* Posts by Voland's right hand

3888 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

NetBSD adds RPi Zero support with 7.1 release

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Variety of reasons

1. Use and development of software which is not license compatible with the Linux kernel.

2. Smaller footprint

3. While Linux documentation and code has improved over the years it is still not the right OS to teach people. If you want to teach people, BSD is a better choice as it is "written by the book" and documented properly. End of the day the primary goal of RPi is education. If it supports BSD this means its scope is no longer just kids and Scratch - it is a viable tool in a University classroom in an OS design course (if there are any universities left which try to teach things properly instead of asking the industry if it likes it with ice cubes or with hot coffee)..

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Oxford Uni boffins say internet filters probably won't protect teens

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Re: Anon for reasons - Basically to avoid the SJW'ers

I do have filters, but they are for time-wasting and viruses. Not for "naughty" content.

My primary worry as a parent is that they will spend the afternoon glued to GooTube or SilverGames instead of doing their homework.

The second is that they will drag a computer STD in.

Only the third is that they will see something inappropriate and in that case they will probably come and talk to me first.

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This is where UK's Navy will park its 65,000-tonne aircraft carriers

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Re: sea power

No, they definitely have an AWACS capability, it might even be on a modern airframe by 2018.

No, they do not. Ask any of the navies which have been using rotor based AWACS and why are they desperately trying to change to fixed wing. Even the Indians whose Kamov-31 has better endurance and higher ceiling than the UK candidates for early warning are looking to switch.

If you do not care to ask, compute the necessary flight resource, spares level and maintenance windows required - you will see that you need to use at least 3 of the very precious slots in the air wing for the rotor AWACS. More like 4. Compared to that you can get away with 2 fixed wing ones which are considerably more capable and have much better endurance too.

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Re: sea power

The more interesting question is: "Can you keep it open (or respectively closed) with a carrier deployment?" or there are more cost-effective ways to do this.

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Scott McNealy: Your data is safer with marketers than governments

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In fact, it is now more difficult to leave the grasp of Google+Apple+Microsoft than to leave a country.

Option A: Try getting any work done without touching any one of these or communicating with a customer which is using them.

Option B: Try finding your granddad's (Irish in McNealy's case) birth certificate and apply for a Eu passport.

Which one is easier?

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Re: No it's bloody not.

That is on this side of the pond. Scott is on the other where things are a bit different.

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If the USA screws with my data, I cannot leave.”

Sure you can. Maintain a few passports. 70% of the USA population have at least one grandparent which is an immigrant enabling them to get another passport. This percentage is lower in Europe, but still quite significant.

Granted, you will have Fuhrer Wannabies like Teresa May chastize you in front of her party conference quoting literally word for word one of Hitler's most antisemitic quotes. Just ignore her and keep your options open.

And if worst comes to worst, you can BUY cittizenship. It may not be cheap, but is doable. In the specific case of Mr McNealy in about 15 minutes to transfer some pocket change to Grand Kayman.

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Is that a phone in your hand – or a gun? This neural network reckons it has it all figured out

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Re: I note...

Is it rAIcist? Or does this reflect a bias in the training routine?

Do not think so - the guns in the background are not in focus and fairly low res. There is no way to get a high confidence rating on them using an image recognition algo. We know and understand it is a gun based on character behavior. If you take the frame from that movie (easy to do - all of us have a copy) at DVD SD standard res there are not enough pixels to work with.

Now the the higher confidence ratio on the police squad photo does look fishy. Interesting what data did they feed this.

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Volkswagen pleads guilty to three Dieselgate criminal charges

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Re: Justice for the UK?

"It's due to a difference in the law, the EU regulations the UK follows in this regard doesn't specifically state that a bypass device/software for the test is illegal, whereas the US regulations do."

Bollocks.

Bypassing emission control is illegal in Eu on both company and individual driver level. The issue is that the only police forces with on-the-spot roadside emission checking equipment which actually enforce it are Germany, Austria and Switzerland. They ethnically profile it - you are not likely to be stopped unless you are sporting an Eastern European number plate and driving something which is obviously modded, smoking like the Admiral Kuznetsov on a really bad day or ridiculously old. I know people who have been nailed and have had cars impounded too for removing the catalyst to replace it with a LOUD FART PIPE (they made the mistake of going to Germany after that).

As I drive in the Eu quite a bit (up to 8K miles a year), I am not going to take the risk of copping the 1000Eu+ fine for bypassing emission control despite the relatively low likelihood to be stopped with UK number plates. So - no, I have not chipped my car back and I am not going to.

Now on the subject of chipping. It will be a good idea if the muppets from the Met start checking and enforcing it. One of the reasons why the air quality in London is so shite is that that >50% of the private hire cars and taxies are chipped or with a custom map to turn off the EGR. Yeah i know - tall order. Requires work to be done.

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Re: Justice for the UK?

UK follows in this regard doesn't specifically state that a bypass device/software for the test is illegal,

There is a bit of variation on this. Chipping (which on modern diesels pretty much shuts off the EGR), reprogramming your ECU map, etc are not explicitly prohibited by EU law and are (usually) allowed by the manufacturer. While they pretend that you cannot do it and it voids warranty, you actually can (especially if you just reprogram the map).

I bought my Isuzu DMAX truck without knowing that the previous owner has had a custom map uploaded in the ECU. It was doing ~ 38.5 MPG UK motorway (67MPh) , 33.5 MPG Eu motorway speeds (85 MPh). After the ECU reset when I changed the battery it is down to 35.5 MPG UK, 29.5 MPG Eu. The mod is well known and it basically kills off most of EGR in software. AFAIK you can do this to all GM and Ford vehicles sold in the Eu (no idea about the others). The manufacturer has done NOTHING to prevent this. Not surprising - the legislation does not force them to and they do not have to undergo a NOx emission test.

What the legislation asks of them is to comply with the test. Which they do. From there on it is a matter of PR and damage control. In this particular case VW decided to admit to cheating (they are reprogramming all UK ECUs for free) as a part of their damage control exercise. So did GM after the Zaphira debacle in Germany.

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Re: Natural Law v Governmental Law

My sympathies lie mostly with the car maker

Mine do not. It was possible to comply with the regs by buying technology from another manufacturer - Mercedes. Merc is extremely reasonable in their licensing terms. They DO NOT charge at all for licensing any technology which deals with car and human safety (it is a company policy) and they used to (I need to check if this is still the case) charge RAND for tech which deals with pollution and environmental compliance. The only thing which they (quite rightfully) insist on is that the fact that the tech is licensed is clearly mentioned. If you open any modern piss-driven diesel booklet you will find somewhere in it that it contains technology by Mercedes Benz GMBh.

This is purely about idiotic "do not lose face in front of more senior managers". Not even about corporate greed.

The worst part of it is that there is ABSOLUTELY NOTHING done about it at corporate governance level. There should have been a Shogun moment here with "The battle was over, the slaughter has began. 2000 heads were cut by blunt bamboo saw that day". Did they do anything about it - NO. That is also why I am not going to buy a car from VW group - not now, not in the immediate future. They did not actually heed the lesson and they just wrote it off as cost of doing business. There will be a repeat of this.

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Official: America auto-scanned visitors' social media profiles. Also: It didn't work properly

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Airstrip One

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Re: Home of the Brave

Based on the picture - maybe. If the second referendum does not go Standartenfuhrer May's way.

Note the insignia on the trooper's sleeve.

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Can you ethically suggest a woman pursue a career in tech?

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Re: "We need to promote women disproportionately, pay them equally or better..."

So let me ask again: when these women graduate, with their new STEM credentials, can we in all honesty invite them to work in the tech industry?

This sounds and is very American oriented.

I would suggest banning ALL fraternities and sororities to start with. You cannot have a non-sexist culture if you start student higher education by "rushing" them into what is the mother of all sexist indoctrinations (I am pretty sure that this idea alone has gotten me on the no-fly list).

Elsewhere around the world there are a few remnants mostly in humanities and management related disciplines (f.e. the eponymous "fuck a pig's head" clubs in some British universities). The STEM field however is pretty much indoctrination and typecasting free and that shows - just walk into any Eastern European university CS or Math department. The ladies are at 50%+ and they are pretty ones too (Fnarr... Fnarr..). If you take a short walk to the Biology building you will find "positive action" entrance criteria to even up the ratio so that the males are not sub-20%. And so on.

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Favored Swift hits the charts: Now in top 10 programming languages

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Re: Oddness in the rankings

I still find that C and Perl do everything I could ever need.

That is their virtue and their problem. You can hang yourself in a gazillion ways.

Projects using C solved that by developing coding style enforcement tools. Some are relatively loose (Linux kernel), some are insanely strict (QEMU). Perl and major perl projects never did. When you combine that with the fact that there is at least 5 ways to write any single thing you end up with severe difficulties in building large projects.

Compared to that Python had a coding standard and a suite of tools to enforce it very early on. That is why it has superseded Perl as the tool of choice for new projects despite still being inferior in terms of both library coverage and performance(*).

(*) While CPAN pretty much guarantees you that the license of anything on it is same as Perl so you can "just use it", PiP does not. I have been burned by that more than once and have had to rewrite projects in Perl in order not to rewrite whole libraries. And do not even get me started on the subject of the global lock in the Python interpreter.

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Re: A modest proposal

In fact, how about not putting her likeness at all?

Why not. Just put the likeness from the previous articles. I kind'a liked this one: https://regmedia.co.uk/2015/02/06/taylor_swift.jpg?x=648&y=348&crop=1

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Re: Interesting to see what people say/think is the new hottness and what's actually being used.

Ditto, Assembler. I don't even use assembler on PIC Micro Controllers."

Stock frame buffer driver for ARM written in C shipping with XOrg primitives tested on Allwinner A20/Mali 400. Unf**** usable. If you spin a window with a mouse you can end up with the window being 15 seconds behind the mouse.

A hack of the same driver (ab)using NEON in assembler using some fairly standard (pretty much lifted out of old Carmack's work) algos for bitblt. Tested on same platform. Flawless - no lag. Probably an >8 improvement in performance. You can look at the hack yourself - search for "turbo fb" on github

There is still some niches where assembler is of value - low level guts of drivers, low level memory management, etc. This is especially valid if you are (ab)using functionality for stuff which it was not intended for and hence not directly supported by the compiler. Another example are the checksumming and memory moving routines in the Linux RAID code (still mostly in ASM till this day).

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Apple Watch exec Bob Mansfield 'gets into secret Apple car'

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Re: Will they be using their usual designer?

Good, can we get Arnie to test drive it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGi6j2VrL0o

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Vodafone gets less flexible on flexible working Ts&Cs for own staff

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Re: Can someone explain to me the the issue around maternity leave?

The statement "how this is meant to suit those returning to work post-pregnancy.” leaves me baffled.

UK (and most Eu countries) law postulates:

1. That you are entitled to request officially flexible working conditions anytime while any of your children are up to 6 years old.

2. Your company must review the request and provide you with a reasonable explanation if they are incapable of accommodating it.

3. If they are being unreasonable you have a good discrimination or constructive dismissal case on your hands.

4. While there is no precedent base regarding changes in flexible working policy mid-contract you probably have a very good case to claim violation of this part of the labor code if they significantly downsize it or revoke mid-contract without going through the step 2 for each and every employee which has a child under 6.

This is the post-pregnancy angle and it will be very entertaining to watch how it bites IBM and the few other companies that have gone crazy on workhousing people lately get bitten by it.

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Re: "Smart working days should not be the same day each week"

Or bugger off on a holiday.

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DOOM'd! Quake god John Carmack lobs $22m sueball at ZeniMax

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You never know

Maybe a new DOOM monster - "The Suit". Think of an Archvile which produces subpoena shaped lost souls in addition to other standard Archvile capabilities - reviving stuff you thought you killed long ago, inflicting immense pain from a distance, etc.

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Force employees to take DNA tests for bosses? We've got a new law to make that happen, beam House Republicans

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The two things combine quite nicely

How wonderful that you had a gun related accident and you happen to have the correct genotype to ensure that your liver is not rejected when transplanted into one of the party sponsors.

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America's Marine Corp steamy selfies scandal, a Senate probe – and El Reg to the rescue

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Re: Ugh.

Ever heard of smokescreen? This is as far as the scandal is concerned. When you have issues like your (now ex) national security advisor being investigated for being a foreign agent you need something to distract the population.

As far as the pictures themselves...

In Anglo Saxon countries anything to do with naked t*ts or god forbid full frontal nudity results in an outrage on the part of the population conditioned on Daily Fail, Faux News, etc. The same thing in let's say in France, Germany or let's say Czech Republic would result in "Meah... So what?" The "outrageousness" of the pictures and the culture of "naked body shame" makes them valuable to a certain part of the USA population. They collect them and for them they have trophy value. UK is not far off by the way.

So the only long term to deal with this is to make it a cultural "Meah, so what?". What's the point to collect naked pictures of your colleagues when they do not give a damn and go to the naturist beach? The answer is none. As there is no trophy value they will stop being collected and shared. By themselves.

By the way, by making it such an issue, the value of the collectables actually increases - this is not actively searched by all kind of idiots that just have to have a bit of that "socially unacceptable forbidden fruit".

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Uber blackballs 'Greyball' tool it used to deny rides to regulators

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Re: Reward the little guy

Stops them having to declare it to the taxman that way

It is just UK being one of the last countries in Europe where the taxi meter does not also serve as a receipt printer as does not go for regular audits to the tax office (like all retail receipts/accounts elsewhere).

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all these regulatory woes would disappear

Really? In Paris? Berlin? Frankfurt?

I did not know that USA is capable of assembling an invasion force THAT BIG.

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Re: Reward the little guy

Yeah, I rewarded them in Madrid over Xmas.

The first one tried to take me from T4 to Alcobendas (1 mile) via the city center. The next morning the taxi company pretended that they need 2 taxis to load 2 adults and two kids with luggage. They did not do it very well as one of the cars was a Peugeot 5006 minivan. Then they drove from Alcobendas to T4 via T1. This time 8 miles.

Pox on both of their houses. Screw them both sidewize - I am renting.

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BOAR-ZILLA stalks Fukushima's dead zone

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Re: I prefer dangerous seafood

You can pick that one from one well known Posh UK supermarket which continues to sell salmon caught downwind of Fukushima.

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AMD does an Italian job on Intel, unveils 32-core, 64-thread 'Naples' CPU

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About effing time

We desperately need some competition in CPU space. Anything else aside we need it so Intel does not price gouge while sitting on its laurels.

If at least some of that trickles down into desktop space I am going to update my development desktop :)

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Your Amazon order is confirmed: Eutelsat via Blue Origin. Estimated delivery date: 2022

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Re: Say barge one more time mofo, I dare you, I double dare you!!!

River barges are PUSHED, not pulled.

While the shipping on the Danube and other large European rivers is nowhere near its former glory, you can still see on occasional 3-4 barge long river train carrying bulk cargo like sand or chemicals going down-river.

Like this one:

https://previews.123rf.com/images/cristinistor/cristinistor1411/cristinistor141100290/33816773-Barges-along-the-Danube-River-Stock-Photo.jpg

I am counting the "tug" pushing 8 ones at the same time in that photo.

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Bezos thinks he can do the same in less than 6 years ?

What are you talking about? Blue Origin was originally founded to go after the Ansari X prize, by 2022 it will be TWENTY TWO YEARS OLD. IT IS OLDER THAN SPACEX!!!

It is just being done the Bezos way - methodically and making sure that every component can stand on its own and be a product. Its engines are already sold to ULA, other components are also likely to be available on a wholesale or "as a service" package.

It is slower, it takes more time than building a vertical like SpaceX, but it gets you there too in the end. It is also pretty much guaranteed to return investment even if it does not put anything into orbit. The engine sales alone will take care of that.

In any case, I would not be surprised if they put a satellite in orbit in 2022. On schedule. As intended.

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Aah, all is well in the world. So peaceful, so– wait, where's the 2FA on IoT apps? Oh my gawd

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Err... There will NEVER BE 2FA on true IoT

At the bottom layer standard compliant IoT is supposedly compliant to ONVIF. The ONVIF security profile specifies a choice of two types of web auth. That's all.

The actual device WSDL files used in the SOAP to transport ONVIF have remnants of other SOAP methods - x509, keys, etc, but again NO 2FA.

The fundamental reason is that IoT is Machine To Machine. 2FA does not belong there. You cannot have 2FA when two dumb pieces of electronics are talking to each other. So even if we replace the horrid SOAPy abomination called ONVIF in the bottom layer, its M2M nature will stay. That means that architectural impossibility to do 2FA without a third "cloudy"/"orchestration" participant will stay too - the actual "things" do not have what it takes to do 2FA.

2FA comes into the puzzle only once you add a cloud service and when a human authenticates to that. That is not IoT - it is the cloud service (not for local services) interface to it.

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US Senator snaps on glove, probes insecure IoT toymaker CloudPets

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Re: Risk vs. Reward

make the next thing

It will not make anything. The whole scam works solely because of contract manufacturing. You do not make anything. If you made something, you would have had tangible assets and it would have taken some time for you to execute a "submerge and re-emerge elsewhere" routine.

The only way of dealing with these in the age of contract manufacturing is to make resellers liable for the tat so that we do not have the banned German batch of toys banned by the regulator re-appearing in UK Entertainer at a "sales" price with the floor staff setting them up for a pre-setup "Mommy buy me this fluffy one" ambush.

Presently, while the reseller is liable for traditional law issues such as fire and health and safety they have little or no liability for the digital bits. They can shrug and say - it is not a service offered by us, deal with the company offering it. This should change with the reseller being fully liable for any digital service bundled "at the moment of sale" with the goods they are selling.

This is not limited to toys by the way. The situation is the same with cameras and other tat. If you successfully slag them off in let's say an Amazon review (which I have), the result is that they put the tat on sale (so more people get it).

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Iconic Land Rover Defender may make a comeback by 2019

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Re: Needling me?

Rock solid, cheap, reliable, flexible, customisable, iconic and wonderful

Bollocks. If that was true, the lunatics around the Mediterranean firing ZPUs and Katushas at each other would have had them mounted on Landrovers. Funnily enough they are not.

The ones that are flush with money and Saudi and Qatari sponsors mount them on Toyota. It may be expensive, but "it is called Invincible for a reason".

The ones that really need cheap, solid, reliable and flexible, because they do not have a Sugar Daddy from an Oil State mount them on Mitsubishi or Isuzu (*).

The Landy because it is EXPENSIVE, UNRELIABLE and INFLEXIBLE compared to a modern truck does not show up anywhere in that equation. That is the reality - it is past its time and if it was not for the British army ordering it it would have had its production stopped 100 times by now.

As a proud owner of one of these I get stopped by the German anti-terror police patrol checkpoint outside Passau every time I come back from holiday. Despite not having any "mounted accessories". I have not noticed them stopping Landies by the way.

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Re: thanks to EU regulations

I do not think it is the emission regs that killed it (though they played a role too).

It is the pedestrian crash safety regs which killed it. They were delayed for light commercials because of British lobbying (with the Landy in mind), but finally came into force.

There is absolutely no way in hell or otherwise to adapt the old design to comply with those. If you whack a pedestrian with that square box front, that pedestrian is pretty much straight to the cemetery.

So regardless where it is made, if it is to be ever sold in Europe, it will not have the classic square front any more.

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Trump, Brexit, and Cambridge Analytica – not quite the dystopia you're looking for

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Re: In the original Foundation trilogy

Except if I remember correctly, Psychohistory only worked when applied to large numbers of people, and only on those who weren't aware of it?

1. It was applied to large number of people - millions of voters. Not so much "swing" ones, but mostly the ones that otherwise did not bother to vote.

2. The actual population it was applied to was not aware it was being targeted. They are still not aware they are being targeted as they are not the person who will read El Graunidad and El Reg.

What this means for democracy (regardless of what the dear professor with the lunatic opinion says) is that democracy is now purely a matter of money. Whoever has the money to pay for the datasources and the compute resource to utilize them has a distinct advantage in the next elections. Neither one comes cheap. You are looking at anything between 5 and 30-40 million "per application".

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US Marines seek a few supposedly good men ... who leaked naked pics of a few good women

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Re: Different hats

" I haven't quite managed to cast off the old-fashioned opinion that men and women are not physically and psychologically identical."

They are not. But that does not mean women are inferior. They are actually significantly more psychologically stable under prolonged stress conditions.

Ask any military pilot if he can fly 960 missions WITHOUT a parachute doing precision bombing from point blank range - turn your engine off, glide in until you can see the white of Horst's eyes and put a small (but deadly) 50kg right in-between his eyeballs. Now do it again. And again. And again. 800+ times. Night, after night, after night. From the first day of the war to the last. The WW2 record on the allied side if memory serves me right is 960 combat sorties and is held by a woman. Not a man.

While a male may show one-off extreme valor, if he has to do it on a repeat basis like this he will end up in a lunatic asylum (or be married to the bottle like my mom's adoptive father who was one of the handful of submarines who fought and survived the entire war from the first day to the last).

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Women in combat units are a social construct,

If it was a couple of decades back you could have told this to some of the surviving Night Witches or their colleagues from the 586 or 587 USSR aviation regiments.

Actually you can try repeating this today. Try telling it to this "social construct": https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/mar/18/putin-honours-syria-veterans-wider-russian-involvement

Just tell us when you are going to do it so we can get around to watch the show and call the ambulance for whatever remains of you towards the end.

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You do realize the US Military is all-volunteer?

Any military does brainwashing, regardless is it volunteer or not.

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For instance, it's the only place I've been where shouting was considered polite behavior.

Not really, you clearly have not worked for a large Chinese networking vendor.

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Success in the bedroom breeds success in the boardroom – research

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Re: elevated mood

My exact thought.

Now, the level of testosterone required to get to the dopamine point is likely to be something that is with you 24x7 and long after the dopamine has subsided.

Unless you are somewhere in Scandinavia, the boardrooms are predominantly male and your aggression level is in a good correlation with your chance of climbing further up the ladder (once you get on it).

The whole paper is a classic example of correlation != causation.

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A mooving tail of cows, calves and the Internet of Things

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Now that is a useful IoT application

That is how IoT should be - nicely splattered all over by REAL Bovine Fecal matter. Not the verbal, marketeering and hipster diarrhea variety. While that is ALSO Bullsh*t it is not the useful kind.

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Watt the f... Dim smart meters caught simply making up readings

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The flip side of that is the integrator (needed to convert the output to something proportional to current) needs a bandwidth-limited response, otherwise it'll tend towards infinite gain at DC & read all sorts of hash as load current at higher frequencies...

The numbers quoted sound like there is no circuit level integration. It is digital and the differences between the meters come from the differences in the sampling frequency and the measurement algorithm.

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UK Home Office spy powers unit pretended it was a private citizen in Ofcom consultation

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You may not have a SIP exit route to the country in question

There is a number of countries out there which have a combination of all of:

1. Ridiculous landline termination rate

2. Ban on VOIP in all shapes and forms including filters on their version of the "Great Firewall Of X" as well as sending in "cops" to beat up VOIP operators for good measure before jailing them.

3. Somewhat reasonable roaming rates for their own customers which are less than the ridiculously extortionate international landline termination rate.

The countries in question are mostly in the Middle East, Subsaharan Africa (hence the terrorist angle) as well as a few last holdouts of Cobbly and Wobbly monopoly on islands in the lesser Antilles.

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Pence v Clinton: Both used private email for work, one hacked, one accused of hypocrisy

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Re: A suprise?

Republican hypocrisy?

Why just republicans? I can think of a handful of modern politicians which have not been caught as hypocrites. The remaining thousands (if not tens of thousands) are all glaring hypocrites.

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VMware bumps certification exam prices, one by $2700

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Re: Not much incentive to make such systems easier to use

My exact thought - they have been brought in line with CCIE and its Juniper counterpart.

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Intel's dying Atom chips strike again: Netgear recalls four ReadyNAS, Wi-Fi management lines

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No it i will cause this one to be marked as fissile matter

Or may be cold fusion - fuses by itself into a lump

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RAF pilot sacked for sending Airbus Voyager into sudden dive

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Interesting

I probably missed this when reading the original incident description.

Am I reading this right? According to the accident investigation report, the meatware failed completely and it was the autopilot that took things into its own hands and pulled the plane out of a dive? I think everybody onboard owes a quite few beers to an unnamed Airbus software engineer.

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Java? Nah, I do JavaScript, man. Wise up, hipster, to the money

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Re: Crippled C++

I have no clue why Java

Google made the (IMHO fatal) mistake to attach an automated defibrillator to it. It is called Android and (in the process of making Android serviceable) Guava, GSON and the rest of the support train.

As long as Android and its support train lives so will Java. If it was not for that, it would have been a niche language on the dusty shelf next to Pascal by now.

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Uber loses court fight over London drivers' English language tests

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Yes, oh Yes

Can we have a follow-up UK wide please.

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If we must have an IoT bog roll holder, can we at least make it secure?

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Let the market decide. If you want an internet-connected toiled holder, fine.

Lovely idea... Reporting diarrhea live on twitter. Oh, I forgot, that is just twitter's business as usual.

So nothing to see here, move along.

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