* Posts by Voland's right hand

3888 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

Supreme Court closes court-shopping loophole for patent trolls

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any foreign country wishing to export its products to the U.S. will still have to run the East Texas gauntlet.

No, just incorpoprate a local entity in a location of your choosing. You usually have to do it anyway.

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Bankrupt school ITT pleads 'don't let Microsoft wipe our cloud data!'

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Re: Once you send your data to the cloud

I see this as like renting an apartment. After so many days of moving out and not paying rent, how long are suppose to hold on to the former tents property. They were renting space on a cloud based system and stopped paying.

That is a flawed analogy. A landlord is not allowed by law to pile up the belongings of the tenant being evicted in the condo parking lot and set them on fire. It is obliged to store them for a reasonable period of time and ONLY if the bills are not unpaid auction them.

IMHO, MSFT should do exactly that - hold off for X days and then auction the data and the "family and other bollocks act" be damned.

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Euro Patent Office staff warns board of internal rule changes

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Allow management to cut a staff member's retirement pension as a disciplinary measure.

That is probably against the labor code for the location where this outfit resides. They should not be writing to the board, they should be taking him to the German Federal Labor court.

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Go ahead, stage a hackathon. But pray it doesn't work too well

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Hackaton ideas - sure, hackaton code - no thanks

There is nothing wrong for an idea from a playground to challenge the organization.

Provided that the idea does not come attached to a pile of spaghetti code produced in a bout of junk food and caffeine induced stupor.

Unfortunately most organizations fail to realize that hackatons should produce ideas and the attached code is usually a PoC to show the idea works. Instead of discarding it and rewriting it from scratch they attempt to sanitize and productize it. In fact, this is actively encouraged at most hackatons I have seen (It is also why I refuse to participate in them).

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Emissions cheating detection shines light on black box code

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Re: it looks like open road testing is the way to go.

It does not and cannot scale unfortunately and it does not address the problem.

At the very least in London (and other European cities), the real problem is that 90% of the diesel part of the hire car fleet (that equates to >80% of all of them) has been chipped or has had their ECU reprogrammed to turn off the EGR and other NOX emission control measures. You walk into any small garage say a couple of words in the appropriate language, wink a couple of times and your car exits the garage running with 20% higher fuel efficiency and with NOX control off.

The reason London pollutions is so bad is not the weak pollution regs, it is the fact that most of the ~1M hire and light commercial fleet in London has them disabled.

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The issue with VW and Fiat was there NO2 emissions, not fuel economy.

With all due respect NO2 is the mother of all pollutants produced by combustion.

So I suggest you lay off the neoliberal pill box before talking.

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Cook fights for life after Google summit blaze

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Re: Good headline

Deep fry - just say no.

Just watch an deep frier fire once. They are almost as difficult to extinguish as metal ones. Water just makes it explode and set everything around it on fire as well as cause severe burns to anyone stupid enough to try it. Most fire extinguishers do not have the capacity to smother it and very few people are brave enough and have the presence of mind to throw a fire blanket over it (probably the only way to stop it early on). On top of that, the friers in most canteens are nicely lined up next to each other so a fire in one spreads over the whole row in a matter of seconds at which point there is absolutely nothing you can do besides running for your life. There is simply not enough fire-fighting equipment to take on the whole row of burning friers in the canteen on most premises.

You will look differently on those fish and chips and southern fried chicken from there onwards.

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Blighty's buying another 17 F-35s, confirms the American government

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Fighters are really redundant.

That is somewhat correct for this particular case (fighters for a naval air wing) in theory provided that you do not want to "project power". If you want to operate strictly from friendly airbases, defend established positions and intercept things coming into "your" airspace you do not need an aircraft carrier and a carrier wing.

Aircraft carriers are purely a tool of power projection so you can do all of the above on the other side of the globe. You also do not know which of all the jobs they will have to do. So you end up using multi-role aircraft. Or so the theory goes. IMHO that theory does not compute for the current cost of 5th generation multi-role fighter aircraft. There is definitely a role for an auxiliary force of something in the SuperTucano class in addition to the jets. They are way too expensive.

By the way, as far as "Civilian intercept by any plane you've got hanging around.", try intercepting a LearJet (15,000m ceiling) or Yak 40 (ridiculous thrust to weight) or An-72 (ridiculously low stall speed). If they have managed to McGuiver an ECM pod to prevent you from locking on, you may find that this statement needs some revising.

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Man sues date for cinema texting fiasco, demands $17.31

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He could have given it some extra though

Maybe... If his date was even moderately impressed by him and/or liked what she saw she would have done something else instead of texting...

I suspect it was a case of this: http://www.thedailymash.co.uk/news/society/i-shaved-my-sodding-legs-for-this-says-woman-on-date-with-twat-20170508127258

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Julian Assange wins at hide-and-seek game against Sweden

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The gurning twat is still a criminal.

Correct - for jumping bail. He has not committed any other offenses on the statute book. However, even that has passed the statute of limitations as per the Bail act of 1976; Where bail is granted by the police and the defendant fails to surrender, the police may charge him as long as the charge is laid within six months of him failing to surrender, or three months of him surrendering to custody, being arrested or being brought before the court for the offence for which he is bailed, whichever is sooner - ss. 6(11) - (14) of the Bail Act 1976.

This is from CPS guidance on bail: http://www.cps.gov.uk/legal/a_to_c/bail/#a32

6 months failing to surrender have passed and he cannot be arrested for the offense for which he is bailed as that prosecution is dropped. So they are entitled to resource him at EXACTLY ZERO resource as per current law. The law says he should just walk out of the embassy and the police are not entitled to bother him as the original charge has been dropped. So (un)fortunately (un or without un depends on viewpoint), we can no longer even nail him for jumping bail.

As far as his other crimes, pissing into Hillary's cornflakes is not a criminal offense.

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Faking incontinence and other ways to scare off tech support scammers

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Re: Quick solution

There is an even better one:

"I believe you have the wrong number, this is X city police department, fraud squad, would you please be so kind to provide your name, address and telephone number we will get back to you shortly".

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You'll get a kick out of this: Qualcomm patents the 'Internet of Shoes'

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They are late to the party

Hi-Tec has been shipping these for at least a year now which means they were most likely developed prior to 2015.

I believe there was even a review on the register of this gadget. While I am fan of Hi-Tec shoes in general, I looked at the price and decided to pass.

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Don't gripe if you hand your PC to Geek Squad and they rat you out to the Feds – judge

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Re: Class Action suit? FBI paying bounty for illegal searches of photos, emails and documents?

The judge erred in law.

You cannot sign off a fundamental right enshrined by the constitution by signing a contract. That is the case both in USA and worldwide (for the countries which have constitutions and the concepts of fundamental rights).

As far as the role of Best Buy, the only way they could have found a one-off deleted image is industrialized search - clone the disk and run everything past a hash comparison for known "dubious" images. The only people who own an up-to date database of that are the police. So, in fact, they are on a no-win-no-fee contract with the police and performing an illegal police search on every machine. There is no doubt about the lack of legality - you cannot waive your right by signing a contract with a private party.

.

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Great Ormond Street children's hospital still offline after WannaCrypt omnishambles

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Re: Any idea total cost ?

The debacle has not finished yet and the debacle will repeat.

The only way of fixing it is planning obsolescence with every procurement with a fixed date.

Neither NHS, nor any other govt dept is doing that.

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Samsung Galaxy S8+: Seriously. What were they thinking?

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Re: Never again

Never again for another reason.

I have a Note 3 on my desk which is a hopeless brick.

The reviewer asked the question of "Why not TouchWiz". There is a simple answer - if you by mistake disable some of the Samsung apps Touchwiz will go into an endless reboot cycle on the next reboot. The cretinous imbecile who wrote it did not include any error handling for an exception if you try and fail send an intent to another bundled Samsung app. It is an immediate reboot.

That would have been fine if the software itself was sound, which it is not - the sole software update the tablet ever got from Samsung corrupted the recovery in such a way that it cannot be reflashed neither with stock, nor with clockworkmod. So the tablet is a brick. Thanks to f*** TochWiz which was written by someone who failed their sophomore CS class. The part called "handle errors".

So sorry - no Samsung ever enters this house ever again. I actually like phones that do not corrupt their recovery partition the first time they update and phones which do not fail on first reboot if you disable some of the factory bundled crap.

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No laptop ban on Euro flights to US... yet

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Re: Clucking Bell!

No, it does not.

It can identify (combined with a skilled operator) equipment which has obviously been altered and/or commonly used detonator components. It also has a very low rate of detection on "high end" computer kit because of the Aluminum alloy casing.

It can also pick up several other things which nobody dares mention the name which are significantly more dangerous than explosives. As a chemist (who knows most of them) I will just leave it at that.

It can pick up common weapons. It cannot pick up explosives and can be fooled easily. I have carried knives, tools and god knows what else through check-in by mistake more than once undetected because they were packed properly. Last time this Sunday - we forgot two repack into the hold luggage two small knives in the picnic basket while coming back from a weekend break.

The Gas Mass spectography (*) units which are used for occasional inspection are significantly more reliable in picking up explosive traces.

If you want to get some level of detection you have to run all electronic equipment via the gas-mass. At present gas samples are manually fed so this will not scale. However, making the sample feed automated is not that difficult, so if this is an issue this can easily be dealt with once and for all. Ditto for "nosing" into every bag - this can and should be easily automated.

(*) They put those in after the liquid incident. When I saw them first I said out loud: "Oh, Gas Mass, my fav toy, how cute" (it was one of my fav toys as a student). I nearly got pulled off for a strip search there and then for speaking loudly what their new magic security theater component is

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Do we need Windows patch legislation?

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Re: It is simply a matter of procurement

Name one vendor in the world that will support that.

1. RHEL, Oracle, etc - all mainstay Unix(like) OS vendors.

2. Most telecoms software vendors

3. Most military software vendors

4. Most industrial control software vendors

Now, they also charge a pretty penny too. So if you do not like the prices you should probably make up your mind for the exact way you are going to obsolete what you are buying on day X, not drag your feet 5 years after it was supposed to be obsolete.

Again - not something public sector procurement ever does. Show me a single public procurement project which planned the obsolescence of the software they are purchasing before they bought it. I have yet to see one.

So continuing on this subject, a good idea will be to make such procurement without an obsolescence plan an automatic sackable offense.

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It is simply a matter of procurement

No patches after 10 years, no public tender.

That would have solved it day one. However, not a single software tender for public services had any long term maintenance clauses attached to it.

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Australia considers joining laptops-on-planes ban

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Re: Have any of the idiots promoting this drivel spoken to the airlines

No, do not restrict them.

Just make them sit _ABOVE_ the hold where the laptops are.

Lithium battery containing equipment is prohibited for traveling in the hold for a very good reason.

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China staggering under WannaCrypt outbreak

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Re: Kill switch

More likely new "kill-switch-less" versions resulting in an ELE of Windows XP.

Chinese installs are under-patched because you can get security updates only via Windows Update nowdays. That does not quite work for 95%+ of the XP population over there is installed using one of the stolen product keys which Microsoft has a blacklist on.

One thing for sure - this is going to drastically decrease the number of bootleg XPs still remaining. It will be impossible to attach one of this to a network. While before they just got infected, but still worked, now they will get b0rked within 5-7 minutes after being attached to a network. The fact that MSFT has provided patches will not help - pirated installs cannot get to them.

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Good news, OpenVPN fans: Your software's only a little bit buggy

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Crypto gets a bouquet: for example, nobody fell into the trap of using weak key generation.

This is a double edged sword. In theory, OpenVPN gets random data by invoking the OpenSSL RNG asynchronous calls. In practice there is a synchronization point inside OpenSSL there which makes the call blocking in the absense of an OpenSSL supported hardware RNG in the system. This in turn results in it stalling and stuttering if the system exhausts entropy.

Entropy exhaustion is actually quite common under virtualization as there is not enough "proper" entropy in the system and no hardware RNG. It does not take a lot too - a few 10s of clients per concentrator in a VM and voila - you start getting random stalls.

Debugging this one is quite an entertaining experience. If you have not seen it before you can be tearing your hair out for hours and not figure it out.

If you hit it, your only choice is to decrease the quality of the entropy you have by using haveged to inject some lower quality entropy into the system as a whole. That is because openvpn itself does not give you an option to use lower quality entropy sources (as the review has discovered).

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Linus Torvalds stops personally signing Linux kernel RC tarballs

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Re: Has Linus invented time travel?

Different countries celebrate it on different dates. This goes back to the cold war when the west and east decided to disagree on using the 8th of March.

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Re: Linus has a mother? Must be one of all inventions

he is also married to one - the one of his children.

I would rate your chances of survival if she decides she is insulted by your post at ~ 0.5%. Look her up.

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WannaCrypt outbreak contained as hunt for masterminds kicks in

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You know, like when they first knew they weren't getting any more security updates.

Which is day one. On quite a few of these you are out of warranty and liability coverage on a 10M+ piece of equipment which can whack a patient with a potentially lethal dose of radiation if you touch the base OS outside the vendor specified params.

What NHS (and many other large enterprises) do is putting such equipment on the general purpose network instead of isolating it and treating it as industrial and process control kit (the way it should be treated).

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Re: Intel

The cure for Intel AMT is dead simple on a desktop. Install a NIC

Fantastic unless you are dealing with a predefined bundle of software + hardware and the retard which built the software has linked it versus a machine ID library which uses the primary MAC as an ID.

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Volvo is letting Android 'take over underlying car software' – report

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How much of the underlying software will be under Android's control, we dread to think.

Took the words out of my mouth. No buy. While I really like a well built Android based infotainment system (in fact, I retrofitted one in my car), its level of access to anything internal should be properly firewalled off an limited.

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Sophos waters down 'NHS is totally protected' by us boast

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Re: Further correction

Sophos now understands

So it did not understand it before. Well... then WTF was it charging it for?

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Ransomware scum have already unleashed kill-switch-free WannaCry‬pt‪ variant

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Re: Oh FFS

It's almost like they're upset nothing has happened.

You have prevented management from demonstrating that they are doing something on a subject that has hit the worldwide press. You are a very brave man.

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Re: Experts all giving advice how how to stay secure

Some people do not have any choice. When the X-ray machines in the affected hospital trusts were bought using Windows XP (or even 2001) imaging software, that was state of the art. The issue is that the life of a piece of equipment like this vastly exceeds the lifespan of the OS that was used for the control system. On top of that, quite often these cannot be patched as the software is written so badly that it will work only with a specific patch-level of the core OS.

That CAN and SHOULD be mitigated by:

0. Considering each and every one of those a Typhoid Mary in potentia

1. Isolating such the Typhoid Mary in-potentia on a separate subnet

2. Preventing any communication except essential management and authentication/authorization going out

3. Providing a single controlled channel to ship out results to a location which we CAN maintain and keep up to date.

Instead of that, criminally stupid idots at NHS IT in the affected trusts as well as other enterprises which were hit:

1. Put these unpatchable and unmaintainable machines in the same flat broadcast domain with desktop equipment. There was no attempt at isolation and segmentation whatsoever.

2. In some cases allowed use of unrelated desktop applications (at ridiculously ancient patch-levels) such as Outlook or even Outlook Express.

3. Opened file sharing on the machines in question.

Each of these should be a sackable offense for the IT staff in question.

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74 countries hit by NSA-powered WannaCrypt ransomware backdoor: Emergency fixes emitted by Microsoft for WinXP+

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Re: How bad will it get...?

I just noticed junior reading the Neuromancer.

That is how it will get. Time to re-read.

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You are missing the point

Organizations which are still on XP have much bigger issues. The expectations that they will patch anything is in the realm of Sci Fi, not in reality.

Worst part - some of them like Telefonica R&D and NHS will just reimage and we will be back to square 1.

There is at least a funny angle. I would really love to see a fly on the wall recording of the poor sod who will be reporting to Putin that the Russian ministry of the interior (their home office) got whacked as he told them (and the rest of Russian gov) to get rid of it a few years back (when he was a prime minister). Talking of "Mr Chrisophrase is very upset..." moment.

All in all, the worm author had no idea how successful it will be. They now are not going to get any money.

Also, this shows what exactly happens when 3 letters decide to sit on an exploit and hoard it. Though in this case, there is a remote possibility that they will get both sued and congressionally whacked. It is unfortunately very remote.

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US Coast Guard: We're rather chuffed with our new Boeing spy drone

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Re: Roboat?

Is a "roboat" an unmanned boat?

No, it is a rowboat - what it becomes after you forget to pay for the cloud account it is associated with.

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TensorFlow: I want to like you, but you're tricksy

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The ML is the least interesting aspect of TF

The most interesting aspect is the "delay evaluation until doomsday and pass a handle around" and how it has been implemented. That is the really revolutionary bit for python (and the stumbling block for most people using TF). Some other languages (f.e. Java) hav similar constructs as a part of their core libs. Python so far does not.

This just asks to be stolen and reused for other purposes.

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PC repair chap lets tech support scammer log on to his PC. His Linux PC

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It was most likely hist real IP

Most of the "support personnel" used in such scams operate on a script given to them by the handler and neither have the competence nor the technical capability to hide their IPs.

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Dyson celebrates 'shock' EU Court win over flawed energy tests

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Re: Is this the same Dyson who has no time for the EU ?

Lots of rants, and you have been unfairly modded down.

The real story is:

1. It is the same Dyson who slept through while the tests were defined. There was an industry consultation, he could not be arsed to participate.

2. It is the same Dyson which woke up to find that some other people did not sleep through and were getting better shop floor standing than his appliances. I am with Bosch and Siemens here - if you can rig the system legally, go ahead and rig it. There are mechanisms to put it right in the end, but unless someone does that occasionally the mechanisms rot and fester which is not good for the endgame.

3. It is the same Dyson who went on a hell-bent moan on the subject instead of doing the job properly for his court case and as a result failed his first court appearance.

4. It is the same Dyson who sponsored us removing ourselves out of the jurisdiction of the court which finally put the things right instead of using the court case.

5. It is the same Dyson which will have NO F*CKING SAY in changing the regulations because his company has decided to leave the Eu together with the country ans REMOVE ourselves out of the jurisdiction of the court in question. Courtesy of him filling Leave coffers with money in rage of pet hate.

Bazooka, foot, look into the exhaust, pull trigger. Now do it again. Again. Again. And again. What a complete and utter idiot. Though with Govenokio, the hair disorganized dolt and the crook he sort of fits where he should be.

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Someone is sending propaganda texts to Ukrainian soldiers

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Actually, this is not new - I think Norks tried to use it in the past too. It has been used in all the conflicts around Africa and the Middle East as well.

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Voland's right hand
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Welcome to the 21st century

In the early middle ages people used catapults loaded with cut off heads.

In WW1 they used dirigibles and leaflets.

In WW2 they used planes and leaflets.

During the many Cold War proxy conflicts they used radio.

Now they use cell towers.

Same goal, just different technology.

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10Mbps universal speeds? We'll give you 30Mbps, pleads Labour in leaked manifesto

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So, we're going to borrow a quarter of a trillion to splurge on infrastructure because interest rates are low.

Who told you they will remain low. I do not see how they can remain low if UK credit rating starts dropping (and it will).

Any borrowing increase at the moment is first degree grand treason not for any other reason, but because we cannot predict what we will be paying on it in two years time.

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Just 99.5 million nuisance calls... and KeurBOOM! A £400K megafine

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Re: 0.4p per call ?

proceeds of crime act

This applies only to criminal offenses. Unfortunately, DPA violations are not a criminal offense. Yet.

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Re: We need a secure caller display system

No. We need to fine the incumbent telcos which sold this guy reduced wholesale termination rate double the amount. Each. Then it will go away.

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Re: We dumped our landline ...

I have replaced landlines with SIP lines partially since mid-2005 and completely in 2007. Initially with SipGate (before they decided that abusing customers is a good strategy), now with Teleppliant.

I have had 2 or 3 nuisance calls via GSM gateways in 10 years. None of the usual bulk dialing ambulance chasing variety. You get those ONLY if you have a proper landline because the dialers and the main telcos operate the scam jointly. The only reason the dialer intermediary is able to offer its scumbag customers the rate they need to run the scam, is because they GOT a reduced termination wholesale rate (quite often along with customer data) from BT, Virgin, Sky, or TalkTalk. So, in fact, these are openly complicit in the scams - they get line termination fees on them and offer special rates to companies they know are likely to need them for bulk dialing.

Due to VOIP being predominantly business service, the VOIP providers do not sell data and/or reduced termination rates needed for the scams to work. So you do not get the calls.

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Uber is a taxi company, not internet, European Court of Justice advised

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Re: Finally some common sense

Why has it taken so long to declare Uber a taxi service

Lobbying. That is a polite way of describing it.

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Mozilla to Thunderbird: You can stay here and we may give you cash, but as a couple, it's over

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Yeah, but idiotic projects like "Firefox OS" produce valley buzzzzz. Something that works and serves customers does not.

All you need to know about this debacle is contained in this line: "Mailing Address. Mozilla Foundation 1981 Landings Drive Building K Mountain View, CA 94043-0801. USA."

This is called CALIFORNICATION.

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America 'will ban carry-on laptops on flights from UK, Europe to US'

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If this was 5 years ago I would not have been able to justify it

I wrote half of our product at the time on flights. There was a running gag around the office that if we desperately need to deliver a new feature they will send me on a round-the-world trip via Australia.

In any case, if we go down that route, an explosive can be concealed in nearly anything. A modern laptop is actually one of the worst places to stick it - too thin and too cramped.

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Fancy a relaxed boozy holiday? Keep well away from Great Britain

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This does not take into account the country culture

I can only laugh when I see Italy and Bulgaria where "laws and regulations are optional" ranked higher than Germany and the Czech Republic.

The top of the table is pretty spot on though.

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UK General Election 2017: How EU law will hit British politicians' Facebook fight

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Re: Appealing to the individual voter?

ROBO-Appealing to the individual voter?

It is just robocalling and cold calling banks for the 21st century. Quite effective.

IMHO, this poster is a very good fit for the referendum and the last two anglo-saxon elections: https://www.amazon.com/Mr-Robot-Movie-Poster-18/dp/B01ANZRTMS

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DSL inventor's latest science project: terabit speeds over copper

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Pointless excercise

Diminishing returns continue.

Can we just, finally, let it die and put fiber in the ground.

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FBI boss James Comey was probing Trump's team for Russia links. You're fired, says Donald

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Re: Is The Register now The Onion?

You mean the Koch brothers are really Lizard people?

I suggest reading "Occam's Scalpel" by Theodore Sturgeon.

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Re: Please stay more on topic

While Comey was political through and through a large part of his political orientation directly impacted on technical matters.

1. Encryption backdooring

2. Searches of electronic equipment

3. Selective politically motivated interest in various hacking, etc cases.

All in all he signed his death warrant the day he intervened in the election. He wanted to be a Hoover, but he forgot the most important Hoover lesson - you do not do that in public. You do it quietly.

In any case, I suspect his replacement will be significantly worse. There is very little to celebrate here.

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IBM: Customer visit costing £75 in travel? Kill it with extreme prejudice

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Re: "...includes participation by our resources..."

That is the criteria to become a manager: http://dilbert.com/strip/2017-02-15

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