* Posts by diodesign

2489 posts • joined 21 Sep 2011

Railway cables overpowered errant drone's compass and flung it back to terra firma

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Order of magnitude error

Thanks - that's been fixed. Please drop us a note via email corrections@theregister.co.uk if you spot anything wrong so it can be addressed immediately and not a day later when we get round to reading comments.

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Forget BYOD, this is BYOVM: Ransomware tries to evade antivirus by hiding in a virtual machine on infected systems

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Use of SMBv1 for XP compat may be at the core

FWIW the files are shared between host and guest through vboxsf, VirtualBox's shared folder driver. There's no SMB involved TTBOMK. If a network share is mapped to the host, it can be accessed by the guest via vboxsf.

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UK MPs to off-payroll workers: Delay IR35 reforms until 2023? You wish

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"I am constantly surprised"

We've cleared up a few things in the article, and added a fact box we'll use in future pieces.

Don't forget to email corrections@theregister.co.uk if you spot anything wrong so we can fix up issues immediately.

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diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Wording

Thanks - we've tweaked the wording of the article to make it clearer and added a fact box we'll use in future articles.

Don't forget to email corrections@theregister.co.uk if you spot anything wrong so we can fix up issues immediately.

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Apple, Google begin to spread pro-privacy, batt-friendly coronavirus contact-tracing API for phone apps

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Have you looked before complaining?

Under Google + Apple rules, there can be only one app operating in a region using the API so it'll be grayed out in the UK until the NHS plugs into it.

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Remember when Securus was sued for recording 14,000 calls between prison inmates and lawyers? It just settled

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: "selling location data"

It's worse than that. It's everyone. Read the linked-to article:

"An American telco that provides costly phone services to prisoners has been accused of harvesting location data on American phone users – and selling it to the police with no oversight.

"That's all citizens, by the way, not just prisoners. Securus sold details of where you have been in the States, based on your phone's location, to the cops."

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Tech's Volkswagen moment? Trend Micro accused of cheating Microsoft driver QA by detecting test suite

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Petty or Pedant?

No, you're just wrong.

Duck tape is an alternative spelling of duct tape. Duck tape came before duct tape.

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Attorney General: We didn't need Apple to crack terrorist's iPhones – tho we still want iGiant to do it in future

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Apple told The Register - ????

Nah, they like to pretend half the time we don't exist, and we like to pretend they totally hate and ignore us. If it suits Apple, they'll respond. If it's us picking apart their tech or decisions, it's the silent treatment - which has never stopped us before.

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Feguson's Crap Imperial College Model

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Feguson's Crap Imperial College Model

Ach, the review is a wee bit bollocks. There's no smoking gun in the science of the model nor the math - just gripes about quality.

If someone who is an expert in modeling pandemics can point out a flaw, great, otherwise it's grousing about code smells.

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Now there's nothing stopping the PATRIOT Act allowing the FBI to slurp web-browsing histories without a warrant

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"No it won't"

Sigh. I knew if we didn't mention HTTPS and DNS-over-HTTPS, we'll get moaned at, and if we do include HTTPS and DoH, we'll get moaned at.

Sure, if you use Cloudflare or Google for DoH, the Feds can request it. That's obvious. But then someone will say they're using DoH through their custom VPS in Laos over Tor, so nerr-nerr. That's why the article said tunneling and DoH would work "to some degree."

There was a whole part at the end discussing the situation but it started to feel like an article within an article so I cut it. I've added a summary for those who need to know what "to some degree" means.

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There's Norway you're going to believe this: Government investment fund conned out of $10m in cyber-attack

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Yup, we f'ked that one up royally. Lessons have been learned - the article's been corrected.

Don't forget to email corrections@theregister.co.uk if you spot anything wrong - we'll get those complaints immediately without having to read every comment.

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Meteorite's tiny secrets reveal Solar System's sodium-rich, alkaline liquid past – a clue to formation of life

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: sorry to be pedantic

Ah, you know what we mean, tsk.

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Sadly, 111 in this story isn't binary. It's decimal. It's the number of security fixes emitted by Microsoft this week

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: To paraphrase Yoda ...

Done - thanks for the heads up.

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CEO of AI surveillance upstart Banjo walks the plank after white supremacist past sinks contracts

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"lunging at a man carrying a gun"

What the hell was he doing jumping out of a truck with a gun in his hand, armed buddy in tow, confronting an unarmed stranger? Riddle me that.

What was the jogger supposed to do, stand there and get shot? Run off?

This could have been avoided - by not getting out of a car armed.

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Total Eclipse to depart: Open-source software foundation is hopping the pond to Europe

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"communist socialist Silicon Valley"

The same "communist socialist" valley that has incredible wealth inequality and nothing in the way of a social safety net?

wtf_am_i_reading.jpg

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Mad dash for webcams with surge in videoconferencing has turned out rather nicely for Logitech

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: long-term secular trends driving our business

It's investment jargon:

"A secular trend, stock or market is one that is likely to continue moving in the same direction for the foreseeable future."

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If you miss the happier times of the 2000s, just look up today's SCADA gear which still has Stuxnet-style holes

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Missing the point, maybe

"It doesn't look like a big deal for several reason"

Who said it was? We're saying the security stuff from the 2000s is still a thing now.

"One is that they essentially had to comprise the Windows PC being used"

Yeah, as the article says at the top. The point Trustwave's trying to make, and I guess we are, too, is that, no, this isn't acceptable. The industry should do better. I know all the excuses why not.

Or let me put it another way: you obviously know a lot about how SCADA works, which is cool. But next time a plant gets hacked, and people say, 'how could this happen?' they can be referred to this article and research. This is how it happens.

I totally appreciate that once you get into the Windows PC connected to the controller, it's virtually game over.

But sometimes the obvious has to be pointed out.

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Source code for seminal adventure game Zork circa-1977 exhumed from MIT tapes, plonked on GitHub

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Odd? We already had this?

This appears to be an earlier 1977 version, as the article notes, not the wildly distributed version.

The file trees are not quite the same, for one thing.

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MediaTek formally pulls open G85 SoC drawer, reveals chipset for next-gen budget blowers

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: big.LITTLE

Nope, Arm calls it big.LITTLE to, er, I think show that the little cores make an impact.

https://www.arm.com/why-arm/technologies/big-little

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UK finds itself almost alone with centralized virus contact-tracing app that probably won't work well, asks for your location, may be illegal

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: “updated to add”

This is a constantly evolving story with more information emerging on a daily and hourly basis, and we've revised our analysis of it. The background mode on iOS is limited - and the NHS's use of it looks problematic.

The FT reports the NHS is considering switching to the Apple-Google API after tests show the iOS app falls into listen-only mode (as we first reported) after a while. A passing Android is needed to wake it up (as we first reported).

Of course, we want to be right first time, that's our number one goal. Bear in mind this is a complex technical and political hot potato that's shifting position all the time.

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The Register's radioactive key rings

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: The Register's radioactive key rings

Hey I do - back when I bought one as a reader. It's attached to my keys and still glowing enough that I can see it in my bag or hanging on the wall in the dark, which is handy.

When I bought one I thought it was just glow-in-the-dark watch paint and the radioactive stuff was a tongue-in-cheek Reg gimmick. Turns out it's true. We're carrying a little bit of tritium, a nuclear weapon ingredient.

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Assange should be furloughed from Belmarsh prison, says human rights org. Here's a thought: He could stay with friends!

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"Where did you get that 'flight' fantasy ??"

Flight risk is not literally a flight as in aircraft flight risk - it means going somewhere else when you've been told to stay in a certain place. The Cambridge dictionary defines it as:

"someone who has been accused of a crime and is considered likely to try to escape out of the country or area before their trial begins."

Julian was told to stay at his bail address in the English countryside, but took off to the embassy in London.

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Red Hat’s new CEO on surviving inside Big Blue: 'We don’t participate in IBM's culture. It’s that simple'

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"Bit of an advertorial"

Few thoughts:

* It's Red Hat Summit (virtually) so RH makes its CEO available to journos, and here we are.

* If Canonical and Suse want to be interviewed, they know where to find us.

* If you don't see us interview someone, it's unlikely we don't care - it's more likely they don't want to be interviewed by us.

On more than occasion, a PR has asked me, "what do I need to do to get my client into The Reg?" And my response is: "You should be keeping your client out of The Reg."

Also, if you've been following Kieren's work, let alone the rest of the site, for a while, you'll know editorial doesn't really do the whole ass-kissing thing in tech.

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Long after Linux, Windows Server Containers finally arrive on Microsoft's Azure Kubernetes Service

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"I am surprised 'register' has not banned you yet"

Uh no, this isn't North Korea. Everyone has the right to respect and disrespect whichever vendor they want.

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CFOs are crossing fingers and hoping a second wave of COVID-19 does not appear, says Gartner

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: If the CFO's are worried

Bob, take it easy, please. When your comments start to look like modem line noise, it's time to step away from the keyboard.

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Happy birthday, ARM1. It is 35 years since Britain's Acorn RISC Machine chip sipped power for the first time

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Video

The first guy presenting, Mike, is Mike Muller – co-founder and, up until very recently, chief technology officer of Arm. He collared me mid-pint at an event in Silicon Valley a couple of years back, and yes, it was about a flippant Register headline about Arm. At least he saw the funny side of it.

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diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: Thanks for this.

SimCity 2000 for Acorn/RISC OS has the best music of all the ports. It just blows everything else out of the water.

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diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"All issues with management blobs etc. aside, this is a bit debatable IMO"

There aren't any management blobs I'm aware of for off-the-shelf implementations: all the bootloader stuff is open-source.

As for desktop Linux - I said it was capable of running the OS, not that it's perfected it. Here's a way to get a system running with PCIe. You can boot a terminal-level Linux on lots of available RV soft and hard cores.

If you think I'm ignorant of RV's issues, you're mistaken, sadly. I can list a few. The dev boards right now are relatively expensive for anything greater than a microcontroller, and your best bet is a soft core on an FPGA. The extension system is dangerously close to going down the route of MIPS with lots of wacky variants. There is no common ecosystem a la Arm Linux. The ISA isn't perfect: I've written RV32/64 assembly code, so I'm aware of the awkwardness at times. Swapping endianness in a 32-bit word, for example, requires a surprising number of instructions.

It's a young architecture that has various kinks to work out. However, it took Arm an age to get to desktop level, and with standards on the server side, so I'm willing to see how this specification and ecosystem grows.

Is RISC-V going to take over the world right now. No. Could it later? Possibly.

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diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"Not sure why El Reg keeps only highlighting RISC-V as the One True ARM/x86 Killer"

It's not going to kill x86, let's be honest nor is it going to outright kill Arm. It poses a threat to the latter's dominance, though.

We mention RISC-V because: Arm's CEO once said, in a meeting in which this hack was present, that RISC-V keeps Arm "on its toes." Arm has responded to RISC-V with various licensing programs that reduce the upfront cost, and also briefly tried to smear RV with a weird attack website. That, to us, signals it's a headache for Arm.

There are other open CPU architectures, sure, but look, OpenRISC for whatever reason didn't excite the industry nor did OpenPower.

RISC-V is backed by Google, Nvidia, Samsung, Western Digital, and more. They are all using it in chips where they could have used Arm. That's why we mention RISC-V. And I speak as someone who is fond of all open architectures, not just RV, and had a soft spot for Arm BITD.

"it's not currently a serious threat to all but the smallest ARM designs in reality."

The RISC-V implementations coming out of China, at least, are Cortex-5x or Cortex-A7x-grade, if the numbers are to be believed. SiFive's U and E-series RV implementations are not competing against "the smallest" Arm designs, either: the U-series features a quad-core 64-bit SoC (with a management CPU core) capable of running desktop Linux.

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From attacked engineers to a crypto-loving preacher with a questionable CV: Yep, it's still very much 5G silly season

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"What is the scientific founding of your statement ?"

There is none. You're trying to find logic and rationality where none exists.

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Sophos XG firewalls hacked, hotfix ready. Texts wreck Apple iThings. Yup, business as usual in infosec world

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"calculations in an office are not done on a graphics card"

It's not about calculations - it's about malware on a machine modulating the shader engine clock to emit RF that you can pick up nearby, jumping any airgaps. And as the article says, interesting but not terribly practical.

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IBM Watson GPU cloud cluster Brexits from London to Frankfurt – because GDPR

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: English please

It's a flippant headline. The headline's there to make you click and read.

IBM Watson GPU cloud cluster Brexits from London to Frankfurt – because GDPR ---> An IBM Watson-hosted GPU cluster is Brexit'ing from London to Frankfurt due to GDPR.

Brexit'ing being a made-up verb for something happening to do with Brexit.

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diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Presumably that only applies to UK users

Hm, I dunno - the third country thing is all about *transfers* of data. Come 2021, Euro customers won't be able to transfer personal data to the UK to process, so the cluster has to move to Europe.

The data already there... is already there.

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Keen to go _ExtInt? LLVM Clang compiler adds support for custom width integers

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: "transistor layouts for FPGAs"

Xilinx (for one) sells a C compiler for FPGAs - you can absolutely write logic in C and compile into a design language using today's tools. Heck, you can even use Python these days (with nMigen).

I know of one UK startup that's made a toolchain that compiles Go down to Verilog for FPGAs in Azure.

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Spyware maker NSO can't claim immunity, Facebook lawyers insist – it's time to face the music

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"I can find nothing about the NSO Group having US offices"

NSO has a US presence, just about - it is a bit flimsy. From the original complaint, according to Facebook:

"NSO Group had a marketing and sales arm in the United States called WestBridge Technologies, Inc. "

Also:

"Between 2014 and February 2019, NSO Group obtained financing from a San Francisco–based private equity firm, which ultimately purchased a controlling stake in NSO Group."

Then there was some rearranging of ownership.

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GCC 10 gets security bug trap. And look what just fell into it: OpenSSL and a prod-of-death flaw in servers and apps

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: El Reg (or the readership) really has changed

As our readership expands - and it has done lately - we have developers (and non-developers) following us with a wide range of ability. Some know C/C++. Some know JavaScript and Python. Some have never touched GCC and are pure Windows developers.

I edited that sentence in to throw a bone to those thinking, 'wtf is GCC 10'. Sometimes people need their memory jogged. Articles that are focused on specific tools, like Docker or Powershell, don't need reminders like this. Articles that have a potential wide appeal may have a line or two explaining the toolchains involved.

If I don't put these in, I get accused of alienating potential new readers. If I do put them in, I get accused of dumbing down the site.

We don't think you're dumb. But I don't want to assume everyone knows what GCC is.

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I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Light-powered nanocardboard robots dancing in the Martian sky searching for alien life

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"third of a milligram"

They weigh a third of a milligram each, but can carry up to ten times their weight. So the payload would be more than a third of a milligram.

Also bear in mind, as usual, this is lab experiment / prototype stuff, not final production. The first transistor was pretty crap compared to what came after.

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Singapore's corona-crushing superhero squad grounded by football fans

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: change.org petition found 900 Liverpool fans willing to sign up

I've moved the picture into the main part of the article - it's now clickable.

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In Rust we trust? Yes, but we want better tools and wider usage, say devs

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"horrendous for performance in practice when dealing with read only data."

If you're just reading data with threads, the compiler realizes this, and you can share without a mutex. Rust has a concept of mutability. You declare a variable mutable (writable) or immutable (read only). Multiple threads can access an immutable variable without a lock.

If you want it to be mutable, you need a lock.

Rust is really cool.

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diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"vim, make, gcc, gdb, strace etc"

I mean, you are using an IDE, it's just rather loosely integrated.

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AMD takes another crack at Intel's server stronghold with more Epyc silicon

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Typo surely 8 core low end, 24 core middle and 16 high end ?

That's the way AMD's done it: in terms of pricing, at least, the 8-core part is the cheapest, the 24-core is the middle, and the 16-core one is the high-end. The expensive one also has more L3 cache and faster core clocks.

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BepiColombo probe swings by Earth on way to Mercury – the Solar System's must-visit coronavirus-free resort

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: It is incredible

I know, right?

As an idiot in his 20s, I quit electronic engineering, where projects were six months to two years away from design to manufacture, for newspaper journalism, where articles were 30 minutes to three hours away from filing to editing, layout, and printing, because it was more exciting.

A relative works for an automaker and she talks of one to three year lead times for minor design changes.

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Watch out, everyone, here come the Coronavirus Cops, enjoying their little slice of power way too much

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"Now they are your best friends? sigh..."

I'm referring to the CDC, yes.

"spend all your time moaning about how much they upset you"

If by moaning, you mean standing up to government and power - tech or otherwise - and scrutinizing it, then yes, we do moan a lot.

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diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: Wear face protection?

Also worth pointing out that Los Angeles has mandated essential business workers wear masks and customers must wear masks.

In the San Francisco Bay Area / Silicon Valley, masks are frequently worn now. It's even recommended by the federal government, which is saying something given the political side of all this.

This virus is no joke. California, population 40m, has got it under control through clear and well-defined early lockdowns, and cases may peak the middle of next week, well within hospital resources, depending on what model you follow. It may peak next month, but again, within resources. Which is more than you can say about the east coast.

I don't say this to gloat. I say it to mean there is value in locking down as early as possible and sitting tight. San Francisco closed all essential stores at 8pm, for instance. It sucks for everyone - I've donated cash to my local bartenders, via gofundme, to keep them going because they are among the tens or hundreds of thousands in the region screwed by this. I know most people are screwed by this thing. You really don't want to catch it, above all else.

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diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"Where does it say that on the official advice, or did you just make that one up?"

Source:

Use of Cloth Face Coverings to Help Slow the Spread of COVID-19

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Who's essential right now? Medicos, of course. Food producers, natch. And in Singapore social media workers have made the list

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: While here in the states

Lest anyone think we here at The Reg are left commie anti-conservative bastards, this comment has been reported by a few users but I've allowed it to stand because... it's Bob's opinion (and hyperbole).

We try to be even handed in the comments as possible.

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Give us a reason... not to buy a new handset? Samsung back-ports Galaxy S20 photo features to Galaxy 10 range

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: "the ability to create customer photo filters"

Thanks - fixed. Don't forget to email corrections@theregister.co.uk if you spot anything wrong.

Also, we're incredibly stressed out, and an incredibly small team - small errors will creep through. Drop us a line if you see them, and we'll fix them.

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Please, just stop downloading apps from unofficial stores: Android users hit with 'unkillable malware'

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"and assume root privilege"

No, it has to exploit security holes in Android 6 and 7, which are old and out of date, to achieve root.

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If you use Twitter with Firefox in a shared computer account, you may have slightly spilled some private data on that PC

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

The media content of direct messages and probably stuff like birthdays.

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Capita inks deal with NHS to 'bring back staff': Workers get an hour of training to recruit and vet retired doctors, nurses

diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Furloughed staff

We already reported on it - see the 'Read more' box I've added to the story.

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