* Posts by James O'Shea

1344 posts • joined 14 Jun 2007

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Intellectual Property Office drops, er, patently cool cartoon to teach kids about trademarks

James O'Shea
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Yes I would

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Who's using 2FA? Sweet FA. Less than 10% of Gmail users enable two-factor authentication

James O'Shea
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Re: Is this 2018, or 1998 ????

Sigh.

In order to use Google Authenticator, I would have to install it on my cell phone. Now, think carefully (this may be difficult for you, but try) IF I DON'T WANT TO BLOODY GIVE GOOGLE MY BLOODY PHONE NUMBER, WHY ON GOD'S GREEN EARTH WOULD YOU THINK THAT I WOULD EVEN CONSIDER INSTALLING AN APPLICATION FROM THEM WHICH BY ITS NATURE REQUIRES EXTENSIVE ACCESS TO THE INARDS OF MY SYSTEM?

Google does not reply to 'feedback'. Google has no phone support. If there is a problem, such as my being somewhere out in West Bumfuck, Idaho, and needing access to my stuff... and NOT having access to my Google Auth-equiped device, then I'm shit out of luck. And I can't call in and ID myself and get in that way, 'cause there's NO BLOODY PHONE SUPPORT. I can do that with Apple or Microsoft accounts; it's a pain but it can be done.

I do not store pix on anything Google. I do not store banking info on anything Google. I do have a nice long password (a 18 character passphrase, including caps letters, common letters, numbers, and symbols) which might be crackable but won't give anyone who goes to the trouble much more than the ability to send email in my name... and I have non-Google email which can be used to alert my contact list that thee's a problem.

I don't trust Google. I will limit their access to my devices. In the event that Google tries to insist on using 2FA, I will simply stop using Google services, because I DO NOT TRUST GOOGLE.

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James O'Shea
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No

I will not be giving Google my cell phone number. No. Not happening. Ever. Because I have several Gmail accounts, I will give Google another email... one of theirs. For some reason that's not good enough. They insist that they _must_ have a phone. They are not getting it.

Google also wants me to use their app instead of Mail or Outlook; Mail and Outlook are 'less secure'. No. I am not using their app.

There is a menu item which allows users to send feedback. Said feedback vanishes into the black hole of Mountain View, never to see the light of day again. Microsoft and Apple will respond to feedback; you have to hit them with a pretty big stick, but they'll respond. Apparently the PSTN doesn't reach to Mountain View, 'cause there's no phone support from Google. Apple and Microsoft give phone support. Annoying phone support, especially from Microsoft, but it's there, And if you persist, you can actually get through to someone who can fix the problem. Sometimes.

No, Google is not going to get access to my phone. Should they attempt to force the issue, that would be the final impetus to my getting my own domain and mail server and I would wave bye-bye to Gmail... and they'd not be able to harvest 'keywords' from my mail any more.

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Wanna motivate staff to be more secure? Don't bother bribing 'em

James O'Shea
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Implement security properly

One organization that I do occasional work for has implemented a new email security policy, a particularly mangled version of two-factor auth.

In Ye Distant Past (that is, up until December last year) I could collect email using OWA, with all the (in)security implications and irritations that that implies, or I could use MS Outlook. If I used OWA, they had rigged it to expire a session after a while and I'd have to log back in. This meant that I might go days before bothering, and sometimes 'important' emails might not be noticed among the sea of idiocy which would show up when I finally logged back in. Besides, I just don't like webmail. As I had Outlook set up for other reasons, I just added the email account for them to Outlook. Outlook was always sitting open on my main machine. I got all their (mostly useless and/or idiotic) email immediately. 'Important' email was actually immediately visible.

So they implemented 2FA... badly. They decided to use the Microsoft Authenticator system. Those who have encountered it might know that it can be set to _require_ certain classes of users (that would be those who don't have Official Company Laptops) to re-authenticate _every 24 hours_. I can no longer just leave Outlook open with their account available; every 24 hours a modal dialog pops up, preventing me from accessing _any_ account in Outlook, not just theirs, until I enter the password for their account, _twice_, and dig out my cell phone and click 'allow' in the MS Authenticator app. If I take too long, the 2FA auth times out and I get to start over. That's entering the password a total of _four_ times or moving really fast to send the auth code. Every. Single Day. On machines which have been accessing that account for literal years.

Meanwhile, 2FA is _not_ implemented for OWA. Sessions still expire, but I only have to enter the password once to get logged back in. I have deleted their account from Outlook and the MS Auth app from my cell phone and gone back to using (ugh) webmail... and to checking email from them maybe once a week because I bloody hate webmail. Congrats, boyz, you 'improved' security by making it difficult to communicate.

They're planning on killing OWA by the end of April, and requiring that all users use Outlook with 2FA. Line management has responded by asking us 'contractors' to install a special texting app... which doesn't go through Exchange Server and so isn't affected by 2FA (and doesn't get the loads of bumf that is emailed out every day). Congrats, boyz, you 'improved' security so much that users are bypassing your system to get actual work done. And no, IT Security won't be able to do anything about it, as the app lives on non-company cell phones. _Great_ work, there, boyz. You just _created_ a security hole.

They have a (small) disk quota applied to email accounts; users have to clean out old mail periodically. I await with interest the screaming when accounts fill up because of the daily bumf and no-one logging in to clean it out. Oh. Wait. They send out email notices when the mailboxes are getting too full, adding to the daily bumf... I wonder how long it will be before they notice that most of the workforce ain't using company email anymore, and what they'll try to do about it. Fun times ahead, boyz'n'grrlz, fun times ahead.

On my own systems here at the office I have also implemented 2FA... just not in an anti-user fashion. Every time users log in from a new device (cell, tablet, laptop, desktop) they must authenticate. Every time users log in using new software (for webmail, that means new web browser, and that's 'new browser', not 'new version of old browser') they authenticate. Once authed, you stay authed unless and until something changes.

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Airbus warns it could quit A380 production

James O'Shea
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Re: Spaceplane carrier

To take a Tesla to Mars, of course.

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'Mummy, what's felching?' Tot gets smut served by Android app

James O'Shea
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Re: Wish I didn't

You might want to verify the context before using terms like 'DP' and 'ATM'. And, especially, 'DPP' and 'DAP'. Think carefully before looking those up...

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James O'Shea
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Gimp

Re: I learned a new word today...

"...and I really wish I hadn't.

On the bright side, not having an appetite ever again should cut down on grocery bills."

Heh. On a related note, perhaps you shouldn't look up 'santorium'.

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Wait! Before you fire up that HP lappy, check the battery

James O'Shea
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Dude

it could have been worse. You could have gotten a Dell.

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Military alliance NATO adopts official hymn

James O'Shea
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Re: @ James O'Shea

yes.

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James O'Shea
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Lookit

It's simple. In the words of an Englishman (okay, he was born in India, but let's just let that go by) who was NATO's first boss, the purpose of NATO is "to keep the Russians out, the Americans in, and the Germans down".

It's worked, do far, though Merkel needs a few slaps, she's getting upity.

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And we return to Munich's migration back to Windows - it's going to cost what now?! €100m!

James O'Shea
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Re: How fake is your news?

"As much as 2017 has been an absolutely *fascinating* year I have *absolutely* no intentions of repeating it."

too late.

http://www.gocomics.com/overthehedge/2018/01/03

We're doomed. Doomed, i tell you.

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We translated Intel's crap attempt to spin its way out of CPU security bug PR nightmare

James O'Shea
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Re: And Nothing about Google?

The problem has been known, to some, for months. It’s been known long enough that _Apple_, not known for rapid patching, already quietly patched macOS! Apparently it’s only a partial patch, but it was out _before_ the news broke! And an alleged full patch is due with the next ‘in band’ update, currently in beta! If you boys are so slow that _Apple_ beats your ass to getting updates out, you’re got other problems, mate!

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Oh, the weather outside is frightful, but the data centre temp's delightful

James O'Shea
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Re: Um...

"Used to be a part of Mexico till the US nicked it in a war (that started in a dispute about who owned Texas)

Net result was Mexico lost nearly half its land area to the US, - hence New Mexico as a US state name."

It's a bit more complicated than that. Mostly, though, what happened was that Mexico had the biggest, best equipped, and best trained army on the North American continent. They also had Lopez de Santa Anna, eleven times president of Mexico, a military genius in his own mind.

Firstly, Santa Anna was responsible for there being a Texas to be in dispute. He let gringos (and their slaves) into what was then considered useless land, fit only for scorpions and Comanches (and he didn't think there was much difference between the two). This was despite the fact that officially slavery was illegal in Mexico. When he woke up to the fact that Texas wasn't as useless as he'd thought it was, he made a big deal out of the slaves and went to show the gringos who was boss. He showed them. Hint: not him. After Sam Houston kicked his ass, Texas was nominally independent, but Houston wanted to make it part of the US. Santa Anna objected. Santa Anna also had a difference of opinion on exactly where the border between Texas and Mexico was. Mostly, Santa Anna opposed whatever Houston wanted. Houston wanted Texas to be part of the US, so Santa Anna was against that. The Mexican-American War was basically fought because Santa Anna had a grudge against Houston.

As Santa Anna was, he thought, a military genius (despite having been beaten by gringo militia) he put a large chunk of the Mexican army up on the border. The US sent troops who danced around Texas, California, Arizona, and New Mexico. They also sent an amphibious force south. Santa Anna discounted them, thinking that the mosquitoes would get them. Unfortunately for him, Winfield Scott, who _was_ a military genius, had heard what had happened to the French in Haiti (10,000 troops, including the commanding general, killed by yellow fever) and landed during the cold season when there weren't many mosquitoes and got the hell out of the lowlands as fast as he could. Most of the Mexican army was in the wrong place to stop Scott, so he advanced up the mountains to Cuidad Mexico. The Marines went 'to the halls of Montezuma' when they took Chapultepec Castle, above the city; Chapultepec's last defenders were Los Ninos Heroes, five military cadets and one of their instructors, Chapultepec being then the Mexican Army's military academy. Five were killed in action, the last wrapped the Mexican flag around his body and jumped off the top of the castle rather than surrender and let the gringos get the flag. That was pretty much it for the war. Some of the gringos wanted to just annex the whole of Mexico, but that was a non-starter. Too many brown, Catholic, non-slave-holders. Instead the gringos took the northern chunk. The Mexicans weren't that sad to see it go; this way the gringos got to deal with the Comanches and the Apaches and the Utes and the rest. And the scorpions. And good riddance to the lot of them. The southern gringos wanted a nice strip of land they could turn into slave states. The northern gringos wanted a nice strip of land they could turn into free states. Neither group considered that what they got was a lot of sand, a lot of hostile Indians (Indians didn't come any more hostile than Comanches and Apaches) and a lot of scorpions.

You'll notice that no-one asked the Comanches etc who they'd rather have running their land. The US Army spent most of the time between the official end of the Mexican war and the start of the US Civil War chasing Comanches and Apaches. Bobby Lee was in Texas, hunting Comanches, until just prior to the Civil War. After the Civil War, the US Army went back to hunting Comanches etc. until the Spanish American War, and then back to Apache-hunting and to the Philippines and moro-hunting. The last of the Indian Wars in the territory liberated from Santa Anna wasn't over until 1901, Apaches being very, very, VERY hostile. Cheyenne and Sioux might or might not have considered that it was always a good day to die; they got stepped on by the end of the 1880s. Apache thought that it was always a good day to kill gringos. Still do. They ain't particularly fond of Mexicans, either.

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Disk drive fired 'Frisbees of death' across data centre after storage admin crossed his wires

James O'Shea
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Re: 50 MB in the '80s?

"Notable in the early '70s, perhaps, when EDS4 and EDS8 packs were normal (detect the ICL experience) but by the mid to late '70s EDS200 was the standard size."

Back in the early to mid 80s we had 200 and 300 MB disk packs. The older guys said that the 200s replaced 50 MB and smaller packs.

"I have never seen a disc drive 'walk'."

Lucky you.I have. I also had to fi the resulting mess.

"Of course they may have been fixed down, but given the delicacy of alignment I would have thought a vibration severe enough to shift the drive cabinet would have had an impact on the platters."

You'd be perfectly correct. Oh, was there ever an impact.

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A certain millennial turned 30 recently: Welcome to middle age, Microsoft Excel v2

James O'Shea
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Re: Except that Excel is actually 32...

Well, Empire Strikes Back _was_ my fav episode... until I saw Rogue One. Now it's my second fav episode.

Note: there have only been five episodes of Star Wars: the original, Empire, Jedi, Awakens, and Rogue. And Awakens and Jedi are iffy.

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Royal Navy destroyer leaves Middle East due to propeller problems

James O'Shea
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Re: Less is more?

"Calling a Swordfish a WW1 aircraft is slightly mean. While it was pretty much obsolescent by the time the war started it was designed in the 1930s and was reasonably state of the art when it first went into service. Given that there was top speed at which a torpedo could be dropped at, slow wasn't necessarily such a disadvantage. The US Dauntless monoplane was of a similar era, and looked more modern but didn't fare any better against fast WW2 monoplane fighters."

The Douglas SBD Dauntless did quite well. The Fairey Swordfish was the #1 killer, or at least wounder, of battleships in the Med and the Atlantic. At Taranto, Swordfish sank the Italian battlefleet, and Swordfish crippled Bismarck out in the Atlantic. The Dauntless was the #1 killer of carriers in the Pacific; they killed four carriers at Midway and hurt or finished off others later on. The Swordfish was replaced by first the Albacore, sort of a Swordfish with an enclosed cockpit.which was so bad that it was re-replaced by the Swordfish, and then by the Barracuda, The Dauntless was replaced by the SB2C Helldiver, the second Curtis design to be named 'Helldiver'. The first Helldiver, the SBC, a biplane, was quite popular. The second was not. The crews had all sorts of names for the SB2C, of which 'Big-Assed Beast' was the most complimentary. They wanted their SBDs back. (Note for those unfamiliar with USN terminology, u\which lasted until Congress forced them to use something less cryptic: 'SB' meant 'Scout Bomber', 'C' or 'D' was for the maker, Curtiss or Douglas, and a number would indicate how many designs that maker had had accepted. 'F4F' was a fighter, 4th design, by Grumman, as 'G' had been given to another vendor. This meant that the F4U Corsair fighter was the 4th fighter designed bu Chance-Vought; the FG was the same fighter, built by Goodyear to Chance-Vought designs.) The SBD Dauntless was slower than the SB2C Helldiver, wasn't as well armed, couldn't go as far, couldn't carry as big a bomb load... and was loved where the SB2C was at best tolerated.

If you want an example of a monoplane of around the same vintage as the Swordfish which was less than a good fit for operations against significant fighter opposition, try another Fairey design, the Battle. Fairey Battles were slaughtered in France in 1940 and the survivors withdrawn from frontline service so fast there were sonic booms. The. Swordfish was still in service in 1945, as was the SBD, both for the same reason: their replacements, Barracudas and SB2Cs respectively, were too big and heavy to fly off small escort carriers. One of the last U-boats to be sunk in April 1945 was sunk by rocket fire from a Swordfish. SBDs launched from the escort carriers of Task Group 77.4 against Kurita's battleships off Samar in October 1944. Several were shot down while taking off, as they launched from inside of anti-aircraft gun range, the USN (by which I mean William F. 'Bull' Halsey) having screwed up really badly. The SBDs didn't have any bombs which could damage battleships, as escort carriers where supposed to keep subs away from the rest of the fleet, and Task Force 77 was MacArthur's Navy, there to support Dugout Doug on the shore, so all the bombs on the carriers were for anti-sub or close air support, not ship-killing. They couldn't do much against battleships, including Yamato, the biggest battleship ever, but they tried.

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Help desk declared code PEBCAK and therefore refused to help!

James O'Shea
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"The Reg is Warped."

Always has been, always will be.

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New UK aircraft carrier to be commissioned on Pearl Harbor anniversary

James O'Shea
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Re: err... no

Nagumo should have been given the Navy Cross for all the help he gave the USN.

He didn't send in the third wave at Pearl. Big mistake.

He committed almost every mistake possible at Midway, including:

1 not sending out deck-load strikes from three carriers, holding the last one's aircraft back as a reserve and to cover the fleet. A full, three-carrier, strike would have flattened Midway at a stroke, so there would have been no need to consider a second strike

2 not sending out extra scout aircraft when some scouts, including the scout launched from the cruiser Tone, were late

3 when the scout from Tone finally got out to its search area and reported American ships, not sending additional scouts to the area

4 when Tone's scout reported what might have been a carrier among those American ships, not cranking up the CAP

5 not either retaining some of the CAP at a high level or sending up additional fighters once the torpedo bombers started arriving

6 not sticking to one thing; either prep for a follow-up raid on Midway _or_ prep for a strike against the American ships. Changing orders in midstream was... not real bright.

7 not flinching when the 'American samurai' of the torpedo bombers attacked, mostly to their deaths

8 related to the above: one land-based torpedo bomber made a suicide run at Nagumo's flag, pulling up at the last second. This convinced Nagumo to commit to sending a second strike at Midway, in direct defiance of orders which stated that he was to hold a reserve rigged for anti-ship.

As it was, the fact that he'd missed the carriers at Pearl, that he'd missed the repair yards (Yorktown was heavily damaged at the Coral Sea and was repaired in those yards; if the yards had been hammered, she'd have had to go to San Diego or Puget Sound and would have been unavailable), that he missed the subs (USS Nautilus put several torpedoes into one of the battleships with Kido Butai; as the American torpedoes at that time were all shit, they didn't do anything more than attract attention. Nautilus was severely depth-charged for quite some time after making that attack. The destroyer making the depth-charge attacks was called back to help defend Kido Butai against American air raids, and left at high speed in a nice straight line, following orders. American carrier dive bombers spotted the destroyer and extrapolated the line and arrived over Kido Butai from a totally unexpected direction. Oops.), all combined to assist his series of mistakes at Midway to really screw things up for Japan. At 10:20, 4 June 1942, Japan was winning the war. At 10:25 they'd lost, it just took three years to make them believe it.

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Boffins: We can identify you by your typing, and we're gonna sell the tech to biz, govt – yay!

James O'Shea
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Re: easily defeated

That would make their app just an improved keylogger. Anti-keylogger measures should work.

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James O'Shea
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easily defeated

I have gotten into the habit of leaving a window in a text editor (Notepad, for example, in Windows, or TextWrangler in OS X) and typing in that. And then copying and pasting. Go ahead, analyze that, laddie.

This way, I have an offline copy, just in case Firefox goes TITSUP without warning (that's happened as recently as earlier this week) or just to keep things straight, or the site might do Strange Things and I can't be arsed with typing all that all over again.

And, yeah, they can't analyze a damn thing.

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How about that time Russian military used a video game pic as proof of US aiding ISIS?

James O'Shea
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Re: Meanwhile, a group of Russia watchers calling themselves the Conflict Intelligence Team

A ‘Putain’ troll? Hmmm. Allons, les gars.

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80-year-old cyclist killed in prang with Tesla Model S

James O'Shea
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Re: The Man Who Fell To Earth

"Unsure why we're both getting downvoted to oblivion even though you've provided evidence for the incident i mentioned. Lots of butthurt Tesla owners here?"

You're the only one with lots of downvotes. I suspect it would be due to your assignment of blame, despite your not having any facts whatsoever to base that assignment on. You not only stated that it was the Tesla driver who was at fault, in the total absence of any supporting evidence in El Reg's story, you then went further and speculated that the driver was watching a DVD and letting the autopilot feature run the car. El Reg specifically stated, and I quote:

"Tesla's Autopilot suite of features includes automatic braking and collision warnings as standard, and can be upgraded to automatically change lanes, maintain speed and park.

It is unknown at this time if the Tesla driver was using the features when the incident occurred."

It would appear that either you have sources of other than El Reg's story, or you are simply blasting hot air out of your ass. Perhaps you would get fewer downvotes if you provided support for your position. A check with the BBC's site shows http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-tyne-41953941 which gives even less information than El Reg's story. Do you have further information? if so, can you provide a link?

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Brit moron tried buying a car bomb on dark web, posted it to his address. Now he's screwed

James O'Shea
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Re: er...

"If you had done a little better job with your googling (basically, just see the bbc article about this which gives his FULL name, with 'Singh'), then you can up the probablity that he is not Pakistani nor Muslim to 99.99999999%"

Ooh, yeah... someone with 'Singh' in their name and from anywhere _near_ the Punjab is going to be Sikh (95+% probability) or Hindu (what's left) not Muslim. Not unless he converted and kept the name, anyway, something quite unlikely. All (male) Sikhs have 'Singh' somewhere about (girls have 'Kaur') but not all Singhs are Sikhs.

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James O'Shea
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Re: bomb on display

'petard' is Frog for 'fart'. Froggy wits applied the term to what might now be called a breaching charge. (No, not something moved around in one's breeches, not unless one has a desire for 72 virgins.) HM Royal Engineers showed that it's not true that engineers in general and military engineers in particular have no sense of humo(u)r when they applied the term to the projectile launched by a particular type of armo(u)red vehicle-mounted mortar during WWII.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petard

The Froggy wits used "hoisted by one's own petard" (in Frog, of course, I can't be bothered to translate it back) to mean 'blown up by your own fart, you silly git, you must be English'. Or something like that. There might also have been some mention of hamsters and elderberries. Frogs are rude. Sassenach deserve it.

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James O'Shea
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Re: The other possibility...

"If they're selling bomb material, they probably won't care about who's buying.

Arms dealers aren't known for their high moral standards, after all."

Au contraire, arms dealers have very high standards. Try shorting their payment and see what happens.

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James O'Shea
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Re: er...

"Most acts of terrorism are committed by muslims

I would suggest that you don't approach a member of the RealIRA and suggest that he might be a Muslim.."

Oh, I'd suggest that he do just that. Just so long as he let me know beforehand, so that I could watch from a nice safe distance. And, if possible, he should let me have enough time to get some popcorn.

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James O'Shea
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Re: Occam's razor

If he hated it that much he should have just pulled a 'Hacksaw' Reynolds and cut it up by hand.

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James O'Shea
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hmm... it's Russian, it's old, are you sure it's still in working order? Perhaps you might want to test it.

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James O'Shea
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Re: er...

"Because on balance of probability, being that the vast majority of terrorist incidents world wide are linked to Islam, then it's most likely that's the case here."

Damn boy, you mean that the ee-vul bacon-haters have gone and taken another job from us hard-working, exceedingly Catholic, Irishmen? Time for a new crusade! Deus Vult! (No, not deus vulture, you prod gits.)

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James O'Shea
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Re: er...

"...why are you assuming he's a 'jihadist' exactly? If I were gonna make any cases, based on the name and mugshot, I'd guess he was a Sikh."

More likely a Jat... some of whom are of the Sikh faith, others Hindu, others Muslim. The name alone is insufficient, and he looks as though he might have shaved sometime which means he probably isn't an _observant_ Sikh. Maybe.

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Logitech: We're gonna brick your Harmony Link gizmos next year

James O'Shea
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I own a Harmony remote

I bought it from CompUSA before they became TigerDirect and then went extinct, which should show you how long ago that was. There was some kind of web site available to allow me to configure the thing quickly. Using the site required installing Silverlight. I declined, and configured it the hard way. I have been using the remote for nearly a decade now; the original rechargeable batteries in it died and I've replaced them. I haven't even attempted to connect it to the site since the initial Silverlight debacle. I was totally unaware that it had any features requiring internet connections, other than initial setup. I feel that I've got my money's worth out of it by now, and in the event that it stops working tomorrow I'll simply dig out the remotes that the assorted thingies came with until I can replace it with a new (and probably far cheaper) universal remote. Not from Logitech, that ship's sailed. When I first got it, I used it to control my assorted systems; I had a DVD player, later replaced by a Blu-Ray player, a VHS, a set-top box first from Comcast then AT&T, and one, later two, computers attached to various ports on a largish monitor. The Logitech allowed me to flip between them all. I haven't used the VHS in years, and use one of the computers to remote into the other, and rarely use the Blu-Ray drive, one computer has a Blu-Ray drive which behaves much better. I simply no longer care about many of the features on the remote.

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Birds are pecking apart Australia's national broadband network

James O'Shea
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Hmmm

yellow-orange thing on head.... check

makes lots of noise, but no sense.... check

does things it's not supposed to.... check

Are you _certain_ that those things are really Trump Birds?

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Donald, YOU'RE FIRED: Rogue Twitter worker quits, deletes President Trump's account

James O'Shea
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Re: Obviously...

"Does he know any other words?"

hmmm... 'wall'

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Official: Perl the most hated programming language, say devs

James O'Shea
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Re: Perl User Groups

Are you sure that you weren’t on a Linux group, he asked, while running for cover.

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James O'Shea
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Line noise & no comments

That’s not Pearl, that’s FORTRAN. Problably FORTRAN77, the first ‘high level’ language I was forced to use.

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US voting server in election security probe is mysteriously wiped

James O'Shea
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Re: In the immortal words of John Boehner:

bob, m'man... exactly when did Hil delete voting records from a government server after an investigation was started? Please be specific. if you can't do that, then when did Hil delete voting records from a government server, period? How about when did Hil delete voting records from _anyones's_ server? If you're on about Hil deleting emails from a private server... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bush_White_House_email_controversy so Hil will be going to jail some time after Boy George does, or sometime around the 12th of never. But do carry on.

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Trump, Brexit, and Cambridge Analytica – not quite the dystopia you're looking for

James O'Shea
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Re: Ms May

"Does it give a percentage likelihood of her being a human?"

Data, Vision, and C-3PO, spokesdroids for the United Android Association, deny that 'she' could possibly qualify for membership. They point out that prospective members have to actually be lifelike.

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James O'Shea
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Re: Ms May

"So, 99 per cent sure she's a man. You too, huh?"

I've long thought that 'her' name is really Lola, not Theresa.

There's not much doubt but that Corbyn's a little girl, though.

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A plethora of patches, Kaspersky hits back, new hope for Wannacry Brit hero – and more

James O'Shea
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Re: Hutchins

"Yeah, he's going to slip off the ankle bracelet and swim from California back to the UK. SMH."

No he won't... but he might swim to a boat off shore. If he gets onto a British flagged vessel, well, the odds of Unc Sugar getting him back aren't good.

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Malware hidden in vid app is so nasty, victims should wipe their Macs

James O'Shea
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Re: A complete wipe?

"I agree that you can't trust the OS itself afterwards, but with Linux at least it would be possible to boot off a live DVD/USB and run a scan from a known good OS to clean out any infection of the system.

The only way to get around that would be to have a firmware persistent malware at which point you'd have to wipe and reinstall the firmware for everything as well, probably over USB."

You can do that with Macs, too. It's perfectly feasible to create USB boot flash drives. It's even more feasible to create bootable external hard drives, and somewhat more difficult but still possible to create bootable DVDs. It would be trivial to boot off one and clean the drive.... _if you already had created such an item_. I, personally, have bootable flash drives with 10.11, 10.12, and 10.13 installed, and have full bootable backups (plural) of my working drives. It would be trivial for me to fix this. The easiest way would, actually, be to put the bad system into target disk mode and clone back one of the backups. However, I have backups and boot flash drives. The vast majority of John Public does not have either and look at you as if you just flew in from Mars when you suggest that maybe, just maybe, having a backup might be good, and that maybe, just maybe, it might be a good idea to have a bootable installer.

How much am I bet that the majority of those affected have no backups whatsoever?

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Your data will get hacked anyway so you might as well give up protecting it

James O'Shea
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Re: Dead people don't have money (problems)

"> everything would eventually be owned by dead people that pay no tax.

If dead people are ever allowed to "own" anything, you can be damn sure they'll also be paying taxes.

Governments aren't _that_ stupid."

Dead people owning everything, and taxes, and not-very-bright governments are precisely the plot of Lois McMaster Bujold's book Cyroburn. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryoburn

Unfortunately for the Bad Guys Who Would Be Frozen To Rule, they decide that running just one planet isn't enough, and want more... and the 'more' is one of the three planets run by Lord Auditor Mad Miles Vorkostigan's boss, Emperor Gregor Vorbarra. This means that they run into Mad Miles. Things don't end well for them. They should have picked a safer target... Cetaganda, say, or Old Earth. The not-bright government was owned by the bad guys, and they made the fatal error of assuming that all governments were as corrupt as theirs was, especially the government of a three-planet empire run from a notoriously backwards home world and including one system taken by conquest and another rather accidentally settled as a brand-new colony. They didn't know that the Vor Counts were, originally, the emperors accountants, and they really didn't understand just how powerful a Lord Auditor was, even if he was the youngest and newest Lord Auditor. Oops.

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Mohawks fling patent infringement sueball at Microsoft and Amazon

James O'Shea
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Why am I totally unsurprised by that?

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You can't find tech staff – wah, wah, wah. Start with your ridiculous job spec

James O'Shea
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Re: Not knowing how to look can make it hard to find

My answer to questions like that is “They were good enough to get me an academic scholarship to Notre Dame, that’s what they were.” Tends to shut the idiots up. For those in heathen lands which know not The Fighting Irish, it ain’t easy to get an athletic schoarship under The Golden Dome, and _much_ harder to get an academic one; actual students aren’t trained monkeys performing under bright lights to make the school vast amounts of money. (Notre Dame Stadium currently seats in excess of 82,000; before that, more than 54,000. They have failed to sell out on home football Saturdays exactly once since 1963, and before that exactly once dating back to 1947. The school has a deal with NBC, every single home game is televised nationally, and NBC pays hansomely for the priviledge. For some strange reason, none of that mountain of cash filters down to the trained monkeys. Cynical, moi? To be fair, one of my suite mates, I spent most of my time there in a five-man suite, was a starting linebacker until he messed up his right knee really good. The school let him finish his degree even though he couldn’t play any more. Some places <cough> Ohio State</cough> would have bounced his ass out so fast he’d have trailed Cherenkov radiation.)

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So the 'Year of Linux' never happened. When is it Chrome OS's turn?

James O'Shea
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Re: 'But the public didn't bite '

"Don't you mean MS Office is NOT capable of doing 100% accurate round trips? Office users don't actually notice that the problem might lie with their software. They've been habituated to the need to keep updating Office because their old version wouldn't read, let alone round trip, a file written by a newer version."

Unfortunately, while there can be problems round-tripping files between Word and Pages, there are _different_ problems than the ones between Word and LibreOffice, and, worse for your position, Apple noted the problems and has. addressed some of them, the paragraph border issue being a glaring example. Worse would be the fact that round-tripping between Pages and LibreOffice shows many of the same problems as between Word and LibreOffice; in both, God help you if you have a large, complex, table. Now that Apple has fixed the paragraph border problem, round-tripping files with large, complex, tables between Pages and Word is much less problematical.

Not everyone is going to notice the problems; notoriously 80% of MS Office users use 20% of MS Office's features (just not the same 20%). However, some users are going to notice. And those users will be the ones who use Office the most, who use it for business/professional reasons, who depend on having those features and having them work. And those users will not be impressed by the way that LibreOffice screws up their work.

It might be that MS Office should take some of the blame for the problems, though not much given the way that LibreOffice has problems talking to Apple's iWork. However, given the simple fact that there are a whole lot more MS Office users than LibreOffice users, it's LibreOffice which would have to change to fit in with MS Office, the way that Apple had to change iWork to fit in with MS Office. You don't have to like it, you just have to live with it. As long as LibreOffice does not make the required changes, round-tripping will continue to be an exercise is frustration.

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Google adds planets and moons to Maps, but puts bits in the wrong places

James O'Shea
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Re: Pittsburgh?

must resist deploying the 'arse end of Pennsylvania' joke, I really must...

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James O'Shea
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Re: Bugger

You don't want to send Zuck or Leisure Suit Larry to Mars, the locals might take that kind of thing as an act of war, and rightly so. I've seen movies indicating that riling up the locals might not be a very good idea.

Send 'em off to one of the planets of Betelgeuse, assuming there are any. Better yet, send them to go find out if there are any planets in that system. It'll take a long time for them to get there, and even more time for the locals to send a response. (Betelgeuse is a red supergiant, so there probably aren't any _surviving_ planets; this makes it an excellent choice to send those two off to. Besides, it's expected to go supernova Real Soon Now as astronomers measure time, making it an even better choice to send 'em to. I think I'll start a Kickstarter to fund this worthy mission.)

<exits, singing Queen's '39.>

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Dear America, best not share that password with your pals. Lots of love, the US Supremes

James O'Shea
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Re: My password is...

Sigh.

1 that’s a pass phrase, not a password

2 The Donald isn’t a kamikaze. Kamikaze were members of the Imperial Japanese armed forces, who (were) volunteer(ed) to die for their country while taking as many of the enemy with them as possible. The Donald has not, and will not, volunteer for anything which might cause so much as a cracked fingernail. (Note that kamikaze-like behaviour is not unique to Japanese forces; look up the Medal of Honor citations for two of the five awarded to pilots in Operation Tidal Wave, or the Victoria Cross award to the captain of HMS Glowworm, for just a few examples). The Donald would NOT drive his ship into a bigger ship’s side. Nope, not going to happen.

3 The Donald isn’t funny.

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Super Cali's futuristic robo-cars in focus – even though watchdogs say they're something quite atrocious

James O'Shea
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Driving in Los Angeles is already worse than driving in Florida, and yes, that includes Miami. Not even LA gets to Mexico City. Things can get worse, quickly.

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2019: The year that Microsoft quits Surface hardware

James O'Shea
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Re: Double "Hmmm"

sz54c8, vultures not known for the ability to spel or gud grammur use.

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James O'Shea
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Re: Flat surface sales

"The lock in on apple products also heavily contributes to this - not being able to go where you want when you want for software without invalidating warranty means they have a monopoly"

errm... you _can_ 'go where you want' to get software for Macs. You have somewhat more of a point for iOS devices, but jailbreaking, installing, and then unjailbreaking is easy enough. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IOS_jailbreaking

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