* Posts by Marshalltown

527 posts • joined 30 Sep 2011

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So long Lotus 1-2-3: IBM ceases support after over 30 years of code

Marshalltown

Worked really well

Wordstar and New Word were excellent tools. I've missed the Wordstar dot-file approach to mast documents for decades now. And New Word, which was WS with bells, produced by staff that departed WS, arguably had the only well written - actually enjoyable to read - software manual I have ever read. Even now I prefer Joe for editing small configuration files in Linux.

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Verizon's bogus bills tanked my credit score, claims sueball slinger

Marshalltown

Obviously

The process is broken if its intent dis discordant with its effects.

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Why do GUIs jump around like a demented terrier while starting up? Am I on my own?

Marshalltown

Really

As far as ads go, why doesn't someone write an "app" that lies to server sites? The app tells the ad server it has received the ad, but writes out to /dev/null. Then everyone's happy. The ad people think they're getting views, you're happy because there's no crap on your screen. It isn't like anyone would miss anything, and the advertisers might even gain some sales to folks to did not take an oath to never buy a thing from the jerks that paid for that monumentally irritating ad.

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Marshalltown

Re: Microsoft time

Actually, Microsoft isn't the only random "time-to..." reporter. I ran an "update" of Opensuse from 13.2 to LEAP 42.2. The "time left" randomly flicked around from in excess of five days worth of 24-hour days to 2 minutes in random fashion. Ultimately it took six hours. Even so I went back and ran a clean install to get thing running sanely. So - as pleasurable as it is to blame Microsoft, they were merely trend setters. I can't even find a decent desktop look now. For some silly reason the developers of KDE have concluded that someone actually likes the cartooney Windows 10 and cell phone look. They never asked me though.

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BOFH: Defenestration, a solution to Solutions To Problems We Don't Have

Marshalltown

Re: Sigh

While acquiring my BA at a State University way back in the late '70s, we were perpetually short of funds in the sciences because the president of the university proudly would turn back funds to the state each year. We would beg for funds for equipment but were consistently refused. At the same time good instructors were heading for life boats since there was no chance they would get a raise. The president in question was felicitously equipped with the same handle as a certain well known "double-ought" agent, no fooling. It was a school laugh.

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Marshalltown
Pint

Re: Seven pints

If all it takes to commit memory erasure is just seven pints, they're a bunch of light weights.

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It's 30 years ago: IBM's final battle with reality

Marshalltown

What grief?

It always puzzled me what grief OS/2 was supposed to create. I used it as a substitute for Windows, running windows s/w into the early years of the century. I gathered that IBM might have still been attempting to extract its pound of flesh from developers, but as far as I was concerned, it worked fine. I built my own machines and it ran on them without problems. I also liked Rexx as a scritping language. It was immensely more useful than does and much less of a pain (to me) than MS BASIC and all its little dialects and subspecialties. The only real grief I encountered was developers who "simply couldn't" do a version for OS/2 - and, of course, MS doing their best to see that their software was less compatible than need be.

History seems to forget how thoroughly MS would break things with each "improvement." Many of the useful "improvements" in Windows were first present in OS/2 and some really nice features vanished when IBM decided the effort wasn't worth the candle. The browser with its tree-structured browsing history was remarkable. No browser since has and anything to match. Even now, relicts of the OS/2 interface are still present in KDE and GNU. Microsoft has finally moved "on" with the horrible looking and acting interface of Windows 10.

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Squirrel sinks teeth into SAN cabling, drives Netadmin nuts

Marshalltown

Squirrels

A year ago all the power in the office went out. Baffled the designated investigator went to check the breakers - nope, no problem there. Well, there's a main breaker outside next to the transformer beside the meter. Hmmm, tripped. Reset - no power in the building nor any repeat trip, that's odd. Call the power company. Crew of two arrives and goes through all the "it must be your fault" dance steps before looking into their side. Finally. Ah hah! one barbecued squirrel in the conduit running under the driveway from the pole - handy, those fibreoptic cameras. Happily, the line from the pole to the building is power co. responsibility, and the beasty had entered by traveling down through the conduit on the pole into the underground bit. For some reason, once there the critter decided to sample 13,8 kV. When the power company extracted the little corpse, all it needed was sauce.

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This bot shorts stocks when Trump tweets (don't fret, the profit is used for good)

Marshalltown

Re: Not very future-proof...

Polls haven't been "predicting" anything for 200 years. And a loser of the popular vote has been elected before four times: 1824, 1876, 1888, and 2000. That last bit seems to be ignored generally ignored, and I believe also that the electors are not constrained to reflect the popular vote, and more than once they have not. The electoral college was established as a check on raw democracy - i.e., protect the states with small, rich populations from those with big poor ones - in short the ante bellum slave states. Effectively the vote of a citizen of a smaller state is weighted more than if they live in California or New York. Back in the day, it allowed every slave state extra power, and as the country expanded westward, the rural farming states acquired that same biased power. It still offers an extra edge to states with small populations, mostly the "red" states, who now also tend to be poor, religious, and rural. Curiously, decades ago the USSC ruled that while the country could be run that way, the states can't be. In California while representatives were elected on a "one man one vote" assumption, each county also elected two senators to the state government, providing the same area weighted bias for rural counties in the senate, which offset the urban weight given to the state house of representatives. The Supremes said that had to stop - one man one vote was the rule, except in the US Government which has a built in bias in the constitution.

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Marshalltown

Re: Not very future-proof...

If you check the numbers, Trump lost the popular vote with numbers almost precisely as predicted. What they didn't bank on was the Electoral effect which can be bassackward to the actual voting.

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BOFH: Elf of Safety? Orc of Admin. Pleased to meet you

Marshalltown
Pint

Re: Ah yes...

Heh. Used to work for the Forest Service long ago. I returned one day from the field with a slightly sprained ankle. The H&S person asked me to detail the accident. I wrote it up. It was immediately returned as an unacceptable explanation. I had explained that while in motion, the safety helmet, which we referred to as micrometeorite protection - totally useless for real world hazards, slipped over my eyes, and I reacted poorly to being unable to see, misplacing a foot and twisting the ankle while straightening the helmet. I was informed that I could not blame safety equipment. So, when I asked what lie the H&S person preferred they left and a report was never filed.

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Marshalltown

Re: Nice twist!

I would have had money on a high-voltage accident involving a UPS in server room.

"We didn't see what happened. We couldn't see at all until the emergency power kicked back on. Then there was this strange, almost overwhelming smell of barbecue. We've no idea what he did to that UPS; he was only supposed to be inspecting things visually as we understand his SOPs."

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Forget quantum and AI security hype, just write bug-free code, dammit

Marshalltown

Re: 1980s computer science

Dragging enough information out of clients to actually produce a decent design they can use without much moaning is often a horrible experience. Every thing from the UI to critical but "I forgot about that" things like - "that piece of information can't be public! Why did you do that????" There's nothing like handing the client your notes from hours of discussion and asking them to find just where they mentioned that some data needed to be secured and some did not, and that was a just for a data base system for some archaeologists in Ukraine.

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'I'm innocent!' says IT contractor on trial after Office 365 bill row spiraled out of control

Marshalltown

That is a silly comment. ...?

Not really. Maybe a little political perhaps. It is a Chamber of Commerce so most likely corrupt - well to judge from the CCs in the counties I grew up in, and it's being in Georgia - at least in minor ways. They need a web site, some editing capacity and possibly a bit of accounting ad all the social media crud. All of that can be done with FOSS. Why doesn't someone invent some antisocial media?

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BOFH: Password HELL. For you, mate, not for me

Marshalltown

Re: "I rarely get cold calls"

Ah yes. I once received an "emergency call." The caller asserted that my Bank of America account had a problem. He had a dense, south Asian accent. Then he asked me to give him my bank account number! Hmmm.

"But, you are calling me. Why would you need my account number?"

The assertion is, "we need to verify your account."

"Verify what?"

"Your account!"

"But you should already have the number."

"Yes, we do. But, we need to verify it."

"What did you say your name was?" He really hadn't. There was a pause, "Jim Smith."

"Where are you calling from?"

"Kansas City."

"Interesting, Jim. You know, from your accent, I would have thought you weren't west of Peshawar."

<Click>

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Trump lieutenants 'use private email' for govt work... but who'd make a big deal out of that?

Marshalltown

Trump

I just wish the idiot would quit all the mouth motions and lip pursings. He seems to be trying to look like a horse's ass with haemorrhoids. And, he pays someone to do his hair that way. It looks like a horse holding its tail off to the side. The sole legacy that Trump may have is the divisiveness he has unleashed. That effect is second only to the Civil War and may very well culminate in the same yet.

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Euro space agency's Galileo satellites stricken by mystery clock failures

Marshalltown

Re: M.A.S.E.R/L.A.S.E.R pedantry

Given the state of knowledge imparted by modern education I doubt that explaining the origin of "MASER" actually explained much. There are lots of folks that are aware of lasers as glorified flashlights (or electric torches in some geographic corners) that are really cool for things like pointing at charts in marketing sessions and letting you know where the scope thinks you are pointing the rifle.

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Marshalltown

"Glonass"

The moon at night?

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Mr Angry pays taxman with five wheelbarrows worth of loose change

Marshalltown

Re: Weigh the coins

Apparently, while currency and coin are "legal tender," and in fact currency is marked "Legal tender for all debts public and private," there are no Federal laws that require private or public agencies to actually accept cash. I found that out many years ago. I used to pay my rent in cash. One day I walked in to pay the rent and a woman at the desk said, "I'm sorry, we don't accept cash." I asked her if she had ever read the fine print on a dollar bill. I also pointed out that (at the time) each check cost me 50 cents. That was six dollars a year I wanted off my rent if they were going to insist on checks. After that I wrote checks 50 cents under the rent. There was some back and forth about the issue. The property management company explained that there were only the two women staffing the office and they would be vulnerable to bad guys who wanted the cash. My response was that's fine, I understood completely, but I was simply charging them for the cost of their insisting on checks.

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WikiLeaks uploads 300+ pieces of malware among email dumps

Marshalltown
Pint

Re: Peices

phuzz,

Nonsense. In fact that rule is the sole example of the "exception proving the rule."

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Basic income after automation? That’s not how capitalism works

Marshalltown

Re: Errrm

"The new technologies result in new work that hadn't previously been envisaged. ..."

That is true, barely, but irrelevant to the point of being political spin. If you automate 1,000 autoworkers jobs off shore, the automakers are out their jobs indefinitely. There is no guarantee that they will (or can) be trained in some form of "new work." Especially new work that will actually pay a salary or wage comparable on an annual basis withe their old job. Otherwise how do they pay for the house and car they owe the bank a significant chunk of their income for the next 15 to 30 years for under the fractional reserve system which permits banks to print money and then point to the government as the culprit. The basic assumption of capitalism is that markets are efficient at redistributing wealth and generating new wealth. But we do not HAVE a capitalist system, nor a Marxist one for that matter. The wealthiest sectors - that one percent - dread real capitalism more than they do socialism. They can afford socialism but capitalism has a genuine potential to level the financial field in ways the socialist merely dreams of. Instead we have corporate welfare. Profits are privatized while losses are distributed socially. The vanishing middle class and manner in which wealth is becoming increasingly concentrated in the hands of a very, very few, is the problem, it is not a problem with capitalism or with socialism. It derives from oligarchic and kleptocratic patterns that are merely labeled as "capitalism."

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Florida Man sues Verizon for $72m – for letting him commit identity theft

Marshalltown

Re: The time has come .......

Speaking as a citizen - who did not vote for DTptn - I think that we really need to explain to the courts that even LETTING such a suit be filed needs some serious thought.

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Harrison Ford's leg, in the Star Wars film, with the Millennium Falcon door

Marshalltown

Re: Eh? What?

"Ford, best known for playing CSO Jack Stanfield in the 2006 cyber-thriller Firewall...

Really?"

I noticed that myself. I never heard of "Firewall" but Harrison Ford is a different story.

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Not OK Google: Tree-loving family turns down Page and pals' $7m

Marshalltown

Re: Translation

People like Trump do think "everyone has a price," but here in the US and apparently in Scotland and Mexico, sometimes the price is "go away and die," not a higher bid. All those big megacorps have made life incredibly difficult in the Bay Area for the majority of the people who live there. Among other processes they forced families to make a choice between lowered living standards and a long, literally life-endangering commute, and a concomiitent degradation of quality of life in the regions where the commuters relocated to: stupidly higher prices, urban thinking (it is commonplace to think of of city dwellers as regarding rural people as hicks), Walmarts and Home Depots.

Those same city folk ("slickers") are often surprised when they discover that country folk don't look up to them and will stand and watch them wade through poison oak after, they ignore a polite, but laconic warning about the plant. There's some satisfaction in telling a "slicker" who demands, "why didn't you warn me?" while heavily slathered in calomine, that you did, and were told to eff off.

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Marshalltown

Re: Condemn?

That is actually how politics should work. In fact, it is pretty much the evident intent of the authors of the constitution and the Bill of Rights, who were all major students of Locke, Voltaire, and Hume. The basic goals were 1) get religion out the governing business - all they do is fight, 2) protect the individual's right to live his life he sees fit, 3) protect property. That last came adrift in the late 19th C when the Supremes at the time were bribed to find corporations to have at least some of the same legal standing as actual human beings. Since then the SC has leaned on the precedent to support corporate entities right up to the point where they now have protection of free speech and can practically vote, which may be in the pipe line under Trump.

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Marshalltown

Re: Condemn?

The property can only be re-assessed when the the ownership changes. So, as long as the owners remain alive and do not change the way the title reads, the property taxes stay what they are. Since the family has owned that land since the 1940s, the taxes are probably the very same as they were when Prop 13 passed. In fact, depending on details ownership, the taxes could remain the same for their heirs. We experienced that with 20 acres in Central California when my father passed away. The taxes did not change until one of my sisters had her name taken off the title. Even then there is a limit to how much the taxes can increase.

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Marshalltown

Re: Condemn?

Yep. No Balmedies here. DT doesn't appear to own any property in the Golden State.

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Climate change bust up: We'll launch our own damn satellites if Trump pulls plug – Gov Brown

Marshalltown

Re: Idea

We did not nickname him "Moonbeam" because of any satellite proposals. He acquired the nickname because he was considered peculiar by many citizens, especially after Reagan.

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Plastic fiver: 28 years' work, saves acres of cotton... may have killed less than ONE cow*

Marshalltown

Re: Not much of a chemist then?

US currency is paper not polymer.

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Fleeing Aussie burglar shot in arse with bow and arrow

Marshalltown

Specious argument

A "fleeing" burglar is not by any visible evidence a "discouraged" burglar. Fleeing as an act exhibits no indication that he would not come back, either when confident you are not home, or better equipped to deal with you as an armed occupant. So, there is absolutely no reason to argue that planting a barb, or shooting a fleeing burglar or car thief in the ass is anything but reasonable self defense. The only person who would disagree is the thief and his personal injury attorney who hopes to profit from the non-pc approach to criminal justice. A jury of potential or active criminals might, and so might a jury narrowly instructed by the judge to consider only the immediate events. Frankly, I would argue that anyone injured while committing a crime should be held to have forfeited the protection of the law during that act. And, since the police regard fleeing a crime scene as a criminal act in itself, fleeing is not an automatic justification for arguing an injury acquired when fleeing TO AVOID THE CONSEQUENCES OF AN ATTEMPTED crime was not acquired in the course of committing the same crime.

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Marshalltown

Re: "Personally I would have notched another arrow."

Well, perhaps he retains a special arrow just for notches. Gun fighters in the "old west" used to notch the grip of the revolver for each opponent removed from the planet.

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Marshalltown
Mushroom

Re: Standing naked trying to defend ones property.

Not just Australia. The trend in the "civilized" parts of the world is to encourage one to share one's property and health with those less advantaged. Thieves and burglars, serial killers and such are all clearly less advantaged.

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Marshalltown

Re: Bloke was lucky

There is something wrong about being told by the police to be a compliant victim. Compliance means that you cede situational control to someone you absolutely know you can't trust. They are after all trying to rob you - at a minimum. If the fellow was unlucky, he'll show up with a serious soil-born bacterial infection in a few days. One can only hope.

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Marshalltown

Re: He should be lucky

It was probably just a target bow - ca. 30-40 lbs. Any hunting weight bow would have brought him down and a war bow would have probably driven the arrow through him and into the car door. Compound bows simply add leisure time for aiming.

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NASA's free research trove may have broken arms trafficking rules

Marshalltown

Re: NASA: past its sell-by date

Here in the US, in most places, school-age kids are not supposed to carry pocket knives ever while at school. One Christmas gift exchange (Second Grade - so I would have been about six) I received pocket knife, a genuine "Davy Crockett," Barlow style, single bladed, pocket knife. The teacher did not immediately confiscate it. She told me I was not to carry it at school. I then carried it home. My dad taught me how to sharpen it on an oil stone and I thence forth completely ignored any injunctions about when and where I could carry it.

I never spent a day without a knife in my pocket until after 9/11 lead to the stupid, idiotic restrictions we now see these days. In fact, most of my teachers must have been aware I had one on me - the shape in my pocket was a dead give-away - and more than once over the years a teacher asked to use it, and I let them without loss of my knife. Thinking about it, the teachers borrowing it usually happened in class, and despite a fair number of brown-nosing tattle tales, I never got in trouble about it.

These days I carry a three-bladed "stockman" style and use it as a marking knife in the wood shop.

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Marshalltown
WTF?

Re: NASA: past its sell-by date

Heh.

My son and I sat down when he was in high school here in the US and went over things I could do that he couldn't, things my dad could do that I could not, and then looked through books my dad grew up reading whose characters were doing things HE couldn't - children's books always lag the present by at least a generation. Basically, doing things that my grandfather - in Canada - could get away with would have gotten me in serious trouble with my parents, and my son a term in juvenile jail, even if I and my wife thought it was not that big a deal.

The acts themselves weren't any worse, but the social environment is far more restricted.

Chemistry at home? Heaven forfend, you could accidentally make something hazardous, toxic, or explosive through an error in mixing. Even BUYING chemistry lab supplies like glassware gets you on DHS and DEA lists these days. My dad actually kept black powder around the ranch for stump and boulder removal and my brother and I were instructed in its use for those various other purposes that did not include muzzle loaders - though we did that too.

Shooting? Well, that's generally a little less restricted in parts the US, but there are lots of citizens desperately anxious to catch up with the <irony on> progressive </irony off> UK. I used to go out hunting spring jackrabbits - good eating prepared properly - but these days, development has foreclosed on that - too many neighbors, dogs, livestock - three horses on half an acre looks cruel to me, and the same for cattle. The local vegetarians an vegans will actually try to educate me on the evolution of the human species. I have a degree in that, and they are more ignorant about the topic than a day in the arctic summer is long but they really don't want to hear it.

Knives,? Arguably, from what I hear and read, the UK might be rather aichmophobic and even more reactionary to knives and things that can cut than to firearms. Is it really true a carpet layer did a prison term for leaving a carpet knife - a tool of his trade - visible in his vehicle?

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Marshalltown
FAIL

' "Indeed. Almost as though American security services are full of paranoid twats."

Way to be even more of a dick than usual, guys.'

But true none the less. It is what they are paid to be. So, they are also paid to leave the "feelings" at home. Quit the trembling lip bit.

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BOFH: The Hypochondriac Boss and the non-random sample

Marshalltown
Coat

Re: Experience...

You worked for a bigger company than I did. Mine owned the place and tended to do what ever he pleased. "It's my hardware."

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Marshalltown
Pint

Ah - that brings back nightmarish times

I had a boss who went on a trip to - mmmh - let us just say an Eastern European country. He took his lap top along - this back in the day of three-and-a-half-inch stiffies. So, he returns, with his lap top and his stiffies, and a newfound sense of maintaining computer "security." The Monday after his return my antivirus lights up like Christmas. What's this" Infected by virus, but how? Well let us purge the hard drive, restore from my back up, and to work. Strangely, several other office systems have the same problem, but never fear, we have backups. Next Monday - omigish! Same tale! In fact very same virus. And the same machines are infected. Scan network logs - no sign of intrusions. Hmmm. Read up on virus. Interestingly the virus is believed to have originated in a certain Eastern European country to which the boss recently traveled. Coincidence? He's out of the office so can't be buttonholed.

I really need that beer just thinking about it.

Week three, same story, except my system is healthy. I had changed passwords - against company policy. There is a sticky on my screen advising of this breach of protocol and inviting me to the boss's office for an official ass chewing. My system was inaccessible for his new, weekly "security scan" using "free software" from Eastern Europe!!! He was quite taken aback when I marched directly into his office demanding he hand over the offending software for disposal with prejudice.

After explaining that the disk he was using was apparently infected with the EE virus, I cut it up in the paper cutter and recycled the remains. I blush to admit that - as a "good" employee - after ascertaining that the floppy disk was the immediate source of the contamination I asked no further questions, and handed the boss my new password. Next week - arrgh! Same story. This time I scanned all floppies he had with him during the trip and - to his inexpressible grief - destroyed several disks of porn all infected with the very same EE virus. Then I scanned his desk top. Same problem - but worse, his recent backups had overwritten clean copies with virus laden ones. Bad. Then - OK, where's the lap top? Wide eyes - WHAT? The laptop - come on. Scanned that - holy cow!! Not just the EE virus but an entire culture dish of nasties. Reformatted and reinstalled the operating system after a thorough session with fdisk deleting all partions, after scrubbing the drive. The problem never recurred, and after that I never again heard about changing my passwords.

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Why I just bought a MacBook Air instead of the new Pro

Marshalltown

"In addition the need for a replaceable battery is much less than years ago ..."

Really? Consider how non-replaceable batteries recently affected Samsung. Think back to the trouble they have repeatedly caused other makers in the past - including Apple. Non-replaceablle batteries consumerize the electronics and maximize cash flow. Battery bad - you need a whole new phone/lap/tablet. Had stuff stored on there? Sorry, it's gone. You should have come in and bought a new one when you first saw signs or trouble. They don't benefit anyone but the maker - unless of course they are designed so they catch fire.

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DRAMA ON MARS: Curiosity bot fires laser at alien metal object

Marshalltown

The white mineral veins in the stone

... beneath are interesting. They look like white quartz. But, white quartz is a a low-temperature hydrothermal mineral. The white color is commonly attributed to minute inclusions of fluid, gas or both.

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America has one month to stop the FBI getting its global license to hack

Marshalltown

Clinton is pretty bad, but look at the other candidates. Johnson (the best of the bad) ignorant as the day is long. Stein, ick, really, really ick. Watch John Oliver's segment on them . Trump, far, far bigger crook than Clinton, a narcissist sociopath (at best) and a far worse history than Clinton, "admires" Putin, talks (and even sounds) like the Penguin in the second Batman movie, hated in Scotland, Mexico and wherever he decides he wants your land for his purposes. I hate to say it but for years now it has seemed like the US elections were a race to see just how egregious a candidate could get elected. I suspect given some of the parallels with classical Athens that it may be an endemic flaw in aging democracies. Jefferson plainly suspected it.

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Marshalltown

Re: US LAW

What WOULD be a just sentence for a murderer? I agree that extending "jurisdiction" is questionable at best, but seriously, using a murder sentence as an example of injustice?

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BOFH: The Idiot-ware Project and the Meaningless Acronym

Marshalltown
Headmaster

Yolo

There is in fact a Yolo County in California. That particular version of the word refers to a marsh (a good deal of the lower Sacramento Valley once upon a time).

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Marshalltown
FAIL

Re: LOL...

I came within a shirt button of letting one of my former PHBs back over a forty-foot (ca. 12 meter) cliff. But I did reach out and grab that button. Oddly, he never noticed. I had just demonstrated to him that despite his life-long conviction that he lacked depth perception, he actually did have it.

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Marshalltown
Pint

Re: C. An anal-gazing "Look-to-the-future" exercise,

AH - but even PHBs underestimate their personal flexibility in that regard. Were they capable of showing similar flexibility at parties they would crowned "limbo King" every time. But, sadly, that is never the case. The PHB flexibility is highly specialized, but quite undeniably extraordinary .in that small - ah - field of endeavour.

Mine's the one - mmm, never mind.

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SpaceX searches for its 'grassy knoll' of possible Falcon rocket sabotage

Marshalltown

Re: do worry chaps 5 years we all be on mars

You probably think Bill Gates is a great programmer too. Musk doesn't need to know jack about space operations. All he needs is a staff that does, and that he has. So, why so bitter? He didn't hire you?

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Marshalltown

Re: Pathetic attempt at diversion

"Don't care, I still want to see him fail."

So, do you work for Lockheed Martin or Boeing?

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'Geek gene' denied: If you find computer science hard, it's your fault (or your teacher's)

Marshalltown

Re: Nonsense.

... It's a spectrum.

I believe that was actually their conclusion. The distribution is a Normal one and all other things being equal, your position on that curve is proportional to the effort you put into it. There is no bimodal curve, all the really gifted and the sadly lacking do is create the tails on the bell's skirt.

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Render crashing PCs back to their component silicon: They deserve it

Marshalltown

Electrons

I used to get a complaint every morning from the office manager. Some wasn't working, would mnot access, would not .... Of course, I would ask her to move out her chair, sit down and have her explain to me what she was doing, and things would be shiny. That would drive her bats ... screaming rage. She would ask what I did "different." I would tell her, 1) I had a cup of coffee before entering the office and 2) I was always polite and said "good morning" to the electrons. It was obvious that it paid off, since they never gave me trouble. She never did have a coronary, but some of the facial hues ... bright pink to deep blueish purple... wow!

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