* Posts by Unicornpiss

1127 posts • joined 7 Oct 2011

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Phased out: IT architect plugs hole in clean-freak admin's wiring design

Unicornpiss
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Facepalm

Re: Bridge rectifier?

"These selenium rectifiers were notorious for the stink they made when they failed, which has been compared with a robot farting."

Everything in that column of the periodic table forms stinky compounds and reeks when burned. (Eg. sulfur, selenium, tellurium, and presumably polonium too)

If you're bored, google "tellurium breath". Apparently it only takes a very small exposure to tellurium to make the breath, urine, sweat, etc. reek horribly of garlic for a very long time.

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Unicornpiss
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Alert

More wiring follies..

A friend of mine bought a house, and she asked me to take a look as every time she plugged in her computer monitor (CRT type) into a certain outlet, the circuit breaker would trip instantly. The monitor worked fine when plugged into any other outlet, and anything else plugged into the suspect outlet worked fine too.

The outlet was a standard 3-wire duplex outlet, like billions of others in the US. The house was somewhat older and parts of it still had 2-prong outlets. Upon pulling the outlet out of the wall, I found that to make this a 3-wire outlet, someone had wired the neutral and ground together, as there were only 2 conductors available from the panel. While this was a code violation, and a safety issue, it would have been mostly okay if the idiot that wired it hadn't mixed up the hot and neutral wires. So the neutral and ground were both hot, and her monitor apparently had some internal fault that led to the discovery.

This could have been lethal, if for example, someone was using an older power tool that had the metal case grounded for 'safety', then touched a pipe or similar with their other hand. A metal-cased power strip could have been shocking too..

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Unicornpiss
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Alert

Mechanically linked breakers..

In a previous life, I managed a restaurant and also did maintenance on some restaurant equipment, including conveyor ovens. We had a satellite operation in an auto plant's commissary about 50 miles away that I also oversaw.

One evening I get a page (yes, that long ago) and the message is "Oven is down in Plant 2" So I bundle up my tools and drive 50 miles to troubleshoot the problem. After some head scratching I discover that one leg of the 3-phase power is not present. So I go hunt down one of the plant electricians, which takes quite a while, then we go on a snipe hunt for which electrical panel actually services the grimy receptacle. Eventually a panel is found and we verify that the breaker actually controls power to the outlet, but it's not tripped. It also appears to only be a 2-phase with the 2 breakers mechanically linked. The electrician verified this by taking the cover off the panel--only one screw was holding it and it came crashing to the floor when it was removed.

Now we're both scratching our heads and with the help of another electrician and a ladder he begins tracing the wiring back from the outlet. He finds that 2 phases and the neutral are wired to the panel we found, but one diverges in a ceiling electrical box and runs to a panel about 50 yards away in another part of the labyrinthine plant. There, another 2-phase breaker is found with only one phase connected, and it was not just tripped, but defective to the point where you could practically make it trip by breathing on it.

I can't imagine the level of incompetence/indifference/rushing to complete a job that would lead to wiring something this way, but it was one of the first displays of this sort that I'd experienced, contributing to barely anything surprising me these days.

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Google Spectre whizz kicked out of Caesars, blocked from DEF CON over hack 'attack' tweet

Unicornpiss
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FAIL

Surely there's a better venue for the next conference?

But maybe not, in these times where simply making a somewhat poor joke or merely insulting someone can get you locked up and/or sued.

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Stress, bad workplace cultures are still driving security folk to drink

Unicornpiss
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Pint

IT is not a healthy profession

Surely there are some IT jobs that are rewarding and not continually stressful. But a lot of us suffer the stress of a thankless job daily and anything that takes the edge off life, even for a while, is pretty hard to resist. Also, when people are unappreciated, it's a lot easier for self-destructive behavior to take hold. If no one seems to care, it can sometimes be hard to care about yourself.

Some of the things that bother us:

-Constant stress/long hours/on call/not enough rest or peace.

-All blame and little recognition or rewards/chance for advancement.

-Unskilled/self-serving management that only have their jobs from failing upwards, yet couldn't walk a mile in the shoes of those they lead without tripping and falling on their face.

-Companies starting more projects without coming close to finishing the ones currently running. (see above comment)

IT is one of the foundations of any company in these times, yet management is nearly always trying to build their house without caring that the foundation is overburdened to the point of crumbling. Because many of us work behind the scenes to put out fires and fix problems that management never even realizes exist before they become catastrophes, our contributions are often not even known. And most of us have a love of technology, problem solving, and helping others, and not of office politics. So we don't play "the game" as well as perhaps we need to. And those of us that do seem to be the lesser-skilled and seem to end up as sycophantic "yes men" (and women) that no one likes, dividing everyone and destroying integrity and unity. Again, people fail up. A lot of us also worry about layoffs or worsening work environments when the poor decisions of people higher up the food chain come to their rotten fruition.

I work for a large company, and in the last 3 years, 3 good people where I work have died literally on the job from strokes and other sudden illnesses, and a few more have had cancers or other conditions that while you can't specifically pin them on work, IMHO stress and the unhealthy behaviors resulting from it are contributing factors in their disease.

Now I've depressed even myself and will finish my pint so I can try to get some sleep and do it all over again tomorrow.

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The age of hard drives is over as Samsung cranks out consumer QLC SSDs

Unicornpiss
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Defrag

Clearly the mechanical hard drive in the article's picture needs a thorough defragmentation.

(I actually encountered one like that--I hadn't realized that some platters were glass until then)

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'Can you just pop in to the office and hit the power button?' 'Not really... the G8 is on'

Unicornpiss
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Pint

Done that.. kind of..

I remote rebooted a UNIX server that had been acting increasingly strange. A server with an uptime of over a year that ran a busy call center. Then did a ping -t and waited for it to come back up so I could continue maintenance. And waited.. and waited.. and waited... Finally, faced with the reality that it was never going to come online, I stated making phone calls and leaving messages to the few people that had a key to the server room, and prepared myself for an early rise and a 150-mile drive to see what happened. I didn't sleep very well that night.

Fortunately one of the people got my message and found the machine stuck on some minor error with a "Press Y to continue" message on the console, and doing so restored normal operation.

Then there's this: https://thedailywtf.com/articles/ITAPPMONROBOT

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Uptight robots that suddenly beg to stay alive are less likely to be switched off by humans

Unicornpiss
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Meh

It's pretty obvious, isn't it?

Most of us don't like people that are too chatty, at least not when all they do is spout continual inanity. Superficial friendliness is not friendship, and there's only so many conversations about the weather, your latest workout, or that great salad someone had that can be endured. I wish some of my coworkers had an off switch. Or at least a "go away for an hour" button.

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Now that's a dodgy Giza: Eggheads claim Great Pyramid can focus electromagnetic waves

Unicornpiss
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Re: I want to believe..

"What do you mean theres no magic anymore? Have you not used wifi?"

Well, I have managed to get older versions of Oracle to install on Win10..

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Unicornpiss
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Alien

I want to believe..

..as there is not enough magic or mystery in the world these days. But I fear this may be some guys with a solution looking for a problem. Eg., find what you want to believe and then figure out a path that sort of gets you there. I'm curious as to the concentrating effect of other shapes, such as cones, trapezoids, etc. I fear that this may be just some random intrinsic property than anything approximately shaped like a pyramid would have. Like some far future archaeologist finding a hubcap and noting that it rings like a bell when struck, so it must have been used in religious ceremonies..

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Unicornpiss
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Paris Hilton

Re: It was aliens wot did it

"Oh dear, am I at risk of being penetrated by a Pointy Mummy now?"

Is this some kind of euphemism for a MILF with a strap-on?

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Western Digital wonders why enterprise isn't keen on its solid-state drives

Unicornpiss
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Re: Supplier markup on new hardware

"I've used Dell for years and my experience has been like yours. Engineer on site within 24 hours and never had a repair refused or quibbled."

You've been lucky then. With the "gold" Pro Support warranty, I've occasionally had my time wasted with all sorts of pointless extended diagnostics for an obviously failed HDD or SDD when trying to get warranty service. Is it a coincidence that the warranty service is more reluctant to replace a drive when there are price or supply issues, such as the some years back flooding of major manufacturer's facilities? I think not.

As far as the next-day service, usually it is, but sometimes we just don't hear from the tech until the day after that. While this isn't as big a deal for laptops or desktops, it's still in violation of our SLA. And occasionally we've had techs quibble over nonexistent "physical damage" to machines.

Still, they're 100x better than HP's support services.

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Unicornpiss
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Re: Supplier markup on new hardware

"I have a Dell Premiere account and I make a point of telling the account reps that they;re losing sales bercase I can buy the exact same 2TB SSDs they're putting in their boxes for half the price from a retailer."

And, you can choose whatever brand you want and not whoever the lowest bidder was that month for Dell.

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Another German state plans switch back from Linux to Windows

Unicornpiss
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@FrankAlphaXII

"I'm not sure why but I never really liked working with Linux.

To each their own. I use Linux at home, and having supported both OSes, I'd say both can be a pain. But it's little things that I like about Linux--the way when you plug in a mouse or other device, that Linux instantly identifies it and it works--no waiting 5 minutes for Windows to decide whether it has a driver for it or not. The way it doesn't constantly pop up pointless notifications. The way it never steals focus from the window you're using. And the quick, relatively graceful patching process that actually tells you what it's doing compared to Windows, which is about as graceful as a drunken hippo in a log rolling competition when patching. If it feels unfinished to some, it's more like because there's enough there and not more than you need, IMHO.

There are days after getting frustrated by a long hard day of supporting Windows machines that I boot up my Linux desktop and enjoy the serenity of it. Conversely there are days when dealing with some stubborn Linux issue, such as getting DRM to interoperate, that it's a joy to boot into Windows and have it just work too.

You can bet though, that if I had a scheduled flight on a new aircraft, that I'd feel a lot less apprehensive if I found the autopilot ran on Linux and not anything from Microsoft.

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Unicornpiss
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Happy

Re: Microsoft Salespeople are like the Priors of the Ori

Have an upvote for the SG1 reference.

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Unicornpiss
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Alert

Re: "It certainly won't be easier to administer"

For that matter, you can use Linux desktops in an AD domain, run a Linux machine as a domain controller, and interoperate both worlds. I understand the want to consolidate things and only support one family of OSes. From a user point of view, the experience probably won't be much different, other than I'd predict everything will run a bit slower and possibly less stable. Hardware requirements will go up too. From an admin point of view, there's going to be a learning curve whether you go from LInux to Win or vice-versa, and there will be some teething problems.

Since management usually only understands cost and not technical things (even some IT management), and Linux is a lot cheaper than Windows, Office, etc., it has to be that MS made them a really sweet deal. Probably something along the lines of "We won't charge you licensing for the first year, and you get free support from us, plus discounts on hardware from one of our partners." It's after that, that there will likely be hell to pay.

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Unicornpiss
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Meh

Re: The problem is not Linux itself...

"Sorry, you've sent us an MS Excel (.xlsx) file: we don't use those. Please resave the file in the correct OpenDocument (.ods) format.."

Um, when was the last time you actually used Open Office or Libre Office? It opens and saves in .xlsx and other formats, and IMHO, crashes a lot less and is much more responsive than Office 2013 and 2016. MS Office may have a few features that the free alternatives do not, but 99% of Office users likely never use them or even know they exist. SharePoint is kind of useful, I'll admit, when it feels like cooperating.

And why switch the whole infrastructure over? Surely an incentive was given by MS to do so, as there's no reason both platforms couldn't coexist.

Some Microsoft salesperson is likely getting a big bonus this quarter..

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All that dust on Mars is coming from one weird giant alien structure

Unicornpiss
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Alien

Iron rich dust..

"Weirdly enough, it appears it is mostly drawn from a formation on its surface called the Medusae Fossae, a single geological object that is slowly crumbling and scattering debris all over the Red Planet."

So THAT'S where that billion year-old mothership crashed...

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Core blimey! Apple macOS update lifts boot from MacBook Pro neck

Unicornpiss
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Trollface

Poor quality control

This is the way in the time of A.J., common reckoning. (After Jobs)

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Fork it! Google fined €4.34bn over Android, has 90 days to behave

Unicornpiss
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Re: At least it's not BING

"But even if we did I'm sure the world would just keep spinning."

Yes, but you wouldn't be able to find a damn thing on it.

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Unicornpiss
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Meh

My concern..

..would be that all the vendors, now having the power to include whatever they want, will actually be 10x worse than just letting Google preinstall its defaults, which while a bit heavy handed, actually work quite well.

While I do think what Google is doing to phone makers with GMS and their Play store is BS, and I agree with the spirit of the antitrust suit, instead of reasonableness I'm afraid we'll end up with a bunch of bureaucratic solutions that make little sense and do very few any favors, such as the idiotic "Korea Media Player" link that MS was forced to include on the Win 7 'Start' menu to make everyone happy. I wonder if anyone ever bothered to even try that, even in Korea?

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Samsung’s new phone-as-desktop is slick, fast and ready for splash-down ... somewhere

Unicornpiss
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Meh

Motorola did this already about 7 years ago

..with the DroidX and their "Atrix" desktop. It never caught on. While there was a dock for the phone I think, I had a DroidX and a suitable cable, and with just plugging the cable into the phone and an HDMI input, you had a couple of options--mirroring the phone display or using it as a "desktop". I will say that the desktop option wasn't bad--the whole phone became a touchpad and apps like the web browser suddenly had usable tabs. Other apps reformatted for the bigger screen too. I'm sure the dock had USB ports for a keyboard, etc. but I never laid eyes on one. I never used it for productivity, but it was good for web surfing and watching videos. And at the time, surprising Apple fanbois with what the little Droid could do.

My personal feelings on why it never caught on was the need for accessories bringing the price into the range of cheaper netbooks, and the lack of proper marketing. Also, the Android platform not being seen as a platform for productivity apps at the time, especially ones that would interoperate with MS Office, which love or hate it, has become the world standard.. (Apple really has the same problem)

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‘Elders of the Internet’ apologise for social media, recommend Trump filters to fix it

Unicornpiss
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Pint

Veritaserum

The thing about alcohol (and drugs), is that it only brings out what is already there in your psyche. A lot of mistakes in politics, hiring, marriage, etc. could likely be avoided by giving someone a few drinks and then letting them speak their mind before making an evaluation. Or perhaps requiring a final debate to be done under the influence of Pentohol.

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Tech support chap given no training or briefing before jobs, which is why he was arrested

Unicornpiss
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Where I work..

..you could carry a grand piano out of the building and the guards would hold the door for you.

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You're indestructible, always believe in 'cause you are Go! Microsoft reinvents netbook with US$399 ‘Surface Go’

Unicornpiss
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Yay..

..another underspec'd, over-hyped, not repairable, barely usable, likely unreliable, fairly useless device from Microsoft.

Spend the same or slightly more and get a much better machine from Asus, Dell, even Acer, with more than one pathetic USB port and a keyboard that doesn't feel like a pizza box lid when you try to type on it, and won't set you back an extra C-note.

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'Plane Hacker' Roberts: I put a network sniffer on my truck to see what it was sharing. Holy crap!

Unicornpiss
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Mushroom

EMP

"I think its time to purchase "classics" that have no electronics in them."

Another benefit for the paranoid, is older vehicles like this are likely to still be usable if anyone ever manages to generate an EMP.

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Unicornpiss
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Coat

It's disgusting to sniff things on the bus..

And may get you thrown off.

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Unicornpiss
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Meh

Re: What exactly does he mean by this?

Well, if he's tapping the OBDII connector and exclaiming "Look at all the data that's being shared!", that would be just silly. Like breaking into someone's house by smashing a window with a brick, hiding behind the bedroom door to eavesdrop, then complaining that their intimate conversations are not secure. Just silly.

I suppose it's possible Bluetooth or WIFI is being used, if there is some route from the entertainment/nav system to the vehicle's other buses. (like in the Jeep hack some years ago) If a BT connection is being used, the value of the data is pretty dubious unless you can actually control the vehicle. If you're just slurping GPS with BT, you're probably within sight of the vehicle anyway. If you're doing this over WIFI, I guess the question would be is the data available over a poorly-secured public IP, similar to someone that never changed the default settings on their router, or only if you've joined the LAN, which again, makes the range and relevance pretty low.

So really there isn't enough data here to do more than raise other questions. We'd need to know what method was used to connect to the vehicle, and exactly what data is being shared, plus is this allowing control. Is it really that useful to view slurped data showing when the vehicle needs its next oil change? (maybe it would be if you could harvest the VINs of nearby vehicles) It would also be nice to know what brand of vehicle we're talking about here.

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Russian battery ambitions see a 10x increase in power from smaller, denser nukes

Unicornpiss
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Coat

Re: Other pacemaker solution...

Well, they do call it your "ticker"..

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Science fiction legend Harlan Ellison ends his short time on Earth

Unicornpiss
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Pint

Have not read much of his work

At the risk of speaking ill of the dead, I did read "City on the Edge of Forever", the story the classic, award-winning Star Trek episode was adapted from. I found the story to be very unpolished and the first half of the (Amazon Kindle) book was an angry forward (rant) from Ellison dropping names and whining about how he was wronged by Roddenberry and others. It was nearly unreadable IMHO, and while imaginative, was more fitting for a pulp novel than a serious SF story. Roddenberry took this diamond in the rough and turned it into an intelligent, accessible, coherent, emotionally involving teleplay that fit into the 40-some minutes of the episode, with nothing salient left out. The book was one of only two I have ever deleted from my fairly massive ebook collection.

I will say that this turned me off reading anything else of Ellison's work, but based on the Reg elegy of the man, it looks like there's a lot more to explore and I'll probably take another look. I didn't realize the man was so prolific. I hope he has found some peace.

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IBM memo to staff: Our CEO Ginni is visiting so please 'act normally!'

Unicornpiss
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Flame

Full seats..

After all the layoffs at IBM, maybe the CEO doesn't want to see every seat full. Perhaps it will just lead to another round of layoffs.

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Chrome sends old Macs on permanent Safari: Browser bricks itself

Unicornpiss
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Thumb Down

Here's a thought then..

..if it's not going to run, how about detecting the OS level and NOT updating! Or is that too complex a bit of programming?

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Meet TLBleed: A crypto-key-leaking CPU attack that Intel reckons we shouldn't worry about

Unicornpiss
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Meh

Re: Intel. All hope is lost.

"AMD Ryzen is better in every regard and ARM based CPUs are a strong contender."

I have been building computers for almost 2 decades with AMD CPUs, and will always choose them over Intel a a matter of personal preference. And I agree that Ryzen is a great processor.

But if you read the article, it looks like AMD's offerings may be vulnerable as well. And that's the thing. Whether you like AMD, Intel, or ARM, Coke or Pepsi, etc., there will always be yet another vulnerability discovered, yesterday's foolproof encryption will be trivially broken in the next decade, and idiot-proofing something just means that more complete idiots will emerge to prove you wrong. With the way security evolves in our high-tech world, it's almost like we're seeing an abstraction of the natural selection that occurs in nature.

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Now Microsoft ports Windows 10, Linux to homegrown CPU design

Unicornpiss
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Meh

I guess we'll see..

Microsoft is such a mixed bag these days of surprising innovation and stupefying failures. I often don't think all of their divisions are on speaking terms with each other. It would be nice to see a new architecture out there, but I'm not holding my breath just yet.

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US regains supercomputer crown from Chinese, for now

Unicornpiss
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Happy

Re: Only because someone has to say it..

"I’d rather it be programmed to design an even faster rig, all by itself ... or maybe that’s asking for trouble"

Oh, you mean like Deep Thought?

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Unicornpiss
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Coat

Only because someone has to say it..

Will it run Crysis?

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VPNFilter router malware is a lot worse than everyone thought

Unicornpiss
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Meh

Just checked..

..and my Asus router is one on the list and there is no firmware update available yet. (no, you can't have my IP address)

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Did you test that? No, I thought you tested it. Now customers have it and it doesn't work

Unicornpiss
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Happy

Re: Worse still ...

Yes, we won't even reboot a server if avoidable if it's Friday and late in the day. You're just asking for your weekend to be spoiled, as the universe has a cruel sense of humor and does not treat kindly those that say "Well, what could possibly happen?"

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Unicornpiss
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Flame

Re: Soldering irons

Painful too is soldering with bare feet and dropping a big ball of molten solder right onto the webbing between your toes. I'm sure you can guess how I know this.

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Mirror mirror on sea wall, spot those airships, make Kaiser bawl

Unicornpiss
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Pint

Tucker..

It sounds (no pun intended) like Tucker actually invented the first MAF or "mass air flow" sensor, used commonly in automotive applications to determine the amount of air being consumed by an engine, and adjust the fuel/air ratio accordingly, although his application of it was obviously different.

I wonder if you could replicate his efforts in filtering low-frequency sound by using a spare MAF from a vehicle, if so inclined..

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Help, I'm being held prisoner in a security camera testing factory. So please read this...

Unicornpiss
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Re: Yeah, all very well but...

With most kits you either have to provide your own cat, or the one provided is shoddy and you have no choice of color or barfiness..

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BOFH: Their bright orange plumage warns other species, 'Back off! I'm dangerous!'

Unicornpiss
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Re: Hazard creation - ironies abound

I poked myself in the eye with the tail piece of my safety glasses once..

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As Tesla hits speed bump after speed bump, Elon Musk loses his mind in anti-media rant

Unicornpiss
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@Michael Wojcik

" It is simply no longer feasible for any but a few niche organizations to provide quality journalism, with proper research, investigation, writing, and editing."

You make an intriguing point. Assuming that journalistic quality has decreased, say, since 30-40 years ago, and it is no longer feasible for any but some niche organizations to provide accurate, well-researched stories, I'm curious as to why you think this is? Surely the mass-market media has enough money and resources to do their homework. Why would they choose not to do so? What sets the niche organizations apart? If not money, could it be that elusive integrity? Is integrity less feasible these days? Or simply not as important? Surely the niches are not making even a fraction of the revenue as the giants, for the most part.

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Unicornpiss
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Meh

Further proof that..

..the very rich are not like you or I. (unless of course you're reading this and you've very rich. In which case you'e probably a troll, or this is an anthropology experiment for you)

I don't know if journalists have more, less, or about the same integrity as they used to. I'd like to say somewhat less these days, but of course it depends on the individual person, and I strongly suspect that everything and everyone has sucked since the beginning of time, and everything these days just gets more exposure.

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Das blinkenlights are back thanks to RPi revival of the PDP-11

Unicornpiss
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Pint

Adventure

"But about this PDP-11 emulator, unless it comes with Adventure then I'm not interested."

The local university had an 11/40, an 11/70, and a VAX as I recall. I remember playing Zork I on it when I was perhaps 9 or 10 years old, using both a VT-100 terminal and a Decwriter. (Was Zork I part of the Adventure series at the time?) Long story as to why I even got to be in the lab. Somewhere I may even have one of the printouts on 140-column green bar paper from one of those sessions. As I recall, it was written in FORTRAN to run on the 11/70. (or it may have been the 11/40, I don't remember)

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Unicornpiss
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Happy

Re: Basic skill of slide rule

"Hanging on the wall"? Sure. It was six feet long, for teaching slide rule technique."

A local restaurant (one of those that specializes in having kitschy decor with antiques, etc. everywhere) has one of these on the wall. It spans 2 or 3 booths. I doubt many of the younger crowd even knows what it is when dining there. They also have a WWII-era Army Jeep on the wall sideways. I'm always a bit afraid to sit under it..

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Unicornpiss
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Pint

Before my time, but..

..when I went to school for electronics training, we had a donated 11/70. (this was 1990-ish) I did a bit of assembly programming, but also learned to troubleshoot the beast using an oscilloscope and the miles of schematics for the thing, with dates on them only shortly after I was born. I used to think that if I could be transported back to the early 70s, that I would have had a decent paying job as a technician working on these things. I got relatively fluent at it. Anyway, it was a good way to learn how a microprocessor worked, when the processor was spanned across a dozen or so cards. I remember interfacing a Radio Shack speech chip with it for a project. I got it to actually talk, though not particularly well.

Ah well, that was about 5 lifetimes ago now, it seems.

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America's forgotten space station and a mission tinged with urine, we salute you

Unicornpiss
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Pint

I hope..

..that current generations end up with heroes like this and the inspiration of routinely exploring new frontiers. Very different times. While many may argue that the money and resources spent on Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, etc. could have been used to feed hungry people, etc. (it would not have been anyway), it makes me sad that we haven't been back to the moon yet, and Mars is still a distant dream. All we have in manned (crewed) space flight is an aging space station and a few private companies that have tried to somewhat pick up the torch.

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Fixing a printer ended with a dozen fire engines in the car park

Unicornpiss
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Meh

Re: Had the fire brigade called to a five star hotel, in Malta....

"Most domestic microwaves are up to 4kW anyway on full power, even the cheapo £30 ones from ASDA

I believe you're incorrect, sir. Wattage is an absolute power measurement. So if you're cooking with 4KW, you must also be drawing 4000W from the mains. Which would be a little over 18A at 220V, exceeding a standard UK circuit, and nearly double that in the USA at 120V. If plugged into a USA 220V circuit, such as commonly used for a clothes dryer, range, or large A/C unit, it could be feasible, but no one except restaurants and other commercial applications have a microwave running on 220V in the USA. Most are 1500-1800W. The cheapo ones are typically under 1000W.

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