* Posts by Kiwi

1617 posts • joined 26 Sep 2011

AlphaBay and Hansa: About those dark web marketplaces takedowns

Kiwi
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Pint

Re: Why don't governments muscle in on the action?

If the government wanted us to be safer, and also take money away from the criminal empires living off the drug trade, they would certainly legalize it, regulate it, and profit from it.

Oh for a thousand upvotes! Have to settle for one from me and a virtual ---->

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Kiwi
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Stop

Re: It's a no-brainer

The War on Drugs has been an unmitigated disaster - by every conceivable metric it has failed.

All except one it seems.

Against all research, against the best advice experts can give, against the simple use of eyes and brains, governments keep up their "war on drugs" idiocy, no matter how much obvious harm it does.

There must be something in it for them. Insanity doesn't cover this level of fail. So whatever it is, there is something these politicians (or their "controllers") want from all this, and they seem to be getting it, otherwise the "war" would've ended years ago. And successfully, as they would've given up the wasteful methods and moved on to stuff that works.

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Repairable-by-design Fairphone runs out of spare parts

Kiwi
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WTF?

Re: No ethical consumption under capitalism

The slightly more expensive, but wholesomely branded alternative is just as bad. With food it'll often be made by the same company, and even come from the wholesaler.

Was out buying some cookware yesterday. "Simon Gault" branded pan - near $200. Exactly identical in every respect (size, shape, colour, materials, decorations and literally everything else) other-brand - $50. Why do people put up with this? Nothing but the brand is changed!

And this is from one of NZ's most ethical firms!

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Judge uses 1st Amendment on Pokemon Go park ban. It's super effective!

Kiwi
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Coat

Re: The walking dead

I would think that the biggest difference is that zombies don't exist.

You've clearly never made the horrible mistake of reading youtube comments!

(many of 'em certainly got the "brain dead" down pat!")

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User filed fake trouble tickets to take helpful sysadmin to lunches

Kiwi
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Angel

Re: Has a customer ever apologised to you?

You mean like beer?

Hmm yes... Beer <obglid xkcd>

And you are right. Hate will fuck you up big time.

One of the fun facts about hate and revenge.. All that time you spent reminising and stressing about what they did to you, the times you spend shouting at an imaginary version of them as you're alone in your car, the effort you put into thinking about putting an axe through their head, all the hateful and angry feelings you send their way through whatever means you can imagine - that's just it, it's all in your imagination and doesn't affect them one tiny little bit. You get lots of pain and anger and stress, they don't even have a clue it's going on.

Get over it, you only hurt yourself! (not speaking from experience, honest!)

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Kiwi
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Boffin

Re: Has a customer ever apologised to you?

"Do you work in our server team? They appear to be powered by confectionaries.."

Better that, than being powered by caffeine and hate.

I've been researching "alternative fuels" for some time now. Coffee, cake and confectioneries are generally fine, but that hate is such a nasty pollutant! It poisons the environment around it, has been linked to all sorts of diseases including stroke and cancer, and often causes depression.

It's a nasty, toxic pollutant and I recommend all efforts be taken to remove it from the work place and replace it with other tastier fuels, which often work much more efficiently!

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Kiwi
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Re: Has a customer ever apologised to you?

The accounts department at my old job used to pre-emptively bribe me with food ("you don't look like you eat enough, here, have some of this home made cake"), in order that I would prioritise them above other departments

Customers of mine would often bribe me with chocolate. Those who brought in the larger blocks got pushed as far up the queue as possible. Those who thought they could bribe me with a small bar sometimes got pushed down the queue.

I knew I was going to have a bad day when I'd get back from lunch and there were 3 or 4 big blocks of chocolate waiting for me. I knew my weekend was gone when I had any thing more than that! (sadly no icon to show how much weight I'd put on in the lead-up to Christmas when customers were wanting their work finished pre-break!)

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Kiwi
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Re: Has a customer ever apologised to you?

Working at an ISP I had a customer phone up and ask me to pass on his apology to a colleague he'd unintentionally offended.

I'd claim responsibility for that only.. Well, dealing with the, er, "wonderful and exceptionally well-trained support staff" at many NZ ISP's the offence has usually been intentional.

Though I had phoned other places to apologise for unintentional insults. And sent flowers/chocolates/coffee etc for some of the more intentional ones. (yes, some of us prefer a decent cup of coffee by way of an apology!)

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Kiwi
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Happy

Has a customer ever...

Or offered you a tasty thanks for your services?

Funnily enough, yesterday afternoon I was at a friend's place waiting to sign for a courier package.

A great many moons ago, when I was working in what I've referred to here as a "factory" IIRC, I also did some work for out-of-firm customers - people who needed a small job done.

I didn't recognise the courier, but he recognised me. I'd done a job for him back then and had apparently helped him out immeasurably with a car restoration he was doing.

He dropped back a bit later in his run with a fairly decent bakery-sourced pie and doughnut for my lunch, and tomorrow has invited me out to see his car and go for a ride, with lunch involved as well.

(TBH, I still can't recall the guy from work or the job I did for him but hey, free lunch is free lunch, and a cheap mince pie is still tastier than the basic sammies I'd probably be having!)

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Alphabay shutdown: Bad boys, bad boys, what you gonna do? Not use your Hotmail...

Kiwi
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Re: Smell Test

most people realize "all of that" up front, which keeps them from STARTING an illegal enterprise...

It's been said that the best place to learn how to "never get caught" is.... in prison..

Most crims don't believe they'll ever be caught, and when you look at the very poor clearance rates for many "crimes" (often while coppers are busy dealing with unimportant stuff that prevents them dealing with proper crimes (yes I am one who views cannabis as "should be legal" (don't use, never used, probably never would) and who believes the cops' time would be better spent on burglaries etc etc etc etc than wasted on something so relatively harmless) you can see why people would feel that way.

Though that said, given how un-protected that guy was, either he was taking a lot of trust in his being overseas, or he was terminally exceptionally stupid, or there's just a teensy wee bit more to the story than has been published thus far.

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.. ..-. / -.-- --- ..- / -.-. .- -. / .-. . .- -.. / - .... .. ... then a US Navy fondleslab just put you out of a job

Kiwi
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Re: Remember: When all else fails...

Morse code will get through. Easy to send, easy to receive. How fast is a matter of practice, etc...

Yup. Turning on/off the signal (even if the mic is stuffed), a torch, build a fire on the deck and wave a blanket in front of it.. I've always maintained it should remain, even though it is so very rarely used these days.

Last time I used it was some 30 years ago, on a farm - me with the farm bike's headlight and the boss with the shed lights across a distance of a couple of miles at dusk. Afraid I only recall a couple of letters these days.

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Kiwi
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Re: Trained != practiced

"Only if you want to stay in the uber-proficient class..."

Such as someone taking responsibility for communications during an emergency situation, quite possibly international communications during wartime?

Voice and data coms are down. You need to communicate.

Do you 1) Have someone who can do a fair bit of morse at a fair rate, even if only 5wpm or 2) have nothing?

May not be the greatest or the most reliable. Hang on a minute, if it's all you have then by definition it is the most reliable, unfortunately.

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Kiwi
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Re: EMP

How much carbide do the ships carry for the acetylene lamps? Id imagine if the ship has been subjected to a sufficient blast for an EMP to take out the electronics the lightbulb will be quite dickered and electricity may not be available.

I have an older style "emergency torch". It no longer has any storage capacity (though I expect a couple of minutes with a screwdriver and a fresh set of AA rechargeables will fix that!) but it still functions as an emergency light. So long as I keep working the winder, the small spinning coil next to the small magnet acts as a generator, and basic wire carries that power to an ancient incandescent bulb that only requires electricity to work. That Edison could make such a bulb with the technology available at the time shows it is relatively easy to do.

A small hand-cranked generator, a small 12v lead acid battery as Eltonga mentions, and you're done. So long as the shutters on the lamps still move (they used louvres rather than turning the light on/off), you have an EMP-proof system that can let you communicate over more than shouting distances reliably. So long as the person at the other end can understand the flashes!

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User left unable to type passwords after 'tropical island stress therapy'

Kiwi
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Re: but inquiring minds must know

I dont know how thats relevent , but I'll join a Firefly conversation anyime.

Answer - we'll never know cos of those ******s at Fox

The answer is in the theme song.

And how can Fox be involved? FF was good stuff, and Fox can't do good stuff! (at least if Fox "News" is anything to go by!)

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UK spookhaus GCHQ can crack end-to-end encryption, claims Australian A-G

Kiwi
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Joke

Gota ask @SG7

Are you perhaps descended from a combination of C9 and AMFM???/

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Trump backs off idea for joint US/Russian 'impenetrable Cyber Security unit'

Kiwi
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Re: WTF

"2) WTF is 'Obaka' supposed to mean anyway?"

I guess it was an honest typo,

I've seen him do it quite a lot. Could be a typo but I don't recall him ever using "Obama"

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Kiwi
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Trollface

Re: What a f@#$ing rube

But Mr Bob, wouldn't multiple votes from one person be voter fraud?

Haven't you noticed? Immoral but not criminal acts by chump's opponents are grounds for multiple investigations and attempts to "lock her up" regardless of the outcome. However outright criminal acts (or acts exactly the same as the other side) by dump&co are perfectly alright. CMIC allegedly screwed his daughter? BUT..BUT KILLARY KNOWS SOMEONE WHO KNOWS SOMEONE WHO ONCE WAS A DEFENSE LAWYER FOR SOMEONE WHO MET A CHILD MOLESTOR IN PRISON SO SHE IS MUCH MUCH WORSE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! etc etc (sorry the frothing is a bit hard to do on a tablet)

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Kiwi
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WTF?

Re: WTF

Americans are sick of "presidents" like Obaka

1) What you say about former President Obama may be true, but at least he wasn't publicly lusting after his own daughter!

2) WTF is 'Obaka' supposed to mean anyway?

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Judge used personal email to send out details of sensitive case

Kiwi
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Big Brother

Re: At least it seems it's an exception

It also makes clear "we do not use what you say in email, chat, video calls or voice mail, or your documents, photos or other personal files to target ads to you"

There are, I believe, a number of complaints on various forums about that, people claiming they've seen ads based on the content of ducments they have open. ICBW however, and will keave it to the reader to find out either way.

From what I recall of doing installs on 8+, going through the privacy settings, there was plenty about data going to "adertising partnets'. And why are ms taking your keystrokes and document data always rather than as needed?

Even if I am wrong about the advertising, MS still takes peoples data in clear breach of many privacy laws around the world. There is no way that it can be legal for my Dr to ship my medical notes to ms, even if yhe use of that data is only by machines, only within MS, and never seen by human eyes. Doesn't matter if I am wrong about the advertising stuff as taking the data is still wrong.

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Kiwi
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FAIL

Re: At least it seems it's an exception

No ms don't do browser advertising.... They put it in the bloody start menu!

And as to "don't sell', take some time to read their T&Cs.

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Kiwi
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Flame

Re: At least it seems it's an exception

Around here I've often seen people use free "cloud" accounts such as OneDrive or GoogleDrive to, erm, "backup" proprietary information sometimes, including thing as sensitive as patients details...

I've had some stuff backed up to megaupload that has a level of sensitivity few people can imagine.

Of course, it was encrypted first. So long as the encryption was good enough, no worries.

With MS carefully recording every keystroke (that's what "typing history" means, right?) and selling that to anyone with a wallet their "trusted partners", the whole idea of personal data security is gone bye-bye anyway.

If you work in a medical establishment with a Win7 or later MS OS and haven't taken efforts to stop MS spying, you'd better hope your country has crap privacy laws - you are giving your patient's data to a corporation who will pass it on to who they want for their profit alone. Soon, I hope, the patients and then the courts take notice.

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FREE wildcard HTTPS certs from Let's Encrypt for every Reg reader*

Kiwi
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Re: There is a dark evil danger to the big uptake of HTTPS

Hopefully can find more soon to say whether this is something I can trust with banking app etc or not, don't suppose anyone here at El Reg has more enlightenment than I can find thus far?

Has generally worked well enough for me. It was a while ago I set it up, but this is the setup I went with https://www.bentasker.co.uk/documentation/mobile-phones/277-android-protecting-your-network-data-from-local-snooping

Thanks, looking now (well soon, when I locate a circular tuit! :-) )

That's assuming, of course, that you control the VPN server, and trust (to a given extent) the hosting provider

I control the server; runs on a mate's machine that does a couple of other jobs for him. I can understand concerns with hosting providers.

The DNS misbehaviour you saw with Opera mini, was it just that you didn't see the queries transit the tunnel? IIRC it forwards all requests (including the initial DNS lookups) via one of Opera's servers, and hopefully that connection was going via the VPN?

Afraid I can't recall atm. I checked with ip-check.info or a simillar site and my real ip was showing. I think it was something else that made me look closer, maybe a sub-domain on the local net that wasn't resolving. Coukd be the issue you mention but my local ip leaked on android. Setting the client up on a linux box seems fine, as far as I can tell nothing leaks.

But I will read the article you linked in due course, and thanks for the time even if I don't use it. Would link the article I used but my main machine is still dead :-(

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Kiwi
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Boffin

Please stop repeating the lie that there is no cost in using SSL.

If you use shared hosting, you cannot use your own cert - and must pay your hosting company to add a cert. A provider we use at work charges £50/site/year ! I get "free" hosting with my internet service, but this does not support SSL at all - so yes "all I have to do" is switch hosting which means paying someone else for something that is currently included in my internet package.

If you host more than one site, then you have to use SNI - which puts restrictions on the software you can use and also locks out older clients. Whether you like it or not, older clients are still in use - whether you piss off the users or not is up to you.

So yes, it's now really cheap - but it is not "free" in general.

Mebbe you need to look at the subject a bit more in depth? Hosting - get your self a Pi or other small machine (depending on what you're doing), chuck Apache or Nginx or some other secure server software on it, install whatever you need for PHP/SQL etc. There's not much involved in that.

LetsEncrypt's certbot does the job of configuring your sites for HTTPS, so no effort there (seriously, NO EFFORT REQUIRED just run the bloody script!)

As to multiple sites, I've a few subdomains on 2 machines on one IP (one email/web/cloud storage, one runs a second cloud storage instance (different port) and also the VPN I'm playing with - first is a Toshiba M200), have no problems with certs or anything. Yes the certs are multi-domain but there's no issue there so far as I have tested (which is with modern browsers, willing to try stuff older if someone asks and I get round to reading said response).

It really is a trivial process to get it running, and you can do your own hosting (if your ISP doesn't allow that, and you live outside the US, then get another ISP!)

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Kiwi
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Boffin

Re: There is a dark evil danger to the big uptake of HTTPS

Now I use my phone as a personal AP and avoid public hotspots.

I'm using OpenVPN (well, playing with it anyway) with a cert-based connection (certificate created on the server then copied to the device). So far seems to be working well but with one browser (IIRC opera mini) it wasn't doing all the DNS etc like it was supposed to, that still went through other things (opera and (surprisingly) chrome.

Hopefully can find more soon to say whether this is something I can trust with banking app etc or not, don't suppose anyone here at El Reg has more enlightenment than I can find thus far?

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Web inventor Sir Tim sizes up handcuffs for his creation – and world has 2 weeks to appeal

Kiwi
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Boffin

Re: How is this going to help; cost to consumers

Put it this way. It's a LOT of hoop-jumping to rip a 4K film these days. I believe due to this most leaks are now coming from insiders.

And yet people with no hope of making money from it are ripping stuff.

If it gets to my eyes and ears, I can copy it. There is no DRM that can protect it after that.

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Kiwi
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Big Brother

Re: I don't see a problem.

Since the audiovisual content eventually has to be emitted in unencrypted form so that my eyes and ears can perceive it, it will always be possible for motivated individuals to rip DRM-protected content anyway.

Yup, a few seconds thought (combined with my (actually very limited) electronics, photography and AV knowledge, and I now have the expertise to defeat any DRM - effectively simply pointing a camera at the screen and using some well-placed microphones (actually I'd wire the output of one into the input of the other, maybe via a little bit of circuitry to keep things sounding good)

Personally, it is not about the money; it is about ease of use, and my freedom to consume media in the format and on the device I prefer. Until content providers make it easier to buy their content than to pirate it, people will pirate it.

When you brought a record, tape, CD or video, you could put it into any compatible player and play it perfectly OK (ie if you only had a reel-reel drive you couldn't do compact cassette, and a gramophone wouldn't play a 33rpm record so well (not if it was limited to 78rpm) in case I need to explain "compatible" to anyone!). When DVD came out it began, where you could only play the disc on a "appropriate region" device. Now with videos, it's just possible I could be out at a mates place, see a movie I want to watch at home, buy it using my phone and..Oh shit, can't put it on my TV1 have to buy another copy for the TV. At which point I would pirate it2 - I purchased a copy to watch on a decent screen, the device I watched it on should not matter. Or maybe I purchased it to preview myself to make sure it's ok for my kids, or appropriate to watch with a couple of Christian mates. But can only watch once before having to buy another copy, and cannot actually have mates around for a viewing anyway (what, you didn't realise you can interpret many (most?) of those copyright notices that way?)

I'm not anti-copyright at all. I am very anti-DRM however, with the exception of encryption or other methods to protect private/sensitive data. Interesting that many of those who are of the "you should not freely see our material" camp also belong to the "we must be able to freely see all your private stuff, and have rights to it if and when we want" camps - eg Google, Apple, and a few others maybe named in the article...

1 Yes yes I know chromecast etc may work, and maybe in future they will be stopped from working.

2 Though you don't need to pirate with so many just-released-still-in-theatres movies on YouTube perfectly legally available, supplied by a big multi-national corporation)

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Create a user called '0day', get bonus root privs – thanks, Systemd!

Kiwi
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Boffin

Re: Agreed but...

Although, I'll admit that an attacker would require quite a lot of privilege already to create the file, that's still no excuse for letting them run a service as root though.

Aside from the random file corruption mentioned by the AC above, I can think of another way this could be exploited.

Sysadmin creates a file with this flaw while ghey are a sysadmin, you can even make it look like a typo' eg "9Proper_user" - as in "Oops, must have accidentally typed in that number when I was setting up this new system account for some-valid_reason using a very limited and inocent and non-exoploitable account.

When sysadmin gets fired some time later, there is an exploit on the system waiting to be exploited, and if found before firing can be made out to be a typo (like I'm doing a ton of since my latop died and I'm stuck with a tablet! :-( )

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Kiwi
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Trollface

Re: Maybe they are not fixing it because...

NIH syndrome reigns supreme

I don't think I've come across that before. Given the subject, I wonder if it means "Nothing In Head"?

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Kiwi
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Could Poettering be an MS deep cover agent?

Lemme see... Buggy code with potentially significant security flaws? Check

Horrible attitude towards other? Check

Utter refusal to fix bugs? Check

Arrogant fuckwit who thinks he is God's gift rather than satan's diarrhea? Check

Nah, couldn't possibly be...

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Bonkers call to boycott Raspberry Pi Foundation over 'gay agenda'

Kiwi
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Re: "pushing LGBTQI"

(2) Christians

I've been a victim of severe bullying, sometimes pushed to the brink of suicide (and beyond, but thankfully never found a way that worked). This was done by bigots who believed I should be killed because I was different.

What makes you think it's ok to bully someone based on a perceived difference to yourself? You're no better than those who tried to push a young boy to kill himself because they didn't like what he liked.

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Kiwi
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Re: LGBTQIBFt

Re: LGBTQIBFtEBTKS

> "Lesbian

[..]

Furry

teapot

You forgot "Everything But The Kitchen Sink". Which will later be included so it doesn't feel left out

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Kiwi
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I just signed, every Man go and do likewise!!!

Sorry, but as a fundamentalist Christian I cannot be a part of such non-Christian things as said partition.

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Kiwi
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Thumb Up

Acting like something doesn't bother you over time results in the thing not bothering you as much... or at all, maybe.

I can only upvote once, so in leiu of a dozen more I'll thank you for a well written post. One that has basis in neurology, a science that is the opposite to that horrible fantasy world of psychology (invented so those fortune-tellers who advertise on late night TV can have someone to look down on and laugh at)

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Kiwi
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Re: The Bible

..actually before that Noah's goes back to Adam & Eve, who had 2 sons....

What happened next...?

Genesis 5:4 covers that.

And yes, Cain's wife was one of his sisters. No law on that was given till much later.

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Kiwi
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Angel

I'm watching while a neighbours lad wrestles with his own nature while being fed this nasty bigotry by his mother

Her path leads to her son's suicide, becoming a criminal, or rejecting everything she holds dear, including his family. Tell her to understand Romans 14:4 and "it is by grace you are saved, not by works". She also needs to learn what the Bible says about loving and showing love, showing mercy, and letting God deal with other people. Hers is the greater sin, and the Bible makes that abundantly clear. She is to love her son and treat him with love, compassion and mercy. The rest is up to God. Forget the church and what they say, "let go and let God"

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Kiwi
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Pirate

since developmental issues DO exist, and genetic ones PROBABLY exist, and somewhere in the middle is reality, where some make choices that others cannot make, and vice versa, because we have brains and are NOT the victims of genetic/developmental predisposition, regardless of circumstance.

I believe that I am gay largely by choice, or rather a series of choices, but these were made when I was very young and there was no way for I or anyone else to see where they'd lead till it was too late.

I also believe genetics can play a very large role, but not always causitive. Same for upbringing. I've met some extremely effeminate men who are cleary and surprisingly straight, who by many accounts should be more bent than the Raurimu Spiral. Also have known several gay teens who became straight for the right woman. Or maybe they'd become gay for the right boy......

Pirate coz lots of frigging in the rigging..

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Kiwi
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Coat

Re: "People like this shouldn't be allowed nice things."

I think you may well find that they don't allow themselves nice things. Because it might make Jehovah[sic] cross.

They need to forget the bad teachings of their youth and read their Bible. Get to know the God of the Bible, not this being of man's worst imaginations.

/me gets asbeatos overcoat

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Kiwi
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Re: Rainbow

But seriously, try not posting when your brain is so lubricated with alcohol that it slips out of your head... and it wouldn't hurt to enable your browser's spell checker.

I'd suggest they were using a tablet, but maybe just seldom type "Tim" and often type "Time".

But tell me. Since when has "Time" been something an English browser's spell check would identify as incorrect? Maybe you weren't as sober as you thought? :-)

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Kiwi
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Coat

Re: "pushing LGBTQI"

I'm against the gay agenda on only one front - adding more and more fucking letters to the original LGB

Your post is offensive to us in the LGBTHDCDYESCWSHG34563726BTNDRTH456QAZGHKOPKJB,GTJFRVHEXFEFUIKGJGCYRSKUGDJYESWX,HGIJNOKMPKHUTFTEXRQZYFVOJN

KHUGDKJGKYR,NGDB HFSKHGCJTES.JGVKYRD,HGCHTEAJHRFJGDKHFSKHVCJYFCKHFDKHFSKYFCLJBFAGLUGUTODKHGCKHFC,HBVKYRWGKHVCOKSUTUELJGDKYSMGJMY,JGCBDDLKHGCJVDJGXSJKAFSD,HB community, and we demand you retract it at once!

(I do often wonder who is really behind this adding of letters. Initially a somple concept that people could easily follow, now it is getting ridiculou. One way to destroy the acceptance of an idea is to make it appear sill)

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MH370 researchers refine their prediction of the place nobody looked

Kiwi
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Boffin

Re: Go find it

Actual quote from same coworker on "faked" moon landings.

Best response to that I've heard (probably on El Reg) is along the lines of "If they could fake that, why haven't they faked any other big achievements?"

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Don't panic, but Linux's Systemd can be pwned via an evil DNS query

Kiwi
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Re: @ kiwi "ALL software has bugs"

om my experience if you cannot manage to avoid typos ending up in your finished code then clearly things have been made too easy for you to enter bad data

I referred to rates of typing mistakes in my post, and I stand by that. Sure, with experience like yours you can become much better than average at typing accuracy, but is that at the sacrifice of speed?

I don't know of any tool for entering bad data other than the keyboard BTW. Well, you could probably use some voice recog or mouse-driven interface but speed drops quite a bit there, keyboard is still the fastest way to enter words into a computer IME (am looking for decent voice stuff but little out there).

A compiler will pick up obvious errors, and may pick up a number of other errors that would still compile but there's something "not quite right", but there's a lot of stuff that can be syntactically perfect, make perfect sense to you when you read the code, but still not be doing what it's supposed to.

But you can guarantee that every number you've entered into code is right? You've never noticed that you'd accidentally transposed a couple of variables (or a variable and a constant)? Never forgotten to remove debugging stuff ( {ifdef debug..} ) wrapped around what should be a random number but you were using a constant so you could test the code? You're either one in several billion, or maybe your code isn't that complex.

BTW, I can spot a half a dozen potential grammar errors and few typos, and at least one word-choice error in your short message! :)

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Kiwi
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Nope, time for you to do some much needed research into systemd because anti-systemd trolls display a complete lack of knowledge about it because they just reprint other trolls ignorant misinformation.

Ok, so I'll do my research by asking someone who obviously knows a great deal about systemd and OS's in generalm, such as your good self.

Please tell me kind sir, why does systemd - an init process - need to be doing reverse-DNS lookups? For that matter, why is it replacing su/sudo/kill etc? What benefit is there for my system in having this stuff in systemd?

As you have obviously thoroughly researched systemd and all it entails, I await your prompt explanation, and thank you in advance for the time taken to give a decent reply that will help me better understand the benefits of systemd, and the logic behind the features that have been added to it.

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Kiwi
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Linux

Re: "Windows. (Bring on the downvotes!)"

I'd probably vote for Windows before Systemd

Even I would vote that way!

A big part of the problem is that many of SystemD's promoters cannot see the issues with it, such as how to read a corrupted binary log file when the system is acting up and the information to tell you what is wrong is contained in said FUBAR'd (literally!) binary log file.

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Kiwi
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Pint

Re: If THIS isn't a reason to hate systemd...

Glad, but not surprised, to see that the average Reg reader is more resistant to the systemd Koolaid.

If ever a post deserved someone making a botnet to upvote, I think this would be it. Alas, I cannot do the botnet, but I can do a beer icon and my one single upvote.

Much gracias for a well-written post!

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Kiwi
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Boffin

Re: @ rtfazeberdee "ALL software has bugs"

The "all software has bugs" and "computers are so complex we should be excused for our mistakes" are Urban myths i.e both false but have been repeated so often that people actually believe them true. M$ I am looking at you

If you type with 99% accuracy that means on average you mis-type one character in every 100. With red squiggly underlines and the like you can pick up typos where the typed word is not found in the dictionary, but if you type "cant" where you meant "can't", there's a good chance you'll not pick up the typo.

Where that typo is a number in a program of a few million lines of code, each done by several people over the years, you will only find it if the typo causes a compile error or warning, or if it eventually causes a noticeable failure in the software. In some cases (eg Heartbleed or EternalBlue) those bugs can take a number of years to be noticed, because the flaw is not triggered in such a way as to cause a problem.

But there's other bugs as well, such as a condition the programmer never thinks to test for (no, you cannot test beyond your experience and beyond what is suggested to you), your code might work flawlessly on every possible situation, but someone has a single pixel in a photo that is #FFEE66 and something in your code reacts with that, and you tried a few hundred thousand colours in your testing but just not that one. It could be a slight delay in how one CPU processes commands, or a system configuration that fragments memory in some weird way, or... So many things you cannot possibly expect and test for.

When code gets beyond a few 10s of lines it becomes hard to spot typos and other bugs. Transpose a couple of digits, not have an obvious flaw at compile and testing, the bug will ship. You may never know it exists, or it may be found the day after shipping. That's why patching systems in professional-grade OS's (and software) work so beautifully, because we need to be able to fix software when someone finds something is wrong.

Theoretically it is not impossible to write perfect code in a complex program. In theory you could type every character in a couple of million lines without one typo. In reality, most humans struggle even to get to a mere 90% typing accuracy (that's one mistake in every 10 characters typed!).

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Kiwi
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Re: If THIS isn't a reason to hate systemd...

(there are none on Android, as far as I am concerned).

As I get time, I'm playing with OpenVPN and Pi-Hole (installed on a Mint 17/KDE media machine atm but I'll hopefully finish my replacement server (under Devuan) this weekend and move it there). The idea being that I have the OpenVPN Android client connected, and with Pi-Hole blocking all the nasty domains it knows of (>111,000 at present), that makes the browsing on Android reasonably safe, and also protects your other activities (such as banking etc) as the VPN encrypts traffic between the device and home.

So far it seems to be working well, and I'm using Opera on the VPN - Firefox refuses to run on the tablet and Chrome is just icky, especially as I discovered when I tried to connect to my webserver using my vpn's url (vpn.myregisteredomain.co.nz) Chrome would only open a search page; you can only enter URL's that Google allows into chrome, if they don't "know" or allow the URL you cannot visit it! I've had the domain for some years, and various subdomains on it as well.

Anyway, putting this here as something for you (or others) to think about. Took a few minutes to set up the vpn and a few more to chuck Pi Hole in. If anyone wishes to talk more in-depth either hope I re-check this thread, or talk nicely to El Reg about contacting me directly.

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Everything you need to know about the Petya, er, NotPetya nasty trashing PCs worldwide

Kiwi
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Holmes

Re: The real blame goes to..

The issue is organisations have NO EXCUSES whatsoever for failing to deploy patches that are issued.

Software compatibility

Hardware compatibility

Software/hardware that needs to be properly audited and certified to be used

Number of patches released in a single lump

Trustworthyness of the vendor releasing said patches (how often to they cause failures).

Time taken to make sure it won't break your stuff

Seriously of the need for this particular patch (ie can the secretary's assistant's intern's machine wait another few weeks, and can we get in the team to re-certify the MRI machine before we point it at some unsuspecting brain?)

There's a few reasons right there for many places not updating immediately. Better networks might make a huge difference (ie if your MRI machine can get it's data to where you need it, but nothing from the internet can reach it...), but some stuff cannot be fixed except for at huge cost.

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Kiwi
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Re: The real blame goes to..

The more we try to find someone other than the criminal who launches the attack to blame, the more confused things get and the stranger the arguments promoted.

Sometimes there can be several parties to blame in an incident. There are a number of reasons people don't patch things, eg my Win 7 no longer gets updates because I have little control over what is there (it also no longer gets internet, and any unknown USB's get checked via another box first); they range from paranoia to incompetence to stuck with old tech that is mission critical and can't be fixed.

The sooner a flaw is announced, the sooner a patch is released. The sooner a patch is released, the sooner "baddies" can start taking it apart to see what is fixed, but it also means the sooner the vendor knows of the problem and fixes it. A new program is written today that in a year's time will be used by almost every person in the world, and in 5 years time it is deeply embedded in all sorts of critical systems. Now, do you want the vendor told very early on that there is a flaw in that program that will let anyone control the devices it is used on, or do you think it better for those who learn of the flaw to sit on it for years1, especially when they're an organisation charged with protecting the security of their nation?

1 As previously stated, I have no idea how long the NSA knew.

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Kiwi
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Alert

Re: WMI (and seriously - passwords in memory?)

PS. How can someone downvote a post containing nothing but statements of fact? If any of the facts are wrong I recommend that you post a reply explaining so instead, for the benefit of all.

Come on Patrick, this is El Reg! It's completely unreasonable to expect someone to explain a downvote, especially a lot of them!

And you're supposed to downvote people for asking about them as well. But I'll do something completely forbidden here and give you an upvote before the first downvote gets here!

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Four Brits cuffed in multimillion-quid Windows tech support call scam probe

Kiwi
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"What if it's your GP's office calling? "

Mine's been told that I don't answer unless there's callerID showing and if they want an answer they need to make sure it is.

My voicemail now says "If you cannot be bothered showing me your phone number, I cannot be bothered answering your call", and a little more to suggest they leave a brief message which might be checked.

Though my Doc doesn't hide their number, nor do I expect they'd have a reason to really. Very few legitimate callers do hide their numbers, and if it's really important they'll let the number show somehow.

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