* Posts by Jamie Jones

2500 posts • joined 14 Jun 2007

Google risks mega-fine in EU over location 'stalking'

Jamie Jones
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Re: Confusopoly

Product codes.... not helped by certain large retailers giving unique model numbers to items they sell, so they can use the "if you see the same model elsewhere for cheaper, we'll refund the difference" line without being bitten:

Quote: http://blogs.thisismoney.co.uk/2012/02/thinking-of-shopping-at-brighthouse-stop-dont.html

Brighthouse is selling this glossy-black Hoover model, pictured, for a cash price of £703.29. I reckon I found the identical model, with exactly the same specifications but with a white paint finish, being sold online for £469.Correct washing machine catalogue

Could I be 100% certain they were the same? No - because Brighthouse, of course, magics its own unique codes out of thin air, rather than use the standard Hoover codes other retailers cite.

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What do a meth, coke, molly, heroin stash and Vegas allegedly have in common? Broadcom cofounder Henry Nicolas

Jamie Jones
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Re: Some stories are just stories

"Aircraft oxygen masks only have 5-10 minutes worth (even pilot ones). They're simply there to get from high altitudes to below 10,000 feet without losing conciousness"

..... at which point, they are no longer relying on air from inside the plane....

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Jamie Jones
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Re: Not very flattering pictures

Usually it depends how rich they are, what neighbourhood they come from, and their skin colour.

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Editing post seems permitted if system clock is set back

Jamie Jones
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Re: Editing post seems permitted if system clock is set back

... It's ever since they switched to that annoying javascript bling that manipulates the date locally.

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Annoying 'edit-post' bug

Jamie Jones
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Mushroom

POST EDIT bug (#2)

If you edit a post to change it to an anonymous post, it accepts the change, but doesn't actually action it... Presumably the other way around, too, but I didn't test that.

Also, this one still not been answered: https://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/1/2018/06/08/Jamie_Jones_Annoying_editpost_bug/

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AC enumeration

Jamie Jones
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Re: How about a slight wrinkle in this plan?

- Yay to different words instead of anon + number.

- Yay to proper threading

- Yay to automatically timstamping the reply (Incidentally, the full date/time is now available if you disable javascript)

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For all the excitement, Pie may be Android's most minimal makeover yet – thankfully

Jamie Jones
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"I've been told the ADB backup system is not that reliable, not compatible with many devices, "

Fair enough - it's not something I've used much.

Incidentally, I don't know why you got the downvotes - especially as no-one posted their reasons...

cheers

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Jamie Jones
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Re: first rule of down votes

"Don't mention down votes!"

:-)

I knew it was inevitable, but my curiosity took the better of me, and I thought the commantards were better than the youtube comment trolls!

All I did was answer a question. There was no opinion stated. If someone thought my answer was wrong, why not say so?

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Jamie Jones
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Trollface

Re: can't compete with a much more up-to-date platform, iOS

twats!

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Jamie Jones
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Re: can't compete with a much more up-to-date platform, iOS

Nice to see I have some groupies!

I'm mildly curious why I got 2 downvotes for answering a question.. Still, if it makes you happy, fire away!

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Jamie Jones
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You have been able to backup most things via adb since android 4.0.

Backup and restore commands Description

backup [-f file] [-apk | -noapk] [-obb | -noobb] [-shared | -noshared] [-all] [-system | [-nosystem] package_names Write an archive of the device's data to file. If you do not specify a file name, the default file is backup.adb. The package list is optional when you specify the -all and -shared options. The following describes the usages for the other options:

-apk | -noapk: Back up or do not back up .apk files. The default value is -noapk.

-obb | -noobb: Back up or do not back up .obb files. The default value is -noobb.

-shared | -noshared: Back up or do not back up shared storage. The default value is -noshared.

-all: Back up all installed apps.

-system | -nosystem: Include or do not include system apps when backing up all installed apps (-all). The default value is -system.

restore file Restore the device contents from file.

More:

command line: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/40202829/adb-backup-unknown-backup-flag

https://9to5google.com/2017/11/04/how-to-backup-restore-android-device-data-android-basics/

gui front end: https://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?p=36499906#post36499906

Improvements to ADB in android 8: https://www.xda-developers.com/android-oreo-adb-backup-better/

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Jamie Jones
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Re: can't compete with a much more up-to-date platform, iOS

Actual applications that are part of open-source Android, or all the proprietary stuff that Google have tied to it to make it almost impossible for the average Joe to use Android without having their data harvested?

Both.

E.g. Webview (open - https://android.googlesource.com/platform/frameworks/base/+/android-9.0.0_r3/core/java/android/webkit/)

play/gms (propretary)

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Jamie Jones
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Re: can't compete with a much more up-to-date platform, iOS

It bugs me when people downvote without saying why.

I'm not too sure about Ios, but you're right about android - some google apps are installed as user apps and are updated through the play store in the normal way - others, which may be preinstalled as system apps, can also update through the play store - the new version will be stored in "user" rather than "system" space, but will automatically be treated the same as the version it's updating. (the "system" copy will still exist, but will be ignored, until you delete the "user" update)

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Devon County Council techies: WE KNOW IT WASN'T YOU!

Jamie Jones
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5 days or 5 weeks?

The letter says the kid was out of school for 5 weeks, not 5 days...

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IPv6: It's only NAT-ural that network nerds are dragging their feet...

Jamie Jones
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Trollface

Re: "the world is clinging stubbornly to IPv4"

Psst. There is this dark and evil technology out there that allows you to use a NAT router on IPv6. It's got a funny name that starts with an L and it's not unix.

Naaa, FreeBSD begins with an "F", and pfsense begins with a "p" !

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Oi, clickbait cop bot, jam this in your neural net: Hot new AI threatens to DESTROY web journos

Jamie Jones
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Coat

Re: Easy source.

That's nothing. I lost 99kg in 1 minute. I shot the mother-in-law.

I went on this new "28 day diet".. All I lost was 4 weeks....

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Jamie Jones
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Windows

Re: Easy source.

"10 things you never knew about xxxxxx"

Argh, that really triggers my OCD. How the hell can they assume they know what I do or don't know on the subject!

</old git whinge>

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Jamie Jones
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Re: I think I can define ClickBait as

@Not Sparticus, you make a great point about these sites showing up on supposedly "proper" sites - I think that's what annoyed me most about them - my guard was down somewhat.

And yeah, I suppose they think the pennies they earn are worth the reputation knock.... It certainly makes me think twice of a site that uses such click farms (though of course, I don't usually see them any more)

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Jamie Jones
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Re: I think I can define ClickBait as

"Outbrain and tombola - sites I completely block in my firewall."

Until now I have never heard of those two sites. By the sound of it, hopefully I'll never hear about them again.

Arggh, despite Giovani giving the correct name, I cocked it up in my reply.

As he says, it's taboola not tombola

For completeness, here is my personally compiled list of similar clickbait sites. Of course, check them out before blocking them - some may be dead now, or may have cleaned up their act. More importantly, never trust random-person-on-internet-especially-when-hes-a-self-described-welsh-git!

# --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

# Kill these zones belonging to either deceptive ad companies, or crappy tacky 'content based'

# click-bait ad-servers, which generally link to a page that links to the link (along with

# others). They usually have a misleading sensationalist headline too. Kill them with fire!

.adhitz.com. domain

.adsmarket.com. domain

.adnxs.com. domain

.content.ad. domain

.content-ad.net. domain

.gravity.com. domain

.mgid.com. domain

.outbrain.com. domain

.zizu.xyz. domain .steepto.com. domain

.taboola.com. domain .tribalfusion.com. domain

.zergnet.com. domain

.revcontent.com. domain # This one even uses thumbnails of people irrelevant to the story! # --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

#

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Jamie Jones
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Re: pot / kettle

Do it properly..... https://www.fca.org.uk/ppi/how-to-check

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Jamie Jones
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Re: I think I can define ClickBait as

Ugh. Yes. Outbrain and tombola - sites I completely block in my firewall.

Total dregs of the internet.

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The age of hard drives is over as Samsung cranks out consumer QLC SSDs

Jamie Jones
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Re: Ah, but

My first hard-disk was 20Mb, the size of a planet, and took about 90 seconds to spin up. It was in an ICL / Three Rivers Perq 1 from 1979/1980 - lovely machine 1024x768 resolution raster (black and white), running a graphical window manager - 1Mb of RAM, 1Mb 8" floppies.... the best graphics tablet I've ever used....

Bear in mind this machine predated the 1K ZX81 ... And no, I didn't get it until 1991 - Manchester Uni flogging off old kit, for £50 - I do believe they were over £100,000 new!

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Grad sends warning to manager: Be nice to our kit and it'll be nice to you

Jamie Jones
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Quite the opposite of being kind..

Not my boss, but this aricle did remind me of a time when I was a student, back in ... errr 1989ish.

I was in one of the computer rooms, and they had recently had a whole bunch of DECstations installed (lovely bit of kit, monitor the size of a planet)

I remember all sorts of warnings placed over the power switches and power points - people kept on switching the things off, despite the fact the machines were all part of the main vax cluster, and users were just users, so there was no proper shutdown invoked... but I digress.

Anyway, there was a girl in there who was reading some large document on the screen, and the screen-hibernate screensaver kicked on, and she asked for help, saying "I hadn't pressed any key or anything for ages then the whole thing just broke".

Realising what had happened, I walked over to it, and threatened the monitor, telling it that I was sick of it acting up, and that it better start working now, or there would be hell to pay etc. Of course, nothing happened so I ranted some more, and said "I give you 3 seconds..." (at this point the girl was looking at me like I was a nutter).. "THREE.... TWO.... ONE" . On "ONE" I thumped the table, right next to the mouse (which she hadn't been using) causing it to move just enough to trigger the screen powering back on.

"See? You just have to tell it who's boss" I said, as I walked away. I really hoped it would happen again, and she'd end up shouting at the monitor itself - alas it didn't, presumably she'd finished her reading and was now using the keyboard.

Yes, I was an annoying troll type of person back then too!

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Sitting pretty in IPv4 land? Look, you're gonna have to talk to IPv6 at some stage

Jamie Jones
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Re: NAT

Steve and FIA, you're both right!

Steve, what you are describing is the "typical" fixed network setup - much the same as if in the IP4 world, you had a block of IP4 addresses allocated to you.

What FIA is remembering is IPv6-to-IPv6 Network Prefix Translation (NPTv6), which is more or less as he/she remembers, but is designed not as a solution for home networks (obviously, there are enough IPv6 addresses around where this isn't necessary.), but for portable networks, or networks which might change provider, and/or certain multihome situations. More reasons why this would be useful are in the first link:

https://www.paloaltonetworks.com/documentation/71/pan-os/pan-os/networking/nptv6-overview

http://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc6296.txt

But yeah, as Steve described, the general experience will be with a permanently static address range - NPTv6 would have more niche uses.

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Jamie Jones
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(gosh, if only there was a technology that could perform Network Address Translation.... oh, no, sorry, some fools condemned all that because "IPv6 would fix it all"... all that stuff that's not actually broke...)

Wrong. IPv6 NAT exists, and is as easy as IPv4 NAT.

Just because some "fools" say you no longer need to NAT, you can if you want. Heck, there is also DHCP6 and IPv6 private-lan address ranges if you really want to stay old school and stick with ip4 type restrictions.

Please don't make stuff up to suit your argument, or call people fools because they understand the headaches NAT can cause. It makes you sound like Trump.

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The internet's very own Muslim ban continues: DNS overlord insists it can freeze dot-words

Jamie Jones
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Re: A few issues

It's not the country domains that were the issue - it's about someone in Europe registering a .com/.org/.net etc - Nominet has not published names and addresses of individuals on whois for .uk domains for many years before GDPR. ICANN had no fight there.

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Jamie Jones
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Happy

Point of information. That would just be a subdomain of of.islam

If you're going to be pedantic... Not necessarily.

Whilst subdomains are split on "." , the reverse isn't necessarily true: "." does not necessarily mean a subdomain split.

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Why Google won't break a sweat about EU ruling

Jamie Jones
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Re: What I want (i.e. will pay for) in my smartphone OS

I understand what you're saying, but I'm not really seeing how that adds up to rooting being a "dirty word".

Well, I simply see having root access as belonging to me, as it's my device. I feel it's as natural as buying a house and not expecting the attic to be out of bounds.

The fact many companies (and users) consider "having root access" to be dodgy is my point.

"many apps will refuse to work"

Yes, which is a hand indicator that lets me avoid inadvertently supporting companies who take such unreasonable, anti-user stances.

I agree! I dumped netflix when they brought that in. I know they did it because of the media companies, but still, they are my only point of contact where I can make a protest. I could have jumped through hoops to get around it, but if I'm paying for a service that suddenly decides my TV is "not authorised" to receive said service, then said service is cancelled with extreme predudice.

I've been lucky so far, but what happens if my bank, or any vital services follow the same path?

My point, though, was therefore, these companies think root is a bad thing (otherwise "known as a dirty word")

"some companies say rooting voids guarantee"

Which, in my opinion, is actually understandable and not disparaging of root access.

I'm not saying this in a sarcastic or insulting way, so bare with me:

I consider a phone as a hardware device / computer. And that device runs software, like a desktop computer.

If I tinker with the hardware on my desktop machine in a not-supported manner, than fair enough - if I screw up or delete the OS, then I'd expect to pay to have it fixed (if I was unable to do it myself). If I arse around with the software and there's an unrelated hardware failure, I expect the guarantee to still hold.

The same with a phone - if a user fiddles using root, and causes a bootloop, they deserve to pay if they need it fixed.

If simply having root means that if the cpu breaks for any unrelated reason, I no longer have a guarantee, then I don't feel that is right (and I'd fight my corner it if it came down to it)

Cheers for the reply!

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Jamie Jones
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Re: What I want (i.e. will pay for) in my smartphone OS

""rooting" has become a dirty word"

It has? Even though if you don't have root access, you don't have control over your own computer?

Yes, it has. I didn't say rooting was wrong - I have root on all my devices, and wouldn't get a device where it wasn't possible - I said it's become a dirty word.

People wanting 'root' are considered dubious hackers, many apps will refuse to work, some companies say rooting voids guarantee... As I said, no-one would treat your access to your desktop machine the same way, but as soon as you talk about "rooting" your phone, it's considered dubious. i.e. rooting has become a dirty word.

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Jamie Jones
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Re: What I want (i.e. will pay for) in my smartphone OS

"rooting" has become a dirty word. (No sniggering at the back, there, Australians)

"Have admin access" sounds more respectable - no company would restrict users from having administrator on their own machine!"

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Sen. Ron Wyden: Adobe Flash is doomed, why is Uncle Sam still using it?

Jamie Jones
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Mind you, there’s a few nice South Africans these days.

And that's not bloody surprising, man!

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Jamie Jones
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wave a chicken in the air

Kids....

Back in my day, there was no waving. We respectively held our chickens in the air, whilst sticking a deck-chair up our nose.

Of course, this was followed by the buying of a Jumbo Jet, and the burying of all our clothes - as was expected at the time.

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On Android, US antitrust can go where nervous EU fears to tread

Jamie Jones
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I don't agree that Android consumers have it good - I find Android the least-bad of various fairly dreadful options, and still highly inferior to Symbian. (Sure, it's entertaining to open a "terminal" window on my phone and muck about in a shell with Busybox-supplied utilities, but not really very useful.)

I'm going to appear like a bit of a contradiction now when I say that I recently bought a 'new' old-nokia as my replacement phone, because I didn't want to have a phone depending on the android or apple bullshit.

At the same time, I generally use Android on my my desktop (as I am currently!) [ Current Desktop ]

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Jamie Jones
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Some of your other points are valid, but you're totally arse-over-tit with this one:

The permanent warning "App permission management is running" to put off users trying to control the abuse of personal data.

Permission Management is in 5.1 - it's purpose is to actively *block* access by apps. When a running app. attempts to use a potential privacy-abusing function, "app permission management" is what pops up the allow/deny dialogue before the app. can proceed.

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Jamie Jones
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Happy

Yeah, but if it wasn't for location info., how else would I know that 10 horny babes within 2 miles of my home want to hook up with me?

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Core blimey! Apple macOS update lifts boot from MacBook Pro neck

Jamie Jones
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This does seem interesting...

I'm thinking of joining in..If the price is right... How much do they pay to beta test their software?

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Submarine cables at risk from sea water, boffins warn. Wait, what?

Jamie Jones
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Happy

Re: Kreskin in the Shell

Obviously, theh'll be out of phase, silly!

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Jamie Jones
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Re: Kreskin in the Shell

By then they'll have the signals going through sub-space. No latency then, even at geostationary orbits!

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Fork it! Google fined €4.34bn over Android, has 90 days to behave

Jamie Jones
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Re: " Can't wait to see the MS fine then."

Not Google Play Store. Google Play Services.

Wrong. The post I was replying to said this:

And how did you install Firefox? Through the Google Play Store almost certainly. The point of this is that without access to the play store Android is pretty much useless.

AND there's the whole "untrusted sources" thing, which you can't undo without breaking the device's security,

It's just checking one box in settings.

which trips anti-root features increasingly common in apps

No it doesn't.

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Jamie Jones
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Re: " Can't wait to see the MS fine then."

There are many alternatives to the google play store.

See: https://www.androidpit.com/best-google-play-store-alternative-app-stores

and https://fossbytes.com/10-google-play-store-alternatives/ for starters.

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Jamie Jones
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Re: Big fines are just a cost of doing big business

Indeed. They are certainly no ICANN!

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You wanna be an alpha... tester of The Register's redesign? Step this way

Jamie Jones
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Pint

Re: Setting cookie already takes JavaScript

To make it worse, the non-JS fallback doesn't show the date/time as it did, it just shows the date, which is useless when you consider that most posts in a forum are made in the same day.
Indeed, I agree. Commit from 2014 reverted and live ;)

Blimey! That was quick! I made the same moan at the time when the change was made... I didn't like the new date change code, but I remember saying "if you keep it, at least don't lose the working non-js fallback", but it fell on deaf ears..

I knew you were the BOFH worth keeping :-)

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Jamie Jones
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Re: How about...

And if the beancounters need convincing... I know I miss a lot of comments I'd usually read - I usually read all the comments on an article after reading the article, but never see any further comments - other than checking to see if anything I've written has had a reply.

If there was proper comment threading/marking/notification, I'd be reading the comments far more often, and as the hacks have already done their job at that point, any ad revenue from then on is just free money, earned from the invaluable contributions of the commentards!

My way of seeing it: If you think about the bog standard 'web forum' you have categories, containing a few forums. Within each forum, you have posts, and replies to post.

I invisage each el reg article would effectively have it's own "forum" - within that forum, you'd have the posts and replies just like in web-based forums.

Then people can follow threads, see new posts since last visit (*still threaded* - the 'see recent posts' option that exists currently kills all threading), and replies to their posts and have online or email notifications set as they see fit.

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Jamie Jones
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Re: Setting cookie already takes JavaScript

I wholeheartedly agree - we strive to ensure the basic functionality of "things" works without JS. JS provides an additional layer on top of the basic functionality.

There were a number of changes to El Reg a few years ago that disapointedly broke that philosophy.

Firstly, in the forums, the clear-to-understand date/time of a comment was changed to a javascript "x hours" or the even more horrible "x days ago". To make it worse, the non-JS fallback doesn't show the date/time as it did, it just shows the date, which is useless when you consider that most posts in a forum are made in the same day.

Second, the needless "expand comment..." - if you are paging/scrolling through the comments, it breaks the flow to have to click "expand comment" . It's not necessary - vertical scrolling is inevitable! If you do want an easy way to skip long comments, a 'skip comment' anchor href is all that is needed.

Other than that, yeah, one of the big appeals to me of the Reg is it's light and efficient design, so fair doos there.

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Jamie Jones
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Re: How about...

Yes I know they've got a grey arrow you can click on that will move the page to the comment it replies to, but that's silly - and then you have to scroll back to where you were.

Wooooooooooooooooooaaaaahhhhh! I never knew the arrow thingies had that purpose... How long have they done that for?

But yeah, a silly way to do it!

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Don't panic about domain fronting, an SNI fix is getting hacked out

Jamie Jones
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Re: Or we finally switch to IPv6

The fact IPv6 doesn't have IP address restrictions make you hate it more?

Wow.

There's absolutely no reason why you can't share IP6 addresses amongst many different hosts, but you know that.

In fact, it was only because of the lack of IP4 addresses that SNI became a thing, but you know that too.

Anyway, SNI is getting a bit of an unfair rap here, as before SNI, the requirement for unique IPv4 addresses (combined with port if you want to be pedantic) meant that you could tell a virtual server just by looking at the IP address.. SNI having the host in the clear therefore didn't compromise on any of the security at the time.

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UK privacy watchdog to fine Facebook 18 mins of profit (£500,000) for Cambridge Analytica

Jamie Jones
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Review of the impact of ICO Civil Monetary Penalties - 20140723

Interesting read:

Review of the impact of ICO Civil Monetary Penalties - 20140723 (https://ico.org.uk/media/about-the-ico/documents/1042346/review-of-the-impact-of-ico-civil-monetary-penalties.pdf (PDF)

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Sueball claims Apple broke hacking laws with iOS batt throttling code

Jamie Jones
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Re: Trespass to chattels?

Cool.

To be more precise than in my original post, it seems American companies attach more importance to the EULA, without there appearing to be too much vocal opposition.

So many times, I've had people argue with me, saying that I've agreed to something that is clearly not legal, just because it's in the EULA (and don't get me wrong, sometimes they are briish). My thoughts have been "not where I live, mate".

I'm glad you have those protections - a puty more people didn't realise - as I said, I guess the big companies have powerful media resources.

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