – now cretins are laser-blinding ferry boat crewmen

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: 15 days jail time ?

It seems the penalty currently is too light given the horrible risk of fatalities.

It clearly isn't a deterrent. Why not treat this in the same way that they would treat someone who fired a gun at the ferry captain?

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My fortnight eating Blighty's own human fart-powder

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: Ginsters

Everyone's mum makes the best food :)

Which is never quite as good as Gran's food, though :)

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How the NYE leap second clocked Cloudflare – and how a single character fixed it

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: the code was updated to check if rttMAX was equal to or less than zero

The difference with a leap second is that it is actually a change to UTC.

That's true, but AFAIK UTC still never goes backwards, a leap second just means that a minute contains 61 seconds instead of 60. I still don't follow how a time difference between successive "now" instants on the same system could ever be negative if it's measuring UTC.

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Those online ads driving you bonkers are virtually 'worthless for brands'

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: Optional

I thought I'd come up with something original with condom escapees, but a quick search reveals that I apparently didn't..

Does this show that subliminal advertising does work?

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Networks in 2016: A full fibre diet for UK.gov

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: Multiple 4k

Phil, Do you even understand how those smartphones and tablets stay connected?

Funnily enough, I do. I've even written some of the software for it. Do you have any actual technical point to make, or will you just stay with the ad-hominem, anonymous, insults?

if you want each phone to 'magically' have 5G connectivity

Who mentioned 5G? And what does the provision of fibre backhaul between dedicated, carefully chosen, radio sites have to do with FTTP links to arbitrarily sited homes with no nearby infrastructure? Getting fibre to central hubs and exchanges is the easy bit, and is what BT are doing. It's the "TP" bit of FTTP that is expensive and, so far, mostly unnecessary.

In places like football stadiums (high concentrations of devices),

All streaming video? I don't think so. No need for 5G, or even 4G speeds there.

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Phil O'Sophical
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Re: An easy first step

Can I propose any 60+ yo retiree is banned from commenting on Broadband, because their working career is over and FTTP v shitty copper 'upto' connectivity and penny pinching over cost no longer affects them.

Yet those very retirees make up a huge proportion of home internet users, seeing as how they're at home most of the time. If they can be disregarded as not needing GB speeds doesn't that simply demonstrate that a large and growing part of the population has no need for FTTP speeds? Will Gbit/s FTTP really make the online shop at Tesco a better experience? Will those retirees be willing to pay for it?

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Phil O'Sophical
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Re: Multiple 4k

We need FTTP not G.fast.

Why?

How does your "futureproofed" fibre roll-out fit with a future where more & more people are using smartphones and tablets for their internet access?

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Phil O'Sophical
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your partner watches more 4k TV in the kitchen while making the dinner.

Wow, talk about 'first world problems"...

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Internet of Sh*t has an early 2017 winner – a 'smart' Wi-Fi hairbrush

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: Truly a hair-raising story...

Wait until they get sued by the first American to go bald after regular use of one of these...

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Army social media psyops bods struggling to attract fresh blood

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: Simple.

They're good at spinning and lying.

Good at trying, perhaps, but they are rarely believed and frequently caught out, so perhaps not the best candidates?

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The Register's Top 20 Most-Commented Stories in 2016

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: To sum it all up

Now what can we look forward to in 2017?

2017:Lots of companies moving to "the cloud"

2018: Lots of companies realizing why they moved off the cloud in the 1970s

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Did webcam 'performer' offer support chap payment in kind?

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: Pah!

Their objective was to see how much they could cause him to blush.

A non-computer story in this vein: a friend's wife worked in Boots (the chemists) years ago. Late afternoon she would often get some teenage boys, still in school uniform, who would wait until the counter was quiet & grab a packet of condoms which they would proffer with payment, not saying a word.

The girls used to take great delight in saying something like "Featherlite? Oh, you don't want those, the ribbed ones are much better" and then waving the packet in the air would call out down the shop "Jenny, aren't the ribbed ones nicer than these?".

Cue exit of scarlet-faced teenager...

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BT and Plusnet most moaned about broadband providers. Again

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: Talk Talk had 8 complaints?

8 of them, apparently.

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Ham-fisted: Chap's radio app killed remotely after posting bad review

Phil O'Sophical
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This is a truly terrible way of responding to criticism, and I think most companies are smart enough to realise the negative PR would cost them far more.

Especially when you do it to a member of a community whose particular interest is communication...

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View from a Reg reader: My take on the Basic Income

Phil O'Sophical
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FAIL

Re: I would love it

from UBI, paid for by all taxpayers collectively. You know what we're talking about right?

Perpetual motion, apparently.

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Phil O'Sophical
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Re: I would love it

Sure, but then you'll be getting the same amount of money too.

From where?

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Phil O'Sophical
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But you, too, could put up your feet and make do on UBI. Why wouldn't you?

Obviously because I want better than a basic living.

And why are you annoyed that other people are prepared to make the compromises you won't make?

I'm not. I'd be annoyed if I were expected to pay for them though. It's one thing to see taxes helping people who need extra help, quite another to see them go to people who simply choose to take the easy option, knowing that "someone else" will pay for it.

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Phil O'Sophical
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Re: A brave gamble

What's the B for, in UBI?

Basic

Does it affect what you wrote?

No, why should it? The previous poster said that UBI would replace benefits, I disagree. Either the basic income will be very low, in which case some people will still need extra benefits, or it will be high, in which case it is unaffordable. It won't replace benefits.

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Phil O'Sophical
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Re: A brave gamble

by eliminating the huge waste in the amount of time and money that society puts into not paying people benefits.

Except that it wouldn't There would still be a need to pay benefits. If you set UBI high enough that a disabled person who does not own a home can survive, it would mean that a middle-aged couple who've paid off their mortgage would have a very comfortable income indeed. That would be unaffordable, but setting it low enough that the middle-aged couple just got by would leave the disabled person starving unless they got some additional benefits.

UBI can't replace benefits, it just residtributes them irrespective of whether the recipient needs them or not.

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Phil O'Sophical
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Re: I would love it

If I could make a basic income, cover my mortgage and a few other bills each month

So you expect the taxpayers who do work to buy you a house, which you will be able to pass down to your children, as well as feed & clothe you?

Replace "taxpayers" with "peasant farmers" and you get a great description of the 17th century model. Haven't the last 400 years of effort been to get way from that?

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Phil O'Sophical
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you no longer have to work to live.

Inevitably that cannot work for everyone, since then there would be no money coming in to pay us

You're no longer going to be slaving 70 hours at a restaurant for £350 a week while the multimillionaire proprietor takes all your tips and the state makes up the difference.

And that inevitably pigeonholes you as someone who thinks that all low wage earners are exploited by evil capitalists, which is not the case (nor is it's opposite, of course, reality is somwhere in the middle).

You're going to be slaving for 70 hours a week for £350 a week on top of the £500 or whatever the state is furnishing you with. It gives you the power to walk away,

Not really. Some people who are willing to work 70 hours for £350 will be so pleased to get £500 for doing nothing that they'll just put their feet up and open another beer. That will make it harder to find people willing to do those low-paid jobs, and will inevitably push up the wages in that sector. That, in turn, will push up prices and so depress sales. For industries that don't need to be local, like help desks, manufacturing, etc. it will just be another reason to offshore the work. That will export tax revenue, and make a UBI even harder to fund.

to work for your own betterment

Except that the reality is that other people will be working for your betterment, since the taxes of the people who work will be paying for your relaxed lifestyle. Many of us will want to know what we get out out of that deal. Yes, that's a self-centred point of view, but most people are self-centred.

Those people who see their taxes increasing to pay for people who choose not to work then have two choices, emigrate and take their tax money elsewhere, or elect a government that disagrees with UBI. Either way it ends in failure.

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It's round and wobbles, but madam, it's a mouse pad, not a floppy disk

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: Poor instructions

<i?I believe I understood I had to remove a disc before putting in the next one since I got my first 45rpm disc player as a child,</i>

You never had an autochanger that would let you stack half-a-dozen disks up for playing?

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Macbook seized or stolen? But you've set a FileVault password, right? Ha, it's useless

Phil O'Sophical
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We've seen this before

Isn't this much the same problem Apple had with their FireWire ports 5 years ago? Looks like the Thunderbolt driver developers didn't talk to the Firewire ones:

https://web.nvd.nist.gov/view/vuln/detail?vulnId=CVE-2011-3215

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Sysadmin 'fixed' PC by hiding it on a bookshelf for a few weeks

Phil O'Sophical
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Happy

Re: Building sites + laptops =

* One for the kids there

http://dilbert.com/strip/1995-04-03

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OpenStreetView? You are no longer hostage to Google's car-driven vision

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: How "open" is OpenStreetMap?

What possessed you to make such an accusation? What's in it for you?

No accusation, nothing in it for me. Just a back-of-the-envelope calculation,. Even if all the amateur mapmakers in the US were off on their bikes like Dave Pickles (above) I don't think there are enough of them, with the aerial surveying equipment they need, to turn out the huge level of accurate detail that we see in OSM.

I'm not suggesting any sort of criminal conspiracy, but I suspect many people have picked up a "free" map at the tourist office and thought "Oh, I know, I'll load it into OSM for everyone else", etc.. Nice idea, but it ignores that little "(C)" at the bottom.

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Blue sky basic income thinking is b****cks

Phil O'Sophical
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Re: Mixed feelings

are Starbucks/beer/cigarettes/Sky TV essentials or luxuries?

Luxuries. Essentials are pretty much shelter (basic housing and power) and enough food to survive. Anything else is a luxury which should be worked for.

I would agree, but many people will insist that they need cigarettes/beer for medical reasons ("It's an addiction") or that TV entertainment is a basic right since they don't have a job...

These issues need to be dealt with no matter how "benefits" are dished out.

Indeed, but then you enter the whole area of eligibility, and "means testing", so it's no longer a flat rate income, but "welfare benefits", and if people can get them in addition to a basic income it's no different to what we have today, it just costs more.

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If only our British 4G were as good as, um, Albania's... UK.gov's telco tech report

Phil O'Sophical
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The report mixes UK and Britain, which does it mean? Blanket coverage of the Home Counties is much easier than covering Scottish islands or remote corners of N. Ireland.

As for 5G means seamless connectivity. Ultra-fast and ultra-reliable, transmitting massive amounts of data at super low latency. we all know that's complete bollocks. We'd need masts popping up every few hundred yards, with the required fibre infrastructure to connect them.

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