* Posts by diodesign

1895 posts • joined 21 Sep 2011

Apple's magical quality engineering strikes again: You may want to hold off that macOS High Sierra update...

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: devongarde

That's the latest beta. 10.13.4 is the latest "stable" release.

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Chrome 66: Get into the bin, auto-playing vids and Symantec certs!

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: So which versions carry site isolation?

They all do - just enable it in settings (article is updated with info on how to do that).

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If you guessed China’s heavy lifter failed due to a liquid hydrogen turbo engine fault, well done!

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: GrumpenKraut

It's now dealt with.

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Hello DARKNESS, my old friend. I've come to talk with you again... about a 10,000-pixel alien-hunting camera

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Megapixel-Gigapixel

Nah, 10,000.

"DARKNESS houses a 10,000 pixel (80x125) MKID array with 150 µm pixel pitch, optimized for a 0.8 µm to 1.4µm bandwidth."

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1803.10420.pdf

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Apple leak: If you leak from Apple, we'll have you arrested, says Apple

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: sanmigueelbeer

The Meltdown + Spectre stuff was kinda weird. We saw big changes to the Linux kernel for what otherwise was billed as a KASLR bypass. It didn't make much sense. A well-placed source confirmed the Windows kernel was undergoing similar changes. Then an AMD engineer referenced a speculative execution bug.

Then all the pieces fit together. It helped that some of us had written low-level MMU code. We were, back in the day, in the trenches battling firmware and kernel bugs, and knew the upcoming changes pointed to a microprocessor architecture flaw that derailed the assurances of the CPU memory access protection circuitry.

So we contacted Intel, Microsoft and others for comment ahead of time. Everyone stonewalled us. So, welp, might as well let the world know Linux + Windows kernels were undergoing massive changes internally due to an apparent chipset flaw. The rest is history.

FWIW Intel has now hired an external PR firm to handle El Reg. And they are professional, former wire reporters, and push to get our questions answered, which is appreciated.

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diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: embargoes

Yeah, there are a ton of embargoes in the tech world. Some other journos might be given new gadgets to review under embargo to a certain date - usually the launch date, so when the announcement goes out, all the reviews go live.

The whole thing can be icky if you're essentially propelling a marketing campaign.

Do we do stuff under embargo? Not going to bullshit you: yes, from time to time. Real example: a chip company has a day or two of technical briefings on architecture features and designs, under embargo that lifts a week later. That gives hacks a week to write a decent technical deep-dive, ask questions, get answers, without trying to rush and race each other to be first. Generally, it produces better technical pieces if the writer is careful to leave out the spin + marketing claims.

Another real example: a vulnerability is found, journalist is tipped off with an embargo that lifts when the fix is out. No point dropping a zero-day on the world when there's no exploit code in the wild. Better to reveal the flaw when a patch is ready, unless it is under active attack - in which case, the cat is out the bag and ppl need to be alerted to mitigations and threats.

If you're the kind of journo who feels obliged to kiss a vendor's ass because it gave you a heads up, you'll get more stuff under embargo and do more ass kissing. If you're like El Reg and, in the words of a PR at one big IT name, "go off script all the time", then you tend not to get invited to embargoed launches, etc.

So, yeah, we do some stuff under embargo if it makes a better package for readers, not to suit someone's marketing launch.

Another real example: an El Reg vulture was told under embargo that a mid-level IT supplier was about to buy a startup. Then the embargo was pushed back a few days, then again to a yet-to-be-decided date, meaning the story couldn't run at all without breaking the embargo. The vulture separately learned of the acquisition through two other sources, while the companies were stalling and ironing out the press announcement stuff.

So, we broke the embargo and ran the story early based on the separate info we got. We weren't going to let a now vague embargo put the kibosh on reporting. Embargoes are informal deals, not legal agreements. If you break them, you don't get them again. Sometimes that's no bad thing.

PS: The footie embargoes are for newspaper print and evening telly deadlines. If a player gives a set of interviews for the next morning's papers or that night's sports shows, they all agree to hold back the coverage until the agreed time so that it's not a rushed frenzy free for all.

Embargoes can be useful for logistics and giving ppl time to prepare a decent package. Relying on embargoed info or falling into the trap of helping a multinational make more money, not so much.

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Tried checking under the sofa? Indian BTC exchange Coinsecure finds itself $3.5m lighter

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Who's been using one of those funny CPUs?

Yup – we cocked up in the rush to the pub on a Friday. Funny story: if you plug "438.318 BTC in USD" into Google, it treats that as 438,318 BTC, hence the massive number in the story.

It was caught and fixed up as soon as it was spotted. If you see anything wrong, please let us know by email straight away so it can be address: drop a note to corrections@theregister.com. Ta.

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Great Western Railway warns of great Western password reuse: Brits told to reset logins

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: "Does anyone have a clue as to what is happening here?"

Yes, as the GWR person explained, people were reusing passwords from other websites, which were hacked and their login details presumably leaked to the dark web, allowing crooks to gain access to their GWR accounts.

Let's say you use mycheapbikesexample.com to buy bicycle stuff, and GWR.com, with the same username and password pair. And mycheapbikesexample.com gets hacked and the username and password database stolen. If crooks can figure out your username-password combo from that DB, they can try it on other sites and eventually log in as you, on GWR.com, if you've reused your credentials.

It's called credential stuffing, it's automated these days, and it's why you should use a unique password per-site and also two-factor authentication.

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Boffins find new ways to slurp private info from Facebook addicts using precision-targeted ads

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Hold on a moment..

People exploiting that low minimum won't be hiring copywriters. They'll be mining for personal information.

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Donkey Wrong: Arcade legend Billy Mitchell booted from record books amid MAME row

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Bah!

Good lord, is that a Pixels reference?

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El Reg needs you – to help build an automated beer-transporting robot

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: "shared collaboration space"

We're not in Shoreditch. We're using WeWork in Sydney, San Francisco and London (Gray's Inn Road, Camden).

In each location, we have our own private walled-off offices with our own desks, phones, Ethernet, etc, adjoining a shared space that has stuff like coffee, tea, biscuits/cookies, beer, cider, wine, kitchen, sofas, etc.

Well, except in California. They took away our alcohol :(

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German sauna drags punters to court over naked truth

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Big John

"Wait, so you guys actually earn less on non-IT stories?"

The Bootnotes are a bit of fun. They're not the focus of our ad team. They're not even a traffic driver - stuff like cloud services going wrong, scandals, security cockups, operating system bugs, and so on, bring in the millions of netizens.

"And if you get just a bit too raunchy, those big advertisers will shy away"

That's not how it works. We sell ad space next to IT stories to IT vendors and providers. These companies want to reach technology workers, and show off their wares and solutions to folks in the industry, so that's why they direct their advertising there. Sometimes, advertisers will run their ads across the whole site. It's really up to them.

The Bootnotes are a side channel of amusement. Advertisers know these off-topic stories are part of the site's charm and heritage. If you're flogging an SDN switch, you probably want that to appear next to networking articles for maximum relevant eyeballs. OTOH you might want to run your ad sitewide. Whatever the advertiser and our ad team strike a deal on; us journalists aren't thinking about it.

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diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Big John

"Allegedly titillating articles like this one draw in a much larger crowd of eyeballs, enhancing ad revenues greatly"

This is a common misconception. Our main advertising is aimed at people coming to read the enterprise IT tech stuff. Ads that run alongside Bootnotes are mainstream and thus low CPM. We do Bootnotes stories to offer some light amusement, and keep to our tabloid roots.

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diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Stamp it out.

"Just what has this News got to do with Technology or Science?"

Nothing, which is why it's in Bootnotes. Bootnotes are off-topic fun for writers who need a break from writing about computers, software, bugs, companies, and other tech stuff. There is more to life than IT, and we're happy to provide some light relief for readers who don't want to stare at specifications.

Amusingly, I think you're the same Stuart who ran the Acorn Cybervillage way back in the day, when I ran Acorn news site Drobe, and we clashed even back then.

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My Tibetan digital detox lasted one morning, how about yours?

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Where can I get the Cool "The Reg Mug"?

Right now they are a very limited edition item. Maybe one day we'll bring back Cash'n'Carrion, our Reg merch store.

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How machine-learning code turns a mirror on its sexist, racist masters

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Mathematical modelling of sterotypes?

"Isn't this mostly what you'd expect?"

Yes, but the point is: don't let old stereotypes interfere with your future code's decisions.

Also, it's an interesting way to study how stereotypes have changed over time.

"I'd be more interested in if anything has actually changed over the years."

Oh Jesus. That's like, half the story explaining it has. Does anyone read the articles?

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Furious gunwoman opens fire at YouTube HQ, three people shot

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: dmacleo

"huh odd how you didn't mention female wearing headscarf. almost as if you were afraid of providing description."

We've been providing updates throughout the afternoon as soon as we were able to confirm them, rather than spread rumor and gossip. We've included details of the suspected shooter.

"also. no fatalities as of this time. odd how that wasn't in article either."

One fatality: the gunwoman. And other injuries were reported accurately.

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Elon Musk's mighty erection fires sperm at orbiting space station

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: LOHAN

LOHAN was overseen by long-term El Reg staffer Lester Haines.

As far as I understand/can recall: the device used a rocket motor that couldn't be legally launched in Europe, so it had to go to the United States for firing. It required a permit from the US aviation watchdog, the FAA, however officials couldn't decide how to classify it - whether it was a drone or a rocket.

They were busy rewriting the rules for drones at the time, and seemed hesitant to make a decision before the new regulations were approved, which had all sorts of politics attached to it. So LOHAN was somewhat lost in federal government's bureaucracy.

In 2016, Lester died, dealing us all a blow in more ways than one. The project has been in stasis since, although not forgotten. We've got our hands on the kit again. There may be movement soon.

See here and here and here.

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Why you shouldn't trust a stranger's VPN: Plenty leak your IP addresses

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: So ElReg what are you reporting this crap for.

Wtf are you on about?

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diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: VPN providers

Hi. I think the piece is pretty clear we're talking about the VPN providers not the underlying encryption tech- especially since we recommend experienced users try openvpn or ipsec.

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diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: disabling WebRTC

Hi. It's pretty clear in the piece that you should disable WebRTC. It's not the first time we've highlighted the dangers of WeRTC either.

Also, in addition to this: don't trust your VPN provider.

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diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Tautological tautology

Sometimes, we occasionally break the language from time to time for laughs and to sporadically irritate pedants, but only once in a while.

However, we've thought of a better headline, so now it's your comment that is the redundant text.

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Microsoft patches patch for Meltdown bug patch: Windows 7, Server 2008 rushed an emergency fix

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: aregross

I don't believe there are any 32-bit Meltdown/Spectre patches from Microsoft. 32-bit is SoL.

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Running Drupal? You need to patch, patch, patch right now!

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: erm patch for D6 I don't think is right

I absolutely hate this. Absolutely hate it. People are freaking out about Drupal 6, when the security team officially supports 7 and 8. I'm seeing all sorts of links to weird pages claiming they have patches for D6. I absolutely hate the idea of sending people to unofficial security fixes. The damage possible is obvious.

I think I've got the patch link right now. Should be this one https://www.drupal.org/node/2955130

Use entirely at your own risk.

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New Forum Wishlist - but read roadmap first

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"Does that mean posting at different times gets me judged under different laws?"

No. We're judged by the jurisdiction where any action is brought against us.

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diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: Feature request: Mod rejection reason

Generally not a great idea to state without caveats that a company has stolen IP from another company when they settled out of court.

99.99% they are not going to sue over an article comment, but it's always the ones you least suspect that end up triggering a legal headache.

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Software gremlin robs Formula 1 world champ of season's first win

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: So many mistakes in the article

The point we were trying to make is that although Vettel was technically in the lead, he had yet to pit so wasn't really 1st. Due to the timing cockup for Hamilton, Vettel was able to unexpectedly secure that lead.

I've tweaked the piece to make it clearer.

Don't forget to email corrections@theregister.com if you spot anything wrong - those go to the top of our todo list, whereas we don't have time to check every comment.

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diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Patrick R

The point we were trying to make is that although Vettel was ahead of Hamilton, the Ferrari driver had yet to pit so wasn't really 1st. However, due to the timing cockup, Vettel was able to maintain pole position anyway.

I've tweaked the article to make it clearer.

Don't forget to email corrections@theregister.com if you spot anything you think is wrong. We see those instantly, whereas we don't have time to read through every comment - there are thousands a month.

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NASA stalls $8bn James Webb Space Telescope again – this time to 2020

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: WillC

"Didn't they remember Mister Scott's secret?"

Spock, it's a joke.

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FCC boss to block 'national security risk' companies (cough, Huawei, ZTE) from US's $8.5bn broadband pot

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Used to, as in...

"I used to do drugs.

"I still do, but I used to, too."

–– Mitch Hedberg

18
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The Register Lecture: The Secret Spitfires

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Adolph Hitler????

It's fixed - please email corrections@theregister.com if you spot any issues. Sometimes typos and whatnot slip through.

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Prof Stephen Hawking's ashes will be interred alongside Sir Isaac Newton, Charles Darwin

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: 'Physics ace'

Black-hole brainiac? Cosmic connoisseur? Battery-backed boffin?

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The Register Lecture: How to build your own tractor beam

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

It's been fixed! Sorry about that.

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Uber breaks self-driving car record: First robo-ride to kill a pedestrian

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: bike or not

"Why is there a broken bike at the scene?"

Not sure at the moment - it could have nothing to do with it, and the reporter on the scene assumed it was.

Edit: She was walking her bike across the road.

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diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: bike or not

An initial report said it was a cyclist, but then the story was updated to say pedestrian.

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It's begun: 'First' IPv6 denial-of-service attack puts IT bods on notice

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"an IPv6 project team is brought in or created specifically to do an IPv6 project"

Yup. IPv6 is hacked on as an afterthought. Not at all orgs, but quite a few, it seems.

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Equifax peeks under couch, finds 2.4 million more folk hit by breach

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: elvisimprsntr

From the linked-to statement:

"Equifax was able to identify approximately 2.4 million U.S. consumers whose names and partial driver's license information were stolen, but who were not in the previously identified affected population discussed in the company's prior disclosures about the incident."

HTH

C.

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Martian microbes may just be resting – boffins

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: TDahl

Cool, but the story's not wrong FYI.

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Virgin Media's Brit biz broadband goes TITSUP: Total Inability To Support Upset People

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Leased lines

Given it allegedly involves a corrupted database, used to authenticate subscribers, I'm not surprised it affects non-leased lines.

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Stunning infosec tips from Uncle Sam, furries exposed, Chase bank web leak, and more

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: furries

I think you're nitpicking a little - or reading too much into a simplified description, simplified for brevity.

I've tweaked that part to try to keep everyone happy.

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diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: El Reg published, "...shit down."

We really need to lay off the Friday martinis :(

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diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Amos1

Argh, ok. Apologies. It was a case of a missing word "not" from the article's sentence, rather than deliberate misinformation or someone not reading the doc.

It's fixed. Thanks.

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diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: Perhaps someone needs to read the 2018 SEC guidance a bit closer...

"I feel like this article is not quite up to the Reg's usual bar of quality, what with the copious spelling and grammatical errors and misinformation."

Argh, ok, we'll go back over it. It was a Friday afternoon piece - but that's no excuse.

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2
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BBC Telly Tax heavies got pat on the head from snoopers' overseers

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Sam Therapy

It's fixed - by "uses a television," we meant watching live telly.

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2
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Huawei guns for Apple with Mac-alike Matebook X

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Phil W

Just like software written by professionals has bugs, articles written and edited by professionals have errors from time to time. It's fixed.

As for the Intel U/M thing. It's a Kaby Lake R Intel Core M part, but has a U in the part name. Because Intel.

From the official spec sheet, the 8550U is a Kaby Lake R part as opposed to a Kaby Lake U or a Skylake U.

Chipzilla's naming of stuff drives me bonkers.

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diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: How do they do it ?

It's been fixed - drop corrections@theregister.com an email if you spot anything wrong.

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The YouTube crackdown on fake news: Promoting bonkers Florida school shooting conspiracies

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: Robert Mueller is a neo-Mccarthyist

"For which he quickly apologised."

Well, it was a load of corporate spin.

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diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Robert Mueller is a neo-Mccarthyist

"The majority of the Russian ad spend happened AFTER the election"

Yeah, something like 56% after, 44% before.

Fact-Checking a Facebook Executive’s Comments on Russian Interference

A Reg reader falling for a SV exec's spin? Oh my days.

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Hot NAND: Samsung wheels out 30TB SSD monster

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: nate1981

Yes - it's a 3.5" drive.

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James Damore's labor complaint went over about as well as his trash diversity manifesto

diodesign
(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: controversial bro-grammer ?

"Is there a way to filter out all SJW insanity that comes from San Francisco based The Register team ?"

Yeah, stop reading us.

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