* Posts by Voland's right hand

3709 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

Chinese bloke cycles 500km to get home... in the wrong direction

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: How Many Trolls ???

Is this the bus going to the airport?

Yes, yes, it is the bus going to the airport

Pointing at the bus going in the opposite direction. What about that one? Does that go to the airport?

Yes, yes, that one goes to the airport.

7
0

Trump lieutenants 'use private email' for govt work... but who'd make a big deal out of that?

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: I would not call them "personal" email accounts

Trump rhetoric about "draining the swamp"?

As someone said on the register a few weeks back. He is draining it all right. You can see all the loverly reptiles out on dry land ready to engorge themselves now.

6
0

Northumbria Uni fined £400K after boffin's bad math gives students a near-killer caffeine high

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: HOW???

My exact thought.

Also, 30G will have some serious difficulty dissolving in a glass of orange juice. Caffeine is not that soluble in cold water.

If anything prior to that did not ring any alarm bells, the fact that 90% of it has remained on the bottom of the glass should have given some food for thought.

2
0

Disk-nuking malware takes out Saudi Arabian gear. Yeah, wipe that smirk off your face, Iran

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

This is well known as: "One (well informed) birdie told me so".

Attacks like this usually leave no traces so it is all conjectures based on target choice and "who will benefit from this".

2
0

Forget Tony Stark's Iron Man – exosuits of the future will be spandex

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

The issue is actually attachment.

You can easily provide assist to the foot as you have a natural attachment point in the form of a boot.

Now try to provide assist to the upper portion of the leg. Hard exosuit does not have issues here as it applies the assist to the shell. In a soft one you will need to drill the bone somewhere near the knee to fix attachment points to it.

2
0

AI eggheads: Our cancer-spotting code rivals dermatologists

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

If the algorithm can be easily used on mobile phones,

Last time I checked tensor flow used python. So unless you are running a BlackBerry (they did have a python runtime), the answer is no.

0
0

UK ISPs may be handed cock-blocking powers

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

You forgot the really horrible one

Tory conferences - age verification definitely needed.

20
3

Congratulations – you're looking better than ever this morning!

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Render times are getting better

Actually, bandwidth to the satellite is getting better. The primary limitation was and still is the time to download the images.

1
0

I'LL BE BATT: Arnie Schwarzenegger snubs gas guzzlers for electric

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: 'charged to 80 per cent in just 25 minutes'

but it's still not too long to spend at a motorway service station.

It is. Petrol/Diesel queue increment is sub-5 minutes. It is even less in countries like Spain where it is customary to fuel up and move to the parking lot to free your slot before you pay. So even if you have to wait for 2-3 cars in front of you, you are still OK. Now imagine that re-factored for 25 minute wait. Now, refactor it further allowing for the occasional tw*t in a petrol BMW, Jag or RangeRover parking in the electric bay because it is closest to the station and they feel their privilege entitles them to it.

So unless every parking slot in the service station parking lot has a charger and that charger is compatible with all cars this is a no go.

11
3
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Difficult to blame him

He is a politician and AFAIK he has done business school remotely.

You give someone like him two options one a few tens of M, the other north of 1Bn. The choice does not need guessing. By the way, the money the leccy utility is asking for charging stations is ridiculous. End of the day they will be getting revenue from every single one of them (probably at a premium compared to you @home tariff).

11
0

DARPA's 'flying wing' drone inches closer to lift-off

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Reinventing are we?

I guess a lot of things are more practical when you're not lugging around a couple of hundred pounds of fragile meat with all the associated life support stuff.

Not as much of a problem of fragile meat as not having the right tech at the time. Today, you can fit high res cameras and distance sensors in the tail at the cost of a few tens of dollars and project the whole affair onto the pilot's HUD. This was not available in the 1950es.

Similarly, you can implement a fully actuated platform on deck which will compensate for some of the bobbing of the ship in rough seas allowing the craft to land on the intended ship class - the ones that carry helicopters today. That was not really an option 60 years ago - the electronics and sensors to control it were not available.

A very interesting option would be using this as an early warning system. It can definitely stay at much higher altitude and most likely stay up for longer than a rotary AWACS.

0
0

How Lexmark's patent fight to crush an ink reseller will affect us all

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

I want to see the printer design

I want to see the printer design capable of accommodating a golf club as a printer head.

When I close my eyes I see a nightmarish vision of the ancient IBM typewriter style daisy wheel with golf clubs attached to it. It will print all right. Very deep imprints - in whatever you put into where the clubs hit.

1
0

Shocked, I tell you. BT to write off £530m over 'improper' Italian accounts practices

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: A corrupt Italian business

Just a thought... Does BT have a anything in Greece?

0
0

Make America, wait, what again? US Army may need foreign weapons to keep up

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Military-industrial 101

Who supplies most of the EU in weapons? We do.

It is less and less actually. With the exception of fighter aircraft and some of their armament where the idiotic F35 programme is a political issue most other continental Eu weapons are now locally supplied.

If memory serves me right, nobody in NATO imports USA tanks and fighting vehicle. It is either indigenous for the countries which have own designs or Leopard 2E which is German. Same for fighting vehicles - indigenous, German or Austrian. Small arms - indigenous, German or Austrian. Artillery - indigenous, German, Austrian or Swedish (Bofors). Missiles - same as last one + French and Italian (Finmechanica). Ships - nobody in his sane mind outside USA will buy a US built ship today.

Compare this to 30-40 years ago when most of NATO was using USA tanks, fighting vehicles, etc.

17
0

Furby Rickroll demo: What fresh hell is this?

Voland's right hand
Silver badge
Pirate

Chucky wants to plaaaaaaay

Furbie, sorry Chucky wants to plaaaaay

9
0

Trumping free trade: Say 'King of Bankruptcy' Ross does end up in charge of US commerce

Voland's right hand
Silver badge
Devil

Re: Same idiocy regardless of location

Yes the USA education system is a bit crap in most places but the way the US has traditionally made up for it is by stealing all the best and brightest

The best and the brightest do not do grunt work on the shop floor. Modern manufacturing requires at the very least secondary technical or technical baccalaureate. In Germany you will find it difficult NOT to graduate with a secondary technical. In USA and UK you get a liberal arts butt-wiper and you are useless for any _MODERN_ manufacturing until you have spent 40K+ for a BS degree on top of that. 40K is not an investment which fits the economic realitites for a factory floor grunt.

So sorry, no bonus - with the current educational systems UK and USA are not competitive and will never be until they start subsidizing technical education at all levels to at least a fraction of what Germany, South Korea, China, etc do. No tariffs, walls, revocation of treaties, quoting at Tory conferences from the Mein Kampf will help here.

4
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Same idiocy regardless of location

There is no plan.

In order to have a plan you need to EDUCATE the workforce. It does not matter if it is the factory floor or the coders in the open plan office. You need to produce educated labor in bulk quantities.

Now, how the f*** can this work out with USA or UK educational systems requiring tens of thousands of thousands to traverse? Here is some news for you - it f***ing does not.

The secret to German industrial dominance in Europe is the German technical education. It produces qualified labor with the efficiency of a VW or BMW plant. Or vice versa. It is massively subsidized too. Similarly, we may not like South Korean (or other countries with "cheap" labor) educational systems, but they do produce the people to fill the positions.

USA and UK cannot and will not compete. Not any time soon. Especially with the current USA education secretary and her desire to disassemble the few remaining working bits in the USA educational system to please the religious nutters.

68
1

Bane of Silicon Valley patents sets its sights on Rackspace and NetApp

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Bonanza is coming to an end

The Supreme court decision in the Samsung vs Apple case forces "damages" to be calculated based on the contribution of a patent to a product. Even if successful, a troll no longer gets all profit from a product for the duration of the "violation". It gets only a fraction proportional to a patent value.

1. This breaks the whole rocket docket concept as now the "value" of the patent and its contribution to a product has to be argued in order for an award to be assigned.

2. If a defendant pulls 2000+ patents at that point as essential to implement a product, good luck trying to claim more than pennies for one infringing patent (regardless of is it stupid, ridiculous, idiotic or actually something real which has been bought by the troll from an asset fire sale).

I do not see how you can feed the parasites feeding off the trolling business with these limitations in place. Check. Mate.

5
0

Government to sling extra £4.7bn at R&D in bid to Brexit-proof Britain

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Priorities

My exact thoughts.

The electronics, software, etc R&D in UK is mostly moribund. There is a bit of stuff going on here and there and a few bright spots like Arm. Otherwise it is nowhere near where it was 15 years ago. It has been superseded (in terms of investment interest) by biotech and pharma through and through.

It is quite easy to quantify too - 20 years ago Cambridge and Guildford was 70%+ telecoms, electronics and software. It is now 70%+ biotech and pharma.

So, the government has decided to try to flog the already dead IT horse (all these business long moved elsewhere) to neigh and run the grand national. Good luck with that one - it will take much more than 5Bn.

It has also decided to kill the current "goose that is laying the golden eggs". Biotech and pharma is run by 70%+ Eu labor. UK simply does not produce anything like the amount of native graduates in this area. So it neither gets public financing nor the labor it needs. One act of gratuitous self harm is followed by another act of gratuitous self-harm. Fantastic Mrs May. Sheer unadulterated genius. Whatagal...

16
3

CIA boss: Make America (a) great (big database of surveillance on citizens, foreigners) again!

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: "At least he is doing it properly - law and regs first"

Just because he can ignore/massage whatever constitution Russia have

That is the rub. He actually does not - you are listening too much to Faux and the Beeb. Every single thing is put into a law first. Then it is enforced. By the way, as a comparison, it is significantly more difficult for Милиция to get personal details from a SP or Content Provider in Russia than in Great Britain. You have to get a court order which can be contested. In UK the police invokes RIPA and the SP immediately bends over.

and being a journalist/human rights activist it's pretty dangerous there. True. It is courtesy of our handywork too. If we did not invest that much into regime change operations pushing through human rights organizations, being a part of one there would not be that dangerous.

Putin himself is a product of our regime change operations. We (directly or through our middle-easter friends) gave a few billion bucks to "freedom fighters" around their borders. These after that went to use maternity wards as human shields, blow up trolleybuses, take whole theatres as hostages and murder wholesale whole primary schools - you name it. If we did not finance them, there would have been no grounds for a macho strongman to arise. Russia would have continued to descend into 3rd world country status unaided. It would have been ruled by some adorable Eltzin-like alcoholic and be of no relevance on the world scene. Instead of that, we got it where it is today - Putin's emergence is the mother of all blowbacks from f***ed up regime change operations. He, like it or not is our creation.

11
1
Voland's right hand
Silver badge
Holmes

Re: Lying Sack of Trump

How is Putin the model?

One of the first things which Putin did after coming to power was to force the issue by law that any ISP should carry a black box. We now know that those were metadata collection probes.

Faux and other media monkeys howled their ass off and flung poo in his general direction for months for that one.

It is funny that what he did is exactly what our guys went on to do. The sole difference is that he put it in law and regulations.

So Putin is indeed the model. He is the model not just in USA. Israel is adopting his NGO funding laws to the letter, there are European countries following suit too. At least he is doing it properly - law and regs first, action later. Not the other way around and then filing a gigantic Communications Data Bill.

23
1

350,000 Twitter bot sleeper cell betrayed by love of Star Wars and Windows Phone

Voland's right hand
Silver badge
Devil

whereas a computer algorithm would have a hard time to realize the anomaly."

Bollocks.

An antifraud algo which does not account for population density _AND_ velocity to move between previous activity location? Are you kidding me?

3
4

Chevy Bolt electric car came alive, reversed into my workbench, says stunned bloke

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Odd belief

Ever tried to get a car moving after the break cables have frozen solid? A HUGE chunk of USA has high humidity and temperatures in the -10 or lower zone in winter. Even if there is snow if you east coast humidity _AND_ unprotected break cables you can have quite a bit of fun.

Now, the fact that the rather sane habit of not using the handbrake in _WINTER_ has spread to the southern USA and has become a standard in summer is indeed quite dumb. So is unfortunately the design of having a significant part of the break cables completely unprotected under the car.

23
9

What's the biggest danger to the power grid? Hackers? Terrorists? Er, squirrels

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Only 15?

How long does it take to remove a destroyed pylon and replace it exactly?

The issue is not the time to replace it. Same goes for the substations.

The issue is that generating capacity will have to go offline and in emergency dump mode. If you take offline using the emergency procedure a large coal or nuclear power plant it will take days to reconnect it and you need to bring things up slowly bit by bit as the capacity comes online. You also risk damage if you go offline in emergency mode - after the grid collapses not _ALL_ of the capacity will be coming back without repairs.

If you hurry to bring it back online because you have the politicos breathing down your neck you are likely to overload the system, it will go into emergency dump mode again and you need to start from scratch. With some more damage to account for.

This is where wind, hydro and other renewables are quite handy by the way - most of them are on/off nearly instantaneously, while they cannot carry the grid on their own they can definitely help you balance the load while you are bringing the capacity online.

2
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge
Coat

Re: No birds dropping bread?

Birds dropping bread is a minor issue.

A Vulture or another large bird of prey taking a dump - different story. It is actually part of the design brief for substations in North America and other places where these can be found to be bird sh*t proof.

Think of the wonderful present from the friendly wood pidgeon or seagull which has graced your windshield. Multiply by at least 10 (if not 100) and make it a bit more runny. Apply between wires carrying 600KV. Enjoy the fun.

By the way - the standard British substation designs _ARE_ _NOT_. As we reintroduce more and more birds of prey and their population recovers we are going to see some fun.

Me coat (the one with the big torch and the candles in the pocket).

1
0

Windows 10 networking bug derails Microsoft's own IPv6 rollout

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: It is not the backward, it is the forward bit which is the issue

SO, Micro-shaft: What's SO HARD???

Managing the network. For lots of clients. Properly. Something you do not need to do. Size matters I am afraid.

In order to manage the network fully, Microsoft uses DHCP and couples that with DNS integrating the whole thing off AD.

That works only half-way on v6 because v6 was engineered originally to provide such information off upstream router(s). First and foremost, what is being provided in the router advertisement is only a subset of what you can and should get off DHCP in a well managed network. Second, it equated management == router which is major design limitation. Third, it makes all clients equal which is clearly incorrect in large networks. Different clients get different answers (that is the case even on my home network).

What Microsoft is doing is the right thing (for once) - trying to manage it correctly via DHCP.

What is getting in the way is the fundamentally broken v6 ip autoconfiguration design which makes all clients equal and provides them with information off a router. The router should not be an active configuration management element in a large network. It should shift packets, not perform configuration duties.

If v6 clients could get v6 information in their v4 DHCP request the whole thing would have been a non-issue. Unfortunately, due to the infinite wisdom of some people who have not done real work for decades and mostly make a living by doing raving lunatic rants about the superiority of v6 that was prohibited in the spec.

14
3
Voland's right hand
Silver badge
Devil

It is not the backward, it is the forward bit which is the issue

The issue is that IPv6 firmly lives in a retro style alternate reality as far as address configuration is concerned.

Namely, when the protocol was designed, someone, in his infinite wisdom decided that IP address assignment and configuration is a major problem. As a result it was stuffed into the protocol in a manner which is _NOT_ expandable in the future. It is a fixed feature set by far inferior to what v4 networks get via DHCP today. Very cute. Very retro. Very useless. Unfortunately expected by most implementations (including Android). (*)

To add insult to injury as a result of the rabid multicast obsession existing in v6, DHCP for v6 was moved off broadcast and ports 67-68 to multicast and a different port making it subtly incompatible in the process.

The end result of mixing retro and deliberate breakage is that a lot of the v6 networks do not work properly for some clients because they need the "other" configuration method.

To complete the raving lunatic design idiocy fest of v6 ip configuration v4 DHCP is prohibited to offer v6 addresses and configuration information. THAT is criminal in its lunacy as it only exists because a number of lunatics (most of them are known by name by the way) who were instrumental in making v6 being adopted so slowly deliberately denied this rather obvious configuration fallback option. In the name of "purity" of the "beautiful" v6 lunatic asylum.

(*) That is MSFT problem as they are trying to roll out the network managed fully by DHCP + DNS as used by AD and not v6 autoconfiguration which is done by your upstream router.

18
4

South Korea to upgrade national stereo defence system for US$16m

Voland's right hand
Silver badge
Trollface

Re: Gangnam style

Korea would be large video projectors to display K-pop.

You sure you spelled it correctly? Should have been K-porn.

By the way, as most dictators of "Kommunist" (quotes really needed) lineage the Kim dynasty regime is more prudish than your typical 16th century convent.

Comes with the territory - you could pretty much plot the prudishness level in the USSR and ex-Warsaw pact 30+ years ago. The more kommienuts - the more prudish.

If the goal is to outrage them, showing some "action", especially the one they consider "perverted" is a much better idea than broadcasting Pop. It may end up in an invasion though...

0
0

Linux is part of the IoT security problem, dev tells Linux conference

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Not dumb enough

Even the useful devices become too vulnerable by being too smart. It is NOT necessary for a CCTV camera to host a complex *ix OS. Basic CCTV systems have been working securely and stupidly for six decades.

Yes and no. The *ix OS comes courtesy of image analysis. Basic (emphasis on basic) CCTV systems cannot cope with image analysis at the rates generated by modern cameras. Try feeding 10 H264 HD streams into let's say motion even on a fairly hefty CPU and watch the show.

While you can (in theory) implement all the relevant image analysis _AND_ alert actions based on image analysis on a non-*ix OS, it is not worth it. You are likely to end up with something broken and insecure in a different way (f.e. hackable via its alert submission channel). The idea of moving to IPoE + image analysis on the cameras is actually sound. So is the idea of using general purpose OS on the Arm SoC which is running the camera in order to run the analysis there. The overall cost of Cat6 + cameras + DVR/Alert management + power is already half the cost of a comparable "basic CCTV" system and dropping further.

The control protocol however (ONVIF) and the implementations of said control protocol in the field are complete and utter sh*te. The people who came up with it deserve to be subjected to some form of cruel and unusual punishment.

3
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: No, the enemy is the idiot who wrote the specs

I'd sooner trust Joe Embedded Developer

You have the worst of those worlds in this area as ONVIF and Co are web based specs - soap over HTTP. So you have both embedded developers doing customer facing http work and Wally Web Developer doing system configuration. With the results expected from either.

8
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: No, the enemy is the idiot who wrote the specs

It is not Linux which is the problem. The alternative OS is likely to either use the same horrid, buggy and insecure SOAP, RTSP and HTTP off-the-shelf code or even worse - the developers rolling their own.

The regulation is already there - I have so far tested only one legal IP CCTV camera. Funnily enough it had an instruction in German. All the other ones were violating DPA and other Eu privacy and data processing related directives, thus making them illegal to be sold.

The problem is that the toothless corporate arse licker known as DPA in the UK will never ever go as far as prohibiting an item for import for violating the regs. Most other countries are not much better.

18
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

No, the enemy is the idiot who wrote the specs

If you look at the "standard" specs for IoT protocols, such as ONVIF they cannot be implemented on a small system with minimal attack surface. The spec requires a fully blown SOAP implementation, RTSP implementation, HTTP implementation and god knows what else. The Internet facing attack surface is gigantic by design.

This is just the standard - before we add all the backdoors for illegal (as they violate the DPA) luser friendly applications which report all of the activities in your house to a server in Shenzen so that a similarly insecure android app works in order for the customer to spy on his household.

This "insecure by design" spec + extra "market requirements" is then given to be implemented by "Joe Embedded Developer" who never had to write any secure code in his entire career.

The results are as expected and should be fixed at the root. Just take all authors of the ONVIF spec and march them off the plank somewhere in the middle of the China Sea. The local flora and fauna will do the rest (*).

(*) There is no need to march the marketing which spec-ed the android app reporting you to a server in Shenzen. That can and should be dealt with by enforcing import laws. Any piece of kit running this software is illegal and should be diverted straight to recycling at customs.

25
1

Britain collects new naval tanker a mere 18 months late

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Maggy what have we done... @Hans1

@Hans 1

Land does not have the right to self-determination. People inhabiting the land do and like it or not, the land goes with them.

It is also important to apply this rule fairly too all concerned and not only when it suits us such as:

Kosovans can have the right to self-determination and join Albania (which they will do the moment they can), but Russians and Bulgarians living along the Dnestr in Moldova cannot. Croatians have the right to self-determination, but Russians living in Crimea do not. Scottish have the right to self-determination only when we can rig the referendum by promising lies left right and center which we do not intend to keep and so on. The moment it starts smelling like they will win it we tell them that no, they cannot have it as Westminster will not grant it.

The right either exists or it does not. If Falklands, Seuta, Gibraltar, Jersey, Guernsey and Co are entitled to it, well then so are other places where a majority of the population in a region does not quite fancy being citizens of the country which gave them their current passports. That by the look of it includes you too - you should be able to vote and you can vote.

6
2
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Maggy what have we done...

If it was not for the Nips being so good at building ships,

The yards would still be open on the Clyde...

Just South Koreans nowdays. Otherwise Roger Waters and Pink Floyd are still spot on.

14
0

Uncle Sam sues Oracle for 'screwing over Asian, black and women staff'

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Why is Oracle still relevant?

The support contracts for them are not. The real money spent by the customers and vendors building on top is not in the database, it is in what they pay for it to be supported.

Also, Oracle is not just databases - it is ERP, Finance and HR packages sitting on top of them. I am not aware of anything free in that area which is worth mentioning. I would have loved to be able to get away from those, but the alternatives are either even more expensive and cumbersome (SAP) or rather limited in their functionality and scale (Microsoft and Co).

4
4

Smart bombs, smart bullets – now guided smart artillery shells, thanks to DARPA dosh

Voland's right hand
Silver badge
Devil

Re: The USA way of doing things

Typically it would cost several allied tanks to kill one Tiger (for all it's faults, and it had a few).

With one exception - if it was unfortunate to run into a Zveroboi ambush. This was the only piece of equipment allies had which could kill a Tiger from any angle including frontal with one shot. It simply ripped its whole gun touret out if it hit. Superweapon engineering? Why bother, just use some really, really really brute force.

Going back to the overall topic - what happens when a superweapon meets a piece of low tech using the principle "do not force it, use a MUCH larger hammer". The superweapon has its head ripped off.

2
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: The USA way of doing things

T34 v Tiger 5. In the end experience, training and numbers

Actually, mostly numbers and strategy to match.

When Germans captured T26s and BTs in Spain and later early T34s and BT7 in USSR they were horrified. It could do (barely) 300-500km on one chainset, needed full fluid change and complete transmission and engine overhaul after 500km, etc. The could not "get it" how you can fight a war in this. Well, they should have just picked up Tuhachevski's papers off the shelf and read them (Guderian actually did, but by that point nobody listened to him).

According to Tuhachevski's analysis war is a rhythmic affair (there is nothing new here, you can find some of these ideas going back to Von Clausevits and "Der Crieg"). it is not continuous, especially when fighting over large territory. You attack, consolidate your gains and defend your positions, regroup, give your troups a rest, replenish resources, then attack again. There ain't such thing as continuous BlitzKrieg in a war theater the size of Russia or the whole of Europe. When you do this using modern tank warfare (according to Tuhachevski and those of his students Stalin missed to execute), you should couple this rhythm to the maintenance cycle. Attack, establish new positions, put all tanks in a field garage for an oil change, chain change and transmission overhaul. If need be, replace the whole tank. Then do it again. T34 was literally built to match this strategy pattern.

If you look at it Russians were very badly beaten in WW2 when they deviated from this songsheet, in the summer of 41 and the summer of 42 (Harkov) because the clue-less homicidal vicar offspring could not add 2 and 2 strategywize and ordered the impossible. When he was pushed aside, the ones who knew the songbook and played by it kicked the German's ass. If you look at the whole war from winter of 42 onwards Russians played it strictly by this book including a number of cases where they refused to comply with allied requests to advance. In reality they could not - you cannot advance when half of your tanks are in bits in a garage or waiting for their turn to be in bits.

The moral of this story is - super duper weapons are useless against reasonable weapons in big numbers combined with appropriate strategy. In fact USA used this themselves - they used numbers in tank, aviation and naval warfare same as Russians in WW2. Germans had the better weapons by far - jets, tanks, ultra long range artillery, submarines, missiles - you name it. It did not help them in the slightest.

12
1
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: The USA way of doing things

A case to point: NASA spent millions of dollars developing a pen

Not NASA. Parker, unsolicited and tried to sell it to NASA which surprise, surprise used a pencil.

As far as Americans trying to stick an ungodly amount of tech into anything, that is mostly limited to weapons research. It is also fairly recent - f.e they did not do it in WW2.

It is unfair and incorrect to generalize that over all of the USA.

3
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

The USA way of doing things

It is the USA way of doing things.

The design philosophy is: "You make the smartest super-duper ultra-guided fire and forget shell/missile/bullet".

If you compare this to what Russians, Israeli, even French do - they use multiple relatively dumb multiple pursuers and some intelligence in the fire control on where to place the pursuers initially. Instead of really hairy engineering and 1M lines of code for a single ultra-intelligent shell, you use a few pages of really hairy math and some algos to solve numerically particularly nasty differential equations. High up-front cost, very low cost of the actual weapons themselves.

If you compare both mathematically, you get significantly higher kill probability with the second approach at a fraction of the cost. It is trivial to prove too - various proofs both from game theory and from optimal control exist for that going about 30 years back.

If we apply game theory to the "meeting of minds"... Err... I am not sure I like the results. In fact I seriously dislike the results, because the second approach is likely to win every time. Time to tell the yanks to keep their stuff to themselves and buy some weapons from Israel, Turkey, Germany, Sweden or somewhere else (*).

(*)UK is missing in that list because BAE is so engrossed in fitting into the American weapons design gestalt that it is by all means an American company. It talks like a USA arms supplier, it thinks like a USA arms supplier, it is in fact a USA arms supplier - nothing British about it at design level.

20
1

Chrome dev explains how modern browsers make secure UI just about impossible

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: HTML5 can do WHAT?!

That is only one of the issues. HTML5 can do most things one has come to associate with a local GUI toolkit. In fact, it is a replacement for a local GUI, multimedia and communications toolkit. That by itself is all right, it is better than executing foreign code... Or is it? All ads are effectively foreign code - they come and go via javascript insertion. Most websites also use tons of 3rd party code. More insertion. And more, and more and more. Each and every one of them becomes a part of the document and is nearly impossible to isolate in its own security domain.

That part of html has had practically zero thought about it and is not likely to be fixed in a subrelease like let's say HTML5.1 either. It is hear to stay and be beaten on the head with large and blunt instruments called noscript and adblock.

14
0

Chelsea Manning sentence slashed by Prez Obama: She'll be sprung in the spring

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Good on Obama!

War is horrific, I rather prefer it that way, as it keeps the village idiots in power from declaring it every other damned day

That is precisely why they should not be hidden, censored and whitewashed.

4
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge
Devil

Re: Manning up

Incorrect spelling.

TrumpoLumpen, not TrumpoLumpa

3
0

Li-ion tamers: Boffins build battery with built-in fire extinguisher

Voland's right hand
Silver badge
Black Helicopters

Phopsphoro-organics

I wonder, does mentally adding some fluorine when seeing a formula of a phosphor-organic compound count as a thought crime... Probably I should stop wondering, I already hear the sound of black helicopters outside.

On a less humorous note - I frankly have some doubts about "low toxicity" of anything which has phosphorus and organics. Probably, it is because I studied chemistry when we had the VX family as a part of the "toxicology" (freshly renamed from "chemical warfare agents") course. Thankfully, it no longer had the lab part (*).

(*) You make only one mistake when synthesizing this stuff. It is usually your last

6
0

Devs reverse-engineer 16,000 Android apps, find secrets and keys to AWS accounts

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Trivial

Create an instance/customer specific key, use the key to authenticate to a service, fetch keys from there. The moment you no longer need them, dispose them and ask again.

1. It allows you to migrate the cloud service. The only "permanent" part is relatively lightweight and 100% under your control.

2. It allows you to blacklist dodgy app instances.

3. It allows you to use multiple upstream services.

And so on...

0
0

CBI: Brexit Britain needs a 'sensible and flexible' immigration programme

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: @Doctor Syntax: It will be horrific

Just make sure they are shipped in and out each year, and May can say they aren't immigrants.

Who told you that the Eu will not throw a spanner of its own in these works. They are aware that the employers of said seasonal labor constitute the core membership and electorate of Teresa May's party. If they want to start returning favors they will definitely find a way to throw a spanner in the works here (like taxing them seasonal labor exported to the UK on the Eu side NI and Mandatory Health Insurance. If there is no declared income, tax a fixed fee). That will make any such labor prohibitively expensive overnight while hitting and hurting specifically core BrExit sponsors and electorate. If you think that the Eu is not pissed off enough start pondering such ideas...

3
0

Two new Raspberry Pi models emerge steaming from the oven

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Thermals

Concur.

I tried to build a DIY timecapsule for off-site backups using it. It was quickly reaching 70C under load and starting to go all funny - processes dying, fs corruption, etc. Even clocking it down did not help.

I ended having to replace the of Pi with a Banana for this reason. No thermal issues ever since. In fact, given a choice between the new Pi and a Banana I would always choose a Banana - significantly more reliable, especially for apps which do a lot of network or USB work.

4
8

SpaceX makes successful rocket launch

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

I'm looking forward to the day when it becomes not even news.

Nearly there. The best indicator is right in front of your eyes. El Reg could not be arsed to pull up any pics and used a stock picture. That is one of the clearest tell-tale signs that this is not really news any more.

5
0

BT installs phone 'spam filter', says it'll strain out mass cold-callers

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: A Typical Scam Call I Get

Typical spam call I DO NOT GET.

Hint: I retired BT service in favour of first sipgate, later teleappliant in 2007. My "fixed" lines are actually terminated on an asterisk PBX.

I never had a cold call ever since 2007. I used to have some anti-spam rules on the Asterisk, but dropped them as they were not getting hit at all for years.

The reason you get scam calls is because BT directly sold them your data.

So all this means that now the cold callers will be paying an extra premium in order to get to you direct to BT. Sweet revenue, here it comes.

5
4

Embrace the world of pr0nified IT with wide open, er, arms

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Laser printers are always “faster” and “last longer”

when it comes down to it last hardly

Err... Beg to differ there. The inkjet I used to use as home office printer is now nearly 7 years old, still running and surviving its 5th < -20C winters at my summer house. It is retired there after being replaced by a similarly home office grade laser printer which is now 5+ years old, probably past 100K pages (severely abused by the SWMBO to print exam preparation materials) and still running OK.

You just need to chose very carefully - same as with any IT equipment. Cheaper today is not always cheapest in the long term once you have calculated its running costs over its full depreciation period (around 7 years in our house).

0
0

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017