* Posts by Jamie Jones

2237 posts • joined 14 Jun 2007

Intel didn't tell CERTS, govs, about Meltdown and Spectre because they couldn't help fix it

Jamie Jones
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Devil

Re: Note that they didn't bother with open source operating systems

FreeBSD were notified under NDA in December, still far too late, but before the expected public release date:

https://lists.freebsd.org/pipermail/freebsd-security/2018-January/009719.html

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UK.gov's Brexiteers warned not to push for divergence on data protection laws

Jamie Jones
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Facepalm

As a rule of thumb...

Any divergence from EU laws is to the benefit of corporate interests, and the detriment of the people.

All those who voted for "taking back control" have really voted for giving away control to those who simply want to make a quick buck. No wonder Murdoch, the Republicans and others are in favour of BRexit - more deals without those pesky Europeans concerned with peoples rights!

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Flight Simulator's DRM fighter nosedives into Chrome's cache

Jamie Jones
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They are probably Android developers as well

Android developers, and ad-targeting firms seem to think that grabbing as much as they can off your device is fair game.

Don't be surprised at the many ad-brokers that slurp your exact location and account info, even if you have location services switched off. Many also grab a list of all your installed apps, and all sorts of other stuff that in aggregate could be used to identify you - and other stuff than frankly they have no business slurping. This equally applies to "respected" companies, and apps which are paid for, and contain no adverts (*analytics* cough)

Just go to any of the ad companies websites - they proudly boast about it.

But back to our industry in general..... How has this happened? A few years ago, if any software phoned home to do anything other than download updates or join a multi-player game etc. there would be hell to pay.

The tracking is actually the main reason I've rebelled against ads. TV companies have no analytics. - Web advertisers can get precise viewing counts and times - they should have been grateful for that. Common-domain ad-serving is JUST to get around the privacy protections in the cookie specification... So why is it deemed ok to do it?

Sorry, got a bit sidetracked in my rant there!

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Oracle open-sources DTrace under the GPL

Jamie Jones
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Re: @Jamie Jones - First paragraph

Not very bright, are you?

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Jamie Jones
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FAIL

First paragraph

Oracle appears to have open-sourced DTrace, the system instrumentation tool that Sun Microsystems created in the early 2000s and which has been beloved of many-a-sysadmin ever since.

It's been open-source for ages, under the CDDL.

CDDL is an open-source license.

Open-Source != GPL

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Jamie Jones
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Re: The Sun has set already

Just remember, if ZFS and Dtrace were just so totally awesome and amazing, Sun Microsystems and/or an Oracle run Sun set of stuff would dominate today. It's nice and all, but maybe not as nice as some want us to believe.

Yes yes, and how did you Linux guys react when Windows people said the same thing about Linux?

It's a totally stupid claim in either case.

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Jamie Jones
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Trollface

Re: Someone has to say it.

Bob, you forgot to mention the eternal worship of the GPL god, and the duty of it's followers to try and convert everyone else, and belittle any that don't convert.

All hail the GPL god!

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Jamie Jones
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Devil

Re: They should relicense...

Come on Oracle, please, relicense to GPL, you know you want to.

Please Oracle, DO NOT license under the GPL - the GPL is a legal nightmare. I suppose dual-licensing would work, but why should they appease the GPL which is the thing that is creating the barriers to usr in the first place?

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Jamie Jones
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Re: Open source tools

The problem is the license and Oracle's lawyers.

How amazingly arrogant.

No, the problem is with the GPL and those that worship it with cult-like status.

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Oi! Verizon leaked my fiancée's nude pix to her ex-coworker, says bloke

Jamie Jones
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Re: What are the odds

When I was in school, back in the days before mobile phones, a friend of mine would often end up phoning his girlfriends house instead of his own if he forgot to first dial the exchange code (he lived just on the edge between his exchange and hers/our schools)

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It took us less than 30 seconds to find banned 'deepfake' AI smut on the internet

Jamie Jones
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Re: Article author is female.

The comment referred to "his" and "him".

Anonymous coward pointed out it was a female.

I see your FAIL and raise you a FACEPALM!

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You can resurrect any deleted GitHub account name. And this is why we have trust issues

Jamie Jones
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The current owner had no way to directly redirect the repo, so he made such work-around so that he could safely go home without being blamed by his supervisor," he explained. "And of course, hoped this would also save someone else trapped in similar situation."

Although it doesn't necessarily imply he's to blame, if the current owner is responsible for code that relies on some third party developer, on some third party site, with no contract agreements in place, he deserves to be blamed, fired, and shot by his supervisor.

I mean... WTF? If you use a third party module in live code, you surely don't link it to a live repository. What am I missing here?

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What a Hancock-up: MP's social network app is a privacy disaster

Jamie Jones
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Re: Like the privacy policy on my new LG TV

Question is, is there anyone to complain to (that may care?)

https://noyb.eu

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Dodgy parking firms to be denied access to Brit driver database

Jamie Jones
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Re: dodgy parking companies

I suspect that's more down to incompetence / stupidity than anything else. They simply hadn't considered the possibility of someone using one shop/car park, going away, then coming back and using the other shop/car park.

And even if they had considered that.... what about if you visit the same shop/carpark more than once a day? Perfectly possible if you forget something important!

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Firefox to emit ‘occasional sponsored story’ in ads test

Jamie Jones
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Re: Market share rapidly heading towards single-digits

You realise all your links are truncated because you didn't linkify them?

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FYI: There's now an AI app that generates convincing fake smut vids using celebs' faces

Jamie Jones
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Re: Too much Daily Mail for my liking

(Writing this as someone personally responsible for the discovery, busting and jailing of a child porn pervert)"

Wait, so you're somehow in a position to discover CP, then confront the suspect, and then jail them? So you're an investigator, a cop AND a judge?

Or just trying too fucking hard?

What's your problem?

I only wrote that because otherwise some arsehole would say I was sticking up for child porn.

But to clarify:

It was around 2002. I was in charge of a server where someone was transferring child porn. I wasn't "trying too fucking hard" to do anything - I was just doing my job, and through looking at log files due to an unrelated issue, noticed these dodgy names.

I did indeed check out the files, and they were really the most disgusting and graphic thing manageable.

I contacted the internet watch foundation, who put me through directly to the police. I gave them logs, files, and IP addresses.

In my initial contact I even said that I checked the files, and they were indeed as bad as the filenames made out.

My contact (I forget his name) later phoned me and said that based on what I gave them, they got the guys identity (from freeserve - a freeserve dialup customer) and got a warrant. He told me that the guy had child porn photos on his wall, and on his desk. He said it was enough to be able to search his computer, where they found shit loads of bad stuff.

I'm sorry if this sounds too unreal, but this is exactly how it went down. He said that the guy WAS NOT known to them in any shape or form, and that he strongly believed that if I hadn't have told them when I did, he was likely to actually carry out some direct attack himself.

Maybe the detective was a clairvoyant, or there was sufficient evidence there to prove it. May be he shouldn't have speculated like that, but he did.

I asked if I was required as a witness, and he replied that they had enough evidence, and that I wouldn't be needed.

I asked about the files - if I needed to leave them untouched in case any forensic examination may be required. He said that they were not required, and that he has to warn me that technically I've broken the law too by having those files, but under the circumstances, there'd be no issue as long as I deleted them straight away. I replied that there was no objection there - I wanted to delete that shit since I first discovered it, and that whilst I worked in computers, he could be ensure that I'd wipe those disks in a proper manor, which I did. He was happy with that.

There were one or 2 other minor calls, and I dunno.. 6 months later maybe, I got my final phone call from the police investigator.

Unfortunately, I wasn't in at the time, so I still had some unanswered questions. But the message he left said something along the lines that the court case was over, the guy was jailed, and he was calling to thank me for my help, and reiterated that he was convinced my intervention stopped him going any further.

That's what he said.

That's how it happened.

I'm no hero, I just reported stuff as I hope anyone would.

It's unfortunate that your experience was more sour, but again, if you have issue with any of that, your fucking issue isn't with me, and your attack speaks volumes - you are a nasty piece of work - maybe the police you dealt with didn't like your vibe either?

HAND

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Jamie Jones
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Re: It's one way to get it watched

... or go for someone good looking instead?

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Jamie Jones
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WTF?

Re: Too much Daily Mail for my liking

Mate, you're the one obsessing about it. Chill, or maybe seek help?

An article about tech, on a tech site tangents off into child pornography *twice* and I'm obsessed for calling you out?

What help do you suggest I seek?

A very strange comment - I can only assume there is psychological projection going on.

Cheers

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Jamie Jones
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WTF?

Too much Daily Mail for my liking

The tech was bound to come eventually. There will come a time when video evidence will become useless (remember the doctored video of Arnie in "The running man")

We can all extrapolate the consequences without you having to mention child porn... twice!

While we're at it, the internet can be used to distribute child porn!

Cameras can take pictures of kiddies!

That recent article on 512GB flash? It forgot to mention how much child porn that would allow someone to store!

And the Meltdown/Spectre bugs? They could allow people to hack family kiddie photos!

(Writing this as someone personally responsible for the discovery, busting and jailing of a child porn pervert)

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New Sky thinking: Media giant makes dish-swerving move on Netflix territory

Jamie Jones
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Re: TV Licence?

Delays are already covered in the licensing - primarily because of those units that can "pause live tv".

http://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/check-if-you-need-one/topics/Live-TV-and-how-you-watch-it

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Jamie Jones
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Re: TV Licence?

No. Just about anything "can receive" BBC broadcasts.

The law applies to any live (live as in "pre-scheduled" as opposed to on-demand) TV broadcast. It was also modified about a year ago to include any non-S4C video i-player content.

So, anything that is available on 'normal tv' needs a license, however you're getting it.

i-player needs a license (unless you only use it for radio or S4C). itv player, channel 4 on demand and 5 on demand don't need a license (unless you watch their "live channels" through them)

Youtube videos don't need a license, however 'live programming' from youtube does - i.e. you need a license even if your only video viewing is cnn live via youtube, or some australian tv via a live internet feed)

The rules apply to both watching and recording.

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29 MEEELLION iPhone Xs flogged... only to be end-of-life'd by summer?

Jamie Jones
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What about my IT membership card? My mobile is a nokia symbian phone!

Long life battery, keyboard that works in the rain, and without you needing to look at it, and only a few seconds to power up.

I own loads of Android devices - I'm typing this on one now - but as a phone? no way!

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You want wires with that? Burger King backs, er, net neutrality

Jamie Jones
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Re: Only 330 million?

Naah. A global effect will be minimal. This is all about how American consumer ISPs deal with consumer connections.

If the worst of the worst happened, and companies became less profitable, they'd still cater to their international audiences. Costs may rise globally, but companies with a strong global reach will keep going.

Hypothetically, if Trump 'banned' google, or any of the others with a global reach, they'd not close down, they'd shift their base to another country.

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Jamie Jones
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Re: At ****ing last

You're holding it wrong.

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Death notice: Moore’s Law. 19 April 1965 – 2 January 2018

Jamie Jones
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Re: Here's a thought - idleness can mean speed increases!

We tried that already IIRC. See Pentium 4 and NetBurst.

Ahhhh. OK. Thanks. Now you mention it, I vaguely recall some people complaining that the P4 was less complicated than the P3, and thus was less powerful when running at the same speed - the idea being it would allow them to crank up the speed as it ran cooler. I didn't realise that predictive branching was one of the things they sacrificed.

From what I gather, they couldn't easily achieve the increased speeds needed to surpass the P3's power.

Cheers, J

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Jamie Jones
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Boffin

Here's a thought - idleness can mean speed increases!

All this speculative/predictive stuff is done so that the CPU doesn't waste time idling...

At the same time, we are rather limited in CPU speeds due to the temperatures reached when the chips are working.

Without any speculative stuff, and using the philosophy that it's OK for a "busy" CPU to be idle, how much could the speed be ramped up due to the otherwise cooler core?

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Jamie Jones
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Re: It would seem that code will need to be tighter

Instead of bloatware and throw big tin at it, how about actually learning how to write good code?

But we've been saying that ever since MS brought us the "Too slow? buy a new machine. Uses too much memory? Buy more!" mantra in the mid 90's.

And nothing ever happened, until 'almost-smart' phones became available, and suddenly everyone was concerned with lean, efficient programming. Then phones became more powerful, and once again, that philosophy died.

Same will happen this time around. Lowest-common-denominator programmers and techniques will still be employed - "You just need to but a more expensive machine! More cores, more Mhz!"

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Half a terabyte in your smartmobe? Yup. That's possible now

Jamie Jones
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Jamie Jones
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They are Chinese, but they advertise heavily on youtube, and I presume they paid a packet to get the wish.com domain in the first place.

You're right of course that any legal claim would be fruitless, but I wonder how much their reputation is worth? I may buy one just to find out!

EDIT: Oh sod it, I just have :-)

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Jamie Jones
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Hence the "(!)" on my post subject!

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Jamie Jones
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$249 ? Only six quid for a 512GB sdcard from wish (!)

https://www.wish.com/m/c/598a64f8c1f4e17244331357

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Jamie Jones
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Re: Slang

People can politely ask something on here, and if their original premise is wrong, some reg users downvote them, even if they state it as a question like you did.

I can understand downvotes if someone stubbornly asserts something incorrect, but why this happens for posts like yours is a mystery. I think it may be some kind of elitest geekyness - how dare anyone ever be wrong about something!

EDIT: Sorry, incoherent, not slept since Saturday

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TalkTalk starts offering punters choice to shift-shift to O2

Jamie Jones
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Re: The beginning of the end .....

Which am I?

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OK, who had 'Montana' in the net neutrality state pool? Congratulations

Jamie Jones
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Re: They have no right to do that

Wrong. So-called NN regulations prevent ISPs from giving the best service to their customers because traffic from all other ISPs has to be give free reign on their network.

Like you, so many people get this the wrong way around. (Most do so intentionally)

What you need to realise is that from a conceptual point of view (i.e. avoiding technical pedantry on how services may literally send requested data) with a consumer ISP, the customer is pulling in data over the ISP. You and others are thinking of it as internet providers pushing data over the ISP.

Customers pay to pull data over the ISPs network. The amount that affects the ISP is related to how much the customer pulls. Therefore, it's fair that ISPs can have plans with various data caps if they want.

What is not fine is them somehow differentiating between the data. Bits are bits.

I'm sure the whole argument against net neutrality formed because companies got stupid, and offered larger monthly data caps (or uncapped usage) that they couldn't afford, but assumed the customer would never attempt to use up.

Then, along comes youtube and netflix, and people are using more data (out of their already paid for allowance) and the ISPs want to get netflix and youtube to pay for their screwup.

Obligatory analogy:

If my bus company offers free transport on a little-used bus route, and then one day some big shopping centre opens up along that route, making the route more popular, then it's up to the bus company to renegotiate how much it charges passengers whenever it's contractually able to. You and others seem to think the shopping centre should pay the bus company for the fact they are getting more passengers...

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Meltdown/Spectre week three: World still knee-deep in something nasty

Jamie Jones
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Order, order!

Intel first said only Broadwell and Haswell CPUs had the problem, but later said its more recent Ivy Bridge, Sandy Bridge, Skylake and Kaby Lake architectures are all misbehaving after patching.

Huh? SandyBridge and Ivy Bridge are older than Broadwell and Haswell

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Smut site fingered as 'source' of a million US net neutrality comments

Jamie Jones
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Happy

Re: Dear oh dear, what is the Reg coming to?`

Jake pointed out one they made: "smut site fingered"

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Jamie Jones
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Re: Ain't American Politics Great?!

Especially when the Demorats would rather shutdown the whole of Government

What planet are you on?

The democrats fucked up, yes, but they fucked up BECAUSE they gave in to trumps demands - THEY GAVE IN TO AVOID A SHUTDOWN, they should have stood firm oh their demands, the spineless wimps.

But even though they gave in, the republicans still couldn't organise a piss up in a brewery even with the democrats bringing the beer.

The republicans control the senate, congress, and have the current President. 3 for 3. Full House. Strike! Yet when the government shuts down, it's the democrats fault? You sure you don't want to blame the Greens, or maybe BRexit?

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.UK overseer Nominet abandons its own charitable foundation – and why this matters

Jamie Jones
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Re: Who owns .uk?

I would say that "we" own .UK and the government manages it on our behalf.. Don't let the government assume personal ownership of a public resource!

But yeah, why can't we say "bye bye nominet" and give the tender to someone else. It shouldn't be Nominets property - let them play with the domain they bought.

Mage: I'll forever associate .gb with x.400/x500 .. arrrgh!

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NHS: Thanks for the free work, Linux nerds, now face our trademark cops

Jamie Jones
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Re: @Lee D : "in my mind"

A colleague and I eventually got FreeBSD in official use in parts of the company we worked for (large UK/worldwide IT company - I even got it into HMRC via a contract the company had at the time.

We initially met A LOT of resistance from management, mainly because it was free, and worse still "unprofessionally has 'free' in its name"

In fact, we probably wouldn't have got anywhere if it wasn't for the fact my colleague ignored them, replacing a decrepit old unix server with FreeBSD and only telling them after a few weeks when they said they were impressed with the speed and stability of the new system - not realising it was an abandoned Pentium desktop, whilst the new £10,000 server which was meant to run NT was never made stable by the windows team, and was just sitting in a corner running a screen saver.

This was back in the 90's though, and although it's better today, there is still a mindset of "more expensive is better" amongst non-technical management.

Indeed, the same philosophy is often used in marketing generally

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Jamie Jones
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Facepalm

Re: Que?

"Why is it 'neoliberal' and not just 'liberal'? Do you think the Conservative party is 'liberal'?

Would this issue have been solved by 'neoconservative? Alt-Right? Who?"

Oops. Google it. Neoliberalism is NOT liberalism.

Basically, neoliberalism is Thatcherite conservatism.

Neoconservatism only really exists in America, and basically applies to the current bat-shit crazy republicans

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Hawaiian fake nukes alert caused by fat-fingered fumble of garbage GUI

Jamie Jones
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Re: Confirmation checkbox needed

WANTED: Team able to build me a fully stocked and working nuclear shelter in/under my garden. Must be able to have work completed in 4 minutes time.

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Brit transport pundit Christian Wolmar on why the driverless car is on a 'road to nowhere'

Jamie Jones
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Flame

Re: And of course the moral issue...

Damn, there are some arseholes here.

I was raising a question about *who* should responsible for accidents .

My example was not meant as a detailed physics experiment or some sort of commentary on anyones driving ability.

Maybe I should have said "A car on the wrong side of the road, in your lane approaches you at 120mph." or something similarly preposterous, though of course, then some of you smart-arses would have still avoided the question and described how such a situation was implausible in the first place.

It's no wonder people who work in our industry are stereotyped as being socially-inept nerds.

Now go ahead: downvote and criticise my spelling/grammar.

HAND.

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Jamie Jones
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Re: And of course the moral issue...

I have no idea until I'm in the situation.

However, as the decision won't be based on precise mathematical algorithms, I won't be blamed for whatever the outcome is, as long as I haven't been negligent.

This is why people who have been in accidents which they didn't cause have never been blamed for the eventual outcome.

I'm puzzled to why it seems you don't see the difference.

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Jamie Jones
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And of course the moral issue...

... Your driverless car is driving down the motorway, currently in the middle lane, driving in it's stopping distance behind a lorry.

Suddenly, the lorries doors burst open, and loads of falling logs come rolling out (ala "Final Destination 2")

Your car realises it won't stop in time. It can take the impact, possibly risking your life. It could swerve to the right, hitting the motorcyclist alongside you - most likely saving you, and killing the motorcyclist, or it can swerve to the left, hitting the family car with 3 kids in the back. This may kill you all, yet you may all survive.

What should the car do? And more relevant, what will the car programmers want it to do? No doubt the people who designed it want to minimise legal costs and bad PR.

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FBI says it can't unlock 8,000 encrypted devices, demands backdoors for America's 'public safety'

Jamie Jones
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Even if I could be 100% sure they'd never abuse that power, they can still fuck off. They don't own me; they have no right to have that ability unless there is proper evidence of criminal activity.

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IBM melts down fixing Meltdown as processes and patches stutter

Jamie Jones
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Chill out, sit down, and just wait a sec. Bejeabus.

Blimey! Take some of your own advice dude!

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We translated Intel's crap attempt to spin its way out of CPU security bug PR nightmare

Jamie Jones
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Thumb Up

Re: "Isn't making it go mainstream before this date kind of a bad thing?"

I felt almost a sense of pride seeing The Register being quoted all over the place!

Here's hoping that Apple and the others finally realise ignoring you is not a good decision.

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Jamie Jones
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Re: SecureString

There is always the chance that the kernel memory can be hacked or even just written out to the page file.

Pffft. What kinda system still uses swapping to a file? and unencrypted swapping too?!

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Jamie Jones
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Re: Other CPU architectures affected by Spectre...

Geeze, at this rate I'll be dusting the cobwebs off the old ZX Spectrum...

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