* Posts by bjr

62 posts • joined 16 Sep 2011

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Micro Focus offloads Linux-wrangler SUSE for a cool $2.5bn

bjr

Makes no sense

Is there a mistake in the reported price? It makes no sense to pay $2.3B for a 25 year old company with revenues of $164M, it makes even less sense for an also ran like SUSE. Redhat is trading at 8.25X revenues, at that multiple SUSE would be worth $1.3B. But SUSE isn't Redhat, it's 1/18th the size of Redhat, it's essentially irrelevant and has zero potential to disrupt anything so you would expect a much lower multiple, frankly I think the price is too high by 10X.

11
7

Google gives its $1m Turing prize to, er, top Google bods: RISC men Hennessy, Patterson

bjr

Silicon valley view of the world

Hennessy and Patterson got all of the credit for RISC but there were others who preceded them. The IBM 801 project, which lead to PowerPC, was built before either the MIPS or SPARC chips, I remember reading the 801 papers in late 1982 and thinking that they were doing the correct thing. However before any of them there was Seymour Cray who was the original proponent of simple architectures. Cray machines weren't Reduced Instruction Set Computers because he had never complicated them in the first place. The CDC 6600 and the Cray 1 were examples of minimal instruction set machines, the CDC 6600 was contemporaneous with the IBM 360, the machine that could be considered the first CISC machine. There were other simple instruction set machines in the 60s and early 70s, the DEC PDP8 and the Data General Nova, both design by Ed DeCastro, however those machines were simple by necessity, cost was the driving factor which at the time meant simple. Cray's machines were simple as a matter of philosophy, they were designed to be the fastest computers in the world and the way Cray achieved that was by using very simple instruction sets and running them at very high clock rates (for the time).

4
0

Google's answer to the Pixel 2 XL CRT-style screen burn in: Lower the brightness

bjr

It's a great phone

I have a Pixel 2XL and all this whining about the display is nonsense. The blue shift is a complete non-issue, it only occurs when you look at the phone at an extreme tilt, it doesn't exist when you look at the phone at a normal angle. This time of year we don't have much sun where I live but people on the forums who live in sunnier climes report that they can read the display in bright sunlight, a little blue shift because of a polarizer is a great tradeoff for the ability to see the display in the sun.

As for the colors, they are great. When I first got it they looked washed out but I've since install the 8.1 beta and now the display looks fine. Comparing my Pixel2XL to my Nexus 6P side by side, I don't see any significant difference, if anything I like the 2XL a little better. All other aspects of the 2XL are as good as everyone says. The photos and videos are fantastic. Android Auto is much more reliable than it was on my Nexus 6P. Another really important feature is that it works great as a phone. Nobody every mentions phone calls in the reviews which is strange because these things are called phones, but the voice quality and the ability to hold a call is vastly better then it was on my Nexus 6P, that maybe due to Verizon having treated the 6P as a step child because they didn't sell it, or it might be that the Pixel 2XL really is that much better, but it's night and day better.

One more thing, why would anyone want to have physical nav buttons? they are a complete waste of space. My 2 year old Nexus 6P didn't have nav buttons and it doesn't show any burn in, neither did my 4 year old Nexus 5.

3
12

Paris nightclub red-faced after booze-for-boobs offer exposed

bjr

Phony story

Everything about this story sounds phony. Polaroids in 2017, where would you buy the film? A Paris bar, maybe Salt Lake City but not Paris. The beaches in France have been nude since the 1950s, it's doubtful that the bartenders would bother offer anything for a simple tit flash in Paris and even if they did why would the management feel a need to apologize?

5
2

Concorde without the cacophony: NASA thinks it's cracked quiet supersonic flight

bjr

BS

The Boeing SST was canceled because of environmental reasons, specifically SSTs damage the ozone layer. It was also clear that they were going to be white elephants. The airlines didn't want them, they wanted the 747. France and Britain had to hold a gun to the heads of their flag carriers to get them to take the Concorde, eventually they just gave them the aircraft.

4
9

Ex-Waymo engineer pleads the 5th in ongoing Uber law fight

bjr

His stock will all go back to Uber

IP indemnification is standard in any contract there are surely clauses in the purchase contract for his company that not only stated that his company had full rights to everything that they sold to Uber but also requires the officers of the company to support Uber in any litigation that might arise. Even if he's innocent of stealing Waymo's code there is no dispute that he refused an order from a judge in the Waymo-Uber lawsuit. Uber will demand all of the stock and other payments that he received from the purchase of his company, he'll undoubtedly fight that but he'll lose because his violation of the contract is absolutely clear.

6
1

El Reg straps on the Huawei Watch 2

bjr

I thought this category was dead

I bought a Pebble when they came out and hated it so much that i switched to mechanical watches, I don't even want a quartz watch on my wrist, it's wind up watches for me until there is a real breakthrough in smart watches.

Until a watch can completely replace a pocket phone there is no point to them. To do that voice recognition has to get nearly perfect, Google Assistant has made great strides but it's still no where near reliable enough to be your only interface. You also need much better batteries, if and when Lithium Air batteries become viable you will be able to stuff a large enough battery into a phone that you will be able to run LTE and GPS for a few days which is the minimum requirement, it will be a few years before we have good enough batteries, maybe longer. Finally they need to stop looking like crap, a tiny Samsung S8 (i.e. piece of curved glass where the entire surface is a screen) would be appealing but something that looks like a Casio from the 1980s is utterly unacceptable.

1
0

Why Uber threw top engineer Levandowski under self-driving bus

bjr

Hes truely and rightly screwed

Staying out of Folsom should be his only objective right now. His lawyers should make a deal with Waymo for a license to the IP in return for his Uber shares (assuming he really has $250M worth of shares). Alternatively if Uber really was complicit in his theft of IP then he should be making a deal with the California state's attorney office to throw Uber under the self driving bus in return for a reduced sentence.

20
0

Do we need Windows patch legislation?

bjr

Somebody should be fired at your NHS

MS supported XP way longer than they should have and when they did stop support that gave years worth of notice. Anyone who is running 70,000 copies of XP in 2017 should be taken out and shot. If they have some software that is XP dependent that they can't replace then they should be running it on XP VMs, if a VM is compromised you can switch to a backup copy in under a minute. In addition to being resilient to attack a VM can run on modern hardware, it's not limited to antique machine like native XP.

2
1

Uber engineer's widow: Stress and racism killed my husband ... Uber: Let's make flying cars!

bjr

Re: "Just 8.8% African Americans"?

It's a good number for tech. If you look at the population of engineering schools, especially elite engineering schools, second and later generation Americans as a whole are under represented. Immigrant and first generation Indians and Asians are there in huge numbers and even among so called "White Men" you will find a disproportionate number are either immigrants from or first generation former Soviet Union. I've been in tech for 40 years, my generation, Boomers in general parlance, are better described as the Sputnik babies in tech, was the only group of engineers who were mostly native born. The US has never been good about producing it's own engineers, it's always imported them whether it was Bell or Tesla in the 19th century, or the Indians and Asians today. For a single short period between the launch of Sputnik and the moon landing the US put aside it's natural fear of math and produced a single generation of native born engineers, after that the trend has been to return to it's natural state where about a 1/3rd of the engineers are immigrants or first generation. If you apply a .66 multiplier, to represent the percentage of multi generation Americans, to the percentage of Blacks in the US population you get .66 * 13.2 = 8.7, so the Uber number is right on the money.

2
0

Microsoft raises pistol, pulls the trigger on Windows 7, 8 updates for new Intel, AMD chips

bjr

This policy allows Intel to clean up the x86 architecture

Intel's and Microsoft's dependence on each other has had a significant negative effect on the performance of their respective products. In Microsoft's case they introduced a lot of x86 specific dependencies into Windows which made sense at the time they did them but in the long run made it very difficult to port Windows to other architectures. When they did the ARM port they cleaned up that mess so WIn10 is now much cleaner than older versions of Windows. On Intel's side they've had to maintain backward's compatibility to every generation of MS OSes. As a result modern Intel processors carry around a lot of obsolete instructions and memory management modes that should have been removed years ago. With Microsoft enforcing a policy that only Win10 is supported on Kaby Lakes and beyond Intel is now free to do a much needed spring cleaning on their architecture.

1
4

Half-baked security: Hackers can hijack your smart Aga oven 'with a text message'

bjr

Re: Incredibly inefficient - not

I'm confused. Are you saying that in Britain it's common to heat a house with a kitchen stove? In the US we haven't done that since the 19th century, we have proper furnaces that heat the house and kitchen stoves or ovens that are designed to cook dinner, they don't heat the kitchen let alone the house.

2
0

Microsoft's in-store Android looks desperate but can Google stop it?

bjr

Google has too little control not too much

The problem with Google is that they exercise too little control not too much. If you want timely OS updates you are restricted to Googles own offerings, Nexus and now Pixel, if you want better or cheaper hardware then you are stuck with last year's Android OS and a layer of unwanted OEM customization's and duplicate services. It's not in Google's interest to challenge Microsoft's approach to providing and alternative ROM because all that will do is peak the interest of anti-trust authorities. This effort will fail because there is no compelling reason for a consumer to choose MS over Google's native services. If Google were doing a crappy job then there would be an opening, but they aren't. Google Maps are the gold standard in navigation and Google Assistant is as good or better than any alternative. It's great that MS is trying to compete because it keeps Google on their toes, but it's hard to see how they could possibly provide a full blown alternative.

2
2

Stop lights, sunsets, junctions are tough work for Google's robo-cars

bjr

Re: Roundabouts...

We have rotaries (the American name for roundabouts) in Massachusetts. A machine would have one advantage over a human, it would know who has right of way. All we poor humans know is that the law changed a few decades ago but we don't know how. Either cars entering the rotary had right of way before and now cars in the rotary have right of way, or maybe cars in the rotary had right of way and now cars entering the rotary have it.

2
0

Microsoft promises free terrible coffee every month you use Edge

bjr

You dont' know what bad coffee is

You are obviously to young to know what bad coffee is if you think Starbucks is terrible. Before Starbucks American coffee was swill. I'm old enough, 62, to remember what coffee was like before Starbucks. We didn't know how bad it was and my parents generation, who had been through the Great Depression and WWII, didn't care. They only cared that it was cheap and plentiful and that's what was sold in the US. I found out what real coffee tasted like on a trip through Italy in 1980. I was young and staying in cheap pensiones. In the morning they gave you a cup of coffee and it was nothing like the mud that was served in the US. Even the most expensive restaurants in the US served awful coffee. The only place that I knew of that served a decent cup of coffee was a mafia hangout in the North End of Boston. Starbucks changed all that. Starbucks changed the culture so now there are craft roasters everywhere and anyone can make an excellent cup of coffee,

As for Microsoft, it's truely sad that they have to pay people to use their browser, and it's a sign of real desperation that they have to give away $5 cups of coffee, that's real money, as opposed to giving away cloud storage space which is virtual money.

7
0

IoT puts assembly language back on the charts

bjr

Are there chips with no development support?

I find it hard to believe that assembly code is ever necessary anymore. I started programming in the 1970s when memory sizes were just a few K (PDP 8s had 4K max, PDP 11s and Novas had between 8K and 32K, a monster PDP 11 system had 256K of mapped memory). When you have only 4K of memory then every bit counts and there is a reason to use assembler. You can do a lot of work in very little memory but at the expense of supportablity, i.e. not only is it hard to read your own code, let alone someone else's, but if you are really aggressive about writing tiny code you would end up with something as fragile as crystal. One common trick was to hold a state bit in the CARRY flag for several instructions. You could write code that would leave the CARRY unchanged so that you could do a branch later. Of course if you were to ever try and modify code like that you would break it.

C took over in the early 80s because it was almost as efficient as assembly code but it was portable and it was far less fragile. The slogan at the time was "C, all the power of assembly languages with the ease of use of assembly language". After 40 years of Moore's law I can't imagine that there is any device out there that has so little memory that you can't do a better job with C than you can with assembly code.

1
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Even in remotest Africa, Windows 10 nagware ruins your day: Update burns satellite link cash

bjr

Should be running CentOS or some other LTS Linux

They have no business running WIndows in circumstances like that, they should be running a long term supported Linux like CentOS which will never do things behind their backs like Windows. Updates could be handled entirely with DVDs or USB sticks.

2
5

Smartwatches: I hate to say ‘I told you so’. But I told you so.

bjr

Went back to a mechanical watch

I bought the Pebble when it came out, it was only $125 so it was worth a flyer. I quickly determined that the smartwatch features were useless and it was also terrible as a watch (display was barely readable), now I'm back to wearing regular watches, in fact I went back to wind up watches because they are the farthest thing from a smartwatch.

When gen 0 or 1 technology is introduced you can usually imagine what it would be like when the technology catches up to the promise. The first PCs were pathetic compared to the mini computers of the day, but it was obvious that in a few years they would be able to as much or more as those refrigerator size minicomputers could do. I thought the same thing when I got a Palm Treo, it included a browser that hinted at what a smartphone would be able to do once the screens got better, the network faster and had a better processor. In both of those cases there were already jobs that they could do well, in the case of the PC they could do word processing and spreadsheets which was enough to justify their purchase, the Treo could do e-mail and phone calls well which was reason enough to buy one. In the case of smartwatches they don't do anything that the phone in your pocket doesn't already do except that they don't do in anywhere near as well. I once thought that a wrist phone that replaced the pocket phone that we carry now might make sense but I've come to the conclusion that a wrist phone can never be more than a niche product (BTW some Android watches are wrist phone capable). The problem is that a 1 inch screen is essentially useless for displaying anything more then the time, it's a limitation of human eyes and it can't be fixed with better 1" screens. The same is true for touch input, human fingers are the limitation, you will never be able to use a 1" surface for any thing more than a swipe. The only user interface that can work well on a watch sized device is speech. The limitation here is that talking isn't private, it's OK to talk to your device at home but it's awkward in public. I do use OK Google in public but only for very limited purposes like making an appointment (in that case the person that you are setting up the appointment with is the only other person there), or maybe looking up a movie time but even that is a little bit awkward. I can't imagine doing much else with speech in public, even if it wasn't embarrassing it would be a mess if lots of people tried to talk to their wrists at the same time. Fitness bands are a different story, they supply an additional set of sensors that can't be put into the smartphone itself because the smartphone isn't in contact with your skin. That's an example of a new technology that provides new capabilities, they aren't competing with an existing device.

1
0

Official: EU goes after Google, alleges it uses Android to kill competition

bjr

The EU ins in Apple's pocket

Apple makes more than 90% of the profits in mobile phones so why is the EU picking on Google which provides an open source platform and has no restrictions on competitive apps in the Google Play store?. Apple is closed source, won't license their OS to any other manufacturer, and severely restricts competition in their app store, but the EU has shown no interest in them. There are hundreds of Android phone manufacturers, they are all free to fork Android if they want or to use CyanogenMod if they want, they do it in China and in the West Amazon has done it, most don't do it because consumers prefer Google's services. But even with Google's own phones, I have the Nexus 6P, you are free to install competitive services. I prefer Google Maps but I also have Sygic on my phone (which I paid for) and I've installed Here Maps for a while which is free. I don't like Chrome so I've installed Firefox, AdFree Browser and Opera. The Google launcher is primitive so I've install NovaLauncher (I have the Pro version which costs practically nothing, there is also a free version). If you want to replace Google Now with Microsoft's Cortana you can, it's in Google Play. If you want to install a competitive app store you can, I also have Amazon's app store on my 6P because I wanted to install Amazon Video which they don't make available through Google Play (that's Amazon's choice, they avoid sharing revenue with Google by doing it that way, on the iPhone they are forced to share revenue with Apple).

There is no excuse for the EUs behavior.

0
13

Vinyl LPs to top 3 million sales in Blighty this year

bjr

In 1983 I bought an Edison cylinder player and a couple of Victrolas, my father was incredulous, he said "what do you want with those things, I tossed mine out in 1948 when they invented HiFi?. I feel the same way about those kinds buying LPs today, I disconnected my turntable in the 1980s when they invented the CD and then I stopped listening to CDs when streaming was invented.

1
1

Brits unveil 'revolutionary' hydrogen-powered car

bjr

Terrifyingly poor performance

It's a go-cart, 0-60 in 10 seconds, top speed 60!!!. I don't see how you could drive this on a highway without getting rear ended. I like the idea of supercaps instead of batteries but I would have coupled them with a small conventional engine and bigger electric motors so that the performance would have been acceptable and the range unlimited. Who is going to buy (or rent) this thing, it's performance is awful and as everyone else has pointed out it's hideous, it looks like a Citreon who's mother had Zika.

1
2

Windows XP spotted on Royal Navy's spanking new aircraft carrier

bjr

Re: Better The Devil You Know

The Zumwalt, which was launched last week, uses Linux. Why would the Royal Navy choose XP when the US Navy is using Linux?

Carriers are in service for at least 50 years and they go decades between refits. It makes no sense for a new ship to use an OS which EOLed before the hull was laid. You need an OS that can be maintained by a defense contractor who understands the life times of military systems. It's easy for a defense contractor to maintain a Linux variant, not so much a version of WIndows let alone a really terrible version like XP.

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3

Aurous shutters for good, will pay $3m damages

bjr

Party like it's 1999

Where si the demand for a piracy service in 2015 when there are so many legal free or cheap ways to get all the music or movies that you want. If you are willing to listen to a few ads Pandora and iHeartradio are free and they have really great apps that are much easier to use then downloading a pirated mp3. If you don't want the ads the monthly fee for Pandora is very reasonable, Spotify only slightly more. The same goes for a Netflix subscription, the month fee for Netflix is which is only $10 a month.

0
0

Who owns space? Looking at the US asteroid-mining act

bjr

It's science fiction but maybe it will help to get things moving forward again

Nobody is going to be mining anything in space in our life times so the details of this law are irrelevant. However it is a statement that it's time to try a private approach to space exploration because governments have failed utterly. It's been 46 years since the moon landing and 60 years since Sputnik and where are we? America can't even repeat Alan Shepard's sub orbital flight let alone go to the moon again. The Russians can still put men in orbit using their space jalopy's, the 50 year old Soyuz, but they have nothing new. In 2017 if all goes well Space X will return America to 1965 where we can put a capsule in orbit. But Space X and Blue Origin are breaking no new ground, they are just building updated V2s like everyone else. Until something radical happens like space elevators, rail guns launchers, Bussard ram jets or some other sci-fi technology nobody is going to be doing any asteroid mining nothing in the solar system is worth millions of dollars per gram. which is what it would cost you to bring something back from an asteroid.

4
0

Apple's Watch charging pad proves Cupertino still screwing buyers

bjr

Re: Don't understand the rage

Actually BMW does exactly the same thing. A battery for a BMW is $500 (FIVE HUNDRED FRIGGIN DOLLARS for a battery). You can't just go to Sears and and get a Diehard like you can for every other car brand you have to get a BMW battery which has a chip in it that has to be programmed by the dealer.

1
6

Elderly? Disabled? You clearly need a .38" Palm Pistol

bjr

Lincoln was killed with a derringer

John Wilkes Booth used a derringer to kill Lincoln so anyone who says this can't kill is simply wrong. This thing is basically a derringer with modern ammunition.

1
0

Visitors no longer welcomed to Scotland's 'Penis Island'

bjr

Athol, MA

In Massachusetts we have a town named Athol. A former governor, Endicott Peabody was said to be so popular that they named four towns after him. Endicott, Peabody, Marblehead and Athol.

1
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CAUGHT: Lenovo crams unremovable crapware into Windows laptops – by hiding it in the BIOS

bjr

Re: Windows only though

It can't effect Linux for several reasons, first it's looking for a Windows installation and it won't find one, second it's looking for an NTFS file system, it won't know what to do with EXT4, and finally windows binaries won't run on Linux except under WINE which they won't be using.

12
0

Gigabit Google? We're getting ready for 10 gigabits says Verizon

bjr

Re: But here's the kicker

Verizon has no caps. I have 150Mbit FIOS from Verizon, it's very reliable. The big problem with Verizon is that they've lost interest in fibre, they haven't added a new town in several years. All of Verizon's efforts are going into mobile.

One more thing, this is for business not individuals. The fastest service that a home user could possibly want is 1G because that's the speed of a PC's Ethernet port, only servers have 10G ports and 10G switches are still extremely expensive.

0
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Boffin: Will I soon be able to CLONE a WOOLLY MAMMOTH? YES. Should I? Hell NO

bjr

Re: Anyone for lunch?

They must have been delicious, that's why mammoths went extinct, they were hunted into extinction by pre-farming people. If they had managed to hang on for another 3000 years they might have been OK. The Asian elephant is a domestic animal and they are doing just fine.

Getting eaten by people is by far the best evolutionary strategy for a species even if it sucks for the individual members of that species. There are probably 51billion lbs of chickens produced in the US alone each year (i.e about 10 billion birds), I'm sure that no wild species is anywhere close. The best strategy for individuals is to become pets. By far the best deal was made by cats, they must have had a really good lawyer. They agreed to sit on our laps occasionally at a time and place of their choosing, we get no say in the matter. In return we agreed to give them a house, as much as they want to eat, and a comprehensive health plan.

7
1

Cash-strapped Chicago slaps CLOUD TAX on Netflix, Spotify etc users

bjr

They will spend more on lawyers then they could ever hope to collect

This is insane. This is basically the same as a sales tax and the law is very clear on this, you can't collect a sales tax from a company unless they have a nexis your jurisdiction. Since none of the streaming companies are located in Chicago they can't collect a tax from them. The streaming companies will fight this all the way to the Supreme Court (where they will win), they have to because if they don't they will end up having to collect taxes for potentially 10's of thousands of cities, towns and states. The cost to Chicago in legal fees will be at least an order of magnitude more than they can ever hope to collect.

0
0

Couple sues estate agent who sold them her mum's snake-infested house

bjr

Re: US Home inspection..

They must of had a home inspection, you can't get a mortgage without one. The home inspector didn't notice the snakes because he wasn't looking for them.

3
0

Tesla's battery put in the shade by current and cheaper kit

bjr

Lead is cheap, Lithium isn't

There is a reason that UPSes mostly use old fashion lead acid batteries instead of lithium, lead is cheap, very very cheap. In fact lead is the very definition of a base metal. Lithium is favored in mobile applications because it's light, that matters to the phone in your pocket and it really matters in a car because the energy used to move a car is directly proportional to the mass of the car, for those of you who didn't take freshman physics the equation is

K = 1/2 * M * V^2, i.e.

Kinetic Energy = 1/2 * Mass * Velocity * Velocity.

So if you cut the weight of a moving vehicle by 50% you cut the energy used to get it to speed by 50%. However a battery pack that sits in your basement has a velocity of 0 so the weight doesn't matter as long as it doesn't exceed the load limit of the floor which in the case of a typical concrete basement floor is very very high. So the only factor that matters for a backup battery system is lifetime cost and that's an area where lead acid batteries are always going to beat lithium batteries because no metal is cheaper than lead, and the process for making a lead acid battery is dead simple. Also lead is really easy to recycle when it comes time to replace the batteries because it's melting point is so low as anyone who has ever soldered a wire or a pipe (before they banned lead solder) knows.

2
0

Jeez, AT&T. Billing a pensioner $24,000 for dialup is pretty low

bjr

Could be an old virus or it could be AOL's fault

Back in the days of dialup there certainly were virus's that called 900 numbers. Sometime around 2002 I found one on my sister's laptop. I solved the problem by wiping Windows off of her laptop and replacing it with Linux. It's entirely possible that there are still some of those viruses out there. There is another possibility which is that AOL eliminated his local number and their software automatically picked a long distance number. That wouldn't be a problem for anyone with a modern phone plan because the phone companies don't charge for long distance anymore on their phone/Internet/TV bundles. But anyone with AOL is unlikely to have a modern phone plan, they would still have a 1990s or earlier plan where you don't have long distance included and what's even worse the definition of long distance is anything outside of yoru town.

1
0

Vint Cerf: Everything we do will be ERASED! You can't even find last 2 times I said this

bjr

Re: Not really much of a problem

One century's garbage is another century's treasure. That's literally true, the thing that archaeologist's love most of all is garbage dumps and cesspits. Historians in the distant future will find Facebook fascinating. They will also love our primitive cat videos. Undoubtedly they will have some form of cat video which is as unimaginable to us as YouTube would have been to the Egyptians who built The Sphinx (the oldest known cat video).

3
0

Seagate's spinning rust most likely to crash, claims backup biz

bjr

Re: Seagate 3TB

You are misremembering. The Death Stars were IBM drives (now Hitachi) not Seagate. At the time (15 years ago) the Seagates were the reliable drives and the dogs were IBM and Maxtor (now part of Seagate). In the last five or ten years the Seagates have been junk, I've lost a half dozen and I only have 10 machines so that's an incredible failure rate. The other brands have been fine. I don't buy Seagates anymore. I'm really glad that these statistics are being published. This is a significant sample set so the numbers are very meaningful. It sounds like Seagate has gotten the message and started addressing their problems if the 4T drives are operating reliably. It's possible that they've just gotten lucky with the 4Ts, we'll have to see another years worth of reliability reports to see if they've really fixed the problem or not.

1
1

Free Windows 10 could mean the END for Microsoft and the PC biz

bjr

Re: Stop and think a bit, please...

A VM is forever. I'm also a Linux user and only run Windows as a VM. You can move the VM to different hardware and different versions of Linux without Windows knowing it's been moved. All you have to do is make sure that the new VM is identical to the old including MAC IDs.

As for increasing the size of the virtual disk, that's easy. I've done it for an XP VM and it worked fine. Create a larger virtual disk, then in a Linux VM mount both the old WIndows virutal disk and the new larger disk and use DD to copy the old disk to the new one. Use ntfsresize it resize the partition. You can also resize with gparted.

6
2

US Navy's LASER CANNON WARSHIP: USS Ponce sent to Gulf

bjr

Re: "Ponce"

This sounds like a case of two peoples separated by a common language. Ponce is just a name in the US, I've never heard it used as anything else. Ponce de Leon discovered Florida, that's the best know Ponce.

2
0

What's MISSING on Amazon Fire Phone... and why it WON'T set the world alight

bjr

Re: Hmmm

You're being really unfair to the Palm Pre. Palm OS was way ahead of anything else at the time, it's multitasking was better than today's version of Android let alone anything in 2009. The Pre came out a month before the first Android phone (it was supposed to come out 8 months before but Palm was chronically incapable of executing, if they had met their schedules the world might be different today). The Pre was a ground breaking product, the Amazon Phone is just a medocre phone at a high price (although in the US they are have a fire sale, $200 unlocked, bet they don't sell any even at that price).

5
0

Scientists skeptical of Lockheed Martin's truck-sized fusion reactor breakthrough boast

bjr

Just in time for a time machine

Doc Brown brought back a Mr Fusion home reactor from the year 2015 so this annoucement is just in time. However they need to boost the power to 1.21GW and reduce the size so that it can fit in the backseat of a Delorean, but maybe they can do that by the end of next year.

0
0

How Microsoft can keep Win XP alive – and WHY: A real-world example

bjr

Have you tried a Virtual Machine

If the problem was software only then a virtual machine running on Linux is the obvious answer, because NETBEUI is involved you will have to try it to see if the performance is good enough (it probably will be). Because this is a business the choice of Linux distros is simple, You should use a Redhat Enterprise Linux clone like CentOS or Scientific Linux. RHEL is supported for a very long time, 11 years, and it's incredibly stable, it just doesn't break. If you want to clone the existing system you follow the same procedure that you would to create recovery files in case of a disk failure. Using something like Acronis, or any other XP backup tool, to create the recovery files. Then you need to create a fresh KVM virtual machine on your Linux box, there is a very simple GUI to do this with. You should set the MAC IDs on the virtual NICs to be the same as the MAC IDs on the system that you are cloning. After you created the VM you should attach the ISOs of your recovery disks as virtual CDROMs. Then boot the VM and follow exactly the same procedure that you would if you were restoring to a fresh hard drive in a real PC. Once you are done you can boot the VM and you will have a clone of the original machine. If you have an install CD for XP you could also just create a fresh XP virtual machine.

Once you have the VM you won't be tied to any particular piece of hardware, you can move a VM anywhere, it's just a file. As long as you make sure that the VM on the new machine is a clone of the original (same MAC IDs, same virtual graphics card), XP won't know that it's been moved. This will allow you to use the system forever even if the PC dies, you can always move it to a new PC. You also won't have to worry about the system becoming corrupted, as long as you keep backups of the VM file you can restore the system. If you keep a copy of the VM on the same PC then you can restore the system in about a minute, all you have to do is rename the backup copy to the primary VM's name and reboot the VM.

The underlying Linux box won;t be subject to viruses, it will be much more stable than any Windows system. Linux includes SAMBA so it can share directories with the Windows systems on the network, including the XP VM. If someone needs to access the Internet from that box they can do it from Linux so it won't be subject to any malware. I've been using WIndows VMs on Linux since 1999. I've never had a virus on my WIndows VMs, not even when I had a Win98 VM, because the only Internet access I do on the VMs is to a couple of trusted sites like Microsoft and Intuit. I use Linux to access the Internet and it's immune to the malware that's out there including the stuff on sites of a sleazy nature.

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Friends don't do tech support for friends running Windows XP

bjr

Re: No

For someone who needs more than a Chromebook can provide but doesn't need things like video editors, a RHEL clone like CentOS is definitely a great choice. XP users clearly don't embrace change so an ultra stable distro like CentOS is the perfect choice. It doesn't break and it will be supported for a very long time, Redhat intends to support RHEL 6.x for another six or seven years. The user interface of the 6 series is Gnome 2 which is menu based so XP users won't be confused. If they got their copies of MS Office at the same time as they got XP then they are going to be on Office 2K, 2003 or 2007. The UI of OpenOffice is very similar to the classic versions of MS Office, certainly much much closer than the current UI on MS Office is.

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bjr

Re: I've been helping friends (and businesses) upgrade from XP to ...

The obvious choice for an Ubuntu user who is unhappy with the direction that Ubuntu has taken is to go to Mint. Personally I'm a Redhat user, I use a combination of Fedora with Mate (thanks Mint people for creating the Mate project) and Redhat EL clones (primarily Scientific Linux and a little CentOS).

On the subject of moving WIndows users to Linux, I have experience with users on the opposite ends of the sophistication spectrum. About a dozen years ago I moved my sister from WIn98 to Fedora after I discovered that her laptop was a virtual pest house of viruses. She has 0 understanding of computers and only needs a browser and e-mail. I cofigured a basic system for her and she never knew the difference except the system never breaks. Currently I have her on Scientific Linux because it's unbreakable and she doesn't need any of the programs that are missing from RHEL (Redhat EL is aimed at enterprises so it doesn't try to be as full featured as it's sister Fedora). If I was doing it today I'd put her on a Chromebook because that would fully meet her needs and require even less support from me. At the other end of the spectrum is my girlfriend who is a software developer but who has always been a WIndows user never a *nix person. She had heavily customized her environment and she is a heavy Photoshop user and the Photoshop license is tied to the machine, and she really hates change. Every now and then I'd have to waste a bunch of my time repairing XP when something broke on it. The last straw was on Valentines day several years ago, we had plans to drive down to Cape Cod for the day, instead I spent the entire day removing a root kit from XP (which I finally did using a Fedora Live USB stick, the was unfixable from within Windows). Once I had the system back up I made an Acronis backup of the system and took it home and created a KVM virtual machine which was an exact clone of her system. As it turns out that was a very fortunate thing because her motherboard died a couple of weeks later. I replaced her motherboard, CPU and memory with an iCore5 and then put Fedora on it and then I put the XP VM on top of Fedora. After several years she is finally using a lot of native Linux apps but she still relies on a bunch of Windows programs so she has the XP VM running in a virtual desktop all of the time. The XP VM is frequently backed up so when it breaks it's always a simple matter of just overwriting the broken copy with a recent backup which takes a few minutes instead of all day. All of her licenses work just fine on the VM. Running an unpatched VM won't be particularly dangerous because it's much less vulnerable than a native system because it's never used for anything dangerous like web browsing, that's done on Linux, and because if something does happen you can fix it by overwriting the VM with a backup copy.

The bottom line is that if you have a friend with very simple computing needs the best solution is to have them buy a Chromebook or a Chromebox, they are barely more expensive than a Win8.1 license, and they will be easy to use and reliable. If you have someone who is strongly tied to XP for a good reason than a virtual machine on Linux is the best way to go. For someone in the middle just moving to Linux is a good solution. A Linux distro with a Mate desktop will be very familiar to an XP user. What's more Open/Libreoffice is much closer to and pre-2010 version of MS Office than the current version of MS Office is. The best Linux distro for a new user is whatever their LInux using friend uses. All Linux distros do mostly the same things so it's just a matter of having someone to lean on during the transition that's important.

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Richard Stallman decides Emacs should go WYSIWYG

bjr

Re: XEmacs?

XEmacs isn't a WYSIWYG editor it's just a better Emacs. I use it constantly, it's a great editor but it's for text files not documents.

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City of Munich throws Ubuntu lifeline to Windows XP holdouts

bjr

Why don't they offer free beer to their Muslim citizens?

Didn't it occur to them that anyone who is still running XP is either extremely adverse to change of any sort or lacks the necessary skills to do an upgrade of any sort let alone to a different operating system?. Anyone who has the necessary skills and the desire to do so can easily install any of the major distros, all they have to do is download an ISO and install it. If you can't make an ISO then you certainly won't be able to install an new OS. frankly they would have a lot more takers offering free beer to their Muslim citizens.

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ZTE Open: This dirt-cheap smartphone is a swing and a miss

bjr

Why do an OS at all?

If the goal of Mozilla is to preserve an open web by moving the world to HTML5 then that's what they should concentrate on. You don't need a dedicated OS for that, you need the development tools, an app store, and a really efficient HTML5 engine. Instead of doing yet another OS, which is doomed to failure, they should enhance Firefox to run apps that look like apps, not browser windows, create a really good open source HTML5 development env, and start an an app store for HTML5 apps. Firefox is already on every platform and it's widely used so they aren't starting from scratch, just extend it to provide a means of running the same apps on both desktop and Android environments.

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First burger made of TEST-TUBE MEAT to be eaten on August 5

bjr

Soylent Green is People

Horrible idea

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Man sues Apple for allowing him to become addicted to porn

bjr

People who file frivolous lawsuits should be severely disciplined

There need to be penalties for filing frivolous lawsuits. I think this guy should be bound, gagged and flogged with a riding crop.

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Fedora back on track with Schrödinger's cat

bjr

First usable Fedora since 14

Fedora 19 is the first usable version of Fedora since Fedora 14. The Gnome3 disaster made versions 15-18 ususable, I've been using Scientific Linux 6.x as my workstation as well as my server OS in the interim, but in 19 MATE is fully integrated so you now have a functioning desktop again. The new installer is much less functional than the old installer but it does work, unfortunately it requires a lot more post install work. The principal problems are,

1) Almost no customization except for the selection of desktops (you can only install one). This isn't terrible, it just means that you have to use Yumex to finish your install later.

2) They changed the User number base from 500 to 1000 which makes it incompatible with every other Redhat system since Redhat started. On an isolated single boot box this isn't a problem but it's a disaster if you have a multiboot system or multiple systems running NFS. The workaround is to not create a user account on the initial boot, just create the root account and then create the users after the system is up.

3) You can't install GRUB in the root partition so you can't do chain loading of multiple OSes. Your choice is either no GRUB at all or to install GRUB2 into the MBR. Apparently this was a deliberate choice so I don't expect this to get fixed. I've been using Redhat since 1999 and it's always been easy to use it in a multiboot environment, now they've made it very difficult, what were they thinking?

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Firm moves to trademark 'Python' name out from under the language

bjr

In a world where Apple can patent the rectangle anything is possible

This sounds insane, only the BBC could claim precedence for the name Python. However we live in a world where Apple managed to patent a rectangular tablet with rounded edges ignoring the prior art for the patent issued in 1500BCE to Moses, God, et. al, so anything is possible.

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