* Posts by Voland's right hand

3409 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

And with one stroke, Trump killed the Era of Slacktivism

Voland's right hand
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Re: One thing we can count on with Trump

It might be fun, seeing Carly as FCC chair...

Wash your mouth.

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After Microsoft joins Linux, Google Cloud joins .NET Foundation

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Wrong Pig

That pig needs afterburners and some weapon pods to carry napalm. Hell is freezing over and desperately needs an emergency warm-up

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PoisonTap fools your PC into thinking the whole internet lives in an rPi

Voland's right hand
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Re: Mac can be pawned too.

By the way, if memory serves me right DSL Nation had the 0.0.0.0/0 DHCP + reply to all arps with itself madness patented. So this guy may end up receiving a patent lawyer nastygram shortly.

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Voland's right hand
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Mac can be pawned too.

This is the old DSL Nation modem fugly DHCP hack - in its native form it does not work on Mac.

What the guy missed is that USB is actually "shared" media - you can present TWO usb interfaces to the host. 0.0.0.1/1 and 128.0.0.1/1.

Bingo. Mac joins the other ones as pawned too. The guy should have thought a bit more in depth on what is happening instead of blindly repeating the old DSL Nation madness.

Fairly trivial to defend against too on Linux - you can (and should) configure it to reject anything larger than class A. This is a 3 liner in /etc/dhcp/dhclient-enter-hooks.d/

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Searching for 'Fatty Kim the Third' banned on Chinese social media

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Trollface

Re: Gugle Trainslate

You sure you spelled it right?

Fatty Kim the Third, not Fatty Kim the Turd.

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UK warships to have less firepower than 19th century equivalents as missiles withdrawn

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Devil

Re: When was the last time a RN fired a shot in anger?

"If the Chinese, Russians, or even India came geared up with purpose, all we could do is issue a strongly worded bloody communiqué anyway."

Correct. Peter The Great alone can terminate the entire UK surface fleet without breaking a sweat and without expending all ordnance. Even the older Slava class missile cruisers carry enough missiles to terminate most of the fleet while being able to take out any aircraft carrying counterattacks from UK non-existent aircraft carrier before they get in range. All of their anti-ship missiles are supersonic and with high-G maneuvers in terminal approach.

Chinese do not yet have anything that heavy hitting, but the Sunburn carrying Sovremennuy class destroyers they bought from Russia can probably knock out half of the UK fleet in one salvo (if the SS-N-22 is as good as as advertised). Their native stock and their fleet aviation is more than capable of finishing the job after that.

India has 7 guided missile destroyers capable of launching supersonic anti-ship cruise missiles (Brahmos which they developed jointly with Russia). Their first salvo can take nearly all of UK surface fleet, the older native and USSR destroyer stock and the fleet aviation will finish the job after that.

So you are indeed correct - UK fleet presently is capable of dealing only with banana republics. Any major power will have it for light midnight snack and the only hope of retaliation are the attack submarines and or the "family atomics"

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Voland's right hand
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Re: When was the last time a RN fired a shot in anger?

Other than the sub sinking the General Belgrano; have they done anything offensive

They have. But not at another navy. Land targets in Afghanistan and the gulf wars.

Probably for the better too as we are rapidly reaching a situation where only nuclear powers have navies worth considering in a fight. Everyone else has just patrol/missile boats - basically a glorified coast guard.

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Voland's right hand
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Re: Right decision

Ship killing has been performed by aircraft and submarines

Really? You need to find your hot air valve and deflate yourself a bit.

So the Israeli's INS Eliat never sunk right? Oh, that was a HMS once too, right? The battle of Latakia gulf never happened either, right? The battle of Baltim never happened, right? The battle of Tartus never happened, right? INS Hanit has never ever been hit by anything, right? And the whole development of Gabriel mark 1, 2, 3 and 4 was never ever justified.

That is the middle east. Shall we move a bit further and continue?

So, the Indian navy never ever sunk Khaibar (again, an ex-HMS). Never damaged any other Pakistani ships either, right?

Or let's look at good old Harpoon, right. It has MORE kills when launched from missile boats (because of Iran using it in the Iran/Iraq war) than from the air.

If anything, in terms of effectiveness and hit ratio ship-to-ship missiles when used have proved to be significantly more effective than air-to-ship ones. Their range nowdays is such that there is bugger all difference between them launched by ship or air - the stand-off distance is in the hundreds of miles.

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Virgin Galactic and Boom unveil Concorde 2.0 tester to restart supersonic travel

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Re: Wheels in the Wings Design Flaw

That's the speed of the aeroplane, not the metal strip.

Bingo.

None of the engines on Concorde were ever actually on fire

I never said they themselves were on fire. I said they set it on fire.

The afterburner exhaust setting the leaking fuel on fire was the initial conclusion of the investigation.

While short from electrics and the flameout (which you mention) have been raised as a possible cause as well later on, neither was proven so the afterburner setting it on fire has always remained as one of the probable causes.

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Voland's right hand
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Re: No overland

Waaaaaaaaaaaait a second.

Everywhere I see Boom mentions 9000nm refueled/4500 unrefueled.

WTF is refueled? Where? How? Are we talking about landing or they have gone off the deep end looking to do in-air passenger aircraft refueling

There is a fairly limited number of options to land for a refueling stop in the Pacific between Sydney and Hawaii and practically none between LA and Japan unless you fly around the Pacific rim instead of direct. That kinda limits what this aircraft can be used for.

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Voland's right hand
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Re: Wheels in the Wings Design Flaw

Relative loads were very different.

Sorry dude, you have failed to grok the root cause and the actual design flaw.

What happened to the Concorde at Charles De Gaulle could have happen to any aircraft. The difference between 200kt and 150kt is minimal - a piece of hardened steel bouncing of a wheel will puncture the tank in either case.

The difference is the aftermath. Due to the way the engines are positioned on the Concorde the whole wing caught fire because the leaking fuel went straight into the afterburner exhaust. The exhaust temperature of a normal non-afterburning turbofan even cranked to max is usually too low to set jet fuel on fire. There is a whole raft of aircraft incidents with fuel leaks out of wings, not one of them caught fire. Example: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_Transat_Flight_236 - the leak was out of the engine itself. That would have killed a Concorde there and then. Do not even get me started on oil and hydraulic fuel leaks. If you walk around budget airline craft on an airfield - half of them have traces of these. Once again - some of these would have set a Concorde on fire.

This is the main reason why they were taken out of circulation - no matter how you armor fuel tanks and lines, shit happens - fuel leaks, oil leaks, hydraulic fluid leaks - they all can burn. This is why an afterburning engine is a no-go for civil aviation - it will set that on fire straight away.

This is what makes this new supersonic aircraft interesting - it is claimed to be non-afterburning. If it is non-afterburning on takeoff it will succeed where Concorde failed regardless of how small is its undercarriage and what level of armor does it have on its fuel tanks.

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Voland's right hand
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Devil

Re: No overland

So, no chance in a Sydney to London.

In theory - that route is 70%+ over water and the rest over deserts where you can negotiate to remain hypersonic too so doable. The only slow stretch is the first 45 minutes over France.

In practice - 10h vs 24 hours stops making a lot of difference - you lose a day. That is different from 10h vs 3h (especially flying west) - you do not lose a business day and this is what Concorde passengers were actually paying for.

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Voland's right hand
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Devil

Re: Wheels in the Wings Design Flaw

That is valid for all aircraft. Your basic village bus 320 has the tanks in the wings too.

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Mac book, whoa! Apple unveils $300 design tome

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Devil

Re: Genius of a different stripe

You forgot the rounded corners.

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Power cut interrupts UK.gov cloud service supplier

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The outage continue till ~ 11-ish

There was fallout until around 11-ish. The biggest outage memset has had during the 10+ years I have been using them.

It is also the first time ever for their system to show BS - it was showing VMs as LIVE while they clearly were not.

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Post-outage King's College London orders staff to never make their own backups

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Re: You are slightly missing the point

You sir, do not know what you are talking about.

Hackers will steal chest X-rays of healthy people

versus:

X-ray diffraction

The former is personalized medical data which may or may not be of interest.

The latter is a humongous raw data dump taken off a device which you cannot make sense of without running FFT and/or convolutions on it and relating it to other experimental data such as which f*** crystal did you put in the f*** spectrometer at the time. Sometimes, a few pints in The Eagle are required (so you get your head spinning in such a helical manner that you get a Nobel Prize as a result).

In any case - I can bet that you wrote that without ever seeing a diffraction picture in your life. I suggest before you write s*** like this next time you have a look at this:

http://undsci.berkeley.edu/images/dna/dna_forms.jpg

and tell me if you can discern the DNA structure out it by just being a "Chinese hacker looking at it". If you can a Nobel Prize awaits you.

This is by th the way the difference between scientific and personal or business data - advanced scientific data is naturally secure through its obscurity as it CANNOT be comprehended by an obeze lump in mama's basement. It takes decades of of sweat and tears in a university to be able to understand it in its raw form. Sorry, shit like Good Will Hunting in real life is in fact science fiction. Actually not even science fiction. Just fiction.

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Holmes

You are slightly missing the point

I am going to dust off my Chemistry hat and put it on. It is a bit tattered after 20 years not in use, but still does the job.

So, with my Chemistry hat on, can you explain me who will successfully make something out of my raw NMR, Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, etc data.

Even if I put my even dustier molecular biology hat on, while the raw data there is less obscure format-wise (it is usually just spreadsheets), unless you know what it is comprehending it is like trying to figure out hieroglyphics without having the Rosetta stone to start off with.

Also, if it is REALLY cutting edge stuff, there are probably 10-odd people around the world which can make something out of your data and every single one of them _WILL_ send it back to you. That is how academia works.

If there is any case where security through obscurity works it is advanced scientific data. Everyone but a select few "opponents" (which will return it to you anyway) will say: WTF, this is gobblygook and wipe it.

Also, I have some doubts about the feasibility of idea of saving raw data on a "shared drive" or using a shared "enterprise" backup system exclusively. The guy suggesting it has no clue of the amount of raw data which can be generated by some instruments (NMR comes to mind).

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TalkTalk teen hacker pleads guilty as firm reveals £22m profit jump

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Devil

The fool and his money will soon be parted

There is always enough of them around. There is a Balkan proverb (exists in most Balkan languages): "Every train has its passengers".

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Shhh! Shazam is always listening – even when it's been switched 'off'

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Re: How else are the US corporations and spooks supposed to harvest all your most personal info...

In this particular case I suspect what the developer is saying is true.

By the time you ask an app "WTF is this on the radio" the horse has bolted. It is quite likely not to have enough data for an answer. So having two levels of "OFF" - processing and listening is a natural technical decision.

Now, why did the developers communicate it so poorly is a different story. I suspect it is a case of Hanlon's razor.

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China gets mad at Donald Trump, threatens to ruin Apple

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Re: Perhaps Tim Cook saw the Runes

That will not help him if Trump starts a trade war.

Half of the components are still made in China. India is only assembling.

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Voland's right hand
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Re: The Chinese don't lose

A trade war is no different to a military war

A trade war between major powers in the nuclear age you mean.

Plenty of trade wars are still being won as we speak. Though they are probably not wars. They are "police actions" - a major power beating a banana republic into submission economically instead of financing yet another junta.

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Voland's right hand
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Devil

Re: And theres the deficit

There is no value to a lender to encourage a borrower to borrow more.

Correct in the world of finance.

Not so correct in the word of politics, especially if you are taking a very long term view. As an example, one of the (usually not discussed) real reasons for the Soviet Block downfall was that in the late 70-es the countries were allowed to start borrowing based on projected GDP, not actual. So borrowing more money became as simple as declaring the next 5 year plan to produce 7% annual growth (yeah, bollocks). The west took upon the opportunity with glee and as a result by mid-80-es the whole Soviet block was so deeply in debt that it could not fulfill its interest payments. The rest as they say... is history.

China has been doing the same to the US for a while now. It will be interesting to see how it pans up. Popcorn.

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Voland's right hand
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Devil

Re: Thin Skin

An interesting conspiracy theory is that the GOP expect to be able to impeach Trump

A very plausible theory I must say. But very very very risky.

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Bong: Let me talk to Trump

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+1

"please delete according to publication".

Priceless.

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Low-end notebook, rocking horse shit or hen's teeth

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Everybody and their mother already has a tablet.

There was a very prolonged and massive lie-down in the PC market from Windows8 onwards as a result purchases bought with the last Win7 are approaching the time in their life when their battery no longer works properly.

Joe average IT guy and Jill the average user in this case replace the whole machine. While this is nothing like the demand which the PC industry has grown accustomed to over the last two decades it is a steady and pretty much guaranteed demand for 1:1 replacements.

No more growth - it is a mature industry now.

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Spain's Prime Minister wants to ban internet memes. No, really

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Re: I don't understand.

"My name is Mariano Rajoy. You hurt my feelings. And now you die."

More like: "My name is Mariano Rajoy. You hurt my feelings. And now I am going to cry".

Somebody, please change the gentleman's nappy, he needs it.

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Pay up or your data gets it. Ransomware highwaymen's attacks on small biz octuple

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Re: You can reduce/eliminate the risk yourself

In addition to hourly/incremental you need a daily or less frequent backup which becomes inaccessible for a reasonable amount of time until media reuse.

This way, even if ransomware wipes your online/connected backup media you can still recover after that.

All of this stops working after 20+ clients though. When you have 20+ clients you can miss a single Typhoid Mary reconnecting them after a quarantine and you are back to square one. There you definitely need some fine grained control over your network and ability to quarantine clients until you have dealt with them.

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Voland's right hand
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Bollocks

businesses need to implement reliable, up-to-date information security solutions

No security solution will prevent a previously unknown threat hitting a new zero day. No security solution will prevent you from an idiot with permissions (which unfortunately is a standard SMB use case where director level people have access to everything and insist on it).

Backups, however, especially backups "in-depth" going back a few months will. A ransomware attack on SMB is no different from a catastrophic failure of a hard disk and/or data corruption failure from let's say bad RAM. You can recover from both if you pull a backup. You cannot recover from a catastrophic failure using a "security solution".

This is different from large buisiness/organization - there ransomware hits 100s of machines and backups alone do not cut it as a protective measure.

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WileyFox Swift 2: A new champ of the 'for around £150' market

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Those pics look distorted.

It is fairly trivial nowdays to do some photo rework to sort out fish eye distortion. I am surprised it does not have that at least as an option.

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GitLab to dump cloud for its own bare metal Ceph boxen

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Re: Cloud

A server is always going to be cheaper to buy

If and only if you are loading it above a certain break even point.

Cloud is cheap when you have a trickle of requests. It is also cheap when scaling your system initially before you understand the user demands and scaling requirements.

Once you know your load and if it is high enough to justify a dedicated server you are likely to find a dedicated server more cost effective. The same goes for various use cases requiring Nx servers.

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The sharks of AI will attack expensive and scarce workers faster than they eat drivers

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Re: Basic misunderstanding how law firm works

Basic misunderstanding of how AI works.

Basic misunderstanding of how the legal system works, especially in countries which do not have a deterministic law system (aka Napoleonic law) - USA, UK and most of Commonwealth.

You have on average at least 5 possible ways to argue a point in court. Some of them are contradictory too. The AI can dig up the points of law and precedents, prepare you the alternative arguments and do all the preparatory work. This is what paralegals, clerks, trainees and junior partners do in a law firm.

You still need a human to chose out of these 5 strategies which one to apply as this depends on jury, judge and god knows what else. This is what determines a good experienced lawyer - he does not just argue the points of law (a graduate can do it). He also determines which ones to raise and which ones to skim over for this particular court - it is not just "law" - it is also strategy in a "game" which involves dealing with humans based on a guesswork assumption of the way they will perceive an argument.

We are still decades away from an AI being able to do that as this means AI being able to assess human emotions and predict them (something tough even for humans).

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Voland's right hand
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Basic misunderstanding how law firm works

The AI is not going to kill the real lawyer jobs (the ones which have passed the bar exam and are allowed to argue a case in court).

Now paralegals, filing clerks, etc - all the small cogs which make a legal shop work are a different story. They do have something to worry about.

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Your body reveals your password by interfering with Wi-Fi

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Devil

Re: I'm not saying this is BS...

800 packets per second - that is fairly high pps. It looks like flooding the channel (more or less).

1. I do not see why they are using ICMP - that is daft - the target may notice. They just need to flood the airwaves with something - if they are in control of the AP they can encode it to another client key (even a non-existent one) and just shovel it out to get the relevant flood rate.

2. 800pps depending on packet sizes (what are they trying does not become clear from the article) looks like flooding the channel.

The attack looks plausible though - a MIMO with some good software is almost like a phased array radar :)

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Russia shoves antitrust probe into Microsoft after Kaspersky gripes about Windows 10

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Devil

"What an odd game, the only way to win is not to play"

Wrong quote:

RIP Leonard Cohen:

Everybody knows that the dice are loaded

Everybody rolls with their fingers crossed

Everybody knows the war is over

Everybody knows the good guys lost

Everybody knows the fight was fixed

The poor stay poor, the rich get rich

That's how it goes

Everybody knows

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Red squirrels! Adorable, right? Wrong – they're riddled with leprosy

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Devil

Squirrels? No. Even the grey ones taste vile unless you are cousin Eddie from American Lampoon Christmas Vacation.

You are thinking of European, aka edible doormouse. Glis Glis.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edible_dormouse

It is genetically closer to squirrels then other doormice. Behaviourally - it is a climbing rat. The pest from hell. Can walk on ceilings and walls, can dig, chews its way even through hardwood and is not afraid of anything either. While other rodents will try to scurry away, this one will try to stare you down and can even jump back and bite.

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Voland's right hand
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Devil

Re: Given how easy it is to cure leprosy these days

While it is "easy" to cure, the damage to the nerves from it cannot be repaired.

By the way - I would not call walking around with an antibiotic drip for 3 months "easy".

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Britain must send its F-35s to Italy for heavy overhauls, decrees US

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Coffee/keyboard

For the time being Turkey and Italy are in NATO and so are most countries you need to overfly to get to them.

So this should work... For the time being...

Though to be honest, the spread of the supply chain across such a wide geography does not bring confidence that parts will be available when they are most needed - during wartime.

Also, what do you do if you need to overhaul one stationed at let's say Port Stanley? Haul it all the way around the world to Italy? Or even more likely - disassemble, load it into a container and send to Italy. That would have been funny if it was on a comedy show. When patrolling an actual contested (or god forbid conflict) zone - not so much.

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Voland's right hand
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Re: Turkey is a godforsaken corrupt shithole

Beko stuff that's prone

Yep. A couple of models. Shit happens. So are others manufacturers in any case.

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Re: Turkey is a godforsaken corrupt shithole

Turkey is a major manufacturing site.

It builds anything and everything from plastic food boxes (some of the best ones by the way), trhough white goods (Beko), through power tools (RTR), Ford and Renault vehicles to F16s and long range cruise missiles.

They had some major quality issues with the first manufacturing sites 20 years ago. Renault Clio Mark 2 built by Turks was a complete and unmitigated disaster. That is in the past.

While some of the stuff Turkey builds today (like Beko) is not the latest and greatest it has a better build quality and reliability record than most of what is built and assembled in the UK nowdays.

In any case, a place which builds long range cruise missiles and F16s should not have an issue with taking a contract to overhaul a piece of a modern fighter jet.

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Re: Widow Maker

Given the F16 still holds it's own in anything we've thrown at it recently I suspect the best option would have been to ask MD to build us another 200 F16s.

You do not need to ask anyone. Turkey builds them and exports them under license and the licensed build is fully certified for NATO procurement too. They are the most updated design too (much better than what NL has at present). You also get (potentially) some of their new weapons as options in the process.

A side effect of Erdogan's "Restoration of the Turkish Empire" complex is a set of missiles which vastly exceed in range and operational capability anything USA was willing to export. All of that integrated to the local version of F-16 (they are certifying that one for F35 too by the way): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SOM_%28missile%29

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Voland's right hand
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Re: Oooh. Italian maintenance!

Careful with those stereotypes. Italy has produced

Produced versus maintained. Look them up in the dictionary.

I somewhere have an old card on what "What is Europe" card from a late 1990-es holiday in Ibiza.

What was Europe supposed to be - A place where the Mechanics are German, Lovers are Italian, Police are British, Cooks are French and all of it is Organized by the Swiss.

What did we get: A place where the Mechanics are Italian, Lovers are Swiss, Police are German, Cooks are British and all of it is Organized by the French.

I have seen it in two versions by the way: the even more fun is "organized by the Italians"

Alternatively, watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SxqwXNfYmOQ

While South European engineering is generally excellent (both Italian and Spanish produce some really cool stuff), South European maintenance...

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Devil

WHAT F*** Economies of F*** Scale

I would understand economies of scale when you are dealing with 10K fighters. That is not the case - for the amount of fighters in Europe and the projected MTBF you are at any given time overhauling 1-2.

Any "Economies of Scale" bullshit blows the bullshitometer off the bullshit scale.

More like "ridiculous cost of the overhaul rig" combined with "ridiculously complicated (ala Boeing Dreamliner) supply chain.

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Panicked WH Smith kills website to stop sales of how-to terrorism manuals

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Re: Growing your own food can

Not only does the bartering of goods (including foodstuffs) and services happen every day in the US

USA HAD laws to prohibit that introduced by FDR during the war for obvious reasons.

Some of these were repealed by court cases in the 70-es. I am not sure if this is valid of all of them.

As far as rainwater collection, etc - all of these everywhere in the world need appropriate planning permission and legalization. This is not US specific. I cannot just hook up my rainwater to my water supply, I need to put certain things in place (non-return valves, etc).

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Re: TNT

My daughter's school chemistry book has revision on the nitrification of benzene. It warns to keep the temperature low otherwise it makes TNT! Obvious terrorist training!

That reads like multiple of bollocks.

As some others have noted benzene nitrates to 1, 2 or 3 nitrobenzene. Nothing to do with TNT.

If you are nitrating toluene you need to keep it cool because of the bit that they do not teach you in the school chemistry course - that most reactions are imperfect.

This is covered in most university chemical synthesis courses: Instead of taking the nitro groups at "perfect" 2, 4 and 6, nitration of tolene results significant contamination of isomers which are nitrated at 5 and 3. Especially at increased temperatures. These are unstable and can cause spontaneous combustion in the end product.

This is also the reason why you will never find TNT in a DIY explosive "bible" - if you try to produce it outside an industrial environment (and subject to appropriate purification) the results will suck. There is plenty of other stuff which is much easier to produce and is significantly more effective.

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Re: Sites?

BAN CHEMISTRY! THINK OF THE CHILDREN!

Labour government tried. And succeeded - it was discussed in the House of Commons at the time.

I remember writing to my MP regarding Labour using court orders to prohibit potential subversives attending an adult education high-school level Chemistry course a few years back.

So UK government has indeed tried and has successfully applied a CHEMISTRY BAN to suspect on the basis of the mere suspicion that said suspect may be dangerous.

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Recruitment giant PageGroup hacked, Capgemini dev server blamed for info leak

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Re: Is it still a leak when it comes from a sieve

This is why you use a new and disposable email address if you ever have to get your details into one.

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Silicon Valley VCs: We're gonna make California great again – on its own

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Devil

but all remain fringe groups due to a very simple fact – states can't cede from the union

Indeed. Welcome to the Hotel California. You can check out any time of night, but you can never leave.

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IoT worm can hack Philips Hue lightbulbs, spread across cities

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Re: ANY i.o.t

I beg to differ.

If it has a known protocol and if it is BEHIND a firewall and talking only to MY GATEWAY - I am all for it.

I have been fighting with the dishwasher for the best of today. It is having a hissy fit and claiming it has "water issues" which I cannot diagnose properly because I cannot interrogate its damn microcontroller and the codes on the front panel are not sufficiently informative.

I would have loved it being connected as long as it is not going anywhere outside my network - this would have allowed me to ask which of the 3 sensors in charge of the damn filling is at fault (reed counter for water volume, water fill cut-off or water level) while it is running through its tests. All of it without getting off my desk a couple of floors above it.

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IFTTT isss notttt afraiddd offf Microsofttt Flowww

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Trollface

So in addition to "business critical" untested badly written Exel we will now have a choice of similarly "business critical" untested badly written IFTTT or Flow. Neither one of them having any resemblance of use cases, design, formalized testing, release or revision control.

Isn't life wonderful...

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